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    T.D.Z. Robots Story - the Soviet Apocalypse [App]  2019-11-9 13:54

    Получил игру за промокод! Очень благодарен!) Игра топ!

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    I can't say enough about how amazing all of the books are from Jasper T. Scott. Looking forward to another amazing read.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    This is a imaginative adventure story that swirls hopes and dreams of life extension as a private war to one's family from a tyrannical alien shown in Into the Unknown, the future will use star gates for family vacations to other habitable planets. You will see aliens who have advanced technology such as teleportation, artificial gravity and inertial damping and long distance communication using neural implants.Jasper Scott gives us a view in which very human emotions coupled with desire, fear and hope brings out the best and worst in us.A detachment of marines in disguise accompanies the off earth vacationers and security after their spaceship is overwhelmed. There is quite a bit of violence somewhat like a video android game on d guys are not always what they seem; poor guys will morph before your mind's eye for the better. Expect that your opinions of who can be trusted will oscillate as you obtain into this quick paced story.Excellent escapism yielding an perfect adventure into the unknown.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    This was a quick paced story that you won’t wish to place down. We meet Logan and Kate at the lowest point in their lives. Logan just lost his six figure salary job as an editor, due to independent authors/publishers only to come home and search his wife sleeping with another man. She claims that it’s just a fling since Logan is always working...the old bored house wife excuse.While Logan decides to drink it off, the President of the US tells the country that a rogue star is headed our method in the next year. He rushes home to be with his family, while resentment still resides. Unbeknownst to he and his wife, her brother Richard was the man who discovered the rogue star and had been trying to convince his sister that the end of the globe was upon us and that they could live with him in his compound in ey search their method to Texas and it wouldn’t be a family end of the globe trip without the teenage hormones of Kate and Logan’s oldest, Alex almost costing them their shelter and their ey’re safe for a moment until Uncle Richard discovers that the rogue star is accompanied by smart life that soon occupies Earth and forces humanity to uproot itself into the harsh conditions of the “new” e invaders are human like in appearance but more robot than anything. They push humanity on a cattle ride and while all may seem chaotic, the US government does not collapse but has plans along with a billionaire to leave on one of 6 rockets to March. Richard has a connection to obtain on one these rockets but getting passed the Invaders, lawless humanity and the US Military brings on a large challenge but Logan, Kate, their children and Alex’s fresh girlfriends family are able to obtain surprising support from an unexpected will not wish to place this one down!

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    In Time for Revenge. I rated this 5.0 out of 5 stars The imagination and mind of Jasper Scott combined with his storytelling talent is awesome! Reviewed in the United States on October 28, 2019Format: Kindle EditionMr. Scott is one of my favorite authors. Having read every one of his books, I have never been disappointed. They are all page turners or quick reads. They bring to my imagination all aspects of quality science fiction and technology wrapped in an perfect story line. He consistently develops amazing personalities, with strengths of hero and faults, as he tells his stories that hold me guessing as to outcome and very interesting and special paths to reach his final epilogue. Thank you Jasper! Hold writing and sharing with me your imagination that depicts various futures and technologies.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    This is my review of the Rogue Star: Frozen Earth (A Post-Apocalyptic Technothriller) book from this bundle under BritMick4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting startReviewed in the United States on August 7, 2018Format: Kindle Edition Verified PurchaseI really enjoyed reading this story, as expected with Jasper's books. It's a special story, not just covering the human aspect but also some of the aliens that come with the rogue star. It's about the survival of all the species. The author does paint a very amazing picture as the characters. The story has a bunch of really cool twists and turns moving from stage to scene. Looking forward to seeing where Jasper takes us in book 2.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    While Frozen Earth is a Sci-Fi story, the driving force here is the emotions and actions of the Human characters. I especially liked that it was set just a few years ahead of the current times. The premise of the story is so plausible, it feels real. A cold dead star is speeding towards earth on a near-miss path that will expand our orbit and throw the earth into a vast Ice-Age where the Glaciers will extend down into northern Texas and Florida. From the time it is identified until it's devastating arrival is just over ten years. I was given the opportunity to be an early reader for this book in exchange for an honest review and I'm giving this a solid five-star rating. The actions, including the over-reactions of the main characters, are so totally realistic and reasonable. I even found myself getting emotionally PO'd with the teen-aged boy who violates his parent's directions over and over endangering everyone. Suddenly, I found myself realizing I would likely be behaving the same method under the same circumstances. It's no wonder an older Brother-in-Law told me I was a "Ball-Breaker" to my dad when I was 15-years-old. It's simple to show characters that are likable or despicable but, it takes an exceptional author to make characters that one can relate to so easily. As an early reader, I was able to comment on more than just Typos. I shared my views on some info and this author is going to incorporate them in the published book. Not a lot of authors are this begin to suggestions and willing to accept other views. In fact, the author gives a rating of his own work and states that if you search any reason to disagree with his rating, he will either change or remove the offending content or change the rating accordingly. What other author has the ethics to do this? This book, and probably the series, would create a unbelievable film appealing to a lot of diverse groups. Another thing I love about Jasper Scott's books is how he ends them. This is a series and you'll obviously wish to read the next parts but, it can stand-on-it's-own without using a "cliffhanger" ending. This is a strategy some authors use to test and force you to their next book to search out how this recent surprise is resolved. Those remind me of, "Will Lassie bring Timmy's parents to the well before the water level rises and Timmy drowns?" Review by THE HOLEY ONE

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    Quite a novel story. I didn’t like that it’s book 1 of ??? Even so, it was a quick read. A couple of questions arise. One would think a superior species would have done its due diligence and learned Earth languages before landing and kicking humans out of the habitable zone. Why is it, when faced with an extinction level event, these stories always have humans starting battles with each other? For that matter why do we always shoot first and ask questions later when faced with a first contact situation? And what”s the with OneZero? Why did she “defect”? Or, is she a “secret ambassador”? Why didn’t”t Richard call? We didn’t search out in Book 1. Who are the goons hunting Richard? Somebody him to hold his mouth shut and then years later, after he spent all the money, they send killers out to slay him. Then they disappear but the psycho assassin stays on the job?In spite of all my questions, I enjoyed the book and can”t wait for book 2.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    Moves a lot, but...Reviewed in the United States on February 6, 2019Format: Kindle EditionVerified PurchaseHello. Just finished this novel. Wasn't the worst thing I've read all year; there were a lot of amazing things in here. The slow collapse of things, Billy the Kid, the turncoat alien... A number of common EOTWAWKI (End of the Globe As We Know It) tropes, like the wife not liking all those firearms at first, the suspicious strangers, and the feeling-their-oats military men, but that's part of the fun. Kinda glad the hormonal teenager got literally washed away- kids are such pains in the butt! (Though I suspect the alien rescue at the end will see to his and his small squeeze's amazing fortune.)What would have helped this story become more than a series of happenings strung together is a change in the main character, Logan Willis.I think the author missed a golden opportunity here. Logan remains static through the tale, changing only to do what's important to survive (which is why I consider this something akin to a series of events). I might have created Logan's inner conflict something to do with money- how he really, really hates people with an excess of money. Having him grow up in a state of near-poverty and being one of the have-nots would set the stage. Logan boot-strapping himself through college and into a solid if unspectacular career can present his motivation. This is backstory that would be revealed in dribbles across the story, of course, and hopefully not an information dump- the author is skilled enough in the craft to accomplish e story involves Logan and his family falling to the mercy of a billionaire, so the opportunity for him to grow enough to place aside his deep-set rage and accept the offered support despite it coming from someone he despises seems a missed opportunity. I might have involved a slurry of mega-rich folks (that Mars colony will cost method more than a single billionaire could afford IMO) which would have only fueled Logan's dislike of the situation, then used Akron as the focus for Logan's ragey disdain. Then as the story unfolds and Logan realizes his only true hope lies with the literal haven built by the billionaires, he matures enough to place aside his rage and accept the support offered, even if said support is offered rather grudgingly through circumstances.When Logan is robbed by the gun-carrying punk early in the story simply because he drives a fancy car, Logan might see things from a fresh perspective- in this instance the gun-toting punk views Logan as someone rich who can afford to lose a wallet, phone, cards, etc. As Logan had just lost his job (another splash of fuel for his inner fire- how's he gonna maintain his lavish lifestyle?), he doesn't see himself as wealthy like that, but he does have to admit he's in better shape than the gun-toting punk robber. (I might have even created the guy that Kate was banging very rich as well, just to add even more fuel to the fire, and perhaps re-ignite the long-buried resentment in Logan that he has to overcome.) Richard's payout from Uncle Sam to his silence could also be used to stoke Logan's feelings on the matter. As I said, there were opportunities to make a flaw in Logan that he has to overcome in to save what's left of his family. That would have added a nice inner conflict to drive the story beneath the string of happenings that plays out here.Overall, if you're into end-of-the-world apocalypse-type stories, I consider this a quick, simple read with a nice dozens of troubles thrown along the hero's path to hold matters complicated. There's a few amazing twists thrown in regarding our extraterrestrial visitors to build on for the second story in the series- portends to be a wild free-for-all with a slew of non-human players. I just felt by this story's end the author didn't quite create this into something deeper, with more tension, than it might have had. All the ingredients were so, I did spot a little number of instances where the author missed a closing quote for dialogue. Mostly toward the final third of the book. I usually highlight those on my Kindle but for some reason, I did not. They are hard to search when missed, and despite an author's best efforts there are usually one or two little oopsies in publications like this. I just want I'da highlighted them on my Kindle so I could bring them to the author's attention. As an author myself, I know the value of having typos and such pointed out so they can be fixed.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    One of my favourite authors in a super bundle me of my reviews from books in this bundle:Into the Unknown: The second in the series of Scott’s stand-alone novels. Humanity’s quest for a tree of life is among the oldest of tales. What if life can be extended, but at the cost of sacrificing the lives of sentient beings? Highly imaginative and creative story telling. Fast-paced action that leaps across the galaxy to encounter alien worlds, and of course aliens with several interesting twists and turns in the plot line. Scott has excelled in this highly recommended zone opera, that borders on military gue Star - Frozen Earth: Jasper Scott does not disappoint. From his zone opera series of a distant future to a fresh SF story right here on earth just a few years away his imaginative writing always impresses. Follow two families through the months leading up to and into an apocalyptic type happening of a rogue star approaching earth. A survival story with a SF foundation and some wonderful twists opening the method for the next book in the series.

