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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    This book proved to be very useful in understanding the topic of orientation kinematics and DCM matrix. It helped me write a small guide on my blog (google: starlino dcm ) that include some notes and my own view on the subject. This book is really simple to follow, just create sure you read the introduction that covers the notation conventions.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    As in matrix and linear algebra, partial derivatives, numerical methods, dynamics, kinematics and of course vector ysis w/lots of trig. One might think that one of the best latest texts ever written on inverse kinematics would be ideal for those of us designing joints both for animation and robotics, but a BIG dose of engineering kinematics is assumed to start with. The authors say "three years of undergrad" would do it-- maybe at MIT, but a LOT of this material is graduate level in UK and US y animators are not engineers, but are interested in the math behind kinematics. There are few books as up to date at this text in that field. But when you see that quaternion multiplication is "explained" in terms of matrix multiplication and linear algebra, it becomes clear that you need a amazing grounding in linear and matrix algebra before tackling this volume.Even the control feedback sections assume you've had at least one or two courses in feedback theory and math. The authors describe this as an "intermediate" text; however, given the paucity of other texts on kinematics in general (at least up to date texts), I'd disagree and call this is is not to knock the outstanding quality of the material, just to warn you that if you're into self study, you might be wasting your cash when you search the material level assumes a lot of engineering background. NOT a beginning text, sadly, as there are few amazing ones up to date on kinematics. If you spend your days with Maya and other programs skinning figures, or designing robot joints, and are willing to spend a lot of time on the prep math-- there is no better text available. But it is NOT an introductory text by any means. After all, moving joints around in 3 and 4D IS ytic geometry in motion, and PDE's are abundant in that field.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    This book is awesome. A definite must for anyone interested in robotics.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    Preface: Dear student, you need a pre-existing degree in Robotics professional experience to be able to grasp what this book is going to be teaching you. What can I say, this was a college level book that was written beyond the scope of a student.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    This book is a comprehensive one full of usefull and practical technical info and applications. Nice and amazing work and Thanks!

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    Perfect reference book. Applicable to robotics, statics ( mechanics), and graphics. A comprehensive collection of matrixes in the Cartesian world.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    I have a love and hate relationship with this book. At times, the author does an awesome job of breaking things down to their most primary level and covering a fair amount of content; yet, at other times he brushes over some material so briefly that you literally have lots of questions about what you just read and no answers provided anywhere in the textbook. Two thumbs up to the author for making himself available for clarifications. Myself and another student had a question regards rotation about global vs local in a certain instance, due to some differences in the info provided in the book and by our professor -- Dr. Jazar was very fast to answer to my email (I think a few days or less). In the end, I think it's a fairly decent text if you approach it with the mindset of knowing that it's an academic text. I've never kept a textbook used by my community college or my university, because I've always regarded them as worthless, but this book is an exception. While there are some quirks, I think it's worthy of remaining in my library, as it does do a fairly decent job of introducing one to the field of applied robotics. If it's a needed text for you, due to the class you'r taking, you won't have a choice but to obtain this book. On the other hand, if you're just looking for a textbook to learn about robotics on your own, I suggest doing a bit of a research, since I believe I've seen some better books out there (certainly don't rule this out, though... it's just that for its price, I don't know if you're willing to deal with the academic nature of the book).

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    This book does a very amazing job of showing every step involved with a lot of examples. It tends to present numerical examples and is a small light on theory, but this is an applied robotics book so no fault there. It makes a amazing text to have in conjunction with other robotics books.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    As expected.

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    Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) []  2020-6-3 18:30

    Meets requirements

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    Hands-On Robotics Programming with C++: Leverage Raspberry Pi 3 and C++ libraries to build intelligent robotics applications []  2020-5-28 18:32

    The book it self nice to read, multiple examples well explained, but it has nothing to do with C++ programming except file names has the extention ".cpp", at list I didn't could be named "Hands-On Robotics Programming with C" as well, or C style API work.I looked for something really using C++ power of object oriented together with some fresh C++ API but I failed to find.I would reccomend this book for programming begginers to obtain familiar wiht rapbery PI known C/Python API

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    Introduction to Robotics: ysis, Control, Applications []  2020-2-3 20:26

    Not poor for the price, but the paper quality is very poor.

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    Introduction to Robotics: ysis, Control, Applications []  2020-2-3 20:26

    Got it like a fresh book.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    Starts with a useful revision of vector calculus, with clear explanations and step-by-step examples. Then shifts into applcation of the math to stat/dyn problems. Turned out to be much better that I expected from the cover art.If you have never had vector calculus before it may be tough, but as a review/refresher (I was coming back to the topic after 20 years) this was a amazing buy.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    very bad

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    I think this book has some amazing coverage of basic topics, but is missing a lot of necessary stuff. It does a amazing job of illustrating those subjects it does cover, but watch out for the numerous mistakes scattered throughout the entire book, especially in the quiz answers and even some of the example problems. It needs to be corrected because it caused confusion in several areas.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    This is amazing value. However if this is a review from long ago, consider complementing with "Forgotten Calculus" (also amazing value).

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    Thanks

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    This book is amazing as a refresher or a crash course, but I would not recommend it to anyone trying to teach themselves statics or dynamics.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    This book had more things you learned in physics 1 than in statics. covered maybe the first chapter or two of my statics book, but after that, it didn't have anything.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    Useful reference tool for college students. My daughter has used to complete homework assignments since the purchase.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    BOOK DOES NOT De MYSTEFIE, IT ONLY ADDS TO THE MYSTERY AND LEAVES ONE WONDERING WHY THEY EVER BOUGHT THE BOOK.

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    Statics and Dynamics Demystified []  2020-1-29 2:32

    Only amazing for people in an intro level physics r an actual statics and mechanics of materials class is terribly es not even include information on trusses or torsion,or really any subject more advanced than moments and torque.

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    AN INTRODUCTION TO SIMPLE PHYSICS: Kinematics []  2021-1-4 18:38

    This book is very simple to read and understand kinematics. It explains the relationship between distance, displacement, speed, velocity (instantaneous versus average), and acceleration in very easy way. I would highly recommend it to every high schooler.

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    Kinematics, Dynamics, and Design of Machinery []  2020-1-11 18:38

    The content of the book is as expected but the graphical quality of the mathematical equations is very not good considering the high books's price.

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    Kinematics, Dynamics, and Design of Machinery []  2020-1-11 18:38

    The content of the book is amazing but the equations appear to be very little .png snapshots of equations making them very difficult to read.

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    Mechanisms and Machines: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Synthesis []  2020-8-21 18:33

    This is a not good textbook. First things first, there's no answers to issues or no solutions. So in order to even know if you got any issues right you need to buy the solution manual as well. Also there so a lot of inconsistencies and mistakes in the book it is ridiculous. This is the worst textbook Ive come across in my engineering undergrad. I would stay away from it at all costs.

