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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

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    the original source [osceola county case search]  2020-8-27 9:48
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    Get the facts [hop over to this site]  2020-8-27 7:23
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    buy lasix over the counter [best price for lasix in El Paso]  2020-9-13 19:32
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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    This book was simple to read and the content that the Author used throughout the book was identifiable so the reader would be able to reflect on their own historical knowledge. The title Glory Field maintained its importance to the Lewis family through a lot of generations. When reading you felt part of that struggle. It created you think how things changed in such a short period of our American history. It took major sacrificies of a race to obtain to where they are today. Sometimes you reflect back and think could this part of history be different. I sometimes wonder. I would highly recommend the book be part of the Middle School curriculum.

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    okay

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    my granddaughter , going into 8th grade, had to read it over the summer. She was not excited about it and read 15 pages a day. She loves to read, but this wasn't anything she was interested in.

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    Saved the day. No book required

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    Like new!

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    Bought this for my daughters class project and we are looking forward to this school year.

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    Amazing book my daughter loves it

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    Amazing book

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    My son loved this book

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    The Glory Field []  2020-1-22 22:58

    Mr. Myers, you have done a splendid job of weaving the Lewis family throughout its history. Thankyou for placing a high importance on family favorite quote, and the one which I think summarizes this work of art is as follows - "Those shackles didn't rob us of being black, son, they robbed us of being human. Who should own them is a human being."I strongly encourage those who read this review to this book and search out what Mr. Myers meant by that. When you do, you will be very glad that you did. The Lewis family ultimately is a family of love, no matter what generation is portrayed. In my opinion, it transcends even being black or white or whatever race you are. My want for my family is that we can be like the Lewis'ankyou for this strong novel, Mr. Myers.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    There were so a lot of characters in the story that it was hard to follow the story. Their names were given in different ways, family name, first name, nickname, that further added to the confusion. Also there seemed to be a preoccupation among so a lot of of the characters regarding cheating on their e historical aspect of the story was what I was looking for, in to understand the "Yom Kippur War.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    Having read the amazing novel The Hope( 4 1/3 stars) culminating in the amazing Israel win in the six day war, also by Herman Wouk I brought the second part The Glory. Wouk uses true figures and mixes fictional characters. Much if his book is factual and the reader learns much about the six day war,the attack by Egypt president Sadat launching another battle with the largest tank wars ever. Also the rescue of Israel captives in Uganda. Also lots of sea wars with Israels little navy versus Arab ships. Also Israel's elite Air Force using Mirages, Panthoms, and later F16 and F15's. Epic battles. We also see the succession of Israel's prime ministers and military leaders.Lots of military wars mixed with hero love stories.I read this 685 page exciting and informative novel in 5 days. Anyone interested in the birth of Israel, its war for survival versus overwhelming odds, her military and political leaders will love this book. Also President Nixon putting the US on Def con three versus possible Russian intervention versus Israel, Henry Kissinger, and President Ford are mentioned. A lot of history that could of lead to WW3. The Glory another Herman Wouk 5 star book and proudly added to our family library.I also bought The Winds of War, and Battle and Remembrance but have yet to read them and review. Also the book Inside, Outside will complete Wouk's epic 5 book collection. Herman Wouk a super amazing author.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    This is a historical novel, interspersed with some fictional characters. It tells the story of the heroic struggle of the Jewish people in Israel to establish and defend their fresh State versus tremendous odds. Israel enjoyed small help from other nations, including the United States. Wouk makes no attempt to whitewash the errors created by Israel's defense minister, Moshe Dayan, and even the prime minister, Golda Meir. Yet Israel succeeded, mainly because it had no choice. It would have perished otherwise.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    What a joy to finish yet again reading Exodus, Hope and Glory. It has been a dozen years or more since I latest read these three marvelous books. Each time I gain a new perspective on the miracle that is Israel. For those that can study this time and think that it is just a marvel of human triumph, I say your grasp of the reality that is Israel is short on truth. Wouk does a masterful job of laying out the info but I say God alone could write the story these books are based on. Another few years, should the Lord tarry and I will read and have fun these three again.