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    Aliens Robots and The Apocalypse (A Five Book Bundle) []  2020-1-28 0:17

    I am a really large fan Mr. Scott's books and have truly loved every one I have read. This review will be for 2 of the stories I have previously read:Under Darkness:What a amazing story! A Hawaiian resort island is ground zero for an alien attack! Very well told story and amazing characters. I so want this was a series instead of a standalone novel (hint tip to the author) but it's still a amazing read! This would actually create a amazing film or TV show! Hey producers...you really need to check this one out!In Time for Revenge:Great book. Definitely kept me wanting more after each chapter. Combination time travel and murder mystery novel set in the (mostly) near future. Loved this concept and hated to see it come to an end. I could seriously see some of the future here as coming true. Highly recommended read!I really hope that these reviews will support you decide to give his books a try. Like I said...I have loved every one I have read so far!

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    Facility 468: A Demon Apocalypse Short Story (Story 5 of the Apocalypse Collection) []  2020-1-25 6:15

    Interesting short read that is amazing for a momentary distraction though lacking in info or actual plot. I feel there were more to this but the author decided to simply end it.

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    The Russian Job: The Forgotten Story of How America Saved the Soviet Union from Ruin []  2019-12-20 18:40

    The author tells us on page 276 that "Since The Russian Job is aimed at a general audience, I have chosen not to contain notes to sources for quotes and specific facts."Trust him, I guess, to have the information correct and we do not need to check the original for ourselves. Strange method to write a history book, and unacceptable.

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    The Russian Job: The Forgotten Story of How America Saved the Soviet Union from Ruin []  2019-12-20 18:40

    Doug Smith has uncovered a remarkable piece of 'lost' history and made a genuinely compelling book. The intriguing info he contains suggest extensive primary-source research, and he weaves them together to make a gripping narrative. There's something for everyone in 'The Russian Job'- Tragedy, Drama, Heroes, and Villains. I got it three days ago and just finished it- without doubt the most interesting book I've read this year.

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    The Russian Job: The Forgotten Story of How America Saved the Soviet Union from Ruin []  2019-12-20 18:40

    While "enlightened" western reporters heaped on the praise that lives on to the show day (See Warren Beatty's Reds), the truth is that the amazing ole USSR was a basket of human misery where the best method out was to die of alcohol poisoning, which a lot of did. The stupid do-gooder USA actually swooped in and saved this mess when it was near collapse in 1921 and allowed it to endure for Stalin and his Non-Aggression Pact with Hitler that created WWII possible. Amazing going Hoover. Superior book that explains how the Deep State was alive then after WWI making things worse for democracy.

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    The Russian Job: The Forgotten Story of How America Saved the Soviet Union from Ruin []  2019-12-20 18:40

    Necessary part of history that should not be forgotten. Accurate and well written.

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    The Russian Job: The Forgotten Story of How America Saved the Soviet Union from Ruin []  2019-12-20 18:40