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    Mechanisms and Machines: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Synthesis []  2020-8-21 18:33

    This is a beautiful amazing text book. It was converted from course notes into a text. There are a few typos in the book, and a few of those typos are in example problems. Typos in example issues create it a small difficult to create sure you are on the right track sometimes, because there were a few times that my understanding didn't line up with the text but my understanding was correct. (This only happened once or twice though). Although there are some typos the math and equations are right when it is first explained and the textbook is written so that it is beautiful simple to understand. Every book has some typos so I wouldn't allow that stop me from buying this book

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    Theory of Gearing: Kinematics, Geometry, and Synthesis []  2020-11-14 18:40

    All good; no issues

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    Structural ysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) []  2020-1-21 21:47

    The book itself is fine, but Amazon's kindle ver has incorrect page ordering. I spoke with several representatives and nobody was able to help me with this issue. They lied to me about being able to download the book to confirm my problem, and the whole experience was less than pleasant. However, I think this speaks more about the issue with Kindle books than with this particular text. I would buy a hardcover copy if I didn't already shell out for the Kindle version.

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    Structural ysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) []  2020-1-21 21:47

    You can either read 60 pages of this overly wordy text or watch a ten min youtube video to understand a easy derivation.

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    Structural ysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Amazing technical text for course work and beyond...

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    Structural ysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Very difficult to understand. Skips over a lot of of the fundamentals when explaining problems. Not recommended if you're trying to self-study for the course.

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    Structural ysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Covers a whole lot of topics. This book offers a lucid and thorough explanation for all subjects in Structures.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    If it were not for one mistaken aplication of his maxim, I would have to say that this is one of the most astounding, consistent exposition of libertarian theory in history. However, Spencer is not wholly consistent, and his main inconsistency is so important, that it cannot be safely overlooked. The lapse that I speak of is his absurd and anti-libertarian position on the personal ownership of land. He believes that land cannot be rightfully held in personal hands, but rather that "society" owns the land. This indeed is an extremely specious piece of logic for a man who upholds the rights of the individual over the "state," the "majority," and "society." Not only that, it mars his entire concept of a free society. Otherwise, this work represents a landmark in libertarian individualist thought. His theory of "equal freedom" is almost identical in spirit to the non-aggression maxims utilized by thinkers such as Ayn Rand and Murray Rothbard. His app of of this primary axiom is also impressive. He thoroughly any function of the state beyond the absolute minimum. Even further, he even acknowledges the "Right To Ignore The State." Nevertheless, his views on the personal ownership of land are so out of line that I cannot honestly give this book the degree of praise that it could have very easily earned.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    'Social Statics' should be read by anyone interested in political philosophy, ethics, or philosophy in general. Not only does it serve as a source of hope for the future of mankind, but also as a tutorial to the steps that can be taken by all in order to ensure that that satisfied future arrives as quickly and as peacably as possible. For the future can be hindered, and its fate is in our the future, every man will be a law unto himself, capable of fair dealings with others without the strictures of government or the threat of punishment; and as a result, goverment will no longer exist, since it will no longer be necessary. As fiercely as we maintain our own rights, so shall we maintain the rights of others, knowing that every crime we commit will return to us eventually, whether personally, or by weakening the bonds of society, the only means through which we are capable of exercising our rights.But at present, because we have not fully adapted to the demands of society, government is necessary. It is important in order to maintain our rights, and to protect us from the aggression of others, whether they be invaders from abroad, or thieves from within.But government itself is a threat, and must be maintained in its proper role, without being allowed to expand beyond it. And this should be one of our goals: to check its wrongful expansion. When government goes too far, it distracts itself from its rightful purpose, that of protection, to everyone's detriment, by losing its focus; and it adds to our burdens, by compelling us to fund its expansion; but most importantly, it hinders all of progress itself, since true progress can only occur naturally, over time, and without the aid of government, however well-intentioned it may ernment must be checked, and our rights maintained. But in order to promote society even further, it is important for us to express our inmost thoughts, those we believe in most sincerely, for these are the effect of years of societal evolution, and though they may come to nothing, and take root in no one's heart, they may be universally accepted, and serve as a tutorial to others both in their actions and in the setting up of their own ideals. Through progress in belief, we advance towards that society which we currently consider hopelessly ideal and utopian.