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    Herman Wouk provides a terrific follow-up to his previous book, The Hope. The Glory continues the story book of Israel's struggle for its homeland and its continued political and military war for survival. Both books are well crafted and include a lot of facts and, in my case, gives one the feeling of being involved in the political and military battles. My only complaint is the relationship between Sam Pasternak and Emily . I feel that the relationship takes from the book but perhaps it is included to lend to the private human flaws of one of the main characters. I just ended up fast-reading through those parts to obtain to the meat and potatoes of the book. I like the fact that Wouk suffixed the book with explanations of what was true and what was fictional in each chapter. I would suggest reading The Hope before reading The Glory.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    If you enjoyed  Joseph's Dream , then you will love The Hope and its sequel The Glory. This book kept me at the edge of my seat for the entire time, all the more so because the most hair-raising action sequences are real happenings from Israel’s military a work of history, The Glory is enlightening. As a work of fiction, it is fast-paced and entertaining enough to be the basis of a successful action movie. Wouk’s description of a dogfight between the Israeli Air Force and Soviet pilots fighting for Egypt, is as amazing as the Death Star stage in the original Star is difficult to properly convey the expansiveness of The Glory to anybody who is not in the habit of reading nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. These days the epic historical novel with a panoramic sweep has gone largely out of style. The Glory has a scope and historical vision comparable to Gone With the Wind, or Middlemarch – or Battle and Battle and Peace, The Glory has a large ensemble cast interconnected by blood, marriage, and unrequited love. There are parts where I start to lose track of who is who – it’s truly like a Russian novel that method – and yet, as a nice Jewish girl myself, I search that the characters feel intensely familiar, like long-lost relatives, even as I forget their names, relationships, and genealogies. The characters are numerous enough and diverse enough to present us firsthand how almost every segment of Israeli society reacted to the Yom Kippur War. The dramatically intense and historically precise descriptions of war scenes are also related to Battle and Peace.If Battle and Peace is truly the greatest battle novel ever written, then The Glory is the Jewish Battle and is difficult to properly convey the expansiveness of The Glory to anybody who is not in the habit of reading nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. These days the epic historical novel with a panoramic sweep has gone largely out of style. The Glory has a scope and historical vision comparable to Gone With the Wind, or Middlemarch – or Battle and Battle and Peace, The Glory has a large ensemble cast interconnected by blood, marriage, and unrequited love. There are parts where I start to lose track of who is who – it’s truly like a Russian novel that method – and yet, as a nice Jewish girl myself, I search that the characters feel intensely familiar, like long-lost relatives, even as I forget their names, relationships, and genealogies. The characters are numerous enough and diverse enough to present us firsthand how almost every segment of Israeli society reacted to the Yom Kippur War. The dramatically intense and historically precise descriptions of war scenes are also related to Battle and Peace.If Battle and Peace is truly the greatest battle novel ever written, then The Glory is the Jewish Battle and Peace.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    Not Herman Wouk's best work [In my opinion]. Story seemed to be 'jerky', not smooth. A lot of characters [maybe too many] with multiple names and relationships that I found hard to follow and hold straight. One male hero has a name and a nickname. Sometimes Wouk refers to him by his nickname, other times by his first name, or his latest name; ––very awkward and confusing. He does related with other men and women too. Husbands, wives, lovers, brothers, sisters, children; having affairs, traveling in odd combinations, i.e. confusing! I recommend that when you begin this book, write down the names and their relationship to the others––in to refer to as the story proceeds. I beautiful much knew the history, so the connection to the fictional characters was my interest––and that turned out to be difficult to follow.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    The first Wouk novel I read was Don't Stop The Carnival shorty after I moved to the Caribbean. It was both funny and enlightening. I have since read most of his major works and found them just as entertaining but also informative. The. Glory is equa,ly as amazing and among the best I have ever read.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    Herman Wouk is a novelist and was correct in much of the story. It covers from prior to the 1973 Battle and contain the raid on Entenbbe and the bombing of the Iraqi nuclear reactor. Wouk's story was much more on developing the characters and to some extent breeze over the 73 my view, the more emphasis should have been on the battle and the details.I was a Vietam Veteran Troops Officer with the 1/4 Cavalry of the 1st Infantry Division on a REFORGER Deployment. We had just complete some gunnery and equipment maintenance at Grafenwöhr, West Germany. Wouk probably never knew that the 1st Infantry Division was considered the most combat ready and mobile unit in West Germany (very questionable). We were place on Battle Alert and flat vehicles were brought into Grafenwöhr with orders to transport us directly to Naples with NATO rail clearances. It was expected that Israel would lose on the Golan Heights and we had warning orders to prepare for immediate movement at any moment to ditionally, Wouk never knew that the US depleted most of the tank and artillery munitions for US NATO Forces in Europe in to help Israel with airlifted munitions.I think that he was guessing about the position of the Nixon Administration and its desire to protect Israel. The US was much more committed than the novel leads one to believe.He only really mentions Centurion Tanks. In reality, the Israelis had Centurions, M48's, and M60's. These are info that a cavalryman or tanker would catch. Wouk overlooked that or decided that it was not a part of the story.I was disappointed that Wouk covered the characters more and the war less. However it was an OK read.