    Douglas Smith writes beautifully and engagingly. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in history. It is truly captivating.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    A amazing read on cold battle era submarine patrols. The author does a amazing job laying the groundwork for the book up front covering all the basics, then goes into a lot of detail on one patrol or mission. You need to hold in mind that subs operating in this timeframe were not sent out to shoot torpedoes and sink ships as in WWII, but to gather intelligence of all types. The author does a amazing job describing all of the Intel gathering that was done on this one mission, including try launches, Russian torpedo drills, Russian submarine surveillance, and more. I know a lot of the info from this time period is still classified, but it would have been nice to contain a second patrol. This is a amazing book to read after reading Blind Mans Bluff.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    My first impression... Is that this book is amazingly authentic: the author (or his advisor) seems to be a deep expert on this subject and its description of life aboard submarines is accurate and complete.He is keen on illustrating both technical matters and emotional situations using well written and knowledgeable to do this, he has to sacrifice the thrilling part. Sometimes there are a lot of interruptions to flow of the story, which are important for a better understanding but they endanger the thrilling.I would recommend this book only for submarine-stuff eagers. For these, the book is likely to be a well deserved 5 r people wishing for a fast to read book, it is a small boring.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    I thought this was a non-fiction book in the same vein of Blind Man's Bluff. It's actually historical fiction based on the author's research, I guess. It's not bad, just not what I thought It was getting.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    I got this because I love allegedly real spy stories[for in the spy android game truth lies in how we see it].First off this is an info rich story because the author has gone beyond due diligence and provide her readers w/all kinds of pertinent historical information. Just one example of the poison gas started in WW1/The inventors Lewis and Nieuwland believed in gas warfare. They thought the use of poison gas would create battles more humane by shortening them and avoiding the suffering of civilians. The author gives astounding info like when the Soviet Union began producing heavy quantities of material, eventually disposing of approximately twenty thousand dozens of it in the Artic Ocean during the late 1940s and '50s. Of course, we know BP Oil did that later of the coast of Louisiana in that not good 2010 using poison to clean-up that oil is book centers on technocrat Stanislav Shumovsky who led a party of 75 Soviet spies into the U.S. in 1931 to enroll in universities majoring in science and/or engineering. No doubt, this was and is common way being used even today. Also what was interesting was that the FBI didn't catch on for decades; just like in organized crime. in fact, the Soviet Union very survival depended upon these spies to use the manufacturing to secure a powerful industrialized battle footing during e author also uses her detailed research to draw significant hero descriptions that bring the players into sharper focus in both in their background, and in terms of their overall significance. The author shows that the Soviet Union spent significant sums of money, energy, and time in their spy t mentioned is that when the battle was over; the U.S. created a with the Nazis to hold the German spy apparatus in-place with Nazi General Reinhard Gehlen at the helm under U.S supervision & direction.A amazing book that reveals a relatively unknown Soviet spy operation.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    I recommend this book for anyone interested in industrial espionage as much as Cold Battle history, how the work was accomplished and for what results are presented in a attractive narrative by Lokhova, who also uses her language knowledge and access to the RGASPI and other archives to write a magisterial acc of the Russian technology position at infancy and its efforts to obtain to parity with its is historical narrative is one that briefly touches on the flashpoint technology problem in the Cold War, nuclear technology, but the main focus was on the USSR's efforts to go from nothing to aviation power over two decades. This quiet but important story underpins the extensive efforts of the USSR of realizing how desperate their technological gap was between its opponents and themselves, and that without technology transfer, both through assistance and espionage, the USSR would be doomed based on their experiences in WWI. This narrative delivers a very readable and plausible explanation for how this gap was ch of the respond lies in the biography of Stanislav Shumovsky, a loyal Soviet soldier with ties to aviation and engineering. As part of a mission to conduct widespread industrial espionage of major industries, Shumovsky was sent with a generation of Soviet students to various universities to learn and work with the emerging American technological superiority. Shumovsky had the excellent cover as he was actually who he claimed to be, a student who wanted to learn engineering in to work on planes. In this capacity, he managed to advance a lot of of the Soviet design bureaus understanding of aviation and engine manufacturing by decades, enabling them to produce viable planes to combat the Germans in WWII (and to combat non-Russian planes in the years afterward).Lokhova manages to document the work impressively in the endnotes without it interrupting the flow. I also appreciated some of the side adventures (the perfume) and some of the problems that Shumovsky and his colleagues faced from counterintelligence from the US, and trust problems with the USSR to the point that some of his most risky days were versus his own country. To spoil the ending though, Lokhova displays what looks like the only genuinely smiling picture (after several of him grimacing or frowning) as an old professor accomplished in his work.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    As a lot of reviewers have stated this is about the Cold Battle history of submarine data gathering both visual and electronic. Fact based with some liberties taken for conversational fluidity, it is a amazing and fast read. The fast is my major problem with this work. While the book lists as 330 pages, only about 2/3 are part of the direct story. The latest 1/3 is 3 Appendix that generally rehash 3 WW2 sub commander missions breifly discussed in the main text. There is also an extensive glossary, and a very extensive bibliography. A lot of this seems to be to fill out the length of the me of my other problems with the books is the disjointedness of some of the descriptions. For example, one sub commander's debrief says that he moved his submarine under a Russian surfaced submarine. No reasons was given until later in the book when it was noted that there was a desire to obtain photos of the hull of Russsian ships and submarines to understand the extent of their technology. So, while I was left wondering until late in the book why a sub captain would risk his crew, career, boat, and an international incident for something that seemed more like counting coup.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    Although there is a vast amount of info regarding the advanced possibilities of our maintaining our Navel Warfare Protection capabilities that I do not fully understand, after reading this book, I am much more comfortable regarding our continued existence. Unlike " The Hunt for Red October" which I vary much enjoyed, this book is based on fact, rather than fiction. As much as I enjoyed also factual book and movie. "U-571", "Stalking The Red Bear" is top Shelf in my library.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    I’m beautiful sure that most biographers of spies think their book should be titled “the spy who changed history”, but Lokhova actually justifies her ing archival info from the NKVD archives she came across in a previous history about Stalin’s Amazing Purge, she gives us the story of Stanislav Shumovsky the man who could be said to have created the Cold Battle Because Shumovsky was not only involved in stealing the secrets of America’s atom bomb but, perhaps more importantly, the means of delivering it – stolen American aviation technology that resulted in the Soviet Union’s Tu-4, its first strategic, transcontinental bomber that could nuke umovsky was the first of the USSR’s very useful scientist spies, agents who not only knew the usual tradecraft but who also had the scientific expertise to know what to seek out on their own initiative, how to chat up loose-lipped scientists and engineers who were satisfied to talk to a fellow colleague, and how to use the gained secrets to develop Soviet rn in 1902, Shumovksy was wounded three times in the Russian Civil Battle where he was an enthusiastic supporter of the Reds. In 1924, he finally got a possibility to realize an old dream of becoming a pilot though a crash permanently injured him so he had to give up flying.When Stalin’s Five-Year Plan for Soviet modernization was launched in 1928, Shumovsky was to benefit from its goal of educating, up to western standards, the country’s best and brightest. Shumovsky, already having served as an troops commander, financial investigator for military affair, and at posting to the electro-mining school for the Baltic fleet, was sent to study aeronautical engineering under Andrey Tupolov, the country’s foremast aircraft fore “Iron Felix” Dzerzhinsky died in 1926, he and Stalin had talked about the importance of scientific and technological espionage in developing the country’s self-sufficiency in weapon development and production. Paging through American Richard Wilmar Rowan’s Spy and Counterspy: The Development of Modern Espionage from 1929, Stalin was taken with how espionage could support the USSR update on the cheap. (Lokohva claims that Stalin learned how to run intelligence operations from this book which seems rather astonishing given his past as a revolutionary and political operator, but, evidently, we have Stalin’s copy of the book with his notes.)Stalin and the NKVD would simply send a bunch of Russians to study at America’s premier institute of aviation engineering, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. And, in 1931, that’s just what happened. Sixty-five Russians were enrolled there. Shumovsky was the leader of these spies, and none stayed in America as long as him. Shumovsky’s closest mate in the group was mechanical engineer Ivan Trashutin. “Ivan Diesel”, as the Germans grudgingly dubbed him, probably did the most of any of the group to victory Globe Battle Two for the Soviets since it was the engines he designed that powered Soviet e next three years were busy for Shumovsky. He didn’t just polish his English and his presentation to Americans and complete his master’s degree in aeronautical engineering. He created numerous contacts for the future, spotted agents for the NKVD to recruit, and hunted up technical papers in the MIT e 1930s were a amazing time to be a Soviet spy in America. The FBI was oblivious to industrial espionage, concentrating instead on the Communist Party of the USA. MIT was desperate for tuition given the declining enrollment in the Amazing Depression. There was a crisis of faith in capitalism so ideological recruitment of agents, always the NKVD’s preferred – and cheapest – way to obtain secrets. As a data point in the link between Jews and communist subversion, Lokhova notes that, while the majority of second-generation Jewish immigrants to America were not spies, “without them, Soviet espionage would not have been able to function in the US in the 1930s and 1940s.”American companies, particularly aviation companies, were desperate for cash. The American capitalists of the 1930s may not exactly been willing to the rope to hang themselves, but they did installment plans and options to set up rope-making factories and licensing of patents on fact, the Soviets were not just interested in technology. They wanted to learn and excellent the production techniques of the man they regarded as the greatest American, Henry e amount of technical aid American companies offered Russian in the 1930s and the number of technical professionals and general workers who willingly moved to Russia was a story known to me in general outlines, but this book fleshes out a lot of the umovksy, “a nice fellow to talk to”, didn’t create a secret of his activities. He chatted people up. He took films of production floors. When the Soviets set a record with a transpolar flight from Moscow to San Francisco in 1937, it was Shumovksy that publicized it. (He even got to meet Shirley Temple on the publicity tour as documented in one of the book’s a lot of photos.)In 1934, Gaik Ovakimian, dubbed the “wily Armenian” by the FBI, a doctor of chemical engineering, arrived in Fresh York Town to take over the NVKD’s network of legal agents in America as well as the illegals that Shumovsky had been running. Shumovsky became a legal agent operating in AMTORG, the trade organization that coordinated business between the US and USSR. He toured plants, research facilities, suppliers, and government facilities. Tupolev even came to America and joined him on some of these trips. They were openly expressing an interest in buying American technology. They stole far more than they bought, e path Shumovsky blazed was followed in 1938 by Semyon Semyonov, the man who would go on to run ENORMOZ, the operation that stole the secrets of the Manhattan Project. Semyonov ran at least twenty agents in America in that is industrial espionage did not go unnoticed. As early as 1934, people at Douglas factories were wary of Russians at their factories. A Vultee engineer at the company’s aircraft plant in Russia noted the presence of stolen American blueprints. George Keenan, then at diplomat in Moscow and future author of America’s containment policy versus the Soviets in the Cold War, urged that only obsolete technology be sold to the Russians. But Americans wanted and the only country, at that time, they regarded as a threat was ings did not always go well for Soviet intelligence in America during this period of time. America became more security conscious starting in 1938 as Nazi power and espionage in America increased. Some American communists were upset that the USSR had officially turned its back on globe revolution with its “socialism in one country” stance, and that affected recruitment. The split in communism between Stalin and Trotsky eventually caused enough chaos and suspicion that Shumovsky was recalled to Russia in 1939.When he returned in October 1941, after a harrowing trans-Atlantic crossing, he became involved in procuring weapons for the USSR. Naturally, that included access to a lot of defense secrets. He returned to the Soviet Union for amazing in 1943, and, by that time, the Americans were becoming concerned about Soviet espionage in their country though it wasn’t until the 1970s the CIA tumbled to the importance of universities in foreign powers obtaining critical e secrets Russian obtained weren’t just in the atomic bomb program and aviation. They included mass penicillin production, chemical warfare secrets, explosive production, movie technology, and, surprisingly, the secrets of perfume production in America.Lokhova does a lot of peregrinations in her story, usually starting out with a dramatic incident and then telling you how it came about. You could argue that it wasn’t Shumovsky that ran ENORMOZ, so he didn’t “change history” the method she says. But I think her point is well taken that Shumovsky’s brilliance and success paved the method for Semyonov.A lot of this book doesn’t directly involve Shumovsky but others. Two are Rae Bennet and Gertrude Klivans, two American women from Russian-Jewish families who were instrumental in getting NKVD recruits up to snuff in their language skills and cultural presentations for work in America. We hear a lot about Bennet especially. Lokhova tries to create us feel sorry for her, but it’s hard. Bennet seems a woman unrealistically obsessed with earthly justice who flew too close to the sun in her utopian beliefs and crashed to earth to land in an unmarked grave in the Amazing Purge. Allegedly, she was involved in a Trotskyite plot to assassinate Stalin.And, while I appreciate Lokhova’s presentation of her story in terms of Soviet patriotism and the country’s attempt to update itself, I’m not going to excuse Stalin’s actions as purely defensive and done to insure Russia suffered no more humiliations, not given Soviet attempts to take over parts of Europe immediately after Globe Battle is book could have used another pass by the editor. There are repetitions. Bennett’s story is partially recounted in both the preface and main text. News of how long the find for the survivors of a failed Soviet transpolar flight is not in the main chapter on “Stalin’s Falcons”. There are non-sequiters in a couple of places. While Lokhova avoids each chapter being a monograph of its own like some books from academic presses, she should have worked to show her tail more chronologically. Finally, while this book has an extensive index, there are no separate listings for CODENAMES.With those reservations, it still is a worthwhile for its look at Soviet industrial espionage in the 1930s and 1940s.And if all this looting of defense technology by a potential future adversary sounds familiar, why, yes, Lokhova does mention, in the preface, current Chinese activities in America.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    I am fascinated with Scientific Intelligence including Enigma and Colossus (code making and breaking), the Tizard Mission and the Cavity Magnetron for Radar and wartime engineering efforts. Svetlana Lokhova, a Cambridge educated historian of Russian descent has prepared an exciting and deeply researched history of Soviet efforts to copy the B-29 Superfortress Bomber and duplicate its features in the Tupolev nuclear capable bomber of the early cold is book is extremely well researched in Soviet Intelligence Archives and MIT's and the FBI historical collections. It contains well crafted biography, history and a smattering of technology and is a fascinating read.Lokhova has also been in the news herself, accused as a Russian influencer of General Michael Flynn and subsequently counter-suing for defamation in US courts, adding an extra point of interest to this extremely well researched history.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    Svetlana Lokhova, scholar at Churchill College, Cambridge, intended this massively researched history of Soviet espionage in the thirties and forties to be more than just another expose of Western traitors. Lokhova uses the Venona intercepts, but with restraint. She makes a point of using Russian-language sources as is book is full of stories of Russians and Americans who saw their actions in the service of Soviet Military Intelligence as saving the lives of millions who would otherwise have died at the hands of the of the main characters is Stanislav Shumovsky, who earned a degree from MIT and also organized an intelligence network in the United States.Another fascinating story is what happened to Raisa (Ray) Bennett, who became the frist American who worked as a Soviet intelligence officer. She disappeared in the Stalinist Terror.Spies transmitted atomic secrets to the Soviets and also contributed to the development to the Tu-4 strategic bomber. I first thought the title of the book, The Spy Who Changed History, might be an exaggeration, but Svetlana Lokhova convincingly argues the importance of Stanislav Shumovsky to the defense of the Soviet Union.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    Never having read a Russian novel, I really have no basis for comparison, but in my perception the documentary history “The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America’s Top Secrets” by Svetlana Loknova is as involved, convoluted, and replete with multiple characters as can be expected of an author from that e narrative begins in the fraught years between the two Globe Battles and following the Russian Revolution. The nascent Soviet Union is struggling with the aftermath but anticipating the challenges to come. Hopelessly behind in technology and economically struggling, Moscow takes advantage of the fact that American universities, most specifically MIT, are also caught in Depression-era money flow problems, and willing to accept foreign students without asking too a lot of questions. The titular “spy who changed history” is Stanislav Shumovsky, a decorated character from the Red Troops following the Revolution. His unique zone of expertise created him a “natural” for admission to the MIT aeronautical engineering program, and his skill at maintaining a low profile and excelling in the academic work provided the excellent cover for clandestine is book is fascinating, thorough and extremely eye-opening. Author Loknova has definitely accomplished a documentary tour de force, especially given the obvious challenges of obtaining source material.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    I also served on a 637 class attack submarine and agree with most of the sentiments of the prior reviews. I did search the book fun to read and very informative. It made a amazing source of memories for something I experienced almost 40 years ago as a junior nuclear trained officer. I feel that the author did a amazing job of surmising what was event on the Russian side of the equation. This was something we did almost daily while on patrol. I am giving this book to my mates who really wish to know what we did back in the day . As the former CO said, it wasn't flashy but it was an interesting job. I am very satisfied that I purchased this book. The author did a nice job.