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    Structural ysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Although there is a lot of amazing material in this book, it is very hard to follow and should not be used for supplemental learning in mechanics education. Essential info and equations are scattered and badly presented. I would suggest multiple other textbooks over this one for engineering majors.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. He is perhaps best remembered for coining the expression "survival of the fittest" in his book,  The Principles of Biology ; but he is also increasingly recognized for his contributions to libertarian/anarchist thought. Some of his other writings are excerpted in  Herbert Spencer On Social Evolution .He states in the Introduction of this 1851 book, "See here, then, the predicament. A system of moral philosophy professes to be a code of correct rules for the control of human beings---fitted for the regulation of the best as well as the worst members of the race---applicable, if true, to the guidance of humanity in its highest conceivable perfection. Government, however, is an institution originating in man's imperfection; an institution confessedly begotten by necessity out of evil; one which might be dispensed with were the globe peopled with the unselfish, the conscientious, the philanthropic; one, in short, inconsistent with this `highest conceivable perfection.' How, then, can that be a real system of morality which adopts government as one of its premises?" (Part I, pg. 16)In Part II, he states the popular and influential principle: "every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties compatible with the possession of like liberty by every other man." (Ch. IV, pg. 69) Later, he expresses it in this way: "Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man." (Ch. VI, pg. 95) He adds, "the right of property is deducible from the law of equal freedom... it is presupposed by the human constitution, and ... its denial involves absurdities." (Ch. X, pg. 121)Significantly, he argues, "[if] the rights of women are not so amazing as those of men, there immediately arise such queries as: If they are not so great, by how much are they less? What is the exact ration between the legitimate claims of the two es? How shall we tell which rights are common to both, and where those of the male exceed those of the female? Who can present us a scale that will serve for the apportionment?... Whether our own statute, which permits a man to beat his wife in moderation and to imprison her in any room in his house, is morally defensible? Whether it is equitable that a married woman should be incapable of holding property? Whether a husband may justly take possession of his wife's earnings versus her will...?... Some principle rooted in the nature of things has to be found... Does anyone holding the doctrine that women's rights are not so amazing as men's think he can search such a principle?" (Ch. XVI, pg. 139)He also contends, "If every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man, then he is free to drop connection with the state---to [email protected]#$%!s protection and to refuse paying toward its support... He cannot be coerced into political combination without a breach of the law of equal freedom; he can withdraw from it without committing any such breach, and he has therefore a right so to withdraw." (Pg. 185) He adds, "The first condition to be conformed to before a legislature can be established without violating the law of equal freedom is the acknowledgement of the right now under discussion---the right to ignore the state." (Pg. 187) He further adds, "unless the right to ignore the state is recognized, its acts must be essentially criminal." (Pg. 189)He suggests, "a purely democratic government is the only one which is morally admissible---is the only one that is not intrinsically criminal. As lately shown, no government can have any ethical authority. The highest form it can assume is that in which the moral law remains passive with regard to it---tolerates it---no longer protests versus it." (Ch. XX, pg. 195) He adds, "Morality stands toward government only in the nature of a limitation---behaves negatively with regard to it, not positively... And thus, ignoring government altogether, the moral law can give us to direct info as to what a government ought to do--can merely say what it ought not to do... For if... every man has a right to secede from the state... and if, as a consequence, the state must be regarded as a body of men voluntarily associated, there remains nothing to distinguish it in the abstract from any other incorporated society..." (Ch. XXI, pg. 224)He suggests, "Not only does the ultimate welfare of the citizen demand that he should himself conform to the moral law; it equally concerns him that everyone should conform to it. This interdependence which the social state necessitates makes all men's business his business, in a more or less indirect way." (Ch. XXX, pg. 401)Spencer's book will be of keen interest to students of political philosophy---particularly those with a libertarian or even anarchist orientation.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. He is perhaps best remembered for coining the expression "survival of the fittest" in his book,  The Principles of Biology ; but he is also increasingly recognized for his contributions to libertarian/anarchist thought. Some of his other writings are excerpted in  Herbert Spencer On Social Evolution .He states in the Introduction of this 1851 book, "See here, then, the predicament. A system of moral philosophy professes to be a code of correct rules for the control of human beings---fitted for the regulation of the best as well as the worst members of the race---applicable, if true, to the guidance of humanity in its highest conceivable perfection. Government, however, is an institution originating in man's imperfection; an institution confessedly begotten by necessity out of evil; one which might be dispensed with were the globe peopled with the unselfish, the conscientious, the philanthropic; one, in short, inconsistent with this `highest conceivable perfection.' How, then, can that be a real system of morality which adopts government as one of its premises?" (Part I, pg. 16)In Part II, he states the popular and influential principle: "every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties compatible with the possession of like liberty by every other man." (Ch. IV, pg. 69) Later, he expresses it in this way: "Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man." (Ch. VI, pg. 95) He adds, "the right of property is deducible from the law of equal freedom... it is presupposed by the human constitution, and ... its denial involves absurdities." (Ch. X, pg. 121)Significantly, he argues, "[if] the rights of women are not so amazing as those of men, there immediately arise such queries as: If they are not so great, by how much are they less? What is the exact ration between the legitimate claims of the two es? How shall we tell which rights are common to both, and where those of the male exceed those of the female? Who can present us a scale that will serve for the apportionment?... Whether our own statute, which permits a man to beat his wife in moderation and to imprison her in any room in his house, is morally defensible? Whether it is equitable that a married woman should be incapable of holding property? Whether a husband may justly take possession of his wife's earnings versus her will...?... Some principle rooted in the nature of things has to be found... Does anyone holding the doctrine that women's rights are not so amazing as men's think he can search such a principle?" (Ch. XVI, pg. 139)He also contends, "If every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man, then he is free to drop connection with the state---to [email protected]#$%!s protection and to refuse paying toward its support... He cannot be coerced into political combination without a breach of the law of equal freedom; he can withdraw from it without committing any such breach, and he has therefore a right so to withdraw." (Pg. 185) He adds, "The first condition to be conformed to before a legislature can be established without violating the law of equal freedom is the acknowledgement of the right now under discussion---the right to ignore the state." (Pg. 187) He further adds, "unless the right to ignore the state is recognized, its acts must be essentially criminal." (Pg. 189)He suggests, "a purely democratic government is the only one which is morally admissible---is the only one that is not intrinsically criminal. As lately shown, no government can have any ethical authority. The highest form it can assume is that in which the moral law remains passive with regard to it---tolerates it---no longer protests versus it." (Ch. XX, pg. 195) He adds, "Morality stands toward government only in the nature of a limitation---behaves negatively with regard to it, not positively... And thus, ignoring government altogether, the moral law can give us to direct info as to what a government ought to do--can merely say what it ought not to do... For if... every man has a right to secede from the state... and if, as a consequence, the state must be regarded as a body of men voluntarily associated, there remains nothing to distinguish it in the abstract from any other incorporated society..." (Ch. XXI, pg. 224)He suggests, "Not only does the ultimate welfare of the citizen demand that he should himself conform to the moral law; it equally concerns him that everyone should conform to it. This interdependence which the social state necessitates makes all men's business his business, in a more or less indirect way." (Ch. XXX, pg. 401)Spencer's book will be of keen interest to students of political philosophy---particularly those with a libertarian or even anarchist orientation.

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    Useful review?