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    The Glory []  2020-9-5 18:15

    Coupled with "The Hope" this was a amazing story of the first 30 or so years of the state of Israel. Herman Wouk is a amazing writer in that he does a amazing job of developing the characters. I can't rate the historical accuracy of the story but I do remember the oil embargoes of the 1970's and their impact on the culture in the United States. If, as the book suggests, the embargoes were retaliation for our help of Israel; then our country created an wonderful investment in democracy in the Middle East.

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    Glory of the Survivor [App]  2018-10-13 21:0

    cool girl with guns, very interesting addictive even can't stop playing.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    This is a series of essays on different Christian questions. C.S. Lewis is my favorite author in this field. I first came to know his writings through reading 'Mere Christianity'. I listen to Christian radio and Charles Colson had commented that it was 'Mere Christianity' that brought him to be a Christian. So I read the book. No one can say that C.S. Lewis is light reading. And this book is no exception. It does take concentration and quiet time to grasp the concepts discussed. But I am enjoying the book very much. The one thing that C.S. Lewis does best is using irrefutable logic to explain his position. After finishing an essay, you are left with a thought of 'Wow' and the desire to read it again.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    I first found a battered copy Weight of Glory in my college library and it was instrumental in shaping my understanding of the spiritual world. As time goes on, I have realized fresh insights from the different essays and twenty years later I understand and appreciate aspects of Lewis' insights that did not register with me as a young student. This is worth reading and rereading. It's one of a few books that I still hold in the deadtree ver even in the digital age.

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    Oh my. I so wish the Glory of God to manifest in my life. But where to start. This book is what I needed. The true truth. Based only on God’s Word. Thank you

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    I first learned of Kenneth Hagin when a pastor said that early in his career reading the authors book's prepared him to serve people's needs and hope. Hagin's life of over seventy years was filled with a lot of spiritual triumphs and some failures. In his a lot of books, Hagin paints for us a long life of spiritual hardships, joys and growth toward the fullness. I say test him.

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    I was given the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book. I do have a limited knowledge of the cycling globe and still enjoyed reading this book as it is not just about cycling. The book has so a lot of layers and twists. I do not wish to say too much and give away the ending but it is an awesome book and have no issues recommending it

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    I really like the choir but the songs are waaayy to short. Ive been listening to the youtube ver and they are extended versions. Just when you're about to obtain into it, the song is over. It will do for now. I wish the youtube versions on CD and then Ill rate 5 sta

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    I have always enjoyed the Mississippi Mass Choir for a lot of a year. It brought back a lot of unbelievable memories of hear some of my favorite songs that give praise to God. I will more melody as I listen to this phenomenal choir.

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    One of my favorite Mississippi Mass Choir albums of all time... especially the soul stirring "It Came To Pass, Part I and II"... I just want when they first brought these out on CD, that they would have recorded the entire songs on them like they did with the DVD... Maybe on down the years they'll come out with a remastered ver or something of the album with all the full length songs... other than that... I LOVE IT!!!

