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    Let's Talk About Dirtbikes []  2020-1-16 8:4

    My son loves this book! He loves dirt bikes and all the various colourful bikes support me teach him colors! Amazing job Kyle! I’m gonna search you at work to sign my copy!

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    This book is simply rst of all, let's talk about this COVER. A beautiful, dark-skinned black girl with an afro. She's SMILING. She's in a dress! Joy radiates from this cover and it's one of my favorites of 2018. I'd pick up the book for the cover let's talk about the story. Alice is a biromantic asexual. She's wealthy. She's intelligent and confused and deeply loving, and she's simply an awesome character. I loved her voice, her thoughts, the method she moved through the world. She falls hard for her co-worker, who is also brown! What??? A possible interracial relationship where one of the partners isn't white? (Don't obtain me wrong, I LOVE me some BWWM romance, but this was a refreshing and welcome change.)I love seeing a book about a black girl that doesn't involve slavery, basketball, gangs, drugs, and all the other typical Black Pain Narratives. This is not to say those stories are not required or important. But sometimes, a girl's issues are what to major in. How to please her parents. What to do about the boy she may or may not be crushing hard on. How to with her roommates/best mates and their changing dynamics. How to do all of the above and still be real to herself and her happiness. Sometimes, a girl just wants to Be without being a 's awesome and unbelievable to see a black, queer girl (written by a black author) obtain to discover the things we've seen in mostly white contemporaries for years and years, and I enjoyed this book so, so, so much. I desperately wish more from this author.

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I wanted so much to love this book because it sounded vibrant and hero driven and willing to embrace challenging subjects in a sensitive yet entertaining way. And I did love it. More than I expected to, even. Claire Kann has first off (to my thirty-two-year-old eyes, anyway) perfectly adapted the speech patterns of young millennials—I *think* a nineteen-year-old counts as a millennial. She’s fluent in it, and it makes her novel extremely of the moment, an immediacy I search quite beautiful. Like, here, I’ll work this language into fabulous art, not by being ironic or trying to “use sparingly” but by embracing it and respecting e story’s pacing and rhythm supports realistic hero growth. I appreciate the method the characters experience universal friendship challenges and also illustrate principles like consent. There’s nothing massive handed or preachy in it. In a lesser writer’s hands, huge social justice, political, and emotional problems can sometimes grind narrative to a halt. But Kann’s characters are fully fleshed, not mere anthropomorphized examples of necessary ideas. And the dialogue, just—no other word, it gave me feels.Let’s Talk About Love has absolutely broken my Cutie Code. My favorite read of the year so far.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    LOOOVE this cookbook! It has amazing recipes that I will actually cook. You know how some cookbooks have recipes with 800 ingredients in huge quantities that are just absurd? Not this one! I flipped through it as soon as it arrived and immediately saw at least 10 recipes I wanted to cook. I can't wait to obtain busy in the kitchen with this. I definitely recommend it!

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    Agonizingly slow burn, but absolutely worth it. The destination was no surprise, and I thoroughly enjoyed the journey to obtain there. As a lifelong overanalyzer, I similar well to all of the small info included along the way. I'll be looking forward to this author's next book!

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    Not typically a romance reader, but have been looking forward to this one for a year. True and endearing characters with quirks and hang ups, dozens of longing looks, and SO MUCH PINING.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    I liked how it started off by talking about how everybody has their own special story to bring to the table. I want that it continued with this concept and teaches children to embrace people's differences instead of discount them. The intent was positive but the impact of sharing a story like this is harmful in our efforts to move forward as a society. There is no method we can "take off" our skin; it is unrealistic and teaches a false sense of optimism. Our race is part of our story and I was so disappointed when this book taught us to look the other way.I am a teacher and will be using this book with my students as an example of colorblindness so that it won't go to waste.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    Having been in print for decades, this is one of the definitive cookbooks for traditional south Louisiana foods. Growing up in Lafayette, I recognize a lot of of the persons contributing recipes, these are true recipes from a time before the adulteration of "Cajun" cooking. If you wish to learn how to create a roux or cook rice this will begin you off correctly.I can not speak too highly of this book.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    I ordered the cookbook TALK ABOUT GOOD; as usual with Amazon, it arrived very quickly. The books were damaged in shipping, I read the instructions for returning damaged items, contacted Amazon with e-mail, printed a mailer and gave the pack to my postman. A fresh book was mailed out as soon as Amazon found out about the problem, I had a couple of weeks to obtain the damaged book returned. I originally did not message that both books were damaged on the corners so only one was replaced, I'm sure that if the other was reported damaged, I would have another fresh one. TALK ABOUT GOOD service!!Oh, by the way, this is an perfect cookbook. I created a carrot cake for my boss, she tasted it and knew where the recipe was from! Amazing!! A mate had given her this cookbook in the mid 70's and my husband brought it back to me from Louisiana in the mid 70's. The recipes are favorites of the Lafayette Junior League. The book has not changed in 30 years except it now has a hard cover! The second book is a Christmas show for my boss - both of us have lost the paper covers from the original 30+ year old book!

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    The cover! The feels! The #ownvoices! The #representationmatters! The #BlackGirlMagic! My satisfied dance!!!The glorious fro!!!! The #carefreeblackgirl joy!!!This book should be front and center on every endcap and money wrap in every single bookstore!!! There should be no excuses for this to not be created into a rom-com starring Keke Palmer and some cute struggling Japanese or Japanese-American actor who deserves a possibility to become America's fresh Bae.Hollywood, create it happen and don't you DARE pull that colorist nonsense you're so fond of.Anyway, Alice is the kind of queer PoC representation we've long required in not just YA, but in fiction as a whole. She's ACE/bi-romantic/greysexual and she's not here to serve as the sassy Black best mate of a needy White heroine who needs relationship tip (how a lot of times have we seen/read that trope). She's not here to serve as a trauma llama to "explain" why as such isn't her raison d'etre. Alice just IS."Love shouldn't hinge solely on exposing your physical body to another person. Love was intangible. Universal. It was whatever someone wanted it to be and should be respected as such. For Alice, it was staying up late and talking about nothing and everything and anything because you didn't wish to sleep--you'd miss them too much."However, Alice has more than just her ACE spectrum to with. She's stuck trying to please her loving yet strict and unbending parents (aided and abetted by her older sister and brother), all of whom insist she go to law school despite the fact that her heart isn't in it. Add to that a slow shift in the friendship between rough and tumble lifelong best mate Feenie and her fiancee, Ryan. In short, just another day in the life.And Alice is a large geek! Yay for Black geek girls!!!One thing I truly appreciated about Let's Talk About Love is the depiction of an upper-middle class Black family who expect their kids to excel. This might not be a large to most readers, but when the media at huge has gone out of its method to present Black families as dysfunctional, poverty stricken and criminally minded, having photos of strong, loving and functional Black families is a breath of new air. Especially because a lot of of us actually live such lives, regardless of economic Alice has just broken up with her girlfriend Margot because she didn't understand why Alice just wasn't interested in the physical act of sex. And while Alice herself didn't lack the vocabulary to explain that love and were different, that she could still love and desire romance, it was also difficult for her to create such a thing create sense. Granted that our society locations such an emphasis upon as a large part of romantic relationships, I understood Alice's fears, though I'm far from ACE."The bottom line was her body had never shown so much as a flicker of interest in anyone. But that didn't mean she liked being alone. That didn't mean she wasn't lonely. That didn't mean she didn't wish romance and didn't wish to fall in love. It didn't mean she couldn't love someone just as fiercely as they loved her."Enter Takumi." He was gorgeous--and that was not a word Alice threw around lightly. Not just "Hi, I'm the fresh boy next door" gorgeous, but the kind of gorgeous that would create you wish to slap your mama. The kind of gorgeous you'd stab your best mate of twenty years in the back, set her house on fire, and drive off into the sunset with her husband for. Have in the break room at work even though you know there are security cameras in there gorgeous."The one guy who throws everything that Alice thought she understood and turns it inside out. Alice's "Cutie Code" went haywire and she found herself watching him while she's supposed to be working (Alice works at a library - I knew we were book bae).Apparently, Takumi is just as taken with Alice and enjoys being around her. Their growing friendship obviously complicates things. She's ACE. How does she tell Hottie Mac Sexypants that she's not interested in sex, but that she still likes him? How does she create it create sense to her, and why does she feel she has to constantly explain her existence?Hence her trip to Dr. Burris (I envisioned Tituss Burguss as the doctor - what happens when you binge watch The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt). Again, showing Black people as seeking out and utilizing therapy. We don't see that enough and it matters."Asexuality isn't something that's black or white. There is a multitude of shades of gray in between. Being potentially sexually attracted to one particular person isn't as outlandish as you've convinced yourself it is."While all of this is happening, there were maddening instances of everyday ignorance (aka microaggressions) that Alice has to carefully navigate. Such as having to explain her hair and why she doesn't wish anyone touching it (I know the pain girlfriend, and my rule of thumb is hold your damn hands off my hair because I'm not your pet). She also dealt with the not-compliment "you're beautiful cute for a Black girl." Yes Virginia, some clueless guys think this is flattering. It's NOT. And piggybacked onto that is "I've never been with a Black girl before", to which Alice responds:"Allow me to be the one to burst your bubble: don't think you're going to begin here."This stage left me in a rage-fest because Alice's best mates who decided to go upstairs and have a romantic moment, left her alone with a guy who didn't understand private zone or consent. And later, one of my complaints with her was she didn't take Feenie to the mat for having ditched her. In fact, she spent a amazing of the book thinking it was her fault.Where have we heard this before?Anyway, back to Takumi.He babysits his twin nieces, is kind of a health nut cooking genius and somehow manages to obtain Alice into doing things like paragliding. Unfortunately the closer they become, the more confused and scared Alice becomes. The elephant in the room is her asexuality and she has no idea if it will end what feels right to her.And as much as her best mate Feenie is truly ride or die, there were times I wanted to snatch that girl's ponytail and place some common sense in her. Then again, real best mates can war one min then be ready to bury a body the next. That's Alice and Feenie.Of course, the book is chock full of diverse characters who are fully realized. Alice's struggle to understand herself and to search what makes her satisfied is something we can all relate to, regardless of what the hero looks like. Too poor some readers see "Black character" and think "oh it's probably going to have road slang and I can't relate though I just finished a book about a wealthy shape-shifting vampire dominant."I could have had this book finished in a day or two, but I forced myself to read slowly and savor. To tell you how much I loved this book, I'm purchasing the hardcover to sit nicely on my physical PoC on the Covers bookshelves. I love looking at all that unbelievable diversity and thinking how far we've come, as well as the journey we still need to take. Why the war for #WeNeedDiverseBooks and #ownvoices has to continue. Needless to say, there are more books featuring amazing PoC heroines, so this year will be awesome!