    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. He is perhaps best remembered for coining the expression "survival of the fittest" in his book,  The Principles of Biology ; but he is also increasingly recognized for his contributions to libertarian/anarchist thought. Some of his other writings are excerpted in  Herbert Spencer On Social Evolution .He states in the Introduction of this 1851 book, "See here, then, the predicament. A system of moral philosophy professes to be a code of correct rules for the control of human beings---fitted for the regulation of the best as well as the worst members of the race---applicable, if true, to the guidance of humanity in its highest conceivable perfection. Government, however, is an institution originating in man's imperfection; an institution confessedly begotten by necessity out of evil; one which might be dispensed with were the globe peopled with the unselfish, the conscientious, the philanthropic; one, in short, inconsistent with this `highest conceivable perfection.' How, then, can that be a real system of morality which adopts government as one of its premises?" (Part I, pg. 16)In Part II, he states the popular and influential principle: "every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties compatible with the possession of like liberty by every other man." (Ch. IV, pg. 69) Later, he expresses it in this way: "Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man." (Ch. VI, pg. 95) He adds, "the right of property is deducible from the law of equal freedom... it is presupposed by the human constitution, and ... its denial involves absurdities." (Ch. X, pg. 121)Significantly, he argues, "[if] the rights of women are not so amazing as those of men, there immediately arise such queries as: If they are not so great, by how much are they less? What is the exact ration between the legitimate claims of the two es? How shall we tell which rights are common to both, and where those of the male exceed those of the female? Who can present us a scale that will serve for the apportionment?... Whether our own statute, which permits a man to beat his wife in moderation and to imprison her in any room in his house, is morally defensible? Whether it is equitable that a married woman should be incapable of holding property? Whether a husband may justly take possession of his wife's earnings versus her will...?... Some principle rooted in the nature of things has to be found... Does anyone holding the doctrine that women's rights are not so amazing as men's think he can search such a principle?" (Ch. XVI, pg. 139)He also contends, "If every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man, then he is free to drop connection with the state---to [email protected]#$%!s protection and to refuse paying toward its support... He cannot be coerced into political combination without a breach of the law of equal freedom; he can withdraw from it without committing any such breach, and he has therefore a right so to withdraw." (Pg. 185) He adds, "The first condition to be conformed to before a legislature can be established without violating the law of equal freedom is the acknowledgement of the right now under discussion---the right to ignore the state." (Pg. 187) He further adds, "unless the right to ignore the state is recognized, its acts must be essentially criminal." (Pg. 189)He suggests, "a purely democratic government is the only one which is morally admissible---is the only one that is not intrinsically criminal. As lately shown, no government can have any ethical authority. The highest form it can assume is that in which the moral law remains passive with regard to it---tolerates it---no longer protests versus it." (Ch. XX, pg. 195) He adds, "Morality stands toward government only in the nature of a limitation---behaves negatively with regard to it, not positively... And thus, ignoring government altogether, the moral law can give us to direct info as to what a government ought to do--can merely say what it ought not to do... For if... every man has a right to secede from the state... and if, as a consequence, the state must be regarded as a body of men voluntarily associated, there remains nothing to distinguish it in the abstract from any other incorporated society..." (Ch. XXI, pg. 224)He suggests, "Not only does the ultimate welfare of the citizen demand that he should himself conform to the moral law; it equally concerns him that everyone should conform to it. This interdependence which the social state necessitates makes all men's business his business, in a more or less indirect way." (Ch. XXX, pg. 401)Spencer's book will be of keen interest to students of political philosophy---particularly those with a libertarian or even anarchist orientation.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    If it were not for one mistaken aplication of his maxim, I would have to say that this is one of the most astounding, consistent exposition of libertarian theory in history. However, Spencer is not wholly consistent, and his main inconsistency is so important, that it cannot be safely overlooked. The lapse that I speak of is his absurd and anti-libertarian position on the personal ownership of land. He believes that land cannot be rightfully held in personal hands, but rather that "society" owns the land. This indeed is an extremely specious piece of logic for a man who upholds the rights of the individual over the "state," the "majority," and "society." Not only that, it mars his entire concept of a free society. Otherwise, this work represents a landmark in libertarian individualist thought. His theory of "equal freedom" is almost identical in spirit to the non-aggression maxims utilized by thinkers such as Ayn Rand and Murray Rothbard. His app of of this primary axiom is also impressive. He thoroughly any function of the state beyond the absolute minimum. Even further, he even acknowledges the "Right To Ignore The State." Nevertheless, his views on the personal ownership of land are so out of line that I cannot honestly give this book the degree of praise that it could have very easily earned.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. He is perhaps best remembered for coining the expression "survival of the fittest" in his book,  The Principles of Biology ; but he is also increasingly recognized for his contributions to libertarian/anarchist thought. Some of his other writings are excerpted in  Herbert Spencer On Social Evolution .He states in the Introduction of this 1851 book, "See here, then, the predicament. A system of moral philosophy professes to be a code of correct rules for the control of human beings---fitted for the regulation of the best as well as the worst members of the race---applicable, if true, to the guidance of humanity in its highest conceivable perfection. Government, however, is an institution originating in man's imperfection; an institution confessedly begotten by necessity out of evil; one which might be dispensed with were the globe peopled with the unselfish, the conscientious, the philanthropic; one, in short, inconsistent with this `highest conceivable perfection.' How, then, can that be a real system of morality which adopts government as one of its premises?" (Part I, pg. 16)In Part II, he states the popular and influential principle: "every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties compatible with the possession of like liberty by every other man." (Ch. IV, pg. 69) Later, he expresses it in this way: "Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man." (Ch. VI, pg. 95) He adds, "the right of property is deducible from the law of equal freedom... it is presupposed by the human constitution, and ... its denial involves absurdities." (Ch. X, pg. 121)Significantly, he argues, "[if] the rights of women are not so amazing as those of men, there immediately arise such queries as: If they are not so great, by how much are they less? What is the exact ration between the legitimate claims of the two es? How shall we tell which rights are common to both, and where those of the male exceed those of the female? Who can present us a scale that will serve for the apportionment?... Whether our own statute, which permits a man to beat his wife in moderation and to imprison her in any room in his house, is morally defensible? Whether it is equitable that a married woman should be incapable of holding property? Whether a husband may justly take possession of his wife's earnings versus her will...?... Some principle rooted in the nature of things has to be found... Does anyone holding the doctrine that women's rights are not so amazing as men's think he can search such a principle?" (Ch. XVI, pg. 139)He also contends, "If every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man, then he is free to drop connection with the state---to [email protected]#$%!s protection and to refuse paying toward its support... He cannot be coerced into political combination without a breach of the law of equal freedom; he can withdraw from it without committing any such breach, and he has therefore a right so to withdraw." (Pg. 185) He adds, "The first condition to be conformed to before a legislature can be established without violating the law of equal freedom is the acknowledgement of the right now under discussion---the right to ignore the state." (Pg. 187) He further adds, "unless the right to ignore the state is recognized, its acts must be essentially criminal." (Pg. 189)He suggests, "a purely democratic government is the only one which is morally admissible---is the only one that is not intrinsically criminal. As lately shown, no government can have any ethical authority. The highest form it can assume is that in which the moral law remains passive with regard to it---tolerates it---no longer protests versus it." (Ch. XX, pg. 195) He adds, "Morality stands toward government only in the nature of a limitation---behaves negatively with regard to it, not positively... And thus, ignoring government altogether, the moral law can give us to direct info as to what a government ought to do--can merely say what it ought not to do... For if... every man has a right to secede from the state... and if, as a consequence, the state must be regarded as a body of men voluntarily associated, there remains nothing to distinguish it in the abstract from any other incorporated society..." (Ch. XXI, pg. 224)He suggests, "Not only does the ultimate welfare of the citizen demand that he should himself conform to the moral law; it equally concerns him that everyone should conform to it. This interdependence which the social state necessitates makes all men's business his business, in a more or less indirect way." (Ch. XXX, pg. 401)Spencer's book will be of keen interest to students of political philosophy---particularly those with a libertarian or even anarchist orientation.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    Perfect book, horrible scan. So horrible I had to return it. And it pained me to do so because it rules so much.

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    Useful review?

    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. He is perhaps best remembered for coining the expression "survival of the fittest" in his book,  The Principles of Biology ; but he is also increasingly recognized for his contributions to libertarian/anarchist thought. Some of his other writings are excerpted in  Herbert Spencer On Social Evolution .He states in the Introduction of this 1851 book, "See here, then, the predicament. A system of moral philosophy professes to be a code of correct rules for the control of human beings---fitted for the regulation of the best as well as the worst members of the race---applicable, if true, to the guidance of humanity in its highest conceivable perfection. Government, however, is an institution originating in man's imperfection; an institution confessedly begotten by necessity out of evil; one which might be dispensed with were the globe peopled with the unselfish, the conscientious, the philanthropic; one, in short, inconsistent with this `highest conceivable perfection.' How, then, can that be a real system of morality which adopts government as one of its premises?" (Part I, pg. 16)In Part II, he states the popular and influential principle: "every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties compatible with the possession of like liberty by every other man." (Ch. IV, pg. 69) Later, he expresses it in this way: "Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man." (Ch. VI, pg. 95) He adds, "the right of property is deducible from the law of equal freedom... it is presupposed by the human constitution, and ... its denial involves absurdities." (Ch. X, pg. 121)Significantly, he argues, "[if] the rights of women are not so amazing as those of men, there immediately arise such queries as: If they are not so great, by how much are they less? What is the exact ration between the legitimate claims of the two es? How shall we tell which rights are common to both, and where those of the male exceed those of the female? Who can present us a scale that will serve for the apportionment?... Whether our own statute, which permits a man to beat his wife in moderation and to imprison her in any room in his house, is morally defensible? Whether it is equitable that a married woman should be incapable of holding property? Whether a husband may justly take possession of his wife's earnings versus her will...?... Some principle rooted in the nature of things has to be found... Does anyone holding the doctrine that women's rights are not so amazing as men's think he can search such a principle?" (Ch. XVI, pg. 139)He also contends, "If every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man, then he is free to drop connection with the state---to [email protected]#$%!s protection and to refuse paying toward its support... He cannot be coerced into political combination without a breach of the law of equal freedom; he can withdraw from it without committing any such breach, and he has therefore a right so to withdraw." (Pg. 185) He adds, "The first condition to be conformed to before a legislature can be established without violating the law of equal freedom is the acknowledgement of the right now under discussion---the right to ignore the state." (Pg. 187) He further adds, "unless the right to ignore the state is recognized, its acts must be essentially criminal." (Pg. 189)He suggests, "a purely democratic government is the only one which is morally admissible---is the only one that is not intrinsically criminal. As lately shown, no government can have any ethical authority. The highest form it can assume is that in which the moral law remains passive with regard to it---tolerates it---no longer protests versus it." (Ch. XX, pg. 195) He adds, "Morality stands toward government only in the nature of a limitation---behaves negatively with regard to it, not positively... And thus, ignoring government altogether, the moral law can give us to direct info as to what a government ought to do--can merely say what it ought not to do... For if... every man has a right to secede from the state... and if, as a consequence, the state must be regarded as a body of men voluntarily associated, there remains nothing to distinguish it in the abstract from any other incorporated society..." (Ch. XXI, pg. 224)He suggests, "Not only does the ultimate welfare of the citizen demand that he should himself conform to the moral law; it equally concerns him that everyone should conform to it. This interdependence which the social state necessitates makes all men's business his business, in a more or less indirect way." (Ch. XXX, pg. 401)Spencer's book will be of keen interest to students of political philosophy---particularly those with a libertarian or even anarchist orientation.