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    It is a very enlightening book. I love reading Bro. Kenneth E Hagin books!

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    Excellent

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    My 2nd favorite album since 2003

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    I received this item within a week, it was the best thing! Because I required it to hear encouraging songs. I will from Seller again, it was fast, and honest Seller.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    Lewis is at his best in some of these essays (like Transposition and Membership) and falls short of that tag in others. When he expresses his original ideas in his characteristic down-to-earth language, it seems like a taste of the Millenium. When he misses, I want I had that time back. But he rarely misses on both. The Inner Ring is an essay that tackles an original observation, but it doesn't keep the reader's attention with ever growing ansposition, on the other hand, illustrates a truth with such clarity and purpose that it's worth multiples of the of the book and the time to read it. I would love to talk with anyone who has read this because I respect Lewis's ideas as worthy of even more attention. I'm glad he has given us this start. I recommend this collection of essays, but I think that a fresh reader of Lewis's nonfiction would do better to start with another work like Screwtape or Mere Christianity.

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    The author could have and certainly should have taken the end longer and a various route. Unfortunately he chose the simple method out just as the flawed character did in the novel. While the conclusion of the story was 1 out of 5 stars at best the rest of the work was worthy of 4.5.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    The book opens with a neat small introduction by Walter Hooper which reminds the reader of the intense personality of "Jack." A window into the humor of one of the greatest Christian minds of the latest century does the reader much amazing in empathizing with the writer. This factor is all-important because most readers are not comfortable with the level of detail to which Lewis will go to create his points. In the mind of this reviewer, a lot of millennials will miss much from this amazing writer for this e first address, "The Weight of Glory" is an address on the nature of glory. Lewis begins the address by reminding the reader that they are too often distracted by easy distractions of life and fail to see that something greater remains just out of view. As he makes this argument, Lewis utters his classic statement, that "it would seem that Our Lord finds our desires not too strong, but too weak. We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant kid who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the of a holiday at the sea. We are far too easily pleased" (26). Point made. Lewis moves on now to the substance of his argument (35). What is the meaning of glory? Lewis answers in one sense that glory is the respond to depth of the human desire for acceptance and admiration. In the Gospel, "only...by the work of Christ" (38), the believer is created an object of glory and is accepted by God. The end effect is that "the door on which we have been knocking all our lives will begin at last" (41). But Lewis doesn't end here, but now turns to another aspect of the concept (42). Glory is the transformation of mortality into immortality, the elevation of the monster to its creative glory. In this context Lewis closes with another of his oft quoted statements. "It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a monster which, if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or else a horror and corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only in a nightmare. All day long we are, in some degree, helping each other to one or the other of these destinations. It is in light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics. There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilisations [sic] - these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit..." (45-46).The second address speaks to an problem that one would think inapplicable to the modern world, but much here should resonate with the modern reader. Lewis here addresses a group of young men pursuing a university education while bombs fell on the streets. No one knew if their work of education would be an exercise in futility. For a group of listeners who saw their time as an abnormality, Lewis reminded them that "life has never been normal" (49) and encouraged them not to let the concerns of battle dissuade them from the task at hand. He reminded them to take their task as a religious duty for "every duty is a religious duty, and our obligation to perform every duty is therefore absolute" (53). But before glorifying scholarship, Lewis strikes at the knees of the young listeners. The ordinary duty of a believer may also be quite, daresay, ordinary. With a amazing reminder of the perspective of heaven, Lewis states that "all of our natural activities will be accepted, if they are offered to God, even the humblest, and all of them, even the noblest, will be sinful if they are not" (54). He goes on again to strike at the heart of intellectualism. "I reject at once the idea which