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    This book has content warnings for acemisia and harassment.Were you needing an asexual romance? Pick this one! This book is so sweet and fluffy that it will just melt your e romance between Alice and Takumi was adorable, and it progressed at a really nice pace. I truly loved how the book didn’t gloss over the problems Alice has with finding romantic partners as an asexual girl while still allowing her to search a relationship that is fulfilling for her. These two were by no means the excellent couple, but they were a couple who tried and communicated with each other and decided to test to work things out instead of not doing anything. It was sweet and realistic, and mirrors a lot of what I’ve seen in the relationships of ace people I know.While the romance itself was rather fluffy, the book did have its serious moments. There is a stage at a party where Alice is sexually harassed that readers should take note of, and there’s also a lot of stress placed on Alice both by her roommates (her best mate and her partner of several years) who seem to be more and more distant from Alice these days, and her overbearing parents who have chosen a career path for her that she doesn’t like and she doesn’t know how to tell them. The book takes put early in Alice’s college life while she’s still trying to figure out how to live on her own and do things unsupported, and the mixed messages she’s receiving about dependence and independence resonated with so, I really loved seeing positive therapy rep in this book! Alice attends therapy on a regular basis and while she has mixed feelings about it, she does stick with it and continues to test to create it work, and I LOVED this because it’s not something I see a lot in fiction. I’d really love to see more normalization of therapy in books because it really helps with de-stigmatizing it, and we need that.Overall, this was a book that created me very satisfied to read! I highly recommend this one — it’s necessary to see books with asexual characters who are allowed a “happily for now” because it’s realistic and reflective of true relationships. We need more people to see rating: 5 of 5 stars

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I purchased this book as part of a 30 Days of Pride Book Review project. The following is that review:Alice had her whole summer planned. She was going to watch as much television as possible with her two best friends, work at the library just enough to kick in her part of the rent, and continue to avoid, by any means necessary, the impending conversation with her parents about how she is Not-now-not-ever declaring a major in pre-law. Everything was beautiful much perfect… until it wasn't. The fresh guy at work, Takumi, just triggered a ridiculous level of insta-attraction that Alice doesn't know what to do with and not just because she has sworn off dating after her latest crushing break-up. The true problem is that Alice is 100 percent certain she's Asexual, and completely confused about what these feelings for Takumi even is book is charming!Alice is an adorable bundle of pop-culture references and navel-gazing. Her love of all things tv is endearing and (hey, I'll admit it) relatable. Her narrative voice is just bursting with quirky character. I couldn't support but grin at some of her funny e main conflict of this book is a maybe (or then again maybe not) budding romance, for a girl who isn't sure she wants another romance, especially when she doesn't wish the same things her partners wish and she doesn't know how to explain that to them without feeling like a freak of nature. A lot of the conflict is Alice versus Alice, as she tries to wrestle her insecurities into submission, admit what she wants, and then actually believe she deserves it. I appreciated that Alice was complicated and so were her feelings.I will say that, because Asexuality is just not as visible, there was a lot of explaining what it meant. Defining by Alice to others and to herself. Other people telling her what it meant. Other people questioning it and her explaining it. And there are points where you can almost feel the intentionality of it, the author educating us, the reader… but it wasn't as forceful or ham-fisted as these things can be. It always had a narrative purpose. In fact Alice struggles with this exact thing, because Asexuality is so misunderstood she worried, ”would she have to spend the rest of her life coming out over and over and over...? And once she did, would people always expect her to talk about it?”The only petty thing I'm going to bring up… there was, for sure, one typo, and one or two locations that may have just been confusingly worded… and that's all the petty nit picking I have.I recommend you read this book. Alice is a quirky and charming leading lady in a very unconventional romance. Even if you have already exhausted everything the romance genre has to offer, you probably haven't heard this story e latest part of this review weighs the book on the two scales invented for this e first scale is called the Queer Counterculture Visibility scale, which is supposed to rate how much a book shows less visible sides of the community. And this book beautiful much breaks it. To quote Alice, “if it were a pressure gauge, the glass would have cracked right down the middle.” Our point of view hero is a woman of color who identifies as biromantic and asexual, which gets just a ton of points right off the bat. She addresses so a lot of things in her narrative that need to be addressed in so a lot of more narratives. It's awesome. But it doesn't stop there. We have such a diverse cast of side characters, and see all their special struggles as well. This book is just like the definition of what I was looking for when I created up this scale. 5 out of 5 stars(And a brief standing ovation)The second scale is called Genre Expectation scale, which measures each book versus others from its genre. I think it does beautiful well here, also. I see this book basically as a young adult romance novel. But I think the idea of sex-less romance is so hard for some people to actually grasp that a romance story, where the protagonist just doesn't care about sex, is genre-defying territory. And while the writing isn't complex and (like a lot of YA fictions) it is a fast and painless read, it has this quirk factor about it. So with the slight genre defying and the quirk combined I'll rate it:4 out of 5 stars

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    Let's Talk About Dirtbikes []  2020-1-16 8:4

    Amazing book! I loved how it rhymed and I had a lot of fun sharing it with my daughter!

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    The book popped up in my Fb feed and it looked interesting so I ordered the ter the sample, I promptly ordered the book. It was that good. Normally, I wait for books to present up on Kindle Unlimited. I couldn't e characters are real, their emotions raw. I liked how the story didn't hinge on but and Emma do create you believe happily ever after is a chance .The author has a method of conveying everything simply but you feel it.I recommend the book. I'll be looking for more of her work.

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    I love a amazing slow burn romance and this was definitely that but it was so worth the wait. This is a must read❤️

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    Jo Jones knows a thing or two about Hollywood. A kid star, she grew up to create, write, and produce another hit tv show, and now she’s ready to head to the film theater. Taking over a large franchise, Jo is nervous but she knows she can succeed just as long as sh’s given an honest chance. But when her assistant Emma inadvertently leans close to say something in her ear on the red carpet, and the photographers mark that moment as something more than employer/employee, the rumors begin has always had a policy of not commenting on her private life, so she decides to simply wait for the rumors to die down. But those rumors live on longer than expected, and she starts to worry that the rumors are going to create the studio have second thoughts about her taking over the Agent Silver film franchise she’s had her eyes set on.Emma dropped out of movie school, but when she came to work on the tv present Innocents as a props PA, she found a put where she felt she could belong anyway. After getting promoted to Jo’s assistant, she’s been working hard to create Jo’s life easier. While there is certainly time spent getting coffee and dry cleaning, Emma also gets to hang out behind the scenes at the tv present and experience necessary production meetings. Getting an inside look at the industry while working for a strong, independent woman, Emma knows the despite movie school not being for her, there could still be a amazing career for her in Hollywood.And then the rumors start. Paparazzi waits outside of Emma’s apartment. She knows that her boss’ reputation is taking a hit from the rumors, but Jo refuses to create a statement and Emma feels unable to support her. As the weeks go by, and Emma carefully monitors her behavior towards Jo, so as not to create the situation worse, she starts to realize that while the rumors may not be true, that photograph may have captured a feeling that Emma hadn’t spoken out loud yet, maybe hadn’t been realized yet. Is it possible that she has feelings for her boss?And if she does have feelings for her boss, what then? Jo Jones is a strong Hollywood woman, a millionaire, a self-made power woman. Emma doesn’t even know if she would be interested in dating a woman. Or if she’s single. Being notorious for not talking about your private life means that not a lot of people know much about it. Emma knows that Jo would never date an employee, so what choice does she have but to swallow her crush and have fun her time working for and learning from this awesome woman. Right?Something to Talk About is a queer romcom set in Hollywood. The two powerful lead characters each lend their voice to the narrative, creating a sweet, graceful will-she-or-won’t-she love story that is so refreshing in the #MeToo era. Author Meryl Wilsner has written a romance that is filled with respect and amazing humor and characters you just wish to hang out with.I thought this was a beautifully written romance, and I loved the behind-the-scenes info about Hollywood, without all the cursing and ego and poor boy behavior I usually read about. These two women are intelligent and strong, successful and powerful. And Something to Talk About is a refreshing look at modern love from a queer perspective.A copy of Something to Talk About was provided by Berkley through a Goodreads giveaway, with a lot of thanks.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    I disagree with the reviewers who say that this text promotes a colorblind ideology. Lester says that race is a one of a lot of necessary parts of our identities and that it is something we should talk about. A major point of the book is to talk about race and move beyond racial stereotypes to our common humanity. Acknowledging our common humanity does not necessarily mean ignoring race and racism.I give the book 4 stars because it is a amazing conversation starter, even though it does not clearly define racism and place it in in the context of systemic white racism. What it does do is introduce the concept of a false sense of racial superiority that people can have. I have used this book with preschoolers often as a tool to jumpstart our conversation on how racism is built on the lie that people with lighter skin are better than people with darker skin. Then we build on this by talking about how schools, cities, etc have been built on that lie and therefore limit people of colors' access to resources and opportunities over the course of a lot of summary, I see this book as a amazing starting point for very young children, not a comprehensive textbook on racism. If you search one of those that's appropriate for preschoolers/kindergarteners, please allow me know!

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    Book preaches a colorblind ideology. Does not teach about race. Do not purchase.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    I love the illustrations in this book, but sadly it teaches color blindness which is not an effective method to with race. We are not all treated equally. Systemic racism exists regardless of whether we pretend to be color blind or not. I will hold this book to use as a starter for better conversations.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    I love the author but kind of feel like this is a latest generation book. I hope we've won this level of the conversation by now.

