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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    I so enjoyed Missy's story. Kathryn Smith's research and words have added a much-needed piece to the life and times of Franklin Roosevelt. Marguerite LeHand was an invaluable participant in his administration.Had she not experienced a stroke, I wonder if FDRwould have lived to see the end of Globe Battle II?Terry James

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    GREAT

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    A very amazing look at the "behind the scenes" political landscape of the 30's and 40's from a private perspective. My assumptions were challenged, which is always good.

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    I just finished The Gatekeeper, which I couldn't wait to read, and I wasn't disappointed. Ms. Smith has done a masterful job of telling the story of Missy LeHand's life. It is a page turner and immensely readable. Smith makes me feel like I really know and understand this extraordinary woman. I hope she writes another biography soon; I really enjoyed this one!!!

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    This was a amazing read. At times I felt like the proverbial fly on the wall to all the political action. The book gets your attention from the beginning and holds your attention throughout. Missy's accomplishments are monumental considering the time period and the relegation of women to second class status.

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    Beautifully researched and documented biography of a fascinating woman essential to both FDR and ER. Especially amazing insight into the importance of Warm Springs for "polios".

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    Less about Missy LeHand than about FDR politics and context. By the end of the book she still was no more true as a person--just the obviously highly competent right-hand aide who continued to help FDR and his work all her life until her illness incapacitated her. Other books on the Roosevelts provide as much "insight."

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    I absolutely loved this long-overdue acc of Missy LeHand, who truly was a key to FDR's success and longevity as president. The author's detail and comprehensive list of resources is outstanding. I love her writing style and appreciation for the small info that create the telling of a life so valuable. Highly recommend!!

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    Remarkable biography of an enigmatic woman who mostly ended up as a footnote in the majority of histories on FDR. Glad her story has finally been told with lots of sources to authenticate it.

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    The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency [Book]  2018-1-19 18:0

    Amazing read but a lot of repetition

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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

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    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Prof. Edwards is a learned academic economist, an historian richly informed by the original sources of his subject, and a gifted story-teller who writes an entertaining tale begin to the common reader’s understanding. In a time when, as Robert Samuelson has remarked, “Historians don’t do economics and economists don’t do history,” and neither often does clear prose, American Default brings the three together in rare combination. The book contends that the devaluation of the dollar and the abrogation of the gold clauses in the early days of the Fresh Deal amounted, at the end of much constitutional wrangling, to “an excusable default.” The argument is persuasive but Prof. Edwards’ even-handed, and even-tempered, presentation gives full weight to the opposite view: “Independently of its outcome, and of the fact that the nation benefited from it, the abrogation of the gold clauses and the subsequent devaluation of the dollar in January 1934, represented a break in a solemn promise.” Circumstances alter cases and yet, dura lex sed lex.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    In 1935, in one of FDR's major Supreme Court victories, the Court upheld the government's banning of gold clauses in personal financial agreements. These clauses, which at one time were frequently employed, needed the payment of a debt either in regular currency or in gold depending upon the wishes of the creditor. FDR through Congress cancelled these clauses in to depreciate U.S. currency as one tool to war the Depression. Yet, as necessary as is this case, I believe this is perhaps the first book-length study of the case. The author is a Professor of International Economics at rhaps one reason for so small attention to the decision is that to fully understand the litigation, one must master the economic dimensions of the gold clause issue. The author devotes the first 118 pages of the book to explaining why the decision was so vital to FDR's tools in fighting the Depression. As an economist, he is well qualified to discuss this background--and I think this is the part of the book that he is really excited about, less so for the legal dimensions. The author writes for the economic layperson (such as myself) quite well, but at times I found it a @#$%!&allenging to ingest all this technical analysis. Probably real as well was I wanted to obtain the Court discussion, and my impatience may have interfered with patiently reading the economic analysis. That being said, the author makes these economic concepts understandable, and the reader can't really grasp the crucial importance of the decision without a healthy dose of this economic e author devotes 68 pages to the legal dimensions of the issue. He discusses how the cases got to the Court; profiles the nine justices, highlighting the importance of the "four horsemen"; recapitulates the arguments created on both sides; and discusses FDR's tactic should the Court keep versus the government. One interesting facet is that the author identifies how a lot of of the very same arguments were created recently in some Argentina e dual focus of economics and law produces a very searching and informative analysis. The author's Introduction gives the reader a fast overview of the issues. As well, the author has included an extensive Time Line, and an interesting Dramatis Personae consisting of short profiles of the key players including the White House, the Senators, the Economists, and the Justices. Extensive notes and a helpful bibliography are also included. A lot of photographs and economic charts are also presented. This is a challenging problem to discuss in a meaningful fashion, and the author is to be commended not only for undertaking his analysis but also for doing it in so skillful a manner.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    When it comes to the study of sovereign default, author Sebastian Edwards, a UCLA professor, got his baptism of fire studying the 16 year saga that started with the 2001 Argentinian default. Inevitably, this led him to the much larger, and poignantly similar, US default to all holders of gold-linked dollar debt in 1933.“American Default” is a blow-by-blow acc of how FDR did a Nestor Kirchner and got away with it –just!The full background is given here. You obtain profiles of his “brain trust” of advisors (I had no idea where the expression “holy Moley” came from, so that was cool), of the nine supreme court justices, with more emphasis on former presidential candidate chief justice Evans and the leader of the “four horsemen,” James McReynolds than on rock stars Brandeis and Cardozo and of other necessary FDR cabinet members, and advisors like Woodin, Morgenthau and re than anything else, the author convinced me that FDR 100% created it up as he went along! The main thesis of the book is that the US was taken off the gold standard (and all gold was as amazing as confiscated) because a Cornell professor of agricultural economics, George Warren, convinced Roosevelt that the depressed of agricultural commodities could be created to rise again if the dollar was devalued vs gold. It’s not clear FDR totally bought this theory, but God knows he gave it a shot.A full chapter is dedicated to the vain effort to achieve this goal through direct intervention in the gold shop by the president himself, who would mischievously decide the gold for every day while having breakfast in bed, surrounded by his a lot of t unlike what happened some seventy years later with Quantitative Easing, however, the voodoo seems to have helped the economy recover. 100% unlike what happened with mortgages in 2008-09, of course, the main plank of government policy was to violate sanctity of contract, thereby lightening the burden on everyone who had borrowed versus gold-linked dollars by more than one third.What I took away from reading this, basically, is that the largest problem that legally differentiates the US default of 1933 from the Argentinian restructuring of 2005 (namely that the US default was purely domestic, whereas the Argentines chiefly defaulted on foreigners) not only helped FDR prevail when four plaintiffs took his policies to the Supreme Court, but also perhaps serves to explain why the US remains in a funk ten years after the financial crisis:In the thirties, the US was prepared to abrogate the right of domestic gold-linked bondholders to a windfall; ten years ago, the Chinese government was created whole on its holdings of Fannie and Freddie, all while the rate of homeownership in the US was allowed to plummet from 69% to 61%.It’s not that surprising we got Trump, is it?I’d love to give the book five stars, because it’s clearly a labor of love and it was a genuine page-turner. Except I can’t. I can’t forgive the author his second-rate explanation on page 128 of how the monetary base can move in the opposite direction from M1 and I can forgive even less his ABYSMAL analysis on pages 130-131 of the happenings that led up to the happenings he can he have delved so deeply into the period starting in 1932 without doing a couple days’ worth of analysis of what went before? As the author himself recounts, FDR’s most popular policy ever, the bank holiday of March 1933, was 100% a legacy policy designed by his predecessors. Minimal research would have been sufficient to establish that Hoover and his cabinet beautiful much came up with and to a amazing extent implemented most of the policies included in the Fresh Deal. They may not have been as daring or innovative (or gloriously unconstitutional!) as Roosevelt, but they did not cause the Amazing Depression. Its causes were much rhaps a junior wrote pages 128 – 131. Edwards should have read them before going to press. I say that and I remember the “press copy” anecdote he tells so well, and it breaks my heart.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    This is a really perfect book about a fascinating topic! Highly osevelt’s decision to abandon the gold standard was a watershed moment in the Amazing Depression and arguably a watershed moment in monetary history. What is less appreciated is how complex this action was. Most debt contracts at the time had a gold clause. Unless these clauses were annulled, devaluation would have led the debts of a lot of Americans (households, corporations, and the government) to skyrocket in dollar terms. This would have been potentially catastrophic. The government thus decided to retroactively annul these gold clauses. … Yes, that sounds like abrogation of property rights; sounds like something we associate with Argentina as opposed to the US. But it happened in the US only 85 years ago and was ultimately upheld by the courts.Edwards tells the story of these happenings – why Roosevelt did it and why the courts allowed it – in a fast-paced, exciting manner.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Beautifully written and very powerful. With wonderful facts in this book Mr. Edwards brought us back to an era we must not forget and to remind ourselves that a amazing depression could happen again. Edwards goes in depth of that crisis then and showing us the economic truth not only about the United States but the entire world. You will not be disappointed in reading this book as you'll explore an awesome writer and storyteller. Highly recommended to everyone. Enjoy!