lingers in the mind of some modern people that cultural activities are in their own right spiritual and meritorious--as though scholars and poets were intrinsically more pleasing to God than scavengers and [shoe shiners]....The work of Beethoven and the work of a [cleaning maid] become spiritual on precisely the same condition, that of being offered to God" (55). Stopping short of wholly discouraging education, Lewis then reminds the listeners of some "enemies" of the scholar. First, Lewis notes that excitement can draw the scholar off to pursue what seems more romantic, but ends up only distracting from a noble cause. "If we allow ourselves, we shall always be waiting for some distraction or other to end before we can really obtain down to our work" (60). Next, is the challenge of frustration. By becoming unduly focused on the future, scholars may be enticed to demur from the call to education. In return, Lewis calls his hearers to leave the future to God as that is where it has always been. Lastly, Lewis warns the band of students to shake off fear as they pursue education. Battle is just a reminder of death, whose victims cannot be increased or decreased. To let it to control us is wrong, but rather one should let battle to bring to remembrance the reality of e third treatise entitled "Why I am not a Pacifist" was delivered to the Oxford Pacifist Society. Lewis begins by laying out a substantial number of logical arguments versus pacifism. He begins by making an astute observation. The human conscience accepts ideas of right and wrong often without logical explanation. There should be a logical interaction between morality and reason, but unfortunately a lot of simply create decisions with their consciences and come to opposing positions. These positions let for no debate or reasoning. So, from the outset, Lewis admits a degree of futility in his speech. But he begins by cutting down the generalization that battle always does more hurt than good. Quite apropos for the modern age, Lewis agrees that "it is...true that battles never do half the amazing which the leaders of the belligerents say they are going to do" (73), but still holds that battles serve a certain utility. He then moves to the argument from self-defense and the defense of the weak (76). Next, he reminds his listeners that the supposition that death and pain are the worst evils may, in fact, be wrong and suggests another chance or two (77). Ultimately, Lewis argues that if Pacifism succeeds, it will itself be annihilated, because where it wins, the state will be overcome and a totalitarian regime will not tolerate the weakness of the theory. In classic form, Lewis concludes that "Pacifism of this kind is taking the straight street to a globe in which there will be no Pacifists" (78). Turning now from the authority of logic, Lewis reminds the listeners of their human authorities. The weight of the state authority should weigh on the Pacifist to reconsider (80-82). Lastly, Lewis draws upon the weight of Divine authority. Under this head, the topic takes a various turn. Lewis portrays the contrasting points within Scripture and church history where various perspectives are given on the matter. He carefully weighs the evidence and concludes that Christianity does not mandate Pacifism (82-88). In the end, Lewis admits a degree of uncertainty, but ends up finding the Pacifist position "very doubtful" (90).Fourth comes Lewis' heady idea of "Transposition." This reviewer is not going to attempt a thoroughgoing explanation of the concept because the metaphysical argument is still gelling and the reader would likely do better wading in the waters of the argument on their own. The only thought that seems fair to suppose is that Lewis is hinting at something of a fourth dimension beyond sensory perception, but which breaks into the physical universe in spasms of miracles and Divine intervention. This dimension is superior to the physical universe in a related method that three dimensions are superior to a two-dimensional painting. In one of the soaring heights of the address Lewis picturesquely begins by quoting the Apostle John ""We know not what we shall be"; but we may be sure we shall be more, not less, than we were on earth. Our natural experiences (sensory, emotional, imaginative) are only like the drawing, like penciled lines on flat paper. If they vanish in the risen life, they will vanish only as pencil lines vanish from the true landscape, not as a candle flame that is place out, but as a candle flame which becomes invisible because someone has pulled up the blind, thrown begin the shutters, and allow in the blaze of the risen sun" (111).The fifth article is Lewis' speech on the relationship between Christian Theology and poetry. In a attractive turn, Lewis denies that Christianity bears a amazing resemblance to poetry. Yes, there is a sense in which Christianity, in the heart of the believer, becomes a kind of poetry (122), but ultimately the epic of Christianity is something more true and historical (128-129). Christianity is not like poetry (which is fact turned into myth), but Christianity is something greater, something like "myth become fact" (129). To this end Lewis postulates in regard to "the humiliation of myth into fact, God into Man; what is everywhere and always, imageless and ineffable, only to be glimpsed in dream and symbol and the acted poetry of