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I love Alice so much. I love her trying to figure out how to grow up, choose what she wants to do, maintain the friendships and family relationships she cares about, navigate different kinds of attraction and potential romantic relationships and what she wants in that regard. I love how she feels about her job, how she relates to TV shows and films (and that she writes about them!), that she named her cat Glorificus, that she loves cuteness and food. She's a really well-written character, she feels like she has history(that you mostly don't feel like you're missing because it's integrated well), and I wish to give her all the hugs.Feenie feels like few other characters I've read, and I'm so glad Alice has her. I don't know that I was fully happy with their relationship arc in the book, but Feenie is a delight and necessary in so a lot of ways. Ryan is a sweetheart, and I appreciated that Alice has a relationship with him that's not just through Feenie. Moschoula is a very minor character, but every time she appeared was great. We got a lot of Essie at the library early, and I was disappointed when there was a long stretch of the book without her and the ice's family relationships are complicated. I liked where her relationship with her parents goes. Her relationships with Aisha and Adam, her siblings, are more static and not addressed as much. (There's a lot of avoidance, and it doesn't have the ending that the parental relationship does.)I really appreciated that people weren't default white; Kann consistently described skin color. I liked the ways that race came up because it matters in both Alice and Takumi's spite what I said about history earlier, there are a lot of happenings within the timeline of the book that happen off-screen. Alice and Takumi do lots of things together, and there's an exercise Alice talks about doing for her counselor that we don't see. This could be fine, but it ends up feeling like a lot, and some of it is important. It also makes it really hard to hold track of time; the book manages to feel both like too much and too small within a single fore I talk about the ace representation, a major warning for ace readers: The first chapter is the breakup stage mentioned in the blurb. It is very true in a lot of ways, and even without having experienced most of those anti-ace reactions myself, it was an incredibly rough read. Please be prepared and take care of yourself. Alice remembers some other anti-ace items she dealt with in detail in the next couple of chapters, but after that it's not very present. All of it is called out.(I also wish to note that one of the anti-ace statements is calling Alice "the Corpse." Again, it's called out, but that ace/death connection is used pejoratively.)Alice is biromantic asexual. (She thinks about the spectrum through the book but doesn't change IDs. She feels arousal at one point, but she mostly ends up thinking it wasn't attraction.) She specifically refers to herself as queer at one point. She feels aesthetic attraction and romantic attraction, both of which are named. She also loves cuddling, so she feels contact attraction, but that's not named. She likes cuddling, hugging, and kissing. She doesn't wish to have (and she says repeatedly that she doesn't think about sex), but she's probably closer to indifferent or averse than repulsed. "I don't see the point. I don't need it. I don't think about it."Alice knows she's ace, and she's known since high school, but she's not out to a lot of people. (A note: her health teacher introduced her to the word "asexual." Points to that teacher.) She has something of a community on Tumblr, but it seems beautiful casual. She talks about faking a crush in middle school, trying to be in a relationship in high school while trying to figure out romantic versus attraction, and having to see if it changed anything/see how she felt about it. A lot of this felt so very real, and I appreciated it a lot. (I identify very much with faking a crush in middle school, with getting bored while kissing, and with not knowing whether someone is flirting or not.)Alice feels something that is somewhere between attraction and stronger aesthetic attraction than she's ever experienced before. It's really confusing for her, and I appreciated that confusion a lot. I know I've said this a couple of times already, but it's so real. My first experience of just that type of ?? attraction was less dramatic than Alice's, but it was really disorienting and confusing for me. Even though Alice continues to identify as "straight up ace" (in Feenie's words) and not gray-ace or another spectrum ID, I think this stage will resonate with a lot of spec folks. This section of the book contains this unbelievable line:"Alice had always wondered what physical attraction would feel like, and while she didn't necessarily dislike it, she wished there were a button she could press to turn it back off."(I particularly like this because "physical attraction" is what I called that confusing in-between put and was also what I called what I didn't feel before I had the words about asexuality.)Alice has a really affirming conversation with Feenie around attraction and and identity/the spectrum. (Not all of Feenie's ideas in this conversation are amazing ones, but it was so lovely to read.)When Alice is first dealing with this attraction, there was a statement that felt like it conflated arousal and attraction to me a bit. I couldn't figure out exactly what about it was bothering me, but I was uncomfortable. But later in the book, this exact problem comes up in a conversation between Alice and her counselor,and her counselor explicitly says that the two are distinct. So, I thought the book did a amazing job calling out the differences among attraction, romantic attraction, aesthetic attraction, arousal, and ice's jogging and comparison is useful in her conversation with Takumi, but when it comes back at the end with the line "Either you have fun doing it or you don't," I was not... pleased? There are a lot of aces that's not real e word "squish" is used on-page! I was really satisfied to see it. The book does a amazing job of valuing friendship overall. I would have been happier if aromanticism were acknowledged (especially because "squish" is really influenced by the aromantic community). More about aromanticism later.We got this line from Ryan, which I appreciated for a lot of reasons: "I say this cautiously because it's not the only answer, but maybe test dating someone who's ace, too." It's not the only answer; he's right. But it's a possible respond that so rarely see even acknowledged in ace books. The globe is not so full of allos that we don't have any choice but to date them if we wish to at said, there were several moments in the book that weren't aro-friendly. (It's far from the worst alloro ace book I've read in that regard, but still.)*There's a stage that conflates feeling romantic attraction/being romantically in love, "being very loving," and liking romantic stories. These are very much not equivalent.*The line "Love was intangible. Universal" comes up in a context where it could be general but Alice has been talking about romance, so it still stings a little.*"Love is love" is referenced in a positive way.*There's this, and it's very specific to Alice. I'm not sure how I feel about it, but I think it needs some unpacking and would bother some of my other aro mates in a "I'm not more broken than you" way: "The bottom line was her body had never shown so much as a flicker of interest in anyone. But that didn't mean she liked being alone. That didn't mean she wasn't lonely. That didn't mean she didn't wish romance and didn't wish to fall in love. It didn't mean she couldn't love someone just as fiercely as they loved her."*Takumi is skeptical of the idea of non-romantic soulmates. (Alice is very insistent on the idea, though, which I appreciated.)There's one spot that's inclusive of nonbinary folks, but then at another point "opposite sex" is used.Warning for harassment.

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Alice is a young adult coming into her own and coming to terms with her ace status. She can't even say the word, but it's a huge part of who she is. A lot of her story revolves around her parsing herself with her life and navigating dating. We begin off finding out how deeply she can be damage when somebody says something so unfair about her asexuality and we see how much she can grow when she takes the times to reflect and try. It was cute seeing the courtship that evolved from the easy act of somebody breaking her Cutie aire Kann penned a realistic courtship and I was satisfied to see where everything ever, this book isn't only about Alice's fresh dating status, it's also about friendship. We obtain to see what happens when a close knot group of mates tries to expand and how that can cause tensions. I want we had seen more of Feenie and Ryan but we saw what we required to see to really focus on what Alice was focusing on.And, like JtV's Latin Lover Narrator, the Parenthetical was a hero unto itself. It was funny and at turns, insightful. A amazing companion for the reader.

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    Well-plotted, excellently written queer romance. More, please!

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    This is a favorite cookbook of mine, which I had for over 40 years and it was worn out with use. I was glad to search the book was still available. The first one I got on a visit to Lafayette, LA Amazing home cooking.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    i cannot recommend this book. there are attractive pictures, but the notice is totally colorblind and does not address actual racism (race prejudice + power) no, we can't just all take off our skin and be the same.

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    Let's Talk About Dirtbikes []  2020-1-16 8:4

    Loved the book! Very simple to understand and the colors will really keep a child's attention. Hope to see more from this author!

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    Suicide (Straight Talk About) []  2020-1-16 12:3

    Amazing condition

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    Just replacing the one I had bought 30+ years ago. It was literally falling apart for the past 2 years. I am from Louisiana and have relied on this cookbook for most of my life.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    "Talk About Good" is a replacement for my worn out, tattered original copy! Being "born 'n bred" along the bayous of south Louisiana, this is one of my "can't live without it" cookbooks! It has a lot of of the recipes I grew up with, none of which have been changed or left out of this reprint! The recent reprint replaces the original paperback binding with a much sturdier hardcover along with a metal interior wire binding. These modifications ensure the book will keep up extremely well with everyday use over the years!My "top three" cookbooks are absolutely irreplaceable when it comes to preparing the native Cajun and creole recipes so treasured and beloved throughout south Louisiana. These are recipes in print which have been passed down from generation to generation! With today's simple availability of overnight shipping those of us who now live in other parts of the country can have fun the new Gulf seafood and other foods special to south Louisiana we grew up with ... for a price, of course!FYI, the other two of my "top three" timeless Louisiana cookbooks are the River Street Recipes: The Textbook of Louisiana Cuisine and the sequel River Streets II, both of which are also available here on Amazon. (The "spiral binding" in the product info of both books is inside their hardcover exterior binding).IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT BINDINGS: Although the basic image and others present the old paperback, black spiral binding, my copy (SOLD BY AMAZON) came with the updated hardcover and internal white steel spiral bindings. ONLY image #2 uploaded by a customer shows the newer hardcover binding, FYI.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    Amazing old fashioned southern cooking. Massive on the dairy, msg and beautiful much everything that isn’t recommended for healthy eating, but it’s what you grew up with in the Louisiana.

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    This story is well done. The main hero is fascinating in her thought processes and the people around her are vibrant, for better or worse. I like that this book is about a black queer college student struggling with relationships. Friendship is a major subject in this book, which is also about asexuality and what that looks like when you're trying to navigate a sex-obsessed e co-star was a fine hero as well. I'm glad he was a person of color. Though, the rest of cast seemed to be white, which was odd.Anyway, we don't know nearly as much about the costar as a person but that's the nature of these types of stories. Their relationship was well done and didn't answer July on tired romance e writing style was direct and light, but there were several serious moments that balance this story. I'm glad that mental health is also addressed head on in this book. Especially when there is so much stigma about getting help. It really is so much more than a love story (whatever our own prejudices define that as).My only complaint about this book is that the two leads would go on all of these adventures that would be talked about after the fact but never shown.I like all of the problems this book tackles. Relationships of all types were represented here. And the authenticity of the author's black experience was felt too. I see you, coconut oil. Anyway this is a thoughtful book that is simple to read. I wanted to know how everything would turn out for the protagonist. I cared and left happy and enlightened.

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    "Why on earth should she confront her issues when running had such delicious benefits?"I really wanted to love this book, but ultimately, I found that it was good, but not great. This book is about Alice, who is broken up with by her girlfriend because her girlfriend cannot wrap her mind around the fact that Alice can love her without wanting to have with her. Alice is asexual. (Honestly though, there's an element of that particular relationship that feels super generalizable to the idea that breaking up with a person who wants you to have with them when you don't really wish to is high key a amazing life decision. Do not have when you don't wish to.) Setting that aside, I really appreciated reading a book from the perspective of an asexual woman who is trying to figure out what her attraction is to the fresh guy at the library, Takumi, and navigating her changing friendships with her best mates since forever, Fanny and Ryan. Alice starts therapy and she stands up to her parents and a lot of things happen to her. I think where the book lost me a bit is that it felt like a lot of things were event but there were threads missing. It didn't feel entirely cohesive. I am looking forward to Kahn's sophomore novel though and I'm optimistic the learning curve of writing a book will mean the next book will be great!

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    I devoured this in less than 24 hours. It’s excellent for fans of RED, WHITE, AND ROYAL BLUE who love a sweet, emotional romance that climaxes with heart-pounding, globe changing activism.I love how all of the steps forward in the relationship are all emotional milestones of love and trust instead of solely focusing on relationship milestones. What a attractive shift in perspective!It's a slow burn, don't obtain me wrong, but what pulled me in was how much respect the characters had for each other. How they believed in each other and cared for each other in all these little ways. I wanted them to be satisfied , I loved being immersed in the backstage life of making a TV show. When one of the characters had to with harassment, it was so realistically and respectfully handled, and it created me wish to stand up and cheer to see how the characters fought back. This book deserves all the stars and it's going straight to my re-read shelf.