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    Not a amazing book,but one that will hold your interest. I am no Navy man, but it seems like to me that there is a need for the a navy to problem wheel barrows so that these squads have an easier time carrying their brass male parts around- appoint well created by the book- A amazing read for a rainy afternoon......

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    Engrossing and thorough acc of life on a submarine, the training submariners must undergo at all levels of the hierarchy on the ship, the importance of submarines to our military and political successes, and fascinating accounts of how submarines gather intelligence and how that intelligence is used to protect US interests. Well-written, fact-filled, and full of respect for submariners. One of the best books I've read this year. Highly recommended.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    A By-Fellow of Churchill College, University of Cambridge, and recently a Fellow in the Cambridge Security Initiative, which is jointly chaired by the former head of MI6 and her former advisor, who is the official historian of MI5, independent scholar Lokhova has formidable credentials for the writing of this fascinating acc of Soviet Russia’s first espionage incursions into the United starts in 1931, with the arrival of picked delegation of Russian students, engineers and scientists, to study at MIT and other universities. All are covert agents, sent to the States to pick up info in a host of technical field and support Russia overcome its deficiency in the design and manufacture of airplanes and other weapons of modern mass war. One of the excellences of Lokhova’s account, which draws on formerly unavailable Soviet sources, is that, a Russian herself, she understands, even sympathizes, with Russia’s need for this information. As the Thirties ramped up, Stalin rightly feared attack on both edges of his sprawling empire: from Germany into the Ukraine in the West, Japan in the Far East. A country that had difficulty producing even predictably workable and vastly outdated wooden biplanes, the USSR had to update quickly, both its production methods and what it produced, to confront formidable e respond was the US, in the Thirties a country and people who small attention to the chance of theft of technical secrets. Soviet Russia was seen as a client more than a rival, and in the pacifist atmosphere of the time, the of planes and airplane parts to the USSR enabled American aircraft manufacturers to stay afloat. The same was real of the universities, particularly the young, struggling to stay afloat MIT, which welcomed the foreign students’ tuition and l this began to change with the pact between Germany and the USSR in 1939, and even more in 1941, when the attack on Pearl Harbor and the US entry into battle led to greatly expanded anti-espionage activities in the States. Even then, though, Russian agents continued to have notable successes. Most notably the stealing of info about the large B29 Super Fortress bombers at the end of the war. (The U SSR didn’t just need info about the A-bomb. They required planes to deliver it in if ever it was needed.)The dominant figure in this activity, the best spy the Russians had for the theft of industrial secrets, was MIT-trained Stan Shumovsky, who ended a long and productive life as a Russian hero, and died e wealth and depth of detail in this acc and Lokhova’s understanding of it in all its complexities more than makes up for occasional deficiencies in narrative style. This is a very good, very interesting book, a model for the writing of espionage history.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    "The Spy Who Changed History" was Stanislav Shumovsky, and the author, Svetlana Lokhova tells his story well. Shumovsky is not a traitor, but a loyal Soviet citizen spying on U.S. academia and industry in the 1930s and 1940s, to support Moscow overcome the Soviet Unions glaring inadequacies in all matters technical.What I liked the most is that a Russian, who has openly declared her sympathies for Moscow is laying out in detail a history of Moscow's infiltration of American academia and industry, using American communists and Russian immigrants. Hard to say this is paranoia when someone sympathetic to the perpetrators is providing a thoroughly cited history of Moscow's acts of intellectual property theft, and recruiting Americans to betray their e traitors cataloged would be the U.S. citizens that aided Shumovsky in his wide spread and successful theft of American innovation and proprietary knowledge.Overall, an enjoyable book, once the reader has slogged through the tedious, and intellectually dishonest descriptions of the Soviet Union and the Russian leadership. Romanticizing Stalin, the NKVD (predecessor to the KGB), and political commissars is inexcusable. Asserting that the mission of the Soviet espionage apparatus in the United States was " not to undermine the [U.S.] system of government" is grossly misleading, in an era when the Soviets had explicitly stated that global communism was a goal. Ironically, the author observes that even the loyal spies sent to the U.S. had problem reconciled the propaganda place out by the Kremlin with the observed reality, even as she propagates contemporary themes.While thoroughly cited, given the method the author has been so cavalier with truth, I would check basic sources before citing her e theme that struck me was how the author would praise Russian greatness at length while making it perfectly clear that the motive for the wholesale theft of American intellectual property was Russian inadequacy. Again and again, she would come back to how Russia was incapable of producing airworthy planes or developing the native talent to build their industrial base. So steal it.I search tremendous irony in the author so obviously sugar coating Stalin's Soviet Union and the Kremlin's heavy espionage campaigns versus the U.S. as she is fighting accusations of being an agent of Russian influence. "The lady doth protest too much, methinks".E. M. Van CourtPost script: Lokhova mentions that Stalin studied a book on espionage (written by an American, of course) extensively, and that it shaped his views and approaches to intelligence, counter-intelligence, censorship, and propaganda. Having read Rowan's Spy and Counter-Spy, this claim is plausible, and Rowan's book sheds light on intelligence operations and practices from the late nineteenth century through Globe Battle I and into the period just after the Amazing War.E.M.V.C.

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    the parallels between this historical research and today's environment is disturbing - actors have changed, but even more disturbing is the help in high levels of government for totalitarian states aimed at taking over our country and method of life...the same venues used in the past are now are used over and over again today: collegiate, research, academia, and purported 'elite' institutions such as Harvard, MIT, and Stanford being used as incubators for foreign sleeper agents, enabling them to steal American technology and research with the aim of destroying our country...it is very sad that more folks don't and read this book - it should be included in the curriculum of our colleges across the country...i recommend any history buff read this book and validate the references - they are a lot of and varied...the author has done a lot of work in this product and it shows... it is a bit plodding, but the facts are there for all to see...

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    Having served on both Permit (Thresher) class and Sturgeon class boats, this sure brought back my West-Pac memories! The areas are various (Atlantic versus Pacific) but the story is so identical. My patrol was 81 days out of Pearl and we did obtain periscope liberty to look at Russia. Peter Sasgen did an perfect job of telling the story of life on patrol. Sturgeon class boats are still some of the finest boats the US has ever placed in service. This book will truly give the reader a very accurate view of life on the boat. Being enlisted, I did not have it as amazing as the officers and CO but we also had a unbelievable skipper and he demanded the highest level of performance from all of us. If you are curious about submarines and their roll in our national defense, do yourself a favor and read Stalking the Red Bear!

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    Stalking the Red Bear: The True Story of a U.S. Cold War Submarine's Covert Operations Against the Soviet Union []  2019-12-24 19:34

    Being a "Cold War", boat sailor myself I found it very accurate with security bounds. Vividly illustrates the stress we operated under. Although as a "Nuke", I do take exception to the accidental "scramming", of the reactor. On the boats I served on, a total of five that never happened once!