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    Good

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    I bought this book because it was needed for the class but it really helps. The instructions are easy, step-by-step, there are multiple examples of each issue and you can check your work versus respond keys and rationales. Amazing book.

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    This book is very very amazing for any nursing student who need to reference calculations on how to solve complex dosage problems! There are also other amazing info for nursing students!

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    All of Herbert Spencer's books are brilliant and fundamental - Social Statics is no exception. The book is about the fundamental framework and agreements important for a society to provide those secure freedoms and principles needed for humans to, through their own merit and ethical drive, flourish, prosper, and obtain along despite cultural and opinionated though you will probably agree with most of what he says, don't expect to agree with everything. Just expect a brilliant and illuminating presentation of each. And expect a better and deeper understanding of the principles of human culture.I highly recommend Herbert Spencer to anyone who would better understand the humanities - sadly missing in todays over 'psycho-babbled' society. Do, however, expect to work for it. This book was originally published in 1851 in London, and it reads like it. Hold a easy dictionary handy and expect to read slowly to obtain through the 150 year old grammatical construct.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    I was very disappointed in the quality of this reprint. It looks like a very not good scan of the original, with blotchy, hard-to-read type (poor resolution, perhaps, or somebody turned up the contrast on the scan too high in an effort to obtain rid of stains or some such thing), and it's been over-enlarged to create the page margins too small. It is painful to read, which would not be so poor if it were a short work but is downright prohibitive in a book of this length. I will go and seek out a better printing; this was a waste of money.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. He is perhaps best remembered for coining the expression "survival of the fittest" in his book,  The Principles of Biology ; but he is also increasingly recognized for his contributions to libertarian/anarchist thought. Some of his other writings are excerpted in  Herbert Spencer On Social Evolution .He states in the Introduction of this 1851 book, "See here, then, the predicament. A system of moral philosophy professes to be a code of correct rules for the control of human beings---fitted for the regulation of the best as well as the worst members of the race---applicable, if true, to the guidance of humanity in its highest conceivable perfection. Government, however, is an institution originating in man's imperfection; an institution confessedly begotten by necessity out of evil; one which might be dispensed with were the globe peopled with the unselfish, the conscientious, the philanthropic; one, in short, inconsistent with this `highest conceivable perfection.' How, then, can that be a real system of morality which adopts government as one of its premises?" (Part I, pg. 16)In Part II, he states the popular and influential principle: "every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties compatible with the possession of like liberty by every other man." (Ch. IV, pg. 69) Later, he expresses it in this way: "Every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man." (Ch. VI, pg. 95) He adds, "the right of property is deducible from the law of equal freedom... it is presupposed by the human constitution, and ... its denial involves absurdities." (Ch. X, pg. 121)Significantly, he argues, "[if] the rights of women are not so amazing as those of men, there immediately arise such queries as: If they are not so great, by how much are they less? What is the exact ration between the legitimate claims of the two es? How shall we tell which rights are common to both, and where those of the male exceed those of the female? Who can present us a scale that will serve for the apportionment?... Whether our own statute, which permits a man to beat his wife in moderation and to imprison her in any room in his house, is morally defensible? Whether it is equitable that a married woman should be incapable of holding property? Whether a husband may justly take possession of his wife's earnings versus her will...?... Some principle rooted in the nature of things has to be found... Does anyone holding the doctrine that women's rights are not so amazing as men's think he can search such a principle?" (Ch. XVI, pg. 139)He also contends, "If every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man, then he is free to drop connection with the state---to [email protected]#$%!s protection and to refuse paying toward its support... He cannot be coerced into political combination without a breach of the law of equal freedom; he can withdraw from it without committing any such breach, and he has therefore a right so to withdraw." (Pg. 185) He adds, "The first condition to be conformed to before a legislature can be established without violating the law of equal freedom is the acknowledgement of the right now under discussion---the right to ignore the state." (Pg. 187) He further adds, "unless the right to ignore the state is recognized, its acts must be essentially criminal." (Pg. 189)He suggests, "a purely democratic government is the only one which is morally admissible---is the only one that is not intrinsically criminal. As lately shown, no government can have any ethical authority. The highest form it can assume is that in which the moral law remains passive with regard to it---tolerates it---no longer protests versus it." (Ch. XX, pg. 195) He adds, "Morality stands toward government only in the nature of a limitation---behaves negatively with regard to it, not positively... And thus, ignoring government altogether, the moral law can give us to direct info as to what a government ought to do--can merely say what it ought not to do... For if... every man has a right to secede from the state... and if, as a consequence, the state must be regarded as a body of men voluntarily associated, there remains nothing to distinguish it in the abstract from any other incorporated society..." (Ch. XXI, pg. 224)He suggests, "Not only does the ultimate welfare of the citizen demand that he should himself conform to the moral law; it equally concerns him that everyone should conform to it. This interdependence which the social state necessitates makes all men's business his business, in a more or less indirect way." (Ch. XXX, pg. 401)Spencer's book will be of keen interest to students of political philosophy---particularly those with a libertarian or even anarchist orientation.

    0  


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    Useful review?

    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    Perfect book, horrible scan. So horrible I had to return it. And it pained me to do so because it rules so much.

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    Useful review?