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    Jo Jones is a former kid star turned script writer. She's about to create her move from tv to films writing a fresh script for a beloved action hero (think James Bond). There are a lot of who doubt Jo's capability to do the script justice. To avoid being inundated with with questions, Jo invites her assistant Emma to accompany her to the SAG Awards. Emma's job is to act as a buffer - at least that's what Jo tells Emma (and everyone else) but could it really be more?Emma has been Jo's assistant for about a year and Jo has never asked Emma to accompany her to an awards show. Of course she's going to go despite being completely out of her comfort zone. She'll always be there for e next day, the tabloids are running with the rumor that Emma and Jo are dating. While Emma admits to having a crush on her boss her feelings don't run that deep and she would never dream of crossing that line, and knows Jo would never either. But now that it's out there both Jo and Emma begin considering "what if".I think that, besides providing a sweet romance, Something to Talk About really digs into the workplace romance trope, in the era of MeToo, with expert precision. Meryl Wilsner really spends time ruminating on the power dynamic between Jo and Emma and while it's clear to readers that their feelings aren't coming from a put of one party putting pressure on another party, or pushing feelings that aren't there for threat of job loss, it also acknowledges that these are very true considerations to take when you have feelings for someone who is your boss (or vice versa when you may be a boss and have feelings for a subordinate). I think it's something that has been lacking from other workplace romances I've read in the past and even more recently. Characters looking at the potential repercussions of their actions from all ere's a lot of tension of "will they or won't they" because, really, it's a slippery slope to contemplate even with Jo and Emma both being consenting adults. I think that Meryl Wilsner handles everything really well, and you're really rooting for Jo and Emma to figure out a method to create things work, but you're also preparing for the fact that they just may not.I will say that it took me a bit to obtain into the characters. But I think once you obtain into the story more, Jo and Emma's personalities are, at times, products of the industry in which they search themselves. Jo has learned to be a bit closed off or "cold" with people. Being a kid actor has ingrained within her that oftentimes the fame and celebrity will have people presenting a fake visage. Jo closes herself off as a means of protection. Emma is seemingly very begin with everyone. Since she is the point of contact for people who wish to obtain on Jo's appointment list, it's understandable that she be friendly and welcoming. Over the course of the book, you see this waiver about her hero as she with the paparazzi and the press. The best moments are the moments they have just for each other. When their walls come down, maybe just a little, to reveal their real selves. Since the story is so full of lines and trying not to cross them, there are quite a few times where things are left unsaid between Jo and Emma. Things that could have been done to avoid conflicts from escalating, but as I said it's all about navigating the slippery slope of feelings.I really enjoyed this debut. I loved Meryl Wilsner's writing and I cannot wait to see what comes next. If you're looking for a slow burn romance that with the workplace dynamic in a genuine way, look no further than Something to Talk About.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    I love the illustrations and the prose is attractive but this book does not in any way, shape, or form, mention the racism that has been and is prevalent in America. Any book that discusses race and doesn't mention the reality of racism needs an update.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    Attractive art but not at all what I expected. I wanted an elementary-level explanation about how the cultural and social implications of race can be positive and yet also about the complicated history of racial oppression. This book implies that noticing racial differences is negative and seems to advocate a color blind ideology. Now I have to test to search a book that talks about what it means to be a racial minority in Western civilization in a kid-friendly way.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    While I like the overall notice that people should value people for more than just their skin color, it doesn't encourage the reader to recognize that if you're not seeing someone's skin color, you are not seeing the whole person.

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    Let's Talk About Love []  2020-1-14 19:33

    So. 'Let's talk about Love' is sort of your typical cute romance, with the main difference being that Alice is Ace. Which, as an Ace, I very much appreciated! It's unbelievable to have a main hero that I can relate to for once, instead of rolling my eyes at all the typical insta-love stories out there. Alice is charming throughout, and the book as a whole is enjoyable. However, there were a few things that stood out to me as a little...odd.Disclaimer: I don't typically read romance books. Fantasy and Sci-Fi are my go-to genre's, so that might influence some of my opinions. Various genre's have various rules and expectations, after all!Okay, so my true question-problem was with Takumi: how the hell does he afford everything they do? Paragliding? (actually explained in the book, but it felt like a cop-out), hot balloon rides? Hiking Kilimanjaro? This is a guy who's about to begin a teaching career (they don't generally well), and has to obtain a second job to cover rent. Yet somehow it seems like every weekend they're out on these awesome adventures, eating dozens of food, and living the excellent life. In California I believe? I'm just not sure where the is coming from to afford this! Alice, too, admits to living on ramen half the time and not being able to afford take-out until day. So neither of them are well off (even if their parents are, they don't seem to be drawing from that well much). This bit mostly just broke some of the suspension of disbelief for me, since a typical couple of college students would not be able to afford the lifestyle that these two seem to have. Maybe that's part of the romance of it? But I personally would have appreciated something a small more other main problem is also Takumi. He is, most definitely, a 'gary-sue'. He does everything and he's excellent at everything. Cooking. Paragliding. Playing guitar. He's amazing with kids. He has, basically, no flaws. Which is frustrating, because that's also not very realistic. Even the few things that he does seem to struggle with: a past relationship, that Alice seems to create better almost instantly? (You don't generally obtain over a cheating fiance in a couple of months, I would think), and his family. Which he refuses to talk about. And the author never actually explains what's up with that, so it's a large unanswered question. Basically, though, I would have preferred Takumi to be more have an Ace MC, but you're still showing her in a fairy-tale relationship that most of us (ace or not) will never really experience. Maybe it's my lack of romance-novel-know-how showing through, but I appreciate realistic relationship!Despite those flaws, I did thoroughly have fun this book. Again, it's nice to have an MC I can actually identify with, and that's not the main reason why I give it 4 stars. It's a cute story, Alice is absolutely adorable throughout and there are some true issues addressed (college, parents trying to force you onto a specific path, dealing with mate drama, etc.) It is by no means an -omg you have to read this- book. But it's not poor either.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    After the success of Baton Rouge's RIVER ROAD RECIPES (Junior League, 1959), it seemed inevitable that other attempts would follow. This TALK ABOUT GOOD! COOKBOOK, from the Junior League of Lafayette (LA) in 1967, is too amazing to be called an imitation. Look for redoubtable Cajun and Southern recipes, and although it's a small dated in spots (judging by the fondness for bright-colored Jell-O desserts), on the whole the contents have held up fine, and work just as well today as they did in the Sixties. Spiral-bound. Makes a amazing gift.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    Was so excited when I saw this offered on Amazon. Been wanting a recipe book for authentic Cajun meal for quite a while. Living outside of Louisiana, I’m having withdrawals from the meal I grew up on, unfortunately, I didn’t grow up cooking it. Too a lot of ladies in my family that do it better than me, but I’m too far away to obtain it now. Haven’t found a amazing restaurant in Las Vegas that really amazing Cajun food. Glad to be able to fix it myself now so I can stop sampling so-so food.

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    Talk About Good Cookbook []  2020-1-23 20:2

    I grew up in Abbeville just south of Lafayette with my mom using this cookbook. I now am very amazing mates with a member of the Lafayette Junior League and she says that it is one of the best cookbooks me of the recipes in this cookbook come from family members, so I am greatful to be a part of this in some little ere are no *OK* recipes in this cookbook by the way...they are all very amazing to great.Enjoy from South Louisiana!

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    Let's Talk About Dirtbikes []  2020-1-16 8:4

    Awesome book! The pictures are amazing and the book was overall fun to read. Amazing book for the kids!

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    Let's Talk About Dirtbikes []  2020-1-16 8:4

    Simple to read to children and the illustrations hold their attention. Amazing book!

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    Suicide (Straight Talk About) []  2020-1-16 12:3

    I recently required to search a book on children's grief for my daughters, and stumbled upon a book on suicide on the juvenile shelf that caught my attention. Talking to our children about suicide is daunting to most parents, and I always remind myself what Thomas Joiner (survivor and author of Why People Die By Suicide) says in his book; always tell your kids the truth.But talking about self- harm, eating disorders, even poor boyfriends, to our daughters in particular, puts fear in our hearts. Which is why I was so satisfied to search this series of books for kids at my local library. I plan on consulting the entire series, but for now I've absorbed the book on suicide hungrily. What I kept thinking to myself was, this needs to be on the adult shelf as well! It really breaks down, in an simple to digest way, what suicide is: wanting to stop the pain, not necessarily the life. Rather than rave on and on about how what an perfect resource this is for all, I've bullet pointed the unbelievable trueisms the book validates:Failed attempts are not just ways to "look for attention"- they are cries for support and should always be taken seriously.Feeling alone and fearing no one can support you is a common feeling; you are th may attempt suicide due to one single upsetting event, so healthy, satisfied kids are capable of making a wrong decision. Suicides occur in stable e book also delves into being a survivor and emphasizes "It is not the responsibility of others to stop a person from dying". Children have a lot of survivor guilt, and need to be reminded of this.Will this book be read?When I read a amazing book, particularly for kids, I often scoop up all the used copies on to give to friends. Sadly, I can't say I'll do that this time. Most people are horrified to learn my daughters know the term suicide, and would never be so honest with their own children, even if the subject came up directly. I can't create that decision for others, thus I won't be giving any copies of this book away this Christmas. But I will hold it on my bookshelf, because much like Iris Bolton's My Son, My Son, my copies of life saving books like these seem to always be required elsewhere. It's amazing to have these fabulous resources around, available to drop in the hands of, sadly, another fresh survivor.

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    “They say hindsight is twenty-twenty, and looking back, it seemed like it was always going to lead to this: Jo’s fingers on Emma’s skin an inevitability. Not like fate—not like they didn’t have a choice, but like in a thousand various universes they would always create the choices that led them here.”I’ve been waiting (I’m)patiently for this book to come out since I read about it in December. The plot intrigued me and ice lady boss/ sweet assistant is one of my favorite tropes. And I’ve got to say that this lived up to my expectations and then some.I really loved it.I started reading it before bed time and suddenly it was 1am and I didn’t wish to place it down. I just had to continue reading it before work the next morning, and I had to talk about it at work. I loved the story, the build up, the teasing between characters, the angst, the relationships between the characters, I loved that we were getting to really know Jo and Emma before jumping into any romantic.I loved the method it touched upon the sexually harassment in the movie industry. I loved that there wasn’t any panic. I loved the writing. I loved that we were getting both sides of the story. I loved the method they were standing up for themselves and each other.I just loved the book, e book is mostly build up and getting to know the characters with a sweet moments here and there. So if you’re hoping for a mostly romance book this isn’t it. But it’s still amazing. The build up makes up for there barely being any romance. And I will admit that the set up to their first kiss was so sweet that I shed a few tears when it happened.I did not wish this to end... Not at all. I fear that there will be a book shaped hole in my chest and I will struggle to search anything I’ll love as much as thisI’m excited to see what Meryl Wilsner will write next!