ritual becomes a small, solid--no bigger than a man who can lie asleep in a rowing boat on the Lake of Galilee"(130). So if Christianity is something more like fact, then what can be said for the prevailing theories of the day? Lewis retorts that the theory of naturalistic evolution is more poetry in Christianity. In an epic that simply must be read, Lewis tells the nihilistic epic of evolutionary atheism (123-125). Ultimately, Lewis points out that the atheists have rejected unique creation a priori. Their presuppositions do not let for a Creator, so to let for such a consideration makes no sense; however, Lewis looks on their naturalistic explanation for the metaphysical realm (cf. 139-14) as "immensely unplausible" (137). Versus this backdrop, Lewis argues that after abandoning naturalism he was led inevitably to idealism, which led him to Theism, which led him to Christ. "And when you examined [the claims of Christ] it appeared that you could adopt no middle position. Either He was a lunatic, or God. And He was no lunatic" (138). In conclusion, Lewis summarizes naturalism as poetry and Christianity as myth created fact and soars to his own heights of epic poetry in his final statement. "I believe in Christianity as I believe that the Sun has risen, not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else" (140).The sixth address is entitled "The Inner Ring." Here Lewis describes the cliquish nature of human relationships. The rings of acceptance are a natural part of life (148), but "dangerous" (149). Articulately, the reader will see how exclusion and inclusion in the rings of culture drive all sorts of ill behaviors and motivations. Lewis brings this problem to the forefront because he believed that "unless you take measures to prevent it, this desire is going to be one of the chief motives of your life" (152). The end of the rings is twofold. The basic danger is that a passion for achieving the innermost circle makes "a man who is not yet a very poor man do very poor things" (154). The secondary danger is something of a spiral into nihilism. "As long as you are governed by that desire you will never obtain what you want. You are trying to peel an onion; if you succeed there will be nothing left. Until you defeat the fear of being an outsider, an outsider you will remain" (154).Seventh is a fascinating essay on the utter difference between the community of the Body of Christ and the famous expressions of individualism, on the one hand, and collectivism, on the other. Christianity is not a "solitary affair" (160), but neither is it the rush and bustle of our modern society. "We live, in fact, in a globe starved for solitude, silence, and privacy, and therefore starved for meditation and real friendship" (160). Another aspect of how the church stands out versus the ideas of the day is brought to the surface. In culture, diversity is often sought at the expense of unity or unity at the expense of diversity. In the Body, both unity and diversity are elevated. One body, unified by Christ, has a lot of parts (166-167). This otherworldly love and community only can come from one source, for "if there is equality, it is in His love, not in us" (170). All of humanity is able to draw ultimate significance and value from Christ (174-174) and thereby to search something that is beyond what culture can offer, namely "natural self" or "collective mass," but instead "a fresh creature" (176).The eighth essay was quite challenging. Here Lewis strikes a nerve when he speaks of the Lord's explanation that one will not be forgiven except that he forgive others. This sobering thought is expounded in about seven small strong pages. The writer postulates that humans often approach God not seeking forgiveness, but in offering excuses. In turn, when it comes to human forgiveness there are certainly similarities, but also significant differences. "In our own case we accept excuses too easily; in other people's we do not accept them easily enough. As regards my own sins it is a safe bet (though not a certainty) that the excuses are really not so amazing as I think; as regards other men's [sins] it is a safe bet (though not a certainty) that the excuses are better than I think" (182). In conclusion, Lewis reminds the reader of the Dominical instruction that "to be a Christian means to forgive the inexcusable, because God has forgiven the inexcusable in you" (182).Finally comes Lewis' discourse on "A Slip of the Tongue." It is here that the reviewer must again admit his inability to follow the argument of Lewis. As best understood, it seems to be a series of thoughts regarding a failure to look to the eternal. The temporal distractions of life take their toll in drawing one's affections from the eternal. In a stroke of genius, Lewis quotes Thomas More before climbing to another literary peak. ""If you have not chosen the Kingdom of God, it will create in the end no difference what you have chosen instead." Those are hard words to take. Will it really create no difference whether it was women or patriotism, cocaine or art, whisky or a seat in the Cabinet, or science? Well, surely no difference that matters. We shall have missed the end for which we were formed and rejected the only thing that satisfies. Does it matter to a man dying in a desert by which choice of route he missed the only well?" (191)In these nine selections, the reader will search a