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    As an economic history nerd I can only applaud the work of my UCLA colleague Sebastian Edwards in his vibrant telling the story of the long forgotten Supreme Court showdown over the United States’ abrogation of contracts written with the gold clause. Remembering the inflation of the Civil Battle greenback era, most creditors demanded gold clauses in debt contracts in which they would be repaid in in either gold or its paper equivalent is system worked fine until the onset of the Amazing Depression. It is here where Edwards begins his story as President Roosevelt adopts an inflationist policy by first abandoning the gold standard by requiring all citizens to turn in their physical gold at the then $20.67/ounce price. Then in June 1933 Congress adopts a joint resolution authorizing Roosevelt to increase the of gold which he ultimately does to $35/ounce and the legislation abrogates the gold clause in all contracts. Indeed, most economists the early recovery from the depression directly to the monetary easing associated with Roosevelt’s gold policies.If Congress hadn’t abrogated the gold clause all debts would have been written up to reflect the devaluation by 69%. Thus it would require a payment of approximately $1700 to repay a nominal debt of $1,000. Needless to say a host of bankruptcies would have ensued.Of course several creditors sued and Edwards skillfully moves the action from Roosevelt and Congress to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court ruled that it was in Congress’ power to alter personal contracts, but it was not in its power to alter U.S. government debt. However, the court ruled that as of the date of the Joint Resolution gold was still trading at $20.67/ounce and Americans were not allowed to possess physical gold at that time. Hence there would be no damages. A brilliant 5-4 ruling by Chief Justice e reason why these cases have been forgotten is that if they went the other method all hell would have broken loose. Instead of rallying as the stock shop did after the ruling, stocks likely would have crashed. It would have triggered a constitutional crisis with Court vs the other two branches of government. Indeed the lead up to the ruling was a precursor to the 1937 court war that Roosevelt would an aside Edwards notes that the United States had a treaty with Panama concerning the lease payments for the Panama Canal. That treaty had a gold clause in it. After a long negotiation in 1939 the lease payment was increased retroactive to 1934 thereby reflecting the dollar devaluation. Thus, the U.S. created amazing on its international treaty obligations.“American Default” is a worthy addition to the economics literature of the Amazing Depression. It should be read with the works of Friedman & Schwartz, Bernanke, Irwin, Eichengreen and Sumner. And because it is more a history book than an economics book the lay reader should search it very readable. Further given the rising debt/GDP ratio in the U.S. when coupled with even larger unfunded liabilities, the idea of a 21st century American default is not totally improbable.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Sebastian Edwards has provided a detailed acc of Roosevelt's decision to take the United States off the gold standard and the political and judicial fallout that resulted. Although I've read a number of books on the Amazing Depression and the Fresh Deal, most of the detail given here was fresh to me.Once the country was off the gold standard, the legal question became whether the gold clauses in a lot of government and personal bonds that needed the borrower to create payments in gold were still legally valid. Sanctity of contracts is, of course, a key underpinning of the shop system, but requiring that bonds be repaid in gold at a time of deflation would have imposed a massive burden on buyers. Ultimately, the Supreme Court sided with the federal government and allowed the gold clauses to be though Edwards does a amazing job in discussing the key problems involved, the book is very sloppy, as several other reviewers have noted. It seems evident that the book was never gone over by a copyeditor because there are a ton of omitted words, inadvertent repetitions, and grammatical errors. The graphs are also a mess.Edwards holds an endowed chair at a major university. He should have taken some of the expense from the chair and hired a amazing copyeditor, assuming that Princeton University Press was unwilling to do it for him. Even hiring a grad student to give the manuscript a read-through would have caught some of the more obvious ur prominent economists provide rave reviews for the back cover. Did none of them say, "Hey Sebastian, Amazing book, but be sure to obtain it proofed before publication." Apparently not!