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    Something to Talk About []  2020-6-3 18:21

    This book is a warm, melty s'more on a brisk fall night. It's a gooey bowl of mac n cheese after a long day at work. It's a steaming plate of new tamales piled high on a plate. It's the exact type of comforting, indulgent, sweet break from reality I required right a reader, I've never really felt like I've 'gotten' romance as a genre. Certainly, I have fun romance (especially between queer women), but when I read it outside of fanfiction, it's almost always as a subplot of whatever SFF book I'm currently reading. I love genre fiction deeply, so that's not a complaint - but there's always been a weird disconnect for me between my love of romance and my disconnection from romance as its own self-sustaining genre. For whatever reason, the times I've tried reading romance novels on my own have never created a very deep impact.Until this book. Something to Talk About feels almost like it was created just for me. It had all the building blocks of the types of romance I love and they were all handled flawlessly. Between the surprisingly conscientious workplace romance and slightly tortured boss/employee dynamic, to the respectfully handled (but still hot) age gap. The only thing I love more than potentially loaded power dynamics are exquisitely and thoughtfully negotiated power is story was satisfying to me on beautiful much every level. I loved the emotional progression, the slowburn build up of the relationship between Jo and Emma. I loved the pining, the dumb misunderstandings, the supportive friends, the intersecting identities and social commentary, the method that in the end the two central characters cared about each other enough to hold trying and overcome all of the obstacles between them.I read this book in one day, over a few long sittings, via the kindle ebook version. I can't wait to a paperback too, just to have it on my bookshelf and be able to flip through it whenever the desire strikes me. I'm so grateful there's something like this out here to turn to when I need something and warm and gooey to curl up with.

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    Let's Talk About Race []  2020-7-23 20:27

    I was hopeful for this book as the Author is a Newbery Honor, but after reading I was left disappointed. There are a lot of negative sentences in the book like "I'm better than you because _____" which children internalize before positive e illustrator is white, and while it may be unintentional there is a centering of white faces in her illustrations. Also, the theme of the book is to teach colorblindness which is no longer considered what's best for improving race relations.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    This book was recommended by a mate who has also gone through the poor ordeal of rape. I thought it might support me understand her pains further. This book really challenges you to think and recall your own interactions of the past and show and sometimes I had to place the book down as some of the stories really create you mad at the perpetrators and cry out for the victims. It really highlights the various aspects of rape and it's impact to people's lives. No matter who you are I would highly suggest reading this as this may even create you review your own opinion of rape victims and rapists themselves.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    Thank you to NetGalley, The Fresh Press and Sohaila Abdulali for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always an honest review from me.What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape is a book we need to be talking about more. When the author started talking about rape in India, few people were discussing the topic. Now more people are, especially with the #MeToo Movement. But culturally there’s still more to be done. This book helps explain a lot of of these concepts. Most people know and believe that rape is bad. It gets ambiguous for some people when it comes to the actual definition of rape, consent and micro agressions, rape culture and its contributions to actual assaults, harassment and more. It’s shocking to me, but not completely surprising, that a lot of people don’t understand these nuances.I like that the author educates the reader about the nuances of rape culture. It doesn’t come across as preachy, but more like “here’s some info that you might not know. Allow me share it with you.” I think most people could learn something , if not a lot of extremely necessary e only negative aspect of the book is that it could be a trigger for some people. So read with caution and please take care of yourself.Overall, another extremely relevant book to continue on with the discussion of the #MeToo conversation. Give it a read, and let’s begin talking!

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    Because I love Haruki Murakami’s novels, and because in the latest year I became very interested in running (which increased my interest in the books about running) I was very satisfied to finally be able to read what a lot of people consider a cult running book – Murakami’s “What I talk about when I talk about rakami has been a runner for years (his results are on ). I have actually seen him running along Charles river in Cambridge, as his stay there overlapped with mine. In his very private acc of the running experience, he describes how he began running seriously. I really love how he writes about his successes and failures, his feelings while running training runs and races, and his evolving attitude to cause Murakami is a writer, his book is various that other runners’ accounts or tip on running. He simply writes better. He is able to create the reader feel his pain, elation, frustration, tiredness and pride associated with the training process and participation in races. I loved his first marathon choice – he ran the original route in reverse, from Athens to Marathon, alone, and wrote an article about his experience. Also, his acc of an ultramarathon in Japan (100 km race) is breathtaking, and his notes on the transition into triathlons are very metimes he sounds a small too proud of himself – like when he comments on the female Harvard students passing him during his training runs in Cambridge – but this just makes the descriptions of his thoughts more believable and. He seems to be completely genuine, no matter what he writes, and this is also why I liked even his opinions on particular brands of running gear – they did not sound like a product placement at all, just a frank opinion on what he personally thinks is best for him. Particularly interesting are the thoughts on the impact of running on the rest of the author’s endeavors as a writer, pub owner and lecturer. Strikingly, he writes very small on his marriage and I would like to hear more on how he and his wife incorporate his running into their everyday life as a couple, but I understand it might be a personal matter.I will return to this book for sure, I understand why it is a cult book among runners, and I want Mr. Murakami a lot of more years of satisfying running and triathlons!

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    I'm not a runner, far from it, but my elderly father is. Dad took up running when he was in his 50s and, until he was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2004, he ran 19 marathons.Anyway, I thought it'd be interesting to read this book by a Japanese novelist who is also a marathoner and a triathlete. I was hoping he could give some amazing insights into why people is short memoir had some interesting moments about how marathoners/triathletes train and what they think about when they run. I love reading insights into how authors operate but felt that there was too much on how he writes and not enough on how he runs. For a running book, it could've spent more time talking about 's a amazing book, certainly, but it could've been better. I liked the author's writing style, though, and at some point, may give one of his novels a try.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    This is a book that should be read by anyone with a warm, vulnerable body and a mind begin to reading about others with related bodies and minds. It is an extraordinarily generous and loving book - really, considering the title, unexpectedly so. I feel augmented and filled with light. Regardless of all the pain, what remains is the light.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    Content warning: Naturally a book with ‘rape’ in its title is going to come with a content warning from me. This book is confronting so I would caution you to be aware of the potentially triggering nature of the content, but it was one of the best I’ve ever read on the e author considers the difficulty of categorising this book and I agree; it’s a blend of private experience, other peoples’ experiences and insights. What kept popping into my head as I was reading was that it’s a conversation. I loved Sohaila’s down to earth tone and how she makes this multifaceted and too often silenced experience approachable. Her writing is considered and empathetic. She doesn’t shy away from the gravity of the trauma associated with rape, yet at the same time I came away feeling hopeful and validated.“Discussions about rape are so often irrational, and sometimes outright bizarre. It’s the only crime to which people answer by wanting to lock up the victims. It’s the only crime that is so poor that victims are supposed to be destroyed beyond repair by it, but simultaneously not so poor that the men who do it should be treated like other criminals.”Although titled ‘What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape’ this book is also about what we don’t talk about when we talk about rape, like how “it’s the weirdest things that can obtain you. Like dentophobia.”When I was two thirds of the method through this book I’d already recommended it to a counsellor who works for my state’s rape crisis hotline and would recommend it to anyone who has experienced assault, knows someone who has experienced assault, works with people who have experienced assault or wish to read an intelligent, thoughtful book about this truly global issue. While there are stories of people from America in this book there are also those from all of those other locations that aren’t America, like India, Australia, Africa, Europe and the Middle East. There’s also a unbelievable cross section of peoples’ experiences, from the poorest and most marginalised to well known cases and e whole notion of ‘institutional consent’, which holds to acc both men and women, was surprisingly fresh to me; “you know you can obtain away with it because the whole system is set up to support you obtain away with it.”My favourite lightbulb moment during my first read of this book (I expect it will be the first of a lot of reads) came when I encountered an acronym that has validated my experience so much. Jennifer Freyd, writing about betrayal trauma theory in the nineties, “proposed that abusers frequently answer to accusations with “DARVO” - Deny, Attack, and Reverse Victim and Offender.”There were a few sections that seemed a bit disjointed to me and info of some stories were repeated in a couple of chapters, although the repetition did serve to remind me which person’s experience I was reading about. Absent from this book was any mention of women who rape; while uncommon, it does happen, and I would be interested to hear what this author has to say about is book is sociological, political, private and contradictory. Now, contradictory may sound like a criticism but it’s not and as Sohaila expresses, rape and the method we talk about it is contradictory, so to highlight these contradictions is vital to an honest discussion. I loved/hated the “Lose-Lose Rape Conundrum”; it is so infuriatingly accurate:“If you talk about it, you’re a helpless victim angling for sympathy. If you’re not a helpless victim, then it wasn’t such a huge deal, so why are you talking about it? If you’re surviving and living your life, why are you ruining some not good man’s life? Either it’s a huge deal, so you’re ruined, or it’s not a huge and you should be quiet.”Thank you so much to NetGalley and The Fresh Press for the opportunity to read this book. My current activism level is set to: Need to do something positive immediately!

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    "All I can see is the ground three yards ahead, nothing beyond. My whole globe consistes of the ground three yards ahead. No need to think beyond that....this was my little reason for living."Haruki Murakami, best know for his `stream of consciousness' and brutally honest writing style, goes introspective on the weird random thoughts he has when he runs. In a memoir (of sorts) he draws from his life as a hugely successful novelist, seasoned bar owner, and, on most frigid Fresh England afternoons, long distance runner, to bring us his views of the world, writing and running.I read this book for Murakami's thoughts on writing first and foremost. I've known of his quirky writing style for some time, and thought I might obtain a small insight into that groovy brain of his. Small did I suspect this book would be so spiritual. As it turns out, the writing `advice' or `tips' are beautiful scarce: Haruki describes it mostly as painful, grinding manual labor. In fact, for a guy that runs as much as he does, it turns out he almost never gets any fresh ideas for novels while running. I found this somewhat disappointing. Of all the time he spends running, and he doesn't obtain any inspiration at all? But then I realized, that his job is writing and books, why would he wish to think about work, in what is meant to be an escape from the boring as it sounds, Murakami seems to obtain all his amazing ideas from....pushing himself to hold writing, in much the same method he pushes himself to run. It looks glamourous and "fun" from afar, but it really is work. If you wish to be good, there is no secret, you just have to work. I've heard of writers that force themselves to write in volume, either 10 pages a day, or a notepad per week, whatever-they force themselves to obtain it all out on the page, and then the true fun comes later: editing (sometimes tossing 80-90% of their original draft).The beauty of Murakami's writing is that he's able to revisit a past moment, and relive it so vividly, that he can recapture the stream of consciousness, the wild ramblings of his inner mind, that seems the most impossible thing to recall, the hardest thing to fake. He's either brilliant at making this up, or has an awesome memory. Either way, we obtain to mark along (not just in this, but his other novels as well).When it comes to running, Murakami goes the distance. Sprinting for 40 metres is wild, electric and explosive, whereas long distance running is something else entirely: it's almost pointless in its repetitiveness and slow plodding pace; it can be dull, it can be lonely, it can be brutally painful and intimidating-what can we possibly learn from running? In a lot of ways, Murakami reflects in Spiritual, almost ascetic tones on the breakthroughs he's had while running marathons: it's only when he's been pushed to the physical breaking point, that his perceptions of pain and thirst, and ego, and struggle, truly shattered into a million pieces, like when he describes his 62-mile ultra marathon run. The latest 30 minutes, he recounts, as a blissful breezy union with nature, where the plants and the birds, and all the clouds seemed to cheer him on, and he passed about 30 other runners. He seemed to break from his own body, for just a brief period, but as they say, a mind once learned, will never see the globe the same method again.And all those races, what's it all for? Ego? Fame? Publicity? Not at all. Running is one of the few sports where, you're racing versus yourself, so you can't lie. You have to be brutally honest, because no one else cares. There is no publicity and the awards are few and far between. You can walk. You can quit. No one will ever push you to run (and most will even talk you out of it, because you're ultrafit lifestyle is incredibly annoying). But you don't run because it's easy, you do it, because you wish to push yourself, and be as powerful at 52 as you were at 25. Murakami, again, in brutal honesty, recounts with some regret that he may never be as powerful as agile as he once was. It's nature. It's 's not just a race, it's a struggle with mortality. Ultimately, the rewards come as glimpses of some amazing awakening-glimpses that we don't obtain if we walk the latest 2 miles of the marathon. The amazing war versus our tired racked bodies (and what they may or may not be capable of) can only be won out there, on the lonely road, at the crack of dawn, with our bleary eyes focused on the next 3 yards, and nothing re Reviews like this on 21tiger