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    The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Stole America's Top Secrets []  2020-2-6 19:26

    The Spy Who Changed History focuses on Stanislov Shumovsky (Stan) who went by the code name BLERIOT during his time in the United States. Stan was part of a cadre of Soviet Spies who came to the United States to study at top institutions for the purposes of stealing scientific secrets in the 1930’s before the Cold Battle was even thought of. His work would lead to the development of a lot of Soviet airplanes and set the scene for gathering the secrets for the Atom Bomb. Of the a lot of spies sent by the soviets Stan would prove to be the most effective with sources all over the United States. The book focuses on more than just Stan but also those who came over and were around him giving a through look at the efforts of Soviet Intelligence in its early days where there were as a lot of missteps as successes. It is a sharp contrast to the spies read about during the Cold Battle era and presents a amazing look at the Soviet government during the early days of intelligence gathering. For those interested in Russian history of the Soviet era this is a amazing addition to the historiography.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    Was not familiar with this author but love post apocalyptic fiction and very glad I read this book. Amazing book and hope to see more in the series.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    Amazing story line, amazing supporting and believable characters. I enjoyed the Method the author takes the reader through the development of each character, and then builds the story around them. Looking forward to the next book in the series.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    Very Interesting. Really amazing storyline. CjW�acters are well developed. Looking forward to the n��t book. Can hardly wait for the various groups to meet.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    One fine read. Spoiler is one starts with Dr. Janine Folkman and fellow Dr. Seth Maygood. They aren't medical Doctors. They are virologists working with others. Dodson Kerry is from Berkeley. He's a guy neither Janine or Seth like at all. He's the guy that will release the disease that wipes out 90% of the worlds population. He doesn't do it knowingly. He steps on something in the lab, walks out and that what starts the e President of the US is dying and he knows it. Colonel Skirjanek is at McMurdo with a joint Aussie, British group. So far they are virus free. The temperatures where they are will save them.Jason Larson is and ex Troops Ranger who now works as a contractor. His wife Samantha, known as Sam, is three months pregnant with their first child. Watching the news and the Presidents address they both know only the immune will survive. Jason survives, Sam and the unborn kid do not. Before she dies she makes Jason promise that if he doesn't obtain sick, he will do his best to stay alive.Once Sam is dead and he buries her and his unborn kid he then calls the family to search out that most of them are already dead and those he talks to are dying. Because his wife was a very successful doctor his house was in an expensive part of town. McMansions were all over. One of his neighbors Howard Dagman was a prepper. He like Jason was ex military. Jason heads for his house. On the method he hears gun shots. Jason knows anyone alive will turn into a looter or worse. Vehicles have been left all over the road. All out of gas. Jason wonders where these folks thought they would go to outrun a virus. Jason also finds a woman who has been shot. She tells him Tyson's people did it. They are a gang and are located at the FEMA center at the Ritz hotel. Amazing information for Jason but once the woman passes he heads for Dagmar's house.Jason's Ranger training kicks in huge time. He goes the back method and takes a long hard look before he approaches the house. Tyson's people might be around and Jason doesn't really wish to run into them right now. There is no power and Dagman's house is dark. Loki Dagman's black lab approaches and Jason quickly renews his friendship with the dog. He heads in to see bags of dogfood ripped begin so Loki has food. Jason follows Loki out back to see a grave. Howards grave. There is also an begin grave next to it. On returning to the house he finds Debbie dead in her bed. She left a note with the combination to getting into the locked rooms. Dagmans garage has two BMW's, a coupe, an SUV and Howard restored 1970's Land Cruiser. The has everything one could need. Two huge rows of solar panels are on the roof so he will have power. He then checks out the basement. He uses the numbers Debbie left. Opens the door, turns on the light to search a veritable armory. Every gun Jason could photo was in that armory. A generator was there also but would only kick in if the solar electricity was lower that 30%. Jason will be staying right here. This house is a veritable gold mine of food, water, guns and has watched his family die. His Dad went to work and Pro knows he won't be coming back. He's eaten everything in the house he can search and knows he will need to go to neighbors houses for food. Finding meal won't be a problem, but staying out of sight might be. Pro is fourteen years old and knows everyone is dead. Pro will survive all right. He's smart, savvy and quick as hell when he needs to be. The Tyson bunch do search him but he's saved by a guy dressed in black. A guy with NVG's and guns. A guy named begins one damned fine is one has Jason, Pro, Loki, Sheriff Bauman who thinks he runs the gang, Sleepy his second who is one intelligent guy, a guy who wants to obtain he and his girlfriend Michelle out of the Ritz, the Tyson' gang who bring people in, most are slaves, some become guards, a Pro who is captured and escapes, he learns much about the gang, he also know Sleepy and his girlfriend can be trusted, a Sleepy who works out a long range mission to end the gang, a Jason a man the gang called Ninja, who provides the muscle, weapons and know how, Rachel and Elsa a woman and young girl Jason saved and Jason Larson, Sleepy and Pro doing their best to save the amazing guys, slay the poor guys and test to survive and stay ve Stars and then some. Waiting for number two.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    The premise of a major die off of the human reface due to a Black Death or Spanish Flu like virus is more likely than the current other alternatives, in my humble opinion. The author draws on a canvas empty of most of the show population to represent realistic reactions of those left behind. The author takes true globe experience of Third Globe warlords to present what could happen to parts of the remnants of society. Well done, Mr. Anderson! Now, write faster, faster!

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    The story line and characters were great! I've read ~50 post apocalyptic novels and this is one of my favorites! The characters were very human and believable, plus you end up caring for or hating these people. Can't wait for the second book! I just hope the second book is ACTUALLY proof read before it is published!

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Can't wait for Book 2. One of the best post apocalyptic novels that I have read.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    An ebola variant gets lose and kills over 90% of the worlds population in a few weeks. Jason Larson is an ex troops ranger and though still grieving the loss of his wife and unborn baby. It falls to Jason to rally whoever else he can to hold what is left of humanity from plunging into a full blown dark age.

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    The hits come quick and furious in this one. The story feels like a combination of all the post-apocalypse books that I've read: ex-soldier - check, poor people doing poor things WROL - check, and yet, it never comes across as formulaic. Glad I stumbled across it and looking forward to the next installment.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    A amazing fun book about zombies and teenagers and singing! Written by the producer of Outlander tv present and a Seattle geek. It is a novelization of a British movie. The humor reminds me vaguely of Libby Bray who I also love.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Anna and the Apocalypse is a tween and YA book featuring high schools mates on their method to graduation and fresh adventures when their city is overtaken by zombies. They're trying to take down these creatures, search their mates and parents, while taking on a very irritating, obnoxious high school assistant principal. A fun read!!

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    Brand spanking fresh and fast delivery :-)

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    Without repeating the material from the players guide, "Bastet" brought together an entire race of werecreatures who's, in my opinion, society and class even surpasses that of the mokole`! (and garou for that matter..) My players enjoyed the ability to play special characters, because of our little groups, and for me, not having to orgnize too a lot of NPC's. Tha ajaba(hyena) were a really cool idea, too. Its a shame they turned to Cahlash. Well, me and my ST group(and LARP group) Give bastet a huge thumbs up! Definatly a must-have for any real werewolf: the apocolypse ST or player!

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    End of Summer: A post viral-apocalypse story: Book One of the Seasons of Man []  2020-1-8 18:52

    You can thank that jerk, Max Dodson-Kerry, for the apocalypse. At the Virologic Research Center nestled 150 feet below the surface somewhere in rural Maryland, he's the idiot scientist who pooh-poohed safety protocols. His carelessness brought about what became known as the Chesapeake Flu, of which reported cases originated at the Maryland or Delaware beaches. Not that you required to know that, sorry. Max Dodson-Kerry was soon never heard from again.End of Summer is the ho-hum title of S.M. Anderson's absorbing doomsday series, "Seasons of Man." This one is a viral apocalypse as the Chesapeake Flu would end up killing 97% of the global population. The author spends the opening chapters chronicling the method the globe ends, but finally settles the "camera" firmly on our main ybe some plot e hombre's name is Jason Larsen, former Troops Ranger who nowadays works as a government contractor for the DoD. At their home in Fairfax County, Virginia, he'd just buried his wife, Samantha, who was due for her three-month prenatal check but succumbed to the poor flu bug going around. Before passing, Samantha had created Jason promise that he'd test to wake up each morning. She must've suspected Jason was this close to ending himself.I dunno if S.M. Anderson had published other yarns, but I aim to research that because I need to read more of this man's work. S.M. Anderson knows how to spin a yarn to hold you on the edge of the seat and miss out on things like family time and going to the ould the apocalypse go down, you should be so lucky as to have a serious prepper living four houses down. It's what ends up giving Jason his edge when he... wait, let's place a pin on of the characters we follow is a shrewd 15-year-old named Prudencio Guerra - but call him "Pro." Months after society collapsed, Pro's knack for survival has kept him still kicking around. He's the sort of savvy guy who's figured some things out. He even ends up schooling those older and more seasoned than him. For example, he imparts a fast lesson on how to tell at a glance if a house may have guns inside, pointing out the relevance of an NRA bumper sticker on a vehicle in the driveway. He reasons, "I think some guys with trucks just have the stickers. But if their wives have the sticker, they really have guns."It's a cardinal rule when writing a post-apocalyptic survival story that it must, at some point, present man's basest qualities. Not everyone's gonna do the right thing. The baddies come in the shape of a vicious gang that's taken over the local mall and the nearby Ritz Hotel and is ruled by a paranoid warlord who used to be a lawman. It's a gang that numbers in the hundreds except most of that are prisoners that they force to do all the hard labor. Months into the apocalypse, the gang rules their roost, their little corner of northern Virginia. Mostly. Even vicious gangs can have a bogeyman.Who is it that's going around taking them out one by one? Whoever it is, it's driving the already paranoid bossman batty.I had never heard of S.M. Anderson before this book. But I've heard of him now, and, as I'd mentioned before, I aim to hunt down his other novels. I am so stoked for this series. The author captivates you with the hero building and with the dynamite action beats. I got so invested in Jason, Pro, Rachel, Elsa, Sleepy, and Michelle, and even in that eager one-year-old black lab Loki. As [email protected]#$% as Jason is, I think my favorites were Pro and Rachel. I recommend the hell out of this book. It's part prepper novel, part white-knuckle thriller, and all-parts unbelievable hero study. I will say the proofreading wasn't foolproof. Elsa was described twice as an eleven-year-old and once as a twelve-year-old. We obtain sentences like "He taken the child around the neighborhood a couple of times..." and "Pro was seated next her in a swivel office chair..." But the story's so good, it reduces the typos to no botheration at all.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Love this movie! My 12 year old daughter and I have watched it over and over. There are some jump scares, some comedy and fun songs! I definitely recommend watching it!!Update: I thought I was reviewing the film since I also bought a ritual copy of the film though prime video. My daughter has not read the book yet, so I can only review the movie.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Bought this for my granddaughter and she loved it! It’s been passed around to her mates and they enjoyed it as well! As far as I know it’s still making its rounds! Will have to my own I guess, for me to read it!