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    This fast-paced and eminently readable acc of the happenings and personalities surrounding the 1930s FDR abrogation of all gold clause contracts, even to contain the outright confiscation of gold itself, is a must-read for anyone with an interest in the “barbarous relic”, the guaranteed by Article 1, Section 8 of the US Constitution. The Coinage Act of 1792, one of the first acts of the US Congress, actually provided the death penalty for monkeying with the gold or silver content of the coinage. No matter. All went out the window with FDR’s Executive Order and subsequent acts of Congress, culminating in the aggregated Gold Clause cases, narrowly decided 5-4, by the Supreme Court (with bitter dissents) in 1935. These sorry happenings are almost totally ignored in history and economics textbooks and modern law courses, probably out of a sense of national shame. Unfortunately, the precedents are used even today to justify modern sovereign defaults in Argentina, Venezuela, and others sure to come, all succinctly summarized by Prof. Edwards. There are quite a few unfortunate typos in the book, but they don’t detract from the lively and well-documented discussion. This book belongs in the hands of anyone interested in and the sanctity of contracts.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    I expect the gold bugs and the crypto crowd will search this an interesting book. Probably the gold bugs already know the story. The end of the hoarders is one interesting story and the Supreme Court cases about debt and the "gold clause" are even more interesting. Best part of the book is the author's summary of the legal arguments and judgments in these cases which are now precedents. The author concludes that devaluation is no huge issue if it is accomplished through court rulings and precedents. Time will tell. There is a short meditation regarding entitlements at the end that should probably give everyone pause. I take one star away for a surprisingly weak copy editing effort: there were more than half a dozen glaring grammatical mistakes, not what I'd expect from a university imprint. To the author's the book avoids mumbo jumbo and is easily read by anyone.

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    American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold []  2020-1-29 9:32

    In a past life, the author must have been a historian. Very well researched and written book. It makes economic history understandable to those who are used to read history of other fields and topics. Amazing contribution as well to the understanding of the US history looking at people who created decisions based on their historical context, the info they had at their disposal and the urgency to solve an immediate issue that affected millions of people. Remarkable story of bright minds working together for the greater amazing under difficult circumstances. The author describes and analyze these interactions with solid data and elegant prose.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    Enjoyable read. Concise and relevant. I learned a lot.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    insightful, informed, extraordinarily ould be needed reading at the elementary school level, although it is a book for all ages.while the views are that of the author, he is a highly informed student of the Court and warrant serious consideration by all citizens, in my also teaches a lot about American history and how organizations work in general.I highly recommend the book. A few sections are somewhat technical, but worth it.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    Fascinating. "inside information" on Supreme Court justices.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    On time and as advertised.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    Dr. Thompson’s book is a must-read for all students of the American Revolution. It builds upon the work of Bailyn and Wood, bringing ideas back to the forefront. If you wish to understand the American Revolution, THIS is the book you NEED to read. Crucial for both students and general audiences, Dr. Thompson teaches us that ideas matter!

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    For a look into some of the most well known figures in the Supreme Court, this book does a unbelievable job. From in-depth analysis of their personalities to small anecdotes on each Justice, the Author clearly knows his 's a tad short, and I think the specific cases could have been covered in greater detail. While it was informative, it didn't have that something unique that had me anxious to hold reading. At times, I felt like I was reading a history book.If you're someone looking to obtain some background into the Supreme Court and some of the characters that shaped it, this is a amazing book to begin with. You may not feel completely entertained, but you will feel smarter after reading this book.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    This book is more like 4 mini books in one. It describes in detail four various historical periods in the Supreme Court and how conflicting views among it's 9 members have shaped our current laws and higher legal system.While it's an interesting vignette into the lives of the some of the Supreme Court Justices, there really isn't much to be learned about the institution itself. If you're looking for info on specific cases, you wont search them here. This is a book about the justices, their personalities, their lives, and how their feuds helped shape the court into what it is e book has no partisan message, it's more about the people than the politics. There is some criticism of Justice's Alito and Thomas but it's more for their ideological inconsistency than some sort of liberal bias. It's worth a read if you're interested in the Supreme Court.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    The larger point of this book is interesting and convincing. That collegiality and consensus-building may be more necessary traits than sheer intellect in determining long-term influence is a thesis that has is book falters in a few ways though. First, Rosen seems to have an axe to grind with certain justices. His characterizations of Holmes, for example, were a bit over the top. Second. In some locations he seemed to cherry pick the evidence. In other areas, the conclusions were all over the place. On Holmes, Rosen had virtually nothing positive to say nor did he attempt to introduce any balance. On Black though, his arguments were all over the map. Was Black 's style really that effective towards the end? Also, is Scalia really that ineffective? Is he really that much of an ideologue considering how often he departs from conservatives on criminal justice problems and a loner considering Ginsburg is one of his closest friends? Third, I think he missed the tag by not adding a chapter on Burger vs Brennan. Finally, the writing could have been better. Too a lot of gratuitous "big" words. The writing was just gaudy with very small reward in elegance.I should note the interview with Justice Roberts was illuminating. I think that might have been one of the stronger chapters in the book. Also, Rosen's assessment of Harlan (mostly the first one, but to a lesser extent, the second) and Rehnquist were ere are some gems, but overall, this is a mediocre book.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    Rosen is an perfect writer and knows his subject. I teach major Supreme Court decisions and have incorporated much of Rosen's content in my teachings and discussions.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    Brad Thompson’s meticulously researched and carefully crafted fresh book A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence That Defined It is a must read for any American interested in a new and enlightening view of our country’s intellectual foundation. A deep thinker of the highest order, this professor-author takes us step by step, sentence after sentence of the Declaration itself and illuminates both its philosophical heritage and its innovative ideas in a manner that will astound even those of us who already have a fine grounding in the subject. He makes us think (and appreciate) anew the Declaration’s radical, historically original depth of moral meaning and the brilliant minds of those who made it. He also evenhandedly and compassionately to all—slaves and a lot of owners as well--with the topic of slavery in a method I have never encountered before. [The only book I can think of that should be read as a companion to Thompson’s is Matthew Stewart’s NATURE’S GOD: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic because where Thompson focuses on the learned intellectuals who led us into battle versus England and achieved our independence, Stewart limns “ordinary” rebellious Americans like Ethan Allan and Thomas Young—who ever heard of Young before?—who were so operative in encouraging a revolutionary mind-set in “average” Colony folks.] It is particularly notable that the Epilogue of A Moral History. . . reads like a Prologue for another book of warning regarding America’s future. Who knew that so a lot of slave holders blatantly supported slavery and outright socialism—their plantations having been “little countries” to be emulated nationally—even after the emancipation? This book should be needed reading especially for high school and college-age young people who are being indoctrinated into voluntary enslavement every day by “educators” brainwashed as completely as the students they now tutorial into the shackles of collectivism in one form or another. This masterful work is not only an homage to the formative yesteryears of America’s birth but also a clarion call to rise up again, this time as an internally threatened people, and war for the freedom of all our tomorrows.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    This book may be the most necessary work of American history in generations. In fact, it may be the most necessary book of our time.Hyperbole? Not in the least. I had the opportunity to preview this book in manuscript, and I have been eagerly anticipating its publication. Distinguished political philosopher and historian C. Bradley Thompson has marshaled extraordinary scholarship and a lucid, elegant style to show a fresh conception of the American Revolution -- one that challenges and is sure to change conventional interpretations and contemporary criticisms. Tracing the genesis and meaning of each premise of the Declaration of Independence, Professor Thompson demonstrates that the Founders were not motivated primarily by economic interests or even political ideology, but by a revolutionary fresh moral philosophy. The effect is an exceptional history of American Exceptionalism -- and a magisterial defense of what Professor Thompson has referred to simply as "Americanism."My proclamation of this book's singular importance is no exaggeration -- not when we consider how universally and relentlessly the foundations of "the American experiment" have been under attack. This assault is nothing new: Some of the earliest critics of the Founders' principles were antebellum apologists for chattel slavery, such as John C. Calhoun, who presciently saw the proclamation of universal individual rights in the Declaration of Independence as a threat to their odious subjugation of their fellow man. The onslaught versus the fundamental ideas of the Declaration was continued by leftist historians of the Progressive Era, based largely on ad hominem arguments about the alleged motives of the Founders. The Founders' elevation of individualism, these critics argued, was merely an intellectual rationalization for their selfish economic interests; and the fact that some of them were themselves Southern slaveholders revealed hypocrisy, thus re recently -- and most notably since Howard Zinn's bestselling "People's History of the United States" vandalized American history with Marxist smears -- it has been Conventional Wisdom that the United States was not founded in noble principles of individual rights and equality under the law; rather, it was grounded in the oppression of blacks and indigenous peoples, and in the exploitation of the downtrodden for the benefit of the few. This neo-Marxist fairy tale has been propagated by the Fresh York Times, whose much-touted "1619 Project" aims explicitly at rewriting the history of the United States as beginning not with the Declaration's seminal proclamation of inalienable individual rights, but with the arrival of the first slaves on our shores. That anti-American narrative is being taught to generations of impressionable young minds, who are coming to hate their own country and to despise its foundational principles -- without even grasping what they are."America's Revolutionary Mind" more than a counter-narrative to neo-Marxist smears versus America; it IS that counter-narrative. To muster his defense of the Founding generation, Professor Thompson has compiled massive, irrefutable evidence -- drawn from innumerable journal entries, personal letters, public sermons, newspaper columns, speeches, pamphlets, books, and official resolutions from the years leading up to the Revolution itself.His clever way of framing his case is to devote one chapter to each of the primary premises enunciated in the Declaration -- then to trace the history of that particular idea, citing the treasure trove of documents from the period. He shows that these were not the views of some isolated, self-serving elite; they were the "common sense" of the time, championed by easy farmers as well as sophisticated lawyers, by pastors as well as politicians, by humble shopkeepers as well as wealthy bankers. It is the chronicle of a rising famous movement that upheld -- with astonishing, explicit clarity -- an ethics of individualism, which in turn came to motivate a battle for their individual rights to life, liberty, property, and pursuit of veral decades ago, I reviewed Henry Steele Commager's "The Empire of Reason" -- his dazzling, inspiring history of how Enlightenment ideas, first imagined in Europe, were implemented in America. "America's Revolutionary Mind" tracks the intellectual odyssey of Enlightenment ideas farther and deeper: It shows specifically how they manifested themselves in a famous American ethos, and were enshrined in the documents that provided the founding framework for a fresh nation."America's Revolutionary Mind" is a masterful historic examination of the roots of "Americanism" -- and a ringing defense of America versus its critics. It should become a fixture in the curricula of college history courses, to serve as a counterweight to the calumnies being spread versus this amazing country. C. Bradley Thompson has given America the tribute it has so long deserved, and that those of us who love America have so long awaited.UPDATE: This should be listed as a "verified purchase": I bought the Kindle edition of this book well before posting this review.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    Wasn't biblical either