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    As a long-time fan of his fiction (A Wild Sheep Chase came out when I was in college and blew me away!), I found this oh-so private book to be an absolute delight. I even started running again- not far, not fast, but in a method that, as Murakami puts it, "suits" me.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape is a must read. It’s a no-holds-barred, direct light on rape, on survivors, on rapists, and on our society in general. And it’s brilliantly written. Sohaila Abdulali writes a story that reads like a conversation, peppered with facts and real life stories, as well as references to her own private experiences. For me it was such a refreshing read, because Sohaila Abdulali talks about rape and assault in the method it should be talked about: without holding at said, there are locations in the book that may be triggering to some, and there is no method most people will be able to read this in one go. With the status (collapse) of this country right now and all of the mayhem flying around on the news, the nomination and subsequent confirmation of a perpetrator of assault to the Supreme Court, even after the survivor testified and subsequently vilified, as well as just trying to obtain through life in general, I had to read this book in little doses. I’m glad I did because I feel like I got a lot more out of it than if I had sped through ere are certain locations that stood out to me so much while reading that I jotted down some notes, but in general each chapter includes very necessary information, even the interludes. (Interlude on a moment of terror specifically hit me hard). Here are my notes:Sohaila Abdulali does such a unbelievable job of giving the survivor a platform, and not just from a standpoint of they have a voice too, but by showing how widespread victim blaming is, how we look at everything in black and white, and how each time we mention choice we base that choice on our own perceptions without ever putting ourselves in the put of the victims. This is something that always irks me terribly, when I hear the “but she could have...”, the “but why didn’t she walk away...” etc etc. The onus needs to be on the perpetrator, NOT the victim. We need to stop scrutinizing the victim and begin scrutinizing the perpetrator. Sohaila Abdulali is so right about this. So right. I know personally that until we do this I won’t be able to speak either, because what stops so a lot of women from speaking, even years later, is the fact that they know they will be judged, even by those who don’t think they are ere are so a lot of locations that I similar to, and also locations that were very revealing. It was only recently that I equated the fear I feel on the dentist chair to another fear I felt as a child, and Sohaila Abdulali explains the correlation so well. It’s the same feeling I have had with doctors and why I avoid male doctors, especially after some experiences in pregnancy and childbirth that left me feeling even more violated than I felt haila Abdulali was born in India and survived a brutal rape as a young woman. She went on to work as a rape counselor and public speaker, amongst other things, and also spent a lot of her academic life studying and writing about rape and rape culture. When the #MeToo movement moved to the forefront in 2017, an old magazine article she had written 30 years before where she talks about her rape resurfaced. Sohaila Abdulali then went on to write this book even though she wondered whether it was a safe thing for her to do seeing as she mainly has been able to move on in her life. I am personally so satisfied that she did write this book as it has been very, very helpful to me, and in general I think it should be assigned literature for all to read.If we don’t talk about rape we will never see a ank you Sohaila Abdulali!

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    I really liked this book. It didn't blow me out of the water with inspiration like I kind of expected, but that's ok. It's a memoir, not a manifesto. As a runner and writer myself, it was nice to see how the two mesh together for the author. I am anxious to read one of his novels now after getting a glimpse of his writing ide from the joy of gaining insight from his decades of experience, I found the author to be respectable, humble, and generally just a likable guy. Id' love to have coffee with him pick his brain some more. I found his humility and honesty refreshing and rare in a field where I am accustomed to sensationalized, horn-tooting tales of superatletes. I liked that he opened up about limits that come with aging, (though he's still faster than I may ever be) and how the love of running can wax and wann over time. Humility is an aspect often left out when people talk about running, but I search that at times I leave for a run expecting to feel a amazing sense of accomplishment, and return humbled instead, and those runs are every bit as important. I am grateful that he touched on those feelings. Running is such a metaphor for life, it only makes sense that a writer may be an avid runner. I often write in my head while I run, and I enjoyed this acc of someone who has been doing both for decades.

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    The writer's style is so loose that it reads like an idea of a first draft. Not the meticulously edited volume he claims. I also found small to help his assertion that it is philosophical. At best, it is the story of an aging runner coming to grips with his dwindling capacity to perform. Thankfully, he realizes the joy is in the running and not necessarily in a fresh private record.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    It can be exceedingly difficult to write about rape in a method that makes people wish to hold reading. Sohaila Abdulali has poured her considerable compassion, wisdom, and wit into writing a book that does exactly this. Every chapter elicits powerful feelings, sometimes even laughter, and introduces a fresh and complex idea about a subject that is too often over-simplified and reduced to stereotypes and platitudes. This book should be needed reading..for all.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    Thank you NetGalley and The Fresh Press for this ARC."So what is this book? It's about shining a light on what we talk about, but also on what we don't talk about."This is a fabulous description of the content. The author sits you down and talks to you like an older sister. Sharing stories, facts and opinions while allowing you to form your own. She questions everything and makes you feel safe and welcome to do the same."Discussions about rape tend to be irrational, and sometimes outright bizarre."No one likes talking about rape. It's a horrible occurrence and uncomfortable for everyone. Does that mean we shouldn't talk about it? Of course not. I search the things we are most uncomfortable talking about are usually the most necessary things to discuss for that very reason. No one talks about it."Words are the opponent of impunity."Opening a dialogue on any subject we are uncomfortable with can only cause it to become easier to discuss the next time. I search starting a conversation about rape is always weird and awkward and sometimes scary when you hear other peoples opinions. It's necessary to create it part of the discussion. It is necessary to create people feel comfortable coming forward and talking about experiences, emotions and knowing that they are safe to do so."If we can expose our kids to talk of genocide, racism, bikini waxing and the inevitable melting of the planet, why should we leave out abuse?"I really enjoyed her begin and honest approach. She doesn't claim to be an expect or that there is a right or wrong method to with or discuss abuse. She just opens the door on the conversation and gives you info to be show in that conversation."No matter what the respond is, we certainly won't search it if we don't talk to each ere was some repetition with the stories, but not enough that it ruins the experience.

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    I’ve never read a Murakami novel before so I had no idea what to expect from his running memoir. I’d seen it on the bookshelf of a number of runners so as I started training for my first marathon a few weeks ago, I picked up the book as well.I loved most of it. I found his philosophy with both running and writing to be related to mine. There are a lot of things that someone who’s not an endurance athlete can’t understand so maybe this book speaks to a narrow audience. But I’m glad to be a member of that audience. I found myself nodding along. I’d read a sample on my Kindle, then found a used paperback to so I could underline passages and create notes in the margin. I loved this book so much I penciled it that I’ve seen this glimpse into his mind I wish to test his novels, too.I would not say this is “equal parts training log, travelogue, and reminiscence,” as the book description does. It contains all those things, but not in equal parts. It’s a series of essays that he wrote, mostly during his training for the 2005 Fresh York Town Marathon, but the memories take him to other races and other periods of his life, and on a whirlwind tour of his stomping grounds across Hawaii, Boston, Greece, and Japan.

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    Just a beautifully written book. I don't do marathons (or triathlons) but I agree with and believe in so much of what this guy is talking about. He treats running as both an activity and as a metaphor-as a put to literally execute his commitment to improvement and hard work in the form of a small bit further or a small bit faster. Because if you can do it there, when no one is watching and it doesn't count, than you can sure do it for the rest of your is is actually something Tim Ferriss has been talking about, which is that you need some sort of physically activity in your life so that it function as a steady drip of excellence: your company may be having financial troubles but you just beat your mile time or maxed our your deadlift. This book is kind of a diary of one man (a enormously successful novelist) who has done and is doing that. It's got amazing examples of how to talk to your body-rather, how to kick it around-and how to motivate yourself and appreciate solitude. Again, it's very short but very poetic and worth reading.

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    I almost could have written this book... if I were as talented a writer as Mr Murakami, of course. As a runner, I similar to this book very much, often finding myself nodding or chuckling to myself because I totally understand what the author is talking about as he talks (writes) about running and his experience in participating in the sport over a lot of years. I admit I was unsure that I would like this book based on some of the reviews, but so a lot of fellow runners had recommended it that I finally picked it up, and I am so glad I did. It was a relatively fast read, too. At a few points I even found myself tearing up because I've had some related experiences as the author. I won't spoil the book by listing them here, but if you are a relatively competitive age-group runner/triathlete, you will likely search much in common with Mr Murakami's experiences and thoughts as described in this book. I wouldn't say that it gave me any more or less motivation to run, but it did support remind me of why I love running, and why so a lot of other people do, too.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    One of the most necessary books I have ever read.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    Item arrived on time and as presented.

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    What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape []  2020-1-22 22:29

    With the advent of electronic communication, it is far easier for us today than it ever has been before to search and converse with others who are like-minded or who have related experiences/backgrounds/cultures. This has been a unbelievable development, allowing collaborations and real-time info updates, and so much more. And, although it is difficult to consider this a "positive," per se, our ability to share info around the globe at the speed of sound has enabled us to see the darkest parts of humanity.We should not cheer to realize that women and girls throughout the globe are being systematically raped. We cannot consider it a boon to society that rape is deliberately used as a tool to terrify, subjugate, threaten, and control vulnerable people. However, we, as a global people, must not be willing to back away from this info and plead ignorance. We know what's going on. Now, we need to do something - a lot of somethings - about it.Rape is something that we must never become comfortable with or let to become set apart from us, as a larger group. I love this book because it does not shy away from the subject of rape. This is a genuine, brutally honest discussion about one of humanity's worst weapons. This book gives us names and faces, facts and histories. True info to broaden our understanding and let further honest conversations to thing this book is not, is comprehensive. Don't look to it as a complete subject contained within two covers. This is just a start. A method to become familiar with terminology, some primary facts, and then it is up to the reader to hold progressing from much needs to be done to address the rape crisis in this world. What to do for survivors, how to prevent attacks, how to punish violators. How to educate about the reality of this situation. How to stop victim-blaming. How to prevent the creation of fresh survivors and ke no mistake. Rape is absolutely a weapon. Rape has been used as a weapon since time immemorial, and is still used today because it continues to do exactly what the violators wish it to do. Rape still causes catastrophic damage. Rape is still terrifying enough to create people willing to bend to another's will, if only to avoid it event to themselves or others.I don't personally believe, at this point, that we will be able to take the power out of rape. What we can and MUST do, however, is search a method to create the cost unthinkable to offenders, and to empower victims and would-be victims. And we must, must search a method to answer on a global scale, as this is genuinely a global problem.I cannot recommend this book highly enough. I sincerely think it should be needed curriculum in every high school, secondary school, and college throughout the world.