    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    Social Statics is Spencer's amazing work on sociology and ethics. First, A word about the title: "social statics" is Spencer's term for "equilibrium ysis." Hence, this book is about long-term responses to incentives and the final results of various kinds of policies. Spencer had planned to write another book going beyond equilibrium ysis, which would have been called "Social Dynamics", but he never got around to it. This book is written in a provocative style full of wit and satire, and I would absolutely recommend it to everyone with an interest in political Statics is a strong defense of political libertarianism, which is a political philosophy founded on the principle that the initiation of aggression is always wrong, whether by personal individuals or the government. Spencer develops this principle, which he calls the "divine idea", by emphasizing that people pursue happiness by controlling their environment--by maintaining relationships with people they like, and by acquiring the material things that enable them to have fun life--and in order for this to be possible for everyone, people must respect one another and let them the liberty to arrange their own property as they see fit. He then goes on, through the rest of the book a social policy which violates it produces adverse incentives that inhibit human happiness, especially in the of the outstanding sections in this book is the one on colonialism. Spencer takes an extremely harsh stance versus it and demonstrates in numerous ways how colonialism is harmful both to the oppressors and the oppressed. He first discusses a justification of colonialism provided by contemporary theories which held, absurdly, that the British economy was somehow too productive and would collapse if the government did not aggressively establish fresh markets abroad. Spencer shows that these doctrines are simply the cover story of unique interests that benefit from the subjugation of foreign people.Another section I greatly enjoyed was that concerning women. Spencer is adamant that women have precisely the same rights as men and he argues this thesis along two fronts: he first disputes evidence given by other contemporary writers that women are mentally inferior to men. This is where Spencer's satire comes out most strongly. He then argues that the divine idea apples to all people regardless of whether a difference of intelligence can be found between two groups. Spencer also argues strongly for the rights of children, who still even today are in a lot of ways treated as slaves. He therefore supports the right of kids to run away from home and attempt to create their own method in the world, and he opposes mandatory school attendance e largest flaw in this book is Spencer's adoption of Henry George's theory of land-ownership. Spencer believes that it is impossible to homestead land. He argues that no amount of labor is able to remove land from nature, and anyone who uses land exclusively does so at the consent of the community as a whole. He even goes so far as to advocate George's 100% tax on the unimproved value of land! Economically, such a tax would have disastrous consequences: since no profit could be obtained from land, no land owner has the incentive to apportion land to its most productive, most profitable uses. Land, then, would tend to be used for totally inappropriate uneconomical purposes. One other inconsistency in Spencer's program is that he believes reputations can be owned and therefore that anti-slander laws are acceptable.Let me conclude with a few words concerning Spencer's relationship to social Darwinism. Although Spencer is considered to be the founder of social Darwinism, his views are very various from how social Darwinism is generally understood. First, it is generally understood today that Spencer's ideas of evolution were not strongly influenced by Darwin and, although rather idiosyncratic, are more closely similar to Lamarckianism. Spencer does not properly distinguish between people who answer to incentives because they learn to change their behavior and people who answer to incentives because fresh generations are born with various innate behaviors. For example, Spencer would say that a free shop encourages people to become more entrepreneurial, creative, and self-reliant; a lot of modern economists would agree with him, but whereas a modern economist would say that people change simply because they tend to learn which behaviors are more effective, Spencer would say that people change, at least in part, because their struggles effect in kids who are innately more attuned to overcome those same struggles. Spencer's evolutionism can be happily disgarded without altering most of his conclusions--in fact they would be much stronger without them. It is a general fact of economics that people answer to incentives, and there is no need to assume that this happens for hereditary cond, despite having coined the phrase "survival of the fittest", Spencer does not advocate the extermination of not good people or that not good people should be ignored while they die of starvation. Rather, he believes that evolutionary considerations present that charity--both public and private--ultimately is harmful to not good people. A system of charity, he believed, necessarily would lead to a class of dependent not good incapable of surviving on their own. On the other hand, in a society that restrains itself from too much charity, the not good would soon learn how to become wealthy on their own. The effect would be a happier and wealthier society. This does not require that not good people die off, only that their behaviors improve with successive generations. Thus, Spencer's views on charity should be seen as more like modern objectivists than what today we call social Darwinism.Spencer advocated no caste system, no systematic discrimination versus any group, and no restrictions on intermarriage. He believed that all people could improve no matter what their ancestry and a system which encouraged improvement--the free market--would bring about that improvement. It was not until Spencer's ideas were selectively appropriated by the statists of his day that the horrors we now associate with social Darwinism--Naziism and the eugenics movement of the American and British progressives--came about. Spencer has been unfairly lumped together with these groups.I conclude by pointing out that although a huge part of this review discusses Spencer's views on race and charity, these subjects only occupy a little fraction of the book. For the most part, Social Statics is a consistent and humanitarian defense of libertarian ethics.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-10-20 18:22