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    If you saw the film then there's no need to read this book. It is exactly the film but without the fun melody and dancing.

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    Perfect book and addition to any White Wolf library

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    Rock!!!The Bastets are the most interesting bete ever. If your tired of pysco werewolfs tearing items up and the drop of a dime then play a baset. This book includes vital info on them and more spiffy stuff. (By the method the yava is totaly optional it says that they are rumors not nececarilaly the truth!)

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    My 12 turning 13 year old daughter and I have been reading Anna together. Not only is it fun, it’s a amazing jumping off point for conversation. Curl up with your tween (when she’s not too prickly wink wink) and enjoy.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I really enjoyed this book because it kept you wondering what was gonna happen next and the ending was a huge surprise.

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    it is amazing am enjoying it

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    I've played kahn and bagheera out of this supplement.

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    Well written book. Gets 5 stars for the amount of info presented. Some of the artwork is less than stellar and there are some typos sprinkled throughout, but nothing that detracts from the overall product. The short story in-character segments are great, and give a amazing appreciation for the Bastet tribes of the Globe of Darkness. Nine tribes are presented, and they cover most of the world. Africa and South America are the main focus of the book geographically, with Asia getting a lot of the rest, Europe and North America obtain some honorable mentions though.Each tribe gets it's own chapter, which goes into detail about the tribe's culture, background and gifts. The Simba (werelions) obtain the *ahem* lion's share of the book, as their battle with the Ajaba, (werehyenas) is described in amazing is book was written for second edition WTA rules, and has a late '90's perspective, and some of the material was updated in later books; namely the revised editions Player's Tutorial to the Changing Breeds. However, it is still an entertaining read, and a worthy addition to any WoD gamer's bookshelf.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I enjoyed this! Bit of a Shaun of the Dead vibe, but completely various protagonists - these were smart, resourceful high schoolers fighting their method through to obtain to their parents. Worth a fast read!

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    I love this.

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    the bastet are solitary monsters who only join together for a moot, it is this you roleplay. perfect for 1 day gaming.

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    Bastet (Werewolf: The Apocalypse) []  2020-1-30 23:23

    Bastet is an expansion of Werewolf the apocalypse. This book includes everything you need to play a were-cat and were-hyena. The werecats include: Jaguars, leapords, lions, tigers, cheetahs, lynx, puma, egyptian cats, and faerie cats. This book includes Much more on the cats than the player's tutorial does, however, there is still no info on any other kind of cat... like ANY of the small cats. Oh well... This book is still amazing and does include fresh fetishes, rites, and totems (called jamak) that are special to the werecats.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I am far from a young adult but we never outgrow our teenage angst and desire to save the world. I loved this book. Anna and The Apocalypse is quite a wild ride filled with familiar family and mate challenges and yes lots of zombies. Prepare to laugh out loud and cheer for some crazy zombie killing heroes.

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    Anna and the Apocalypse []  2020-1-14 19:33

    [email protected]#$% female lead hero meets funny zomedy = new take on the zombie genre! Some fun surprises and things I didn't see coming.

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    End of Days: The True Story That the Establishment Does Not Want You to Discover: Apocalypse, Book 1 []  2020-2-4 23:5

    The 1 star review about things being the same for 2000 years motivated me to by this book. I THANK YOU! The 1 star review was prophecy fulfilled in true time. As I read the book I found a quote from the Bible written about 2000 years ago that said, 2 Peter 3:3-6 - "knowing this first: that scoffers will come in the latest days, walking according to their own lusts, and saying, “Where is the promise of His coming? For since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of creation.” WOW! The Truth Will Set you Free! Amazing book. Read it while there is still time. THANKS AGAIN 1 STAR REVIEW.

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    End of Days: The True Story That the Establishment Does Not Want You to Discover: Apocalypse, Book 1 []  2020-2-4 23:5

    Unbelievable Series. Love it. Thanks

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    End of Days: The True Story That the Establishment Does Not Want You to Discover: Apocalypse, Book 1 []  2020-2-4 23:5

    Yawn. A protestant again predicting the end of the world. How trite and repetitive. Ever message how the end of the globe has been predicted - with dates and time - for the past 2000 years of Christianity and yet, it's still not happened? In another year, this book will join the others in the dustbin of unfulfilled prophecy, but not before the author manages to create a few bucks off of suckers.

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    End of Days: The True Story That the Establishment Does Not Want You to Discover: Apocalypse, Book 1 []  2020-2-4 23:5

    Well written, biblical, relevant, urgent. He who has ears allow him hear. It is not too late to prepare and be ready as the end of days are upon us.

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    short story's sett in Tao Wong's world

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    This was so much fun to read various perspectives in the SA universe. Definitely worth picking it up. I hope Tao can do more of these

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    A minor quibble occurs with Alzheimer's when various writers use it in short stories and it is inconsistent. Still, I enjoyed them all. Looks like a little bridge to the next book.

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    This book shows that someone with some talent and imagination can really have some fun with the globe Tao Wong has created. I hope this opens up some doors for fresh characters to be written in this universe. I would also like to see the characters here expanded upon.

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    Love this series and this book was flat out awesome. A lot of special globe building stories that all kept the feel and tone of the world. Each of the stories was well written and engaging. Several would be a amazing series of their own. Congrats to all the authors.

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    When I started this book I had no idea what to expect with all the various authors in it. I thought how could so a lot of authors with so a lot of various chapters create a amazing book. But I was very pleasantly surprised. This book has something for everybody in it. If you like this genre you’re going to love this book if you like questing, fighting, drama, intrigue in this book is for you. It’s a true page turner. There’s one chapter that I really loved about a dog I won’t go into it but it was a true page turner. I have to say this short story phoenix rising I did not wish it to end. I hope the author will continue to write and continue that story

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    Anthologies can be dangerous, especially if they contain previously unknown authors. This one, proves to be a amazing e various perspectives and writing styles of the multiple authors are blended well by the interludes which was a clever method to connect them all together.