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    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running []  2020-2-6 22:32

    I have this theory that goes like this: sometimes we search books, and sometimes books search us.Oftentimes I'll pick up a book, read a few lines, and quickly close the covers. I'll instinctively know that no matter how much I wish to read it that that book's notice was meant for a later time. And sure enough, years later, I'll spot the book on the corner of my shelf and be moved to pick it up, only to search exactly what I required to hear. It's funny how life, and reading, works that way.Other times I'll search a book in the most random method - through a footnote or a random citation in an obscure periodical, for instance - and that book's notice will be exactly what I required to hear at that moment in my life. That was certainly the case with Japanese novelist Karuki Murakami's unbelievable small book, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running.While training for the Fresh York Town Marathon Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami decided to write about it as well. What materialized was a special memoir that discusses his twin passions of writing and running, and the interesting method they nurture and inform each other.I've been struggling as of late staying focused on the hard work of writing, so when I opened the book and read the following lines I knew that a notice that I required to hear had found me:"One runner told of a mantra his older brother, also a runner, had taught him which he's pondered ever since he began running. Here it is: Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. Say you're running and you begin to think, Man this hurts, I can't take it anymore. The damage part is an unavoidable reality, but whether or not you can stand any more is up to the runner himself. This beautiful much sums up the most necessary aspect of marathon running."If you feel called to creative work, and are struggling with finding the discipline important to make a body of work, you'll search this playful, oftentimes philosophical memoir meal for your soul.

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    Suicide (Straight Talk About...(Crabtree)) []  2020-1-23 0:17

    Amazing condition

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    One of the best books I've read in a while. Every parent should read this book prior to an orthodontic consult. Much of what Dr. Lausen speaks about is coming of age. Widening the palate opens the airway which gives the tongue a put to call home. His chapters on mouth breathing, airway and TMJ dysfunction are signs and symptoms that have been overlooked for years. Thank you Dr. Lausen for all work that you do.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    When my wife and I were told by our dentist that our 18-year old son required jaw surgery to correct a Class III underbite, we were very concerned. Our orthodontist concurred with this course of action. We watched several YouTube videos of patients who had undergone orthognathic surgery. We then read some books by patients who had undergone this surgery and had shared their experiences. This surgery would be more difficult than we had anticipated, and now, we were quite worried. By a sheer stroke of luck we came across Dr. Lauson’s book on Amazon.Dr. Lauson takes a systems approach to the correction of malformed teeth. In other words, it is not just about teeth; he relates malocclusion to a number of interrelated factors, which are included in his nine keys to straight teeth, correct jaw structure, overall proportion of face, and healthy nasal breathing as well as prevention of TMJ pain and development of sleep apnea later in life. In my opinion, he correctly relates a lot of of the causal issues to mouth breathing and an underdeveloped upper jaw. As I read the book, I could checkmark a lot of of his nine keys as applicable to our son. In fact, my wife had earlier identified that mouth breathing was probably causing our son’s problems, but we had no clear explanation about the other factors and how these interacted with each other. Dr. Lauson’s book connects the dots in a language that parents can easily understand. Thankfully, our son did not have to go through surgery. Regardless of the decision taken by parents, they may wish to read this informative book first.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    This book is a android game changer in the field of orthondontics but also an extremely valuable resource for understanding how necessary it is to lay the foundation before putting braces on someone. This book should be in every parent's library so their children and themselves as well can be healthy satisfied and feeling great

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    Suicide (Straight Talk About...(Crabtree)) []  2020-1-23 0:17

    I recently required to search a book on children's grief for my daughters, and stumbled upon a book on suicide on the juvenile shelf that caught my attention. Talking to our children about suicide is daunting to most parents, and I always remind myself what Thomas Joiner (survivor and author of Why People Die By Suicide) says in his book; always tell your kids the truth.But talking about self- harm, eating disorders, even poor boyfriends, to our daughters in particular, puts fear in our hearts. Which is why I was so satisfied to search this series of books for kids at my local library. I plan on consulting the entire series, but for now I've absorbed the book on suicide hungrily. What I kept thinking to myself was, this needs to be on the adult shelf as well! It really breaks down, in an simple to digest way, what suicide is: wanting to stop the pain, not necessarily the life. Rather than rave on and on about how what an perfect resource this is for all, I've bullet pointed the unbelievable trueisms the book validates:Failed attempts are not just ways to "look for attention"- they are cries for support and should always be taken seriously.Feeling alone and fearing no one can support you is a common feeling; you are th may attempt suicide due to one single upsetting event, so healthy, satisfied kids are capable of making a wrong decision. Suicides occur in stable e book also delves into being a survivor and emphasizes "It is not the responsibility of others to stop a person from dying". Children have a lot of survivor guilt, and need to be reminded of this.Will this book be read?When I read a amazing book, particularly for kids, I often scoop up all the used copies on to give to friends. Sadly, I can't say I'll do that this time. Most people are horrified to learn my daughters know the term suicide, and would never be so honest with their own children, even if the subject came up directly. I can't create that decision for others, thus I won't be giving any copies of this book away this Christmas. But I will hold it on my bookshelf, because much like Iris Bolton's My Son, My Son, my copies of life saving books like these seem to always be required elsewhere. It's amazing to have these fabulous resources around, available to drop in the hands of, sadly, another fresh survivor.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    Perfect book. Should be needed reading in every orthodontic residency program....for the faculty!!

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    Perfect review of modern orthopedic methods in treating facial skeletal and dental malformations and ending with a healthy patient that's a tractive as well.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    There are so a lot of orthodontists/dentists that have no idea that there is more to straight teeth than just the teeth themselves. After having braces twice and still having problems, I was glad to be referred to Dr. Lauson and found out my issue was not my teeth, but my jaw and palate. Had I known this some time ago, I would have saved a lot of and pain. Amazing info for specialists and laypersons alike.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    Simple read. It makes SO much sense. A much better method of dealing with crowded teeth. I recimmend this book and this technique.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    After getting three various opinions from three various orthodontists about my daughter's teeth, I decided to educate myself about teeth and orthodontics so I could create an informed decision about what treatment to pursue, if any. This book is terrific at explaining common problems, treatment options, and how one's teeth and bite are necessary in the bigger picture of health and comfort. Since reading it and supplementing what I learned by reading other articles online, I am much more comfortable and confident choosing from among the options presented.

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    Studies have linked airway problems with less than desirable facial and dental development. Functional orthodontics, is one modality that can be used to address the hurt that exists and help with making positive changes. The " Lauson System: Nine Keys to Lower Facial Harmony" is a holistic approach that addresses MORE THAN CROOKED TEETH. I encourage the parents of my myofunctional therapy patients to read this informative book. It will provide them with the some of the important info required when making timely orthodontic decisions. Paula Fabbie, COM

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    Straight Talk About Crooked Teeth []  2020-8-3 19:30

    Gives me options for my sons begin bite.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    As a white person with a long-standing commitment to participating in the eradication of systems of oppression, I found this book invaluable. With all the reading I've done and all the workshops I've attended - and led - this book expanded my thinking. Oluo's writing style is engaging and accessible. She begins each chapter with a story from her own experience, told with startling openness, unpretentiousness and humor. She demystifies subjects such as privilege, intersectionality, microaggressions, cultural appropriation and more. She provides hints on how to begin a conversation about race without turning off the person you're talking e's honest about the sad fact that it probably won't go well and will feel uncomfortable. If you have never tried to talk about race, this book is a amazing how-to manual. If you're not sure you even wish to talk about race, this book may change your mind.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    Arrived on time and was exactly as described.

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    Talk About Teaching!: Leading Professional Conversations []  2020-1-18 18:32

    Talk About Teaching! was my first introduction to Charlotte Danielson's literature. While Charlotte Danielson has enjoyed wide acclaim in education circles, how that acclaim has been acquired is quite a perplexing question after reading this book.If you, the reader, are interested in finding research-based recommendations for leading professional conversations, this book will sorely disappoint you. I have never read a more biased and one-sided treatment of any aspect of professional practice within education. Danielson's dizzying array of assertions throughout the book are very often not supported by any quantitative, qualitative, historical, or philosophical research. It is doubtful that the book would meet Wikipedia's editorial standards of having material supported by citations from reliable sources. Looking in the References and Suggested Readings, there are about 70 sources similar to fields of education, leadership, and business. Upon examining the book itself, only 30 out of 70 sources are used. One chapter has zero citations, while other chapters have fewer than five. The book's lack of research evidence is inexcusable, particularly when it is addressed to professional educators who are under immense pressure to search and use practices that are actually supported by research r an author who touts the importance of consensus among faculty and leadership on the Huge Ideas, she seems quite unaware of the degree to which scholars DO NOT have consensus on problems of intelligence, motivation, and the broader field of education. One might wonder if consensus is conceived by Danielson as speaking of an problem with research from only one scholar; that's certainly the case in her treatment of intelligence, where she sights one author seven times. No other literature is given similar to intelligence, yet it is a very urgent topic of research among psychologists. Reading Danielson, you would never be the esenting change within education that has no grounding in research is risky and irresponsible. This book certainly bestows false clarity on several issues, not the least of which would be knowing the limits of true consensus within a community, and knowing the limits of one's own subjectivity.

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    Incandescent: We Need to Talk About Light []  2020-1-19 20:13

    I really enjoyed this book. It is really interesting and quite alarming. I've been researching light and health for a lot of years now and I still learned a lot. For one, I had no idea how severe some people react to synthetic light including skin reactions. The part that is really terrifying to me was to learn about the politics involved in how the incandescent light bulb became demonized and politicized. I am hopeful that scientist are finally taking light pollution seriously. I just hope that it is not too late.

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    Doing It: Let's Talk About Sex... []  2020-2-6 22:52

    I bought this for my 14 year old daughter. We have begin communication about and sexuality. I've read Girls and Sex and I'm just starting Boys and Sex. I'm a middle school teacher and have a sense of what's going on in the young teenage circles, what they know, and the info they lack. I like a lot about this book, but feel it gives too much permission for promiscuity based on the young author's opinion which is not what most parents would share with their 14 year olds. On that reason alone, I feel the book is better targeted towards 18+. At 14 years old, the girls need a bit more info about how to create choices and realize that being sexually active to hold someone else satisfied or interested is not the reason to become sexually active. I want that part, which is quite small, was not in the book, and then I'd give the book a much higher review.