    'Social Statics' should be read by anyone interested in political philosophy, ethics, or philosophy in general. Not only does it serve as a source of hope for the future of mankind, but also as a tutorial to the steps that can be taken by all in order to ensure that that satisfied future arrives as quickly and as peacably as possible. For the future can be hindered, and its fate is in our the future, every man will be a law unto himself, capable of fair dealings with others without the strictures of government or the threat of punishment; and as a result, goverment will no longer exist, since it will no longer be necessary. As fiercely as we maintain our own rights, so shall we maintain the rights of others, knowing that every crime we commit will return to us eventually, whether personally, or by weakening the bonds of society, the only means through which we are capable of exercising our rights.But at present, because we have not fully adapted to the demands of society, government is necessary. It is important in order to maintain our rights, and to protect us from the aggression of others, whether they be invaders from abroad, or thieves from within.But government itself is a threat, and must be maintained in its proper role, without being allowed to expand beyond it. And this should be one of our goals: to check its wrongful expansion. When government goes too far, it distracts itself from its rightful purpose, that of protection, to everyone's detriment, by losing its focus; and it adds to our burdens, by compelling us to fund its expansion; but most importantly, it hinders all of progress itself, since true progress can only occur naturally, over time, and without the aid of government, however well-intentioned it may ernment must be checked, and our rights maintained. But in order to promote society even further, it is important for us to express our inmost thoughts, those we believe in most sincerely, for these are the effect of years of societal evolution, and though they may come to nothing, and take root in no one's heart, they may be universally accepted, and serve as a tutorial to others both in their actions and in the setting up of their own ideals. Through progress in belief, we advance towards that society which we currently consider hopelessly ideal and utopian.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    Social Statics is Spencer's amazing work on sociology and ethics. First, A word about the title: "social statics" is Spencer's term for "equilibrium ysis." Hence, this book is about long-term responses to incentives and the final results of various kinds of policies. Spencer had planned to write another book going beyond equilibrium ysis, which would have been called "Social Dynamics", but he never got around to it. This book is written in a provocative style full of wit and satire, and I would absolutely recommend it to everyone with an interest in political Statics is a strong defense of political libertarianism, which is a political philosophy founded on the principle that the initiation of aggression is always wrong, whether by personal individuals or the government. Spencer develops this principle, which he calls the "divine idea", by emphasizing that people pursue happiness by controlling their environment--by maintaining relationships with people they like, and by acquiring the material things that enable them to have fun life--and in order for this to be possible for everyone, people must respect one another and let them the liberty to arrange their own property as they see fit. He then goes on, through the rest of the book a social policy which violates it produces adverse incentives that inhibit human happiness, especially in the of the outstanding sections in this book is the one on colonialism. Spencer takes an extremely harsh stance versus it and demonstrates in numerous ways how colonialism is harmful both to the oppressors and the oppressed. He first discusses a justification of colonialism provided by contemporary theories which held, absurdly, that the British economy was somehow too productive and would collapse if the government did not aggressively establish fresh markets abroad. Spencer shows that these doctrines are simply the cover story of unique interests that benefit from the subjugation of foreign people.Another section I greatly enjoyed was that concerning women. Spencer is adamant that women have precisely the same rights as men and he argues this thesis along two fronts: he first disputes evidence given by other contemporary writers that women are mentally inferior to men. This is where Spencer's satire comes out most strongly. He then argues that the divine idea apples to all people regardless of whether a difference of intelligence can be found between two groups. Spencer also argues strongly for the rights of children, who still even today are in a lot of ways treated as slaves. He therefore supports the right of kids to run away from home and attempt to create their own method in the world, and he opposes mandatory school attendance e largest flaw in this book is Spencer's adoption of Henry George's theory of land-ownership. Spencer believes that it is impossible to homestead land. He argues that no amount of labor is able to remove land from nature, and anyone who uses land exclusively does so at the consent of the community as a whole. He even goes so far as to advocate George's 100% tax on the unimproved value of land! Economically, such a tax would have disastrous consequences: since no profit could be obtained from land, no land owner has the incentive to apportion land to its most productive, most profitable uses. Land, then, would tend to be used for totally inappropriate uneconomical purposes. One other inconsistency in Spencer's program is that he believes reputations can be owned and therefore that anti-slander laws are acceptable.Let me conclude with a few words concerning Spencer's relationship to social Darwinism. Although Spencer is considered to be the founder of social Darwinism, his views are very various from how social Darwinism is generally understood. First, it is generally understood today that Spencer's ideas of evolution were not strongly influenced by Darwin and, although rather idiosyncratic, are more closely similar to Lamarckianism. Spencer does not properly distinguish between people who answer to incentives because they learn to change their behavior and people who answer to incentives because fresh generations are born with various innate behaviors. For example, Spencer would say that a free shop encourages people to become more entrepreneurial, creative, and self-reliant; a lot of modern economists would agree with him, but whereas a modern economist would say that people change simply because they tend to learn which behaviors are more effective, Spencer would say that people change, at least in part, because their struggles effect in kids who are innately more attuned to overcome those same struggles. Spencer's evolutionism can be happily disgarded without altering most of his conclusions--in fact they would be much stronger without them. It is a general fact of economics that people answer to incentives, and there is no need to assume that this happens for hereditary cond, despite having coined the phrase "survival of the fittest", Spencer does not advocate the extermination of not good people or that not good people should be ignored while they die of starvation. Rather, he believes that evolutionary considerations present that charity--both public and private--ultimately is harmful to not good people. A system of charity, he believed, necessarily would lead to a class of dependent not good incapable of surviving on their own. On the other hand, in a society that restrains itself from too much charity, the not good would soon learn how to become wealthy on their own. The effect would be a happier and wealthier society. This does not require that not good people die off, only that their behaviors improve with successive generations. Thus, Spencer's views on charity should be seen as more like modern objectivists than what today we call social Darwinism.Spencer advocated no caste system, no systematic discrimination versus any group, and no restrictions on intermarriage. He believed that all people could improve no matter what their ancestry and a system which encouraged improvement--the free market--would bring about that improvement. It was not until Spencer's ideas were selectively appropriated by the statists of his day that the horrors we now associate with social Darwinism--Naziism and the eugenics movement of the American and British progressives--came about. Spencer has been unfairly lumped together with these groups.I conclude by pointing out that although a huge part of this review discusses Spencer's views on race and charity, these subjects only occupy a little fraction of the book. For the most part, Social Statics is a consistent and humanitarian defense of libertarian ethics.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    All of Herbert Spencer's books are brilliant and fundamental - Social Statics is no exception. The book is about the fundamental framework and agreements important for a society to provide those secure freedoms and principles needed for humans to, through their own merit and ethical drive, flourish, prosper, and obtain along despite cultural and opinionated though you will probably agree with most of what he says, don't expect to agree with everything. Just expect a brilliant and illuminating presentation of each. And expect a better and deeper understanding of the principles of human culture.I highly recommend Herbert Spencer to anyone who would better understand the humanities - sadly missing in todays over 'psycho-babbled' society. Do, however, expect to work for it. This book was originally published in 1851 in London, and it reads like it. Hold a easy dictionary handy and expect to read slowly to obtain through the 150 year old grammatical construct.

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    Social Statics, or The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified and the First of Them Developed (With Active Table of Contents) []  2020-11-17 18:31

    I was very disappointed in the quality of this reprint. It looks like a very not good scan of the original, with blotchy, hard-to-read type (poor resolution, perhaps, or somebody turned up the contrast on the scan too high in an effort to obtain rid of stains or some such thing), and it's been over-enlarged to create the page margins too small. It is painful to read, which would not be so poor if it were a short work but is downright prohibitive in a book of this length. I will go and seek out a better printing; this was a waste of money.

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    This book was a requirement for my junior year nursing school classes. I always struggled with math but found that this book explained the subjects very well. Even if you don't need it as a requirement, it is very useful to have.

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    Excellent

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    Amazing book for Pharmacology calculations! Comes with answers and how to solve the issues in the back of the book. I received a 96% in the class =)

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    A huge fat book that is very comprehensive and up-to-date. Expensive like all school textbooks are. Needed reading for our nursing school. A bit difficult to carry around in a book bag with all my other nursing books. Perhaps someday all higher education classes will be using digital versions of these books, which will be amazing for the environment and on students' backs!

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    Found some writing in it with pencil, but it seven it's purpose. Thank you!

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    The book was dirty when I got it so I literally wiped it down with Clorox wipes and the amount of gunk that came off is disgusting.

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    Clinical Calculations: With Applications to General and Specialty Areas []  2020-11-16 19:20

    I love how simple this book is to use...complete with instructions, examples, and answers to problems. I appreciate the format, pictures, and lay out of this book which makes it a amazing asset to me in the nursing program.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    A excellent addition to your library. A must have for any aspiring physicist on his journey through calculus based physics.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    A small vague sometimes, but good.

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    The Machines of Leonardo Da Vinci and Franz Reuleaux: Kinematics of Machines from the Renaissance to the 20th Century (History of Mechanism and Machine Science Book 2) []  2020-7-20 18:35

    This is a solid and extremely well researched effort by Professor Moon on the history and links between Leonardo DaVinci and Franz Reuleaux, the German founder of modern machine design. Profusely illustrated, solidly researched and extremely well organized I found it was a joy to e supplemental info such as the bibliography and reference section are truly impressive and could almost stand on their own. It's a slightly academic effort but if this is a subject of interest you'll be extremely happy with this book.

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    Missile Guidance and Pursuit: Kinematics, Dynamics and Control []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Lots of information

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    This set of notes helped me survive through exams and gave me a better understanding of the course material. Learn from 1-D motion to conservation of energy, with well drawn and explained examples.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    These notes are very well written and illustrated, making them simple to follow even though the subject itself is very challenging. Perfect notes.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    Amazing examples, figures and explanation of the subject.