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    The theory laid out by the author is that the justices on the court who have the most ability to build consensus are the most successful and the ones most likely to have their cases stand the try of time. He utilizes 3 sets of justices and a justice and a president to attempt to create his argument.While the book is interesting, and interesting insights into the minds of the people involved as well as a look at their judicial philosophies, I think the book suffers from one major flaw. While making the case using these justices, he ignores numerous other justices. It is my suspicion, although I cannot verify it, that if he used various pairs of justices, his conclusions might have been a bit different. Place another way, it is very possible that the author cherry picked these justices to create his be a valid hypothesis, the author would have to look at other pairs of justices and see if his idea holds water. Until that happens, this is just another book that examines the quirks of the different justices involved.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    This is the "companion" volume to the latest PBS series on the Court, but it is very various from that program. The author, Jeffrey Rosen, is a Professor of Law at George Washington University here in Washington, although he also writes for "The Fresh Republic" and other prominent magazines such as "The Atlantic." Rather than exclusively focusing on case development, as the PBS series beautiful much does, Rosen rather concentrates on developing a focus on the "temperament" of different Justices (and President Jefferson) and how their temperamental outlooks and characteristics affected the activities of the Court. The book is built around four chapters, each of which juxtaposes two individuals, who Rosen argues had substantially various temperaments: Marshall and Jefferson; Harlan I and Holmes; Black and Douglas; and Rehnquist and sen's focus on temperament is both helpful and, on occasion, a problem. It is helpful because it reminds us of a fact too often overlooked when reading Supreme Court history: for all their lofty status, the Court is still a little group of strong-minded individuals with healthy egos who have contrasting goals and persuasive techniques, but remain fundamentally just humans with all their frailties. So, they can lose their tempers, obtain alienated, lash out, suffer emotional hurt, and so forth just like the rest of us. Just as in his previous book, "The Most Democratic Branch" (also reviewed on Amazon), Rosen is extremely skillful in explaining legal concepts and Court holdings in such a method as to create them easily understood by the general reader. The issue with his approach is that he must juxtapose individuals to create it work, and I found myself disagreeing to a certain extent with his portrayals of certain folks (Holmes, especially, Jefferson somewhat less so, and William O. Douglas a bit), which seemed strained in to give some zip to his discussion. Conversely, I found him too sanguine in evaluating others, such as Rehnquist and even Black to a certain extent. But these are problems that can be argued of the most valuable sections of the book is the conclusion, which is largely devoted to a fascinating interview of Chief Justice Roberts after his first year heading the Court. At 258 pages, including notes, the text moves alone nicely, and only on occasion does Rosen obtain too immersed in detailed legal analysis as to cause difficulties for the general reader. I found the Rehnquist-Scalia and the Black-Douglas chapters to be the best--but this is not to slam the other two chapters. There are some amazing illustrations and helpful notes, but no bibliography. A good, solid treatment for the general reader.

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    The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America []  2020-1-24 22:6

    Amazing look at the contrasts of personalities of the past Supreme Court justices. Anyone interested in SCOTUS would be happy in the book.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    C. Bradley Thompson’s book was a surprising and unbelievable revelation.His thesis is that from roughly 1760 to 1776 the American colonists distilled a new, radical and even revolutionary political philosophy; that this philosophy was concisely and eloquently framed and set forth in the Declaration of Independence; that the Founders knew that they were inventing a fresh philosophy, they were self-aware and deliberate; and that this fresh political philosophy became the foundation of a completely fresh society, culture and government unlike any seen before in human e Declaration was not just an eloquent document, written to justify the Revolution and stir people’s spirits; it was the final summation of a tremendous amount of thinking and writing that had gone before by many, a lot of colonists. It is not a surprise that he attributes the essential premises of this revolution in thinking to John Locke. What is surprising, and what Thompson documents prodigiously, is how a lot of colonists were completely and profoundly aware of where they were getting their ideas, and how thoroughly they had thought about them, and how clear they were about the interconnections of those ideas. If ever there were an exemplary illustration of the fact that ideas move the world, this is it.I enjoyed this book tremendously.