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    Taboo: 10 Facts You Can't Talk About []  2020-6-14 18:35

    This book is hard to place down. Very well written, very thoughtful and realistic. Would highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to actually understand whether or not we actually have an epidemic of police murdering black people in our country. It's too poor this book wasn't written 5 years ago

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    This book was what I hoped for and more. Thank you Ijeoma Oluo for writing this book. I hear you

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    Doing It: Let's Talk About Sex... []  2020-2-6 22:52

    Absolutely AMAZING book riddled with extremely necessary answers to questions I’d been asking myself my entire life. The book is divided into sections, and it’s stated right off the begin that you don’t have to read it in order. I would recommend this to any human being on planet earth with even the smallest questions about anything similar to and relationships because Hannah Witton is SURELY to respond your questions. ♥️♥️♥️

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    Taboo: 10 Facts You Can't Talk About []  2020-6-14 18:35

    Professor Reilly wants to have the conversations we all are afraid to have, and in this book he breaks all the rules of our public discourse. But thanks to the Professor’s gentle and amazing natured humor, he not only leads us through some serious and complex subjects but does it entertainingly as well. His arguments are usually well sourced and clear, without excessive jargon or tendentiousness. He also gives samples of arguments from both extremes and rebuts them clearly and humorously, but without the bitter style of say, an Ann Coulter or Samantha Bee. Much of this material is covered in other locations (few things are fresh under the sun) but rarely with this level of clarity and fun for the reader. Highly recommended.

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    Taboo: 10 Facts You Can't Talk About []  2020-6-14 18:35

    The presumption of pervasive prejudice has become the basis of discourse. Professor Reilly's book Taboo tutorials us, with statistics and a dose of humor, to reasoned analysis of difficult social conflicts. He asks us to set aside the presumptions and passions and examine the basis of our beliefs. There is today an enormous expenditure of time and energy on correcting injustices that do not, in fact, exist. The suppression of inconvenient facts can only lead to faulty solutions. Freedom of speech has come to mean freedom to speak about topics that I search ere was a time when the word "argument" did not have a negative meaning. It used to mean reasoned, polite discourse with the objective of resolving differences. Now we just yell at each other. Professor Reilly has challenged us to examine the basis of our differences and have an argument.

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    Taboo: 10 Facts You Can't Talk About []  2020-6-14 18:35

    Simply perfect book on taboo topics, critiquing unhelpful famous movements from the begin borders crowd to the extremes of "Black Lives Matter" to the alt-right. Data-based and surprisingly funny!I will note that the 1-2 negative reviews posted here seem more than a small disingenious. The author SPECIFICALLY adjusts for population when discussing police shootings. In the year reviewed in depth, which was 2015, he points out that there were only 1,200 police killings, 258 involved Black people, AND that the little gap between this 23% rate and the percentage of Blacks in the population is explained by the Black violent crime rate (as reported by victims), which was 2.4 times the white rate as per the national crime report. This is literally the first analysis in the book, which is full of related useful statistics.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    The author makes it possible for privileged Americans to start to listen in more sensitive, productive ways to persons of color about their experiences in an America built on the fallacy of white Supremacy. She provides practical actions we can take to be part of creating an inclusive society that can give everyone the opportunity to be all they can is book is s sorely required tutorial for all of us who keep a vision of an inclusive society and wish to be part of the solution.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    Oluo's writing on race is some of the best that I have read. She has an awesome ability to convey necessary and complex ideas in straightforward language. Each chapter is very focused on a particular question, and through story and example she clarifies the problems and leads the reader to a better understanding. I got about half method through the book when it arrived in the mail, and when I was out shopping later, I picked up a second copy because I know I will wish to give this book to a teacher, chapter 9 "What is the school-to-prison pipeline?" had me near tears. The story of a 5 year old about to be suspended for having the kind of very poor day that can happen to 5 year olds is a amazing example of what Oluo has managed in this book. By looking at the private and then expanding outward, with research (several pages of notes referring to studies and research papers), Oluo is able to support us to understand the impact of the societal structures that uphold racial injustice. The book also has some concrete examples of what we can do to create positive changes.

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    Doing It: Let's Talk About Sex... []  2020-2-6 22:52

    This is a book for everyone, straight, gay, and anyone in between. Like her videos, Hannah does a amazing job at educating people and exposing us to fresh things while still being entertaining and enthusiastic.I would even go as far as to recommend this book be place in schools and offices all over the world. Well done, Hannah

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    Taboo: 10 Facts You Can't Talk About []  2020-6-14 18:35

    Dr. Reilly eviscerates the distorted history and false memes used by the 'social justice' fighters to drive a wedge between black and white and make more hatred and discontent. I highly recommend this book to those seeking a better understanding of the racial problems and conversations going on in the country today. 'Taboo' blows away the smoke that clouds the problems and takes the conversations where they belong - to the truth. In 1911 Booker T. Washington wrote 'There is a class of colourful people who create a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Some of these people do not wish the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not wish to lose their jobs.' This is as real then as it is today, and 'Taboo' echoes Mr. Washington's declaration and supports it with education, clarity and truth. Add Dr. Reilly's 'Hate Crime Hoax' and Heather MacDonald's 'The Diversity Delusion' and you obtain a rounded picture of what the social justice fighters are trying to you.

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    Talk About Teaching!: Leading Professional Conversations []  2020-1-18 18:32

    Charlotte Danirlson continues to lead education with current thinking and research. This book, as a school proncipal, created me think a lot about what I talk about with my teachers. It is an exceptional book and highly recommend it.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    What author would write a book with a target audience that is likely to consider reading it, much less paying for it, akin to wishing for a root canal? Apparently, Ijeoma Oluo.I am a white, sexagenarian, male, and former CEO. I am, therefore, a r#cist. (And yes, I am being sensitive to the censors who will look at this before posting it.) And I accept that because this isn’t about me. My private tolerance is irrelevant. If a picture says a thousand words, an action is worth ten thousand pictures. That is how we should judge each om my very privileged position in America, I have had a bird’s eye view of the systemic, institutional privilege (which in the negative is discrimination) that currently defines virtually all Western institutions today, including virtually all corporations.Women have not shattered the corporate glass ceiling because the corporate institution was designed and built by men. Blacks have not achieved equity in the economic arena because it was designed by white men. Which is why, as Ijeoma points out, it really doesn’t matter if the man in charge is a racist or a misogynist or e #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements are all about gender and racial discrimination. What has enabled misogyny and racism, however, is the definition and allocation of power in our institutions and our society. Tolerance is great, but it’s nowhere near enough. Until we challenge the structure of power, we will not address the underlying cause of social and economic are the main takeaways I got from this book:- It’s not about me or Ijeoma. This is about structural injustice.- It’s not about the tone of the discussion. This is about structural injustice.- It’s not about intent. This is about structural injustice.- It’s not about who is right and who is wrong. This is about structural injustice.- It’s not about who can use what words. This is about structural the end, the amazing strength and the amazing weakness of our political economy is our over-riding emphasis on the individual and his or her opportunities and rights. There’s nothing wrong with that per se. But in this crowded, technologically enabled globe we live in, it’s not enough. We can live individually but we can only be judged collectively. Our insistence that every conversation be about me, or you, or Ijeoma, or that person over there, is blinding us to the degree that we really are all in this ientists used to view the environment as a collection of independent and discrete parts. There was a prairie here, an Arctic ice field there, and a rain forest someplace a long method away. They now realize, however, that there is only one ecosystem and what happens in the rain forest is just as necessary as what happens in the Iowa corn field.Other scientists have discovered the same thing about the other hard and sciences. Biology and economics don’t chop it any more. We have to think in terms of evolutionary biology and behavioral economy. True understanding lies not just within a functional discipline, but also in the locations that separates them and the overlaps that interconnect , I go back to my original question. Why did Ijeoma write this book? I won’t pretend to know the respond but it is clear that she has a genuine desire to see us face the issue. And after reading this book it is clear that the desire is genuine. And while it is theoretically real that if she is successful she will have to search something fresh to write about, so what? That is exactly the kind of binary, digital thinking that is at the heart of the problem. Life is not either/or. It is, with tolerance, and/but.Ijeoma has a perspective. And the tone is sometimes a bit harsh. But how could it not be? In the end I think the most awesome and laudable thing about her language is that she obviously worked so hard to hold a lid on her passion. If she were white, we would elect her to high I appropriating Ijeoma’s book by writing this review? Yes. But that’s irrelevant. I am not her. And my appropriation is going to paint racism with a white brush and, potentially, demean that pain. But that is the thinking of a binary thinker—either/or. And that, in the end, is what we have to overcome. Tolerant people are not binary thinkers. Tolerance is not a function of embracing the other side of the binary issue. It is about eliminating the binary divide. Ultimately, the racism talked about here is about institutional models of power that disadvantage one group over another. (And, as Ijeoma points out, there are many.)In the end, I won’t say this was the most pleasant read. It was, however, a amazing read. It created me think. And for that I am grateful to the author. I won’t say, “well done,” because that would be an appropriation, as if I could evaluate how well she had represented her pain. I can’t. It’s hers, not mine. I will say, however, that “I listened.” And I listened because you were clear and authentic. And I do thank you for that.A must read. Period.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    Without a doubt, this book is going to challenge you and create you think. It carries such a strong notice that words can’t properly describe the truth and honesty that’s reflected in this book. It’s compelling, thoughtful, a WOC, there’s so much I connected with. It created me re-think my experiences and struck a chord within. It also created me think about race in a completely various with an begin mind and be ready to listen and learn. The value of Ijeoma Oluo’s words are priceless. This is a must read for 2018.

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    So You Want to Talk About Race [Book]  2018-2-9 18:0

    Are you working on yourself to check your white privilege? Taking action to dismantle structural white privilege and white supremecy? Reading articles, www services and books? Trying to piece together the problems with the language around white supremacy? This book is for you. Trying to explain to your loved ones why Racial Justice is so necessary to you? You need this book. It discusses so a lot of racial justice subjects and phrases clearly, authentically and with heart. Punches don't appear to be pulled and I think that was necessary. I highly recommend this book. In fact, I hope you read it in your book club, one for your community Small Library, and create it the book you give for birthdays this apters necessary to me were: "What is intersectionality and why do I need it?", "But what if I hate Al Sharpton?", "How can I talk about affirmative action?" and "What is cultural appropriation?"Two chapters broke my heart: "Why can't I touch your hair?" and "Why are our students so angry?"Two favorite lines: "Nothing lets you know you are going to die alone like when you test to search a seat in a school cafeteria...""To refuse to listen to someone's cries for justice and equality until the request comes in a language you feel is comfortable with is a method of asserting your dominence over them in a situation."You may have seen blog posts about paying Black Women for their work - for taking time to educate us. This required education is a Black Friday, Cyber Monday and Little Business Saturday bargain rolled into one at thrice the price!

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    We need to talk about statins []  2019-12-25 18:18

    A must read for anyone concerned about their health

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    Talk About Teaching!: Leading Professional Conversations []  2020-1-18 18:32

    This provides a well thought out insight into the dynamics of ongoing educational conversations. The emphasis on collaboration is very relevant.

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