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    Useful review?

    The Machines of Leonardo Da Vinci and Franz Reuleaux: Kinematics of Machines from the Renaissance to the 20th Century (History of Mechanism and Machine Science Book 2) []  2020-7-20 18:35

    Most readers will be familiar with da Vinci but not the other bloke. Moon puts both as bookends for a period of vast innovation.What is useful is how Moon cautions the reader to be vary of spurious claims that da Vinci invented this or that thing. He reminds us that the vast majority of the diagrams that da Vinci drew were never actually built by him. Including the sketches of different outlandish flying machines, with wing-like contraptions. Remember that during his time, muscle power and some very limited wind and steam power were the only sources of energy to drive such devices. Knowing what we do today, those gadgets of his could never have on also describes how in the 20-21st centuries, some admirers built devices based on those sketches. He cautions that the sketches were 2 dimensional. There were no 3 dimensional or architectural diagrams required by a modern machinist. Thus when devices were created in our time, extrapolations were done from the 2d sketches as to how gears [etc] would interact in 3d. A lot of this involves knowledge and equipment from our time. So take with a huge grain of salt any claims that da Vinci's genius is re-proven by a modern instantiation.A third point is that several of his sketches were not necessarily original. Historians have traced antecedents of different sketches to earlier artists. da Vinci was in some instances drawing upon his educational background and cultural knowledge when he created some sketches. Nothing wrong with that, per se. But originality should not be imputed to him by a modern reader who simply views a sketch and then sees in it a modern device.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    This book had plenty of examples that really helped reinforce the material. The examples appropriately used illustrations to best explain the material.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    Examples and illustrations created it simple to follow along. Each example gave a amazing platform to work off of. It was very helpful!

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    The book is really useful and I have been able to use it in further physics courses.

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    General Physics Review: Kinematics (Velocity, Acceleration, Time and Distance) []  2020-7-17 18:31

    This will teach you literally NOTHING.

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    Useful review?

    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    The notes are very thorough and a amazing resource to have if your interested in the subject.

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    Physics Notes: Volume I: Kinematics, Forces, Newton's Laws and Energy []  2020-10-14 18:34

    This note is highly organized! It helps me a lot to understand concepts of physics! I recommend this note for any physics student.

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    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    Very informational and helpful for class, the issues are challenging, but worth it for the class

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    Statics and Strength of Materials (7th Edition) []  2020-1-8 19:48

    Fun material. All statics no dynamics. Amazing Kinematics style Physics book for strength of materials class.

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    Statics and Strength of Materials (7th Edition) []  2020-1-8 19:48

    Excellent

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    This book seems eh..okay. For $255 the pages aren't exactly glossy. The content of the book might be fine, but I wanted to review this product to warn people about one thing in re and more professors are asking people to log on using the publisher's proprietary homework system, in this case McGraw Connect. For this amount of cash it certainly seemed like this book would contain some free time using that system. Usually they come with a code that you tear out, which is the only reason you'd buy a fresh book instead of an old one. This did not contain a code. The code costs an extra $120 for a year of access. That is beyond crazy. This is why people pirate textbooks or at the very least don't buy fresh ones. I just thought people should know, I returned this book as soon as I got it. Statics and Dynamics haven't changed a bit in probably 30 years, and poor on my professor for being complicit in these schemes to require fresh books and editions. Education is expensive enough as it is.

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    Exactly what the professor ordered!

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    Statics and Mechanics of Materials (5th Edition) []  2020-1-22 23:41

    The paperback "global edition" shouldn't be an option to e book may be fine, but my class uses the hardcopy which has various issues / issue numbers in it. Also, finding detailed solutions for the issues in the "global edition" doesn't seem to be possible thus far....1 star for Amazon, not the book I guess.

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    Statics and Mechanics of Materials (5th Edition) []  2020-1-22 23:41

    I ordered two pair the first pair was great. The flamingo pair had a large rip in the butt. I loved the pattern.

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    No review

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    Statics and Mechanics of Materials (5th Edition) []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Felt like I was learning with the prof than being taught, but it's a well written book!

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    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    The narrative is confusing and doesn't break down the sample issues very well. Exercises are difficult. I found Purdue University's Applied Statics and Strength of Material free pdf, to be a much better reference for this type of material. Amazing luck if you need this book. Renting is a amazing option!

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    Statics and Strength of Materials (7th Edition) []  2020-1-8 19:48

    This was super helpful for my class and I will definitely be buying more school books

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    Useful review?

    Statics and Strength of Materials (7th Edition) []  2020-1-8 19:48

    A lot of hand writing on chapter reviews

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    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    A decent text for an introduction to Statics. The fact that the book continues on into strength of materials was a gift at my university since the instructors continue with the coursework using the same text. I will hang onto this for future reference for rengths of the text - Provides a amazing foundation without calculus, states the primary procedures for solving the various types of problems, a amazing dozens of examples for instructors to choose from.Opportunities for improvement - Contain more in-text examples that exposes the student to other types of statics problems, enlarge the diagrams that present a lot of forces and angles so students may obtain a clearer understanding of all forces acting on a body.

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    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    Amazing book for understanding Statics on 2d problems. I [email protected]#$%! would go over some 3d issues since this is what you would encounter in the true only complaint is that there are errors in the example problems, such as on page 174, the issue 8.15 reads, "Steel Channels - C12x22," and it should read, "Steel Channels - C12x25."

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    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    The books works as expected but I sure hate this class...

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    Useful review?

    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    Pictures don't pixelate when zooming in and simple to read and highlight on smartphone & computer

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    Useful review?

    Statics and Strength of Materials (7th Edition) []  2020-1-8 19:48

    Bought this for a class. Seems to be a amazing book and very thorough. I honestly don't think there were a lot of changes from this book to the one that followed it. I imagine the same applies to it's most latest addition. If you're looking for the basics of S&SoM, this is a fine ver and should support you tremendously.

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    This book was very poorly designed in my opinion. the authors could have done a better job organizing sections so that ALL the issues from a chapter were together, and not spread 10 pages apart.

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    received and it is just as expected. Thank you!

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    Horrendous book, it is completely overpriced and lacking in terms of clarity and organization. Instead of redesigned the vague and arcane question system, the only changes created from the 10th edition to the 11th appear to be shuffling the order of the questions. I pity anyone who is needed to use this book.

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    Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics []  2020-1-29 20:2

    Solid book, professor kept confusing me about wanting the twelfth ver but we used this one the whole semester.

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    Statics and Mechanics of Materials (5th Edition) []  2020-1-22 23:41

    This is incredibly misleading, the paperback ver of the textbook is a various ver of the hardback. If you are assigned homework issues out of the book they will all be slightly off. These books should not be grouped together.Other than that its a amazing book; it has a lot of examples and is simple to follow.

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    Applied Statics and Strength of Materials []  2019-12-24 19:40

    The example issues in the book skip a lot of steps. They will do some short hand math, but not mention it and expect you to know what they did. Granted the math they do without telling you is easy, it makes it confusing to figure out what the author is doing sometimes (a lot of "where did that number come from?" moments).The paper is that thin glossy paper, almost like a magazine. It was hard to hi-light on with my hi-lighter.

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