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    America's Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration That Defined It []  2019-12-20 18:40

    A really interesting and insightful approach to the analysis of the American Revolution.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    I bought this book for my husband as one of his father's day gifts. He said it was a very well researched book and has learned so a lot of things about "The Boys of Summer" and the role they played in WWII. We are a baseball loving family and really appreciate their sacrifices.....all of them.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    Love the story about Kelly formula.Ed Thorp is very curious and brilliant. He tests the Kelly formula on gambling and investing. And created a lot of money.He further develops fresh tools for both gambling and investment, making more money. In fact, Thorp has one of the best track records in e book also talks about Claude Shannon, a amazing mathematician and a amazing investor.Overall, a highly recommended book.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    I LOVE THIS SHOW! These two changed my life. They are part of this intersectionality that is real, vast, but still underrepresented; Queer, black, femme, nerds from the south. What I love is that they have such heart and personality, even when they are saying the most unchristian sentiments. They're hilarious, just being their genuine selves, well, as much as TV allows to. I'm so grateful to be represented and to hear people speak out on things to a community hat needs, and deserves to hear it. They create me laugh, cry, and come back for wont be disappointed, unless you're Keri Hilson.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    Perfect book. Solid explanations of both the Kelly formula and its historical context with Ed Thorp, Claude Shannon, y quibble is there is not quite enough math in it. One gets the feeling that author Poundstone wanted to leave out the math, so as not to intimidate the non-mathematical reader, but by doing that he doesn't provide enough info on the Kelly formula. Had to go online and read some articles about the formula to understand it. That info should have been in the book.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    "Fortune's formula" is the author's cute name for what mathematicians call the Kelly criterion. Much of the book is entertaining episodic anecdotal history of characters like Shannon, Kelly, Thorp, Milken, Boesky and Long Term Capital Management. The formula-free discussion of mathematical aspects of the Kelly criterion is rather amazing (to my taste as a professional mathematician). Entertaining acc of dispute between the proponents of Kelly (math types) and economists led by Samuelson who viewed it as too dangerous even in the long run. Memorable slogan: 100% Kelly tactic marks the boundary between aggressive and insane lecture briefly ..... in a hypothetical gambling or investment situation where you have a range of choices to bet on/invest in, and where you know the correct probability and profit/loss from each possible outcome, the Kelly criterion tells you how to split your investment between the various choices. The point of the formula is to take into acc the fact that (when investing all your money) a 20% gain one year followed by a 20% loss next year works out as a 4% loss, not zero. Its use in splitting beween dangerous and safe investments is uncontroversial. People obtain emotional about the "efficient shop hypothesis" that you cannot assess probabilities for future stock more accurately than the consensus probabilities reflected in current prices; but this is an empirical question, like asking "can you beat Tiger Woods at golf", and of course has the same respond for most people. Poundstone conveys such concepts beautiful well.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    Anne Keene's THE CLOUDBUSTER NINE is a fascinating and engaging story. Keene tells the tale of the naval aviation training program that took put in Chapel Hill, North Carolina (and four other sites) during Globe Battle II. On one level, the book provides a strong and revealing look at some of the men of the Greatest Generation as they prepared to war for America's freedom--men like George H. W. Bush and John Glenn. But the book is also a delightful and impressively researched story about some of the major league baseball players--Ted Williams and Johnny Pesky, for example--who trained as pilots and played ball for a squad called the Cloudbuster Nine, a team that played several exhibitions versus other major leaguers (Babe Ruth appears in the book as another individual who contributed to the battle effort in his own way). Finally, the book is a touching and emotional memoir that relates the experiences of Keene's father, the team's bat boy and later an aspiring minor league pitcher. The book is filled with memorable anecdotes and photographs. I would recommend it to any reader who enjoys Globe Battle II history or little-known facts about some of America's amazing heroes.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    1st allow me first thank the author, Anne R. Keene for sharing this private and awesome story with us! The technical writing of this book is very detailed and filled with with never before stories and pictures! Being the son of a unbelievable father who was a Fenway Park usher during his latest year of high school and into college, this book reminded me of all the unbelievable times spent with him until his final days of 2017. One of Williams' #1 fans, dad would have loved this book! Ms. Keene's book is a must read for baseball fans, families, and anyone who is interested in our amazing country's history. The stories transcend the sport and enter into the private values of life. Amazing work, Anne R. Keene!

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    this was an interesting book about WWII era naval pilot training and its interaction with college and professional sports. Will be very interesting to baseball buffs.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    [email protected]#$%!! Congrats Child Fury and Crissle! I've been a dedicated listener for years and I am so satisfied to see the continuous growth and leveling up that you both achieve. While 20 mins seems short, I'm thankful to have weekly visuals to go along with the podcast (which can never be too long, lol). I hope you know how much joy you all bring to others at this point in your careers. Thanks for all you do!

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    FDR and the American Crisis []  2020-1-16 11:25

    Worth every penny.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    I thoroughly enjoyed the Cloudbuster Nine. Amazingly researched, Anne Keene's book reads like a novel even though it presents a true life history of an necessary time in our country. The story goes method beyond Ted Williams and the Chapel Hill warrior pilot baseball team, giving the context of the happenings from a worldwide historical perspective. Touching private stories are interspersed throughout the book, which not only draw the reader forward but create it one of the most heartwarming tributes I've read. A must read for baseball lovers, history buffs, and anyone who wants to be transported back to a time of true heroes.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    This is a amazing book! Anne is a terrific writer, hopefully there will be more to come from her. You don’t have to be a sports’ fan to have fun this book. It is filled with dozens of info on pilot training at UNC during WW2. Anne’s terrific acc of her Dad’s baseball career and his love of the android game is so interesting, heartwarming and at times sad. There are stories about Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky, The Babe and so a lot of other stars. I loved “Cloudbuster 9”!