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    I really enjoyed these short stories and am looking forward to reading more of Earth’s change and the struggle to survive this fresh apocalypse. Some of the characters classes and powers were amazing and completely unexpected! Really have fun the method the system has opportunities for those with pre system illnesses or injuries.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    It seems to me that Robert Ludlum who, during the 70's and 80's could do absolutely NO wrong when it came to writing the best spy novels EVER, is still living IN the 70's...as far as writing goes. Let's face it, NONE of Ludlum's novels are gonna victory any awards based on the dialogue of his characters...b-u-u-u-t if you are searching for the guy who could propel a novel based upon sheer narrative talent alone, Ludlum would victory hands I read 'The Apocalypse Watch' I kept getting the distinct impression--at first--that this was a direct sequel to the unbelievable 'Holcroft Covenant'...but that isn't quite the case. Then after reading a bit further, I felt that this was a quasi-re-write of 'Covenant' instead...but again, that isn't quite the case, either. As far as plot goes, it wasn't exactly Ludlum's most original, but I have to say, it certainly moved with the usual pace of his average thrillers. As I read this book, I felt somewhat saddened that truly one of the amazing Adventure/Thriller authors of all-time had begun to reach that point where his edge, his ability to be new has started to come to an end. What seems to have started with 'The Scorpio Illusion' has now continued with 'The Apocalypse Watch' and although I have high hopes for his future novels, it DOES appear that the 'absolute master of the superthriller' has seen the decline of his ability to dominate the audience he himself helped to create. But even so, I still enjoyed this book more than a LOT of other novels released in the past 5 years or so that were hailed as genius literary works of art. In my opinion, Ludlum just cannot escape his earlier novels, and his faithful reading audience has a very difficult time indeed reading his books without comparing them to his other tremendously entertaining novels. If we could do that, his novels (including his more latest ones) would stand up rather well.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    OK, the issue with this book is it's based on a Nazi resurgence, threatening world-peace. Most of us think of Nazis as little white trash groups that the Southern Poverty Law Center keeps close track of. In this novel it's twenty or thirty thousand well-trained, high-placed people that are funded by millions and millions of dollars. So you have to suspend your disbelief. I did, and really enjoyed this thriller.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I loved the LGBTQIA representation in this book, as well as the diversity. It is a very special YA novel. I didn't have fun how long it was and it was also very repetitive.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I loved this book, it was original, thoughtful and beautifully written. I think you should give it a try.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I gave this book 3.5 Stars but rounded down because it was closer to a 3 than a is really hard for me to rate this book appropriately. I am beautiful sure I highlighted more passages in this book than I have ever highlighted before. There were some amazing things in this book and some super relatable moments but as an overall I found it to be to easily summed up in a method that just...didn't feel right. I will admit that I did not see the end coming...but that may be due to the fact that it was just a disappointing wrap up to an interesting story idea. This particular passage really spoke to me:"You’re a story. I’m a story. There are 7.5 billion stories on the planet. Two hundred and fifty fresh stories start each minute, and 105 stories ’s simple to let the globe to collapse down to our own stories. To see ourselves as the central figure in the only story worth knowing and forget that every person we encounter is living their own, is the center of their own universe. But that’s the nature of the human experience."There is so much about this that I can deeply relate to and I think that we all could benefit from reflecting on this idea and remembering it often. As an overall, I didn't hate this book and actually REALLY enjoyed most of it. I just found it to be disappointing and wrapped up in a method that was...lame. 

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

    I loved these short stories and views into the globe of the system apocalypse. As a teaser, my favorite is one with an unlikely protagonist who is a amazing companion. I look forward to seeing if there are continued stories of any of the characters introduced - but overall they are amazing one shots giving depth and heart to the other people during the first year of surviving the system it if you like the setting, the anthology is a fun read.

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    The System Apocalypse Short Story Anthology Volume 1: A LitRPG post-apocalyptic fantasy and science fiction anthology []  2020-1-8 18:49

     Anthologies are always a mixed bag. You may love some of the short stories but hate others. They’re a amazing possibility to see fresh works from authors though. I have fun them because they have the potential to be delightful small story nuggets. This is definitely one of the best LitRPG short story collections I’ve read.Overall Score: 7.7 out of 10Intermissions 1-7These small intermissions take put between each short story and I thought they were an interesting method to spread a short story through the anthology. Each intermission acknowledges the short stories around it, creating a cohesion to the anthology. Very nicely e: 7.6 out of 10Hunting Creatures by Craig HamiltonThe best story in the anthology for me. It’s a amazing story about a bounty hunter that survives the System Apocalypse and is on the trail of a System powered serial killer. It’s one of the few stories I’ve read that combines the detective genre with LitRPG e: 8 out of 10Tooth and Claw by Alexis KeaneThis is an interesting story about a dog who gets system powers and tries to search his human. The story is a bit longer than it needs to be, but nice action, and it's a dogs POV all the method e:7.4 out of 10Debts and Dances by Tao WongA short story about Lord Roxley a day before the system is established on earth. Dances and dangers abound as he makes plans to stake a claim on earth. The story has a familiar hero that it was nice to learn more about. It ties perfectly with the main series without spoiling e: 7.6 out of 10Rebellion Within by IX PhoenIt was interesting to have a non-binary main hero and a story that dealt with the predujeces of the community and those seeking to take advantage of him. I thought it was most interesting when it stuck to that plot. It felt the most genuine then. However, much of the story meanders away from that. For a short story, it's a bit too slice of e: 6 out of 10Overture to Oblivion by L.A. BattThis short story was really amazing stuff. It’s about the System Apocalypse in Fresh Zealand from a Māori perspective. Amazing cultural development, clear and concise background stories, special classes and powers, and amazing action. I enjoyed it a e: 7.8 out of 10Phoenix Rising by R.K. BilliauThis was a mixed one for me. The story is about the begin of the System Apocalypse for a middle aged man with dementia. He gets bound to a phoenix who gives him a class that lets him be reborn. So if he's about to die he can instead be reborn with the ability using his memory to form a fresh body. It ends up tuning the MC into teen and younger ver of himself with small connection to his later life. It was a neat premise but got a small annoying since I had to obtain to know the MC again and again as he relearned about the system and what happened to his family. The action was ok, but it also wasn't the focus of the story. Still, it was an entertaining e: 7.1 out of 10

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Okay so for those not familiar with Ludlum: decent narration, smart international thrillers. He seems to do his research (foreign languages, government agencies etc.). But usually his plots cohere better; this one did not. And as the review from Amazon said, there is a seemingly endless series of assassination attempts. I mean, all his plots are ridiculous...but this one seems to take the cake. My favorite of his novels is The Icarus Agenda. That is a beautiful clean narrative. The Bourne Identity and The Matarese Circle in particular are probably his best. If you are a fan of Ludlulm by all means read this. But if you are fresh to him like I said please read Matarese Circle or the Bourne series first.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I read about this book and I wasn't sure what I was getting myself into. I thought I'd like this book maybe give it a 3.4 star rating and then move on with my life. However once I picked this book up AHHHHHH I DEVOURED IT. So this book is about Elena Mendoza a girl born of a virgin mother and working at a Starbucks. Shes an outcast because of the fact that she was born of a virgin and is constantly taunted because of it. Her life completely alters when on that same day at Starbucks a boy who she doesn't know shoots a girl she has a crush on......and Elena HEALS HER because the Starbucks logo tells her to. Gahhh this book is so unqiue and special. It's my first book that I've read by Shaun Hutchinson and I can promise you I'll be reading everything he writes from now on. This book was incredible. From the characters to the plot, to the moral aspects of life from religion, to death, to alternate world's, to problems with politics everything is laid out in these pages. It was wonderful I could just talk about it all day but I'm just going to leave at this. Read this book. It'll change you.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Never allow it be said that Shaun David Hutchinson doesn’t know how to write an apocalypse. This is the most immediate one yet, with Elena’s newly-discovered miraculous healing powers coinciding with beams of lights rapturing people – more and more every time she heals someone. (It’s not noted in the book, but it seems to be following the Fibonacci sequence although it started with eight rather than one). The voices that unlocked Elena’s powers tell her the vanished people are being saved, and she must hold using her powers in to obtain everyone off Earth before the end times. Naturally, Elena is a bit suspicious, since the voices won’t say where the people are going, why the globe is ending, how Elena is involved, or really anything helpful at all. There are cameo appearances by the MCs of some of Hutchinson’s other apocalyptic books as well, which was a fun touch.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    This was one of the strangest books that I ever read, and I'm totally okay with that. This book was weird, weird, weird, but in an intriguing and captivating way. I didn't quite understand what was going on at some parts or where on Earth it was going, but I still felt dedicated to it and Hutchinson made a fascinating heroine who led this story wonderfully.Elena Mendoza is a complicated, complex hero that powered through this book despite a lot of obstacles and challenges. She had a fresh, endearing voice that told it like it was, and I really enjoyed diving her head. She loved, she cared so deeply, and she was so powerful in the face of all of the crisis she came across. If the fate of the globe was in her hands, I definitely wouldn't be too scared since she had a amazing head on her shoulders and I trusted her to figure out the right thing. Also I could read an entire book with just her interactions with the voices and her. They were AMAZING and is is entirely book is exceedingly diverse as well. Elena is a bi Mexican girl, her crush is on Freddie who is a lesbian, and her best mate Fadil is Muslim and questioning his sexuality but believes he is ace. There are some unbelievable conversations in the novel that Fadil tackles with his culture and also questioning his sexuality. It was subtle in the middle of the the whole globe ending storyline, but it was so necessary and moving. I loved diving into all of these characters' lives more, and the rep was so fantastically so, one of the best things about this novel was the friendship between Fadil and Elena. YA seems to have an problem with just straight friendships between males and females without any sort of attraction being involved. This book defies all of this and gives us a loving, caring friendship where both can admit their wrongs but also winner each other so fantastically. I just wish everyone to have a friendship like theirs, and we need more YA stories with male/female friendships like e largest problem that I had with the story was the pacing. It kind of just dwindled for a long time for me. I wanted so desperately to love this, and I think if the pacing was ramped up a bit, it would have been there. I felt like we were running in circles. I understood why Elena wanted to know more about why David did what he did, but this focus just really lost all the pacing for me. We never moved forward and we did a lot more talking about things than any other action. The end kind of seemed a bit confusing and rushed for me. I felt there wasn't a proper lead-up, and I'm still a bit confused by it. I also never got a why from the story, and I feel like there required to be a tchinson is no doubt a talented writer, and I'm certainly going to be checking out his other books. He had a amazing writing style, and the creativity in this novel was amazing. He managed to create it feel true and so realistic with hitting on necessary subjects but still created it feel light and fun at certain places. The amount of detail and originality was so intriguing as well with Elena being a virgin birth, developing healing powers while trying to save the globe from the apocalypse, and she had to with voices through stuffed animals and my small ponies from crazy gods? It sounds as crazy as it gets, but he created it work somehow.Overall, this is one of the most interesting books that I ever read, and it has to be the most intriguing concepts that I'm going to read in 2018. I thought it had so a lot of unbelievable points to it including a diverse book crew, a unbelievable heroine, and a amazing writing style. However, the pacing and non-answers really drew the book down from me. I just wanted a small bit more of a speedier and concrete story, but it is still an intriguing and necessary story. If you wish something that is so outside the norm of regular YA, this is the book for you! 3 crowns and a Belle rating!

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    I listened to this book in audio file and the narration was beautiful bad. The narrator was trying to be the voice of multiple characters and I had problem figuring whose voice he was supposed to be doing. After trying for 4 hours of listening I gave up. I wasn't going to spend another 18 hours of listening to a voice I couldn't understand or follow. The German accent was driving me e story might be good; however, there was so much dialogue that I could tell what was happening. The time line jumped around too much for me to follow, especially when they were having conversation between characters.If the reader can't connect with a main hero within 4 hours of listening to a book there is a major problem. I had no connection with any of the characters and so I gave up. Again, I like the plot to the story, but there were too a lot of factors that created me story listening to the story.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    I created the mistake of picking this up for a latest vacation (where I couldn't another book in the middle), and was therefore stuck with it while my wife read her own book.I'm a BIG FAN of suspense/thrillers, especially those with some link to Globe Battle II. But the plot and characters and dialogue are so weak in this one that I can only shudder at the thought of trees dying so that this could be printed.I haven't read any other Ludlum novels (and I might not either), so I can't say if this not good quality is typical for him.But I definitely encourage you to give this one a WIDE berth. It could very well be the worst book I've ever read.If you're into amazing suspense thrillers with a Nazi theme, check out Robert Harris's Fatherland. It sits at the opposite end of the spectrum as my all-time favorite novel from this genre.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    This is my favorite of Shaun Hutchinson's books, and I've t loved the others - especially his realistic novels that swerve into surrealism. WE ARE THE ANTS, and AT THE EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE are brilliant, and thoughtful, and full of dark humor. THE APOCALYPSE OF ELENA MENDOZA are all those things, except instead of dark humor, this book seems lighter. More hopeful. More comedy than dramedy, if that makes sense. The f/f romance is rom-com light and funny, and that's not simple to do when your title hero is at the center of the end of the world, and keep the future of humanity in her hands. It's also awesome in that this is a comedy about the apocalypse, which in no method trivializes the end of the world.I will insta-buy every book from this author forevermore.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    THE APOCALYPSE OF ELENA MENDOZA is about the power and choice that young people have, even when they don't realize they have it. But it's also about a girl born of virgin birth who hears voices in inanimate objects and finds out she can cause miracles. I felt delighted to have such a serious theme come in a pack so strange and delightfully wrapped. And now I know what a talking stuffed baby Cthulhu sounds e characters here are fun to travel with - they are well-textured even if they are super YA tropey (Mean Girl, Crush Object, Best Mate Sidekick, Deadbeat Stepdad). My copy is post-it noted up with passages I wish to return to at some point to examine a small one critique is that this book is deliberative over plot-oriented. It reminds me of those meditative walking labyrinths -- that feeling of swirling around decisions you have to/should/must make. I’m not sure that’s in the book’s detriment. Rather, I think it puts an upper boundary on the kind of teen reader who will search this book rewarding and accessible. Teen readers who wish more plot twists are going to be is book is also a powerful post-election readalike to A.S. King's GLORY O'BRIEN'S HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSE.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Not my favorite Ludlum, but okay. Parts were interesting and exciting, but the ending was flat. Part of my issue was the narration. I switch from Kindle to Audible. Am not wild about Michael Prichard's narration, and especially so with this book. Often confused by who was saying what - everyone sounded beautiful much the same. Ended up reading as much as possible to avoid the narration.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    The sophomoric spy novel "The Apocalypse Watch" burdens the reader in a sloppy storyline with small subtlety or suspense. Juvenile dialogue establishes a confusing setting in a globe of deceit and deception where ambassadors argue like cowardly e premise behind the storyline has amazing promise however the high-strung conversations and quick banal action shatter any opportunity for enjoyment. The spies behave foolishly, flirt as adolescents, and become easily distracted congratulating each other like sports teammates during investigation conversations. A prime example is while speaking of the Resistance and a murder yet gush over an actor's prior roles lessens any possible emotional build. In another regular instance, the Vice-President of the United States transmits in a facsimile "...we'll create mule**** out of the whole passel of ***holes..." (paperback - Chapter 26, page 517) subsequently reducing a commanding station into a hollow title.Overall I search the book weak and unworthy of quality reading ank you.

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    The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Lately I’ve been doing a lot of reading, but the books haven’t been grabbing and holding my attention, and always left me wanting more. Then I saw a BookTuber that was raving about how excited she was to read The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza. She showed her ARC and talked all about the premise of the book and I know immediately that I had to read it. I had never read anything by Shaun David Hutchinson before, but now I definitely know I need to read more of his tchinson doesn’t take long to obtain into the action of the book and the pace doesn’t slow down until it’s over. In the beginning, we met Elena and she explains all about how she was born of a virgin birth. She works at Starbucks and on the day, she is going to finally talk to her crush Freddie everything goes downhill. See, Freddie gets shot by David Combs and Elena heals Freddie and saves her life. At the same time a beam of light comes down from the sky and David Combs disappears. Coincidence? I’ll never tell… You need to read the book to search e characters were phenomenal and relatable. I don’t have anything directly in common with any of the characters, but I loved them so much. They were quirky, genuine, and loveable. The hero development throughout the book helped to move the story along and unravel all the pieces. Each of the characters were critical to the story in their own way. They didn’t always seem like they were playing a roll, but it was mandatory for each of them to be there. Each hero also learned a lesson which is awesome to see in YA fiction, as I feel it’s something that seems to be lacking aun David Hutchinson is an absolutely awesome writer and the method he weaves a story with the written word makes your wish to curl up in his books and become one of his characters. His writing style is delightful, thought provoking, and engaging. I can’t wait to read more of his books and look forward to seeing what the future holds for such a talented individual.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Ludlum's nineteenth, and another Fresh York Times Bestseller. I've read and enjoyed all the others. The story: Agent H. Latham has penetrated a neo-Nazi organization called the Brotherhood Of The Watch. BOTW is actively planning the Fourth Reich with a fresh Fuhrer and a high-tech brain implant and much infiltration, undercover work, and Lebensraum. Latham returns to France from the neo-Nazi camp deep in totally protected German mountain ranges with a list of neo-Nazi collaborators from around the world. Apparently the list includes hundreds if not thousands of names, a lot of of whom are top leaders in every significant country in the ham is killed by the BOTW elite exterminator team in Paris, and his brother, an agent for a various branch of the US government, swears to complete the mission and search his brother's killers. He does. Along the method he involves a cast of scores from a lot of nations and enough derringdo, explosions, citadel assaults and a murky romantic sub-plot to satisfy almost anyone.But it's too poor the printing industry invented italic type. Ludlum uses a lot of it. Sometimes it signifies internal thought, usually in turmoil. Sometimes italics are used for emphasis. There's a lot of that. In fact, it is rare to search anyone in this book, except perhaps an occasional waiter, who doesn't cry, scream, explode (verbally) yell, sob, insist, demand. Characters rarely walk, instead they run, jump, fly, crash, fling themselves, pivot, agonize, plunge, etc., etc. To suggest this novel is neither well-written nor well edited isperhaps, an overstatement. If you like this sort of stuff, here's a whiz-banger for e plot is up-to-date for 1996, drawn from current real-life thought and action. It's just too poor Ludlum didn't do a better job of exploring this truly frightening globe movement.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    This audio ver is very well read by Edward Herrmann, he uses his talented voice to portray Frenchmen, French women, Germans and Americans, and manages to obtain every accent and nuance perfect. American agent Harry Latham must penetrate deep into a Nazi hideaway in Austria, to test and learn the truth and depths of a neo-Nazi movement threatening to form a fourth Reich. His brother Drew must search out the fate of Harry, who disappears mysteriously. The story encompasses the inner workings of Intelligence Operations from London to Paris to Washington to Berlin, and the Nazis are everywhere, waiting to execute their recent plan, a plan so vile and so destructive it will slay off political power figures in all the major cities in the world. The story is crammed with violent acts of murder, so a lot of that I lost count, and the spies are in every crack and crevice. But who is spying for whom, and who can be trusted? Were it not for the a lot of changes in venue and the overdone introductions of fresh characters every ten minutes, I might have been able to respond that question. As it worked out, I understood the story, and thought the plot was great, but had such a hard time keeping track of all the characters and happenings that I think I lost a lot of the effect. There were four audio cassettes, with a running time of 6 hours, which was great, a amazing value for your money. There were plot twists that were brilliant and will surprise and delight you, but the best part about this story was Edward Herrmann's voice. Don't look for the mini series soon.

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    The Apocalypse Watch: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Have been a Ludlum fan for years, this is a amazing book, was going back through my library, I reread my favorite authors every several years, and it was better to on my kindle than obtain the book.

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