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    A fun read. Anne Keene tells a story that not a lot of Americans know about. Military and baseball historical buffs will search this work informative and interesting. As a middle aged student of history and baseball in particular" The Cloudbuster Nine" more than satisfies on several levels. This is a work that blends history and a private family relationship. Major Leaguers like Ted Williams , Johnny Pesky and Johnny Sain are bought to life in various roles than on the diamond. An extensively researched book. All in all a very touching story. It is no doubt that these pilots represented the " Greatest Generation" in a supreme way. But, everyone on the home front pitched in. It is essential that the younger generations of our nation are exposed to the history of this era.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    I really loved this book. Perfect in detail. I 'm from Raleigh, and knew of the baseball squad in Chapel Hill, but this book gives me a really in-depth story of baseball and serving in the military, at the same time.Raymond James, Raleigh, N.C.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    It's hard to describe what this book is. Is it a primer on betting strategies? A look at practical math? A history of mathematically inclined gamblers? A "mob" story? A manual for money management in investing?The book has facets of each, though in the end, the main takeaway is the superiority of the Kelly system for managing bankrolls whether gambling or r the most part, it is an interesting read though there are sections that bog down. I'd recommend the book as an interesting historical look at some people who tried to beat the house - in gambling or investing - and as a primer on the Kelly way but I wouldn't suggest that anyone head to Vegas or Wall St. with their kid's college savings based on this book.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    This a fascinating history book. The author is a amazing writer. The history of how people (try) to create gambling and in the stock market. And why it is so l sorts of popular people and scientists who worked on ways to beat the systems. Some so fascinating facts about Rudy Guliani, Michael Milken, Ivan Boesky and others.I could not place it down. A amazing book.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    You could say that I have been an Ed Thorp fan for almost 15 years. I haven't met the man personally, but I have benefited a lot from his willingness to share his thoughts on risk management and more. He appears frequently this book, because of his app of the Kelly criterion and his work with Claude Shannon who popularized it in the context of can learn a lot from this fun read. The math isn't too involved for general audiences. On the other hand, Mr. Poundstone is very capable with technical subjects and I assure you he could have treated the math more in depth. What makes his writing so amazing is that he provides context and a fun method to learn the ideas with enough substance from the research that you can use it as a bibliography to start serious research.

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    This book reads so easily and appeals to a wide audience - especially women and mothers of players who appreciate the android game of baseball and the example set by those WWII players who paused their careers to serve in the war. A read for several generations.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    This book talks about the fundamentals about logic, info and probability. It talks a lot about Claude Shannon's story which is very beautiful to me. And then it discusses the generation of info theory and the essence of it. As a scientific researcher in a very much similar field (operations research), I search the discussion precise and accurate. It also talks about the story about several other necessary figures in the development of info theory, such as Kelly, Thorpe etc. In particular, it contains the debate over the celebrated Kelly's formula. This is the best book I have ever read on the subject of Kelly's formula. And it really explains it well. I will recommend this book to any person who is interested in info theory or computer science (or any similar field).

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    Amazing book, keeps attention. All the stories are hilarious, and got the Kelly criterion lesson from this book- with some tweaking, as everyone does, it has brought losses down and gains up. Shannon and Thorp are the rare examples to read about, like the Tesla's and Einsteins of the world...

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    The Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team That Helped Win World War II []  2020-1-16 2:25

    Although I purchased this book to add to those I already own about my childhood idol, I found that it covers a much broader subject in addition to its portraits of Ted, Pesky, and the other players on this squad of Naval pilot cadets. Basically, the author is searching for an respond to why her father, who was the team's bat boy,became an embittered and emotionally withdrawn adult despite his lifelong love for baseball. Her discovery of his dusty trunk filled with forgotten photographs became the basis for her research. There are only 45 men alive who played in the major leagues and also served in WWII. She was able to interview a number of these individuals, now in their nineties, and her book will be enjoyed by anyone who treasures baseball history and the history of an America which is rapidly vanishing.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    Awesome book that breaks down the Kelly Criterion and all of the past mathematical equations and other weirdness that helped him [email protected]#$%!. The book is chocked full of amazing stories and explanations but it's drawn out with stories that in my opinion are based solely off of people's ego instead of there lack of understanding.I would still recommend this book but I would google "Kelly Criterion" for some background info about what in Christ's name you're actually reading about.

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    Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street []  2020-2-1 8:9

    Someone recommended this book to me as an investment book. At the time I was not sure how gambling and quantitative approach to investment are related. But this book, through its illustration of Kelly's criteria provides a fresh method to think about investment strategy. I learned all the moot theories in school - Mean portfolio optimization, diversification, efficient shop theory, etc. But thinking of info theory, Kelly's criteria and ever show arbitrage can give one quite an e book interweaves mathematics, history and stories quite well and is a very amazing read. Imagine an investment book that reads almost like a fiction novel :)The material is very well researched and it includes history of gambling, and investment and how info theory evolved. The book also gives a view into how a strong school of thought can eclipse other schools of thought. in this case, Samuelson, et all from MIT refute geometric returns from Kelly's criteria even though working proof is show and the alpha factor in returns is not a myth.I am glad the person recommended this book to me.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    First, I have never opened up my wallet so fast to anything-- yes I will be paying my 99 lil 'ol cents every week because these two DESERVE IT!! (they better obtain every cent too). Second, it's so refreshing to see these two hard-working creators getting what they have worked so hard for!The present also touches so a lot of necessary stories that, I personally think, are amazing for family discussion as well! It's basically the [email protected]#$% podcast that we all know and love but condensed into 20-min episodes. Plus, we still obtain the podcast on Tuesday. Such a amazing present to play while you're chilling and smoking a joint.Will definitely hold watching! Crissle, that WIG GIVES ME LIFE! And, can I also say-- CLOTHES. SHOES. SKIN. RADIANCE. YOU BOTH LOOK FREAKING GREAT! Ok, I'm done.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    I love them! Their podcast has had me hooked for the past 2yrs and I’ve been listening to them backwards because I wish to hear them all. Now that there’s a present my fandom is even happier. This first episode was hilarious! Especially Child Fury in denial about Miami being in Florida! I don’t even blame him! This dynamic duo is so entertaining. I can’t wait to see tonight’s episode!!!!

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    Child Fury and Crissle are giving so much of themselves already and now a visual treat! I've learned and laughed alot listening to these two and their LSN superfriends, Mate Location and Gettin' Grown. They provide relatable content and obtain me through weekly. I couldn't be any more various from these two, and yet the things they say they enjoyed growing up or felt about themselves or the experiences they had, created my heart skip a beat because it sounded familiar. The amazing and the bad, I'm a listener who started in 2016 with Beymergency (I know it front to back; that's how much I've listened) and then I went back, like we all did, and listened from the beginning. This present is such a treat, especially knowing that Dustin is a part of it, that they could give whatever they wish and I will consume it. I love the outfits and the hairstyles and the set design. They've got awesome guests; they're doing us proud!

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    This book is painful to read. As a fellow sufferer of RSD/CRPS, I understand the unique hell that Kim went through on a continual basis. Unfortunately, I am stuck in that hell right now, but this book gave me hope at a time when nothing else has. I gave me a renewed sense of war that I thought I had lost. The street is long and differs for everyone with this horrendous disease. I am so glad that I bought this book. I may have to read it daily for a while to renew my sense of determination, but that's ok. I have plenty of time on my hands. Well worth the investment if in the end I obtain my life back. Ed, thank you for writing this book and loving your wife the method you do. Wishing we were all so lucky. Kim, thank you for sharing your story and not giving up. I am so satisfied for you that you managed to regain quality of life again. My prayers for continued success. I wouldn't want this disease on anyone. God bless you both and anyone else that suffers with this as well.

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    Still recovering from a spinal decompression surgery in June 2018, my nerve pain in my leg is everyday and activity adds to the intensity of it. Chiropractic,acupuncture, PT, etc... reading what Kim and Ed went through helps me believe this is nothing to with. I'm satisfied with what I can do, others are living with far worse pain than I. Thank you Kim, Ed, thank you for sharing this period in time in your lives. PS

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    As a physician, I wanted to read this story of a patient's perspective of dealing with chronic pain. I have spent 20 years as a family physician and ER doc and have been "across the desk" from patients like Kim and those who, whether because of legitimate cause or not, we're drug seekers. It has caused me to look at thinks differently. I almost totally agree with the crucifixion of modern medicine, pharmacy, Worker's Comp, insurance and legal system. It is a broken system beyond the point of repair. It is a challenge to live in the system but test to not be a part of the system. Looking for the day I can escape like Ed and Kim and live with the sun, the sand and the sea.

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    FDR and the American Crisis []  2020-1-16 11:25

    Amazing, balanced overview of Roosevelt's strengths/weaknesses as well as a very readable overview of the crises he dealt with. Amazing for anyone wanting a readable option of that time period, adult or middle schoolers.

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    This is a real love story wrapped in a no nonsense book exposing some of the negative situations that arise resulting from our American health care system. Kim is a real character for taking a various and difficult path to recovery with her loving and devoted husband, Ed, at her side.If you suffer from pain, or know someone that does, this is a truly inspirational saga of how a true person overcame it with the "love of her life" assisting and validating their mutual escape from the "rat race" of modern American medicine.An inspirational, insightful, romantic, heartwarming, must read for pain sufferers and their caregivers.

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    Ed's wife Kim sure went through a lot of pain. And to think that the employer was never taken to task. As for the medical profession portrayed by Ed, it is a pity they weren't struck off. I loved his anonymising names for each, e.g., Dr Senile, Witch Doctor, Robot Doctor etc ... but that's the only bit of them I loved!If, Dear Reader, you have debilitating pain, read this book as you may see some rays of hope yourself.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    I love this show. As well as being entertaining, they advocate for self care and mental health.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    Love that their first guests (Desus & Mero) can relate with the journey of starting from Podcasting and now having a TV show. 5 seasons and a movie

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    Wow, so somehow they took a 2.5 hour present and condensed it to 20 mins and it still has a bunch of quotable lines? That Miami back-and-forth? Lmao. This is why I love them. This is a amazing first episode. Can't wait for some more trash!

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    FDR and the American Crisis []  2020-1-16 11:25

    Albert Marrin is just an wonderful writer, and I am grateful. I read all of his books, but was not thrilled with the topic of this one. After all, I know all about Franklin Roosevelt. WRONG!Boy, do I not know all about him. This is a riveting, thought-provoking, powerful, awesome read. I hold reading chunks to my husband and he loves Marrin too, and I know he will read it--and then I will be forced to listen to him reading chunks aloud to is man tells wonderful real stories and makes them page turners. I cannot praise his writing enough. Read it! (My husband believes these books should not be labeled for young people in any way..they are compellingly amazing for adults too!)

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    FDR and the American Crisis []  2020-1-16 11:25

    Wow, I could not place this book down. It is well written, very dramatic (his mother, WWI, Amazing Depression, WWII and much more) and thoroughly covers the life and presidency of FDR.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    Tim Hornbaker thoroughly researched this book. After reading this book, you will understand how the NWA exerted such powerful control over professional wrestling in the United States but how the greed of individual promoters created it very difficult to keep together.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    Very long but well worth it. It’s loaded with history and facts about the NWA, its members and the wrestlers that created it the legendary organization that it was.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    Child Fury and Crissle are unbelievable and the spirit of the Podcast can be seen in the episode. I will gladly give them my coin to watch their infectious personalities and scathingly true comments. And Eff Xfinity for not having the Fuse, WETV, and ID channels.

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    Missy: The Icon []  2020-1-20 22:43

    Obsessed! Love Crissle & Child Fury. The present is fresh, funny and my fresh favorite. The only method it could be created better is to create it longer.

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    This book helped me in so a lot of ways. I ran across the title while perusing books about living on a boat. Ed Robinson"s other book LEAP OF FAITH is about everything you own and taking the possibility to live your life the method YOU wish to. As a person who with chronic pain and physical limitation, I connected with THE UNTOLD STORY OF KIM. It could have been titled with MY name. I read the book in one afternoon on my Kindle, and then read it again the next afternoon. It struck such a chord with me that I implemented a plan of action for myself. The next day, after some internet research, I "flushed" my prescription for Flexeril (a strong muscle relaxer, which I had been on for four years). Then, I gently began weaning myself off my narcotic painkillers. Now, six weeks later, the "fog" has lifted and I am retrieving my life. No longer drugged into a state of "just getting through the day" I am learning how to live again. Loved the book and really connected with the author and his wife, Kim. God Bless you both. Look for us in begin waters. We'll be there soon.Ed & Kim.

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    I’ve read or listened to most of Ed’s books, so I found it very interesting to learn in detail their catalyst for making the decision to take to the water. As for those “professionals” who denied Kim the care she needed, may God have mercy on your soul.Hoping the best for Kim and Ed!

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    This is an necessary testimony from people who never considered themselves "the type to rail versus the system." Most of us have lived parts of this story, though few have come up versus the naked display of crass heartlessness driving so much of our society as quickly as Ed and Kim. If you don't believe this can happen to you, just wait. One defense they don't discuss, though they demonstrate it amply, is humor. Evil can't survive being laughed at.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    As a bit of an amateur pro wrestling historian, I found a lot of value with this book. It gives you the ins-and-outs of the creation of the National Wrestling Alliance and how it supplanted the National Wrestling Association as the main governing body of pro wrestling. The author gave amazing biographies of the NWA champions, and the political wrangling behind the scenes that created them champions. He also gives biographies of the promoter/members of the NWA, which is extremely e history of the federal government's anti-trust investigation is convoluted, and can be a bit hard to follow at is book is over-all well-written, and is an simple read IF you have some knowledge of the topic and the various "characters." Even if this is your first foray into this subject, stick to it and read it a time or s: Amazing source of info on the formation of the NWA, which was the main pro wrestling organization in the USA for nearly 40 years. The bios on the promoters and champions were interesting and ns: Readers fresh to this material may have a small problem with the anti-trust investigation section, because there are a lot of people e pros far outweigh the cons for this book.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    An absolutely perfect book, exhaustively researched, well written, highly informative. It goes into meticulous and sometimes exhaustive detail about the history of the NWA from it's 1948 formation (and its early precursors) until 2007 when the book was written. Covering the founders, promoters, promotions, the champions, challengers, and the Alliance's adversaries, including the info of the anti-trust suit brought versus them, this book is among the best books ever written on the topic of professional wrestling. I highly recommend it to anyone that is serious about knowing about the NWA.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    Amazing book. A small stuffy and clinical but very well researched and filled with details.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    The research by author Tim Hornbaker on the early history of professional wrestling, leading to the birth, glory years and fall of the NWA, is nothing short of spectacular. But the book ultimately fails to deliver a winning move on the premise that the "monopoly" of the NWA somehow did hurt to the vering the beginning of the organization in 1948, with six founding members from across the nation, Hornbaker separates specific periods of the NWA with features on legendary wrestlers and e focus of the text concerns a federal investigation in the 1950s concerning alleged monopolistic practices, which was settled in 1956 through an agreement signed by the NWA on specific guidelines to permit tournament by independent promoters.Under the leadership of Sam Muchnick - NWA president from 1950-1960 - pro wrestling emerged out of a substantial troubled economic period into a decade of amazing popularity - fueled by TV - and recognizable champions and belts. This was not sports-entertainment by any stretch of the ere are few wrestling books which delve into the topic with such depth, while placing happenings in a true historical perspective. And instead of being a stranglehold, it can be argued that the NWA kept the industry honest for the talent by having strict rules that promoters must adhere to; importantly, that they have the financial means to operate a territory.

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    This was a amazing testimony of one's strength and courage. I, too, suffer from this dreaded disease (CRPS). I've dealt with much emotional and physical pain in my life; but, these latest three-plus years, ever since this war begun, has been the greatest of all other pain combined. I take four pain medications (one narcotic), but it only takes some of he edge off. Morphine and a neuro-stimulator has been proffered, but I refuse to go that route. Prayer and my high-tolerance for pain will have to suffice. To those who don't know, allow me assure you that Ed and Kim's description of the pain is no exaggeration. On the McGill pain index, it's the worst chronic pain known. I'm so satisfied that Kim is pain-free (God has blessed her), but her case is an oddity. There's no known cure for this rare nerve disease. I pray God will heal me, but if not, His grace is sufficient. To those who suffer with chronic pain: be powerful and don't ever quit fighting!!!

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    The Untold Story of Kim []  2020-1-26 20:33

    My daughter suffers fibromyalgia and I bought this book thinking she may gain some hope for her own condition. This book is a heart-wrenching and beautifully inspiring story of the journey Kim and Ed experienced battling the medical, legal, and health insurance system in find of relief following Kim's injury. It demonstrates the strength some people present in the face of wonderful adversity, and gives hope to those facing related challenges. I higly recommend this book. I am in awe of Kim's achievements, and of course, also with the love and help she received from Ed. You guys are amazing.

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    FDR and the American Crisis []  2020-1-16 11:25

    I don't know what this book was doing in a dollar shop but what a find! Although it was written for young adults, as a Senior, I could not place this book down. I just want this type of history book was available when I was a student of History. Back in the sixties, the history books we were needed to read were dry and boring. Marrin weaves facts with the private side of FDR and the perspective of the globe leaders involved in WW II. His writing style kept me turning the pages and it provoked me to examine this time in American history from a private perspective. I recommend this book to people of all ages.

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    FDR and the American Crisis []  2020-1-16 11:25

    A unbelievable book! I love reading history and nobody tells the story better than Albert Marrin. He always tells the truth in an unvarnished and honest way. The book marketed as young adult nonfiction but is a compelling read for anyone of any age.

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    Nutritional Lithium: A Cinderella Story: The Untold Tale of a Mineral That Transforms Lives and Heals the Brain []  2020-2-6 21:11

    Amazing book with awesome information. I have recommended it to a lot of people ank you!

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    Nutritional Lithium: A Cinderella Story: The Untold Tale of a Mineral That Transforms Lives and Heals the Brain []  2020-2-6 21:11

    I give it 5 stars, I started using lithium with Dr. Amy Yasko's protocol, it showed up depleted in my Hair test. A lot of people don't understand why they would need lithium, thinking it's for people that with depression. This books explain why our bodies need this essential mineral. Why it's the foundational mineral to begin with methylation. But, also know, you need magnesium & potassium, too. Lithium will use these minerals up while you up your B12s. This is my understanding from my doctor. There is other health problem he covers I didn't know about that lithium helps with, so this was informative, too.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    Extremely interesting almost academic which is ironic for the subject. I was hoping for some more behind the scenes Tales. Having said that if you are student of pro wrestling, you will love this book.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    For someone that isn't, it will be a long slog.

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    Nutritional Lithium: A Cinderella Story: The Untold Tale of a Mineral That Transforms Lives and Heals the Brain []  2020-2-6 21:11

    Very well written, researched and up to date. I have read other books on lithium and a lot of research publications. This is well worth the read.We have also found the addition of lithium a life saver for our son with neuro-lyme.

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    Nutritional Lithium: A Cinderella Story: The Untold Tale of a Mineral That Transforms Lives and Heals the Brain []  2020-2-6 21:11

    Very interesting book.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    371 pages finally telling us the WHOLE TRUTH about professional wrestling from the very beginning to the fall of the wrestling organization from which all others came. THE NWA! Shocker! Some wrestling matches especially championship matches are real! Champions had to have the ability to protect the title when doublecrossed! This was called a shoot match. You had to damage your enemy or lose the belt. Back in the day you could see some matches were scripted but some were REAL! Poor blood, greed, or ego caused some to disregard the script and go for it! Real some of this book is boring. Especially the beginning. But overall if you are really a wrestling fan you NEED this education. From then on you will view matches differently. WWF fans search out the true beginning of your wrestling globe and the WHOLE story of the McMahon family from A fans search out that your Verne Gagne might have been the greatest of them all. Globe class fans search out about Frityz Von Erich. And lifetime wrestling fans relive matches and names you have long forgotten! Did you know Champions have to post a bond in case they go rouge? A lot of of you have a grand dad or dad who was an avid rassling fan. This book would create a GREAT bonus for him. A possibility to relive some of his happiest memories.

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    National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling: The Untold Story of the Monopoly That Strangled Professional Wrestling []  2020-1-7 19:0

    This just might be the best book on the history of pro wrestling that I've ever read.

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    Nutritional Lithium: A Cinderella Story: The Untold Tale of a Mineral That Transforms Lives and Heals the Brain []  2020-2-6 21:11

    This book has been a godsend to me. Nowadays my recurrent depression is lifting very well with a everyday regimen of nutritional lithium orotate, a very low dosage of this trace mineral, which is very various than the well-known drug, Lithium, used for treating bipolar depression. Dr. Greenblatt's belief that a lot of people have lithium deficiency because of long time usage of drinking filtered water or bottled water, is very interesting, and could be the reason that I have a lithium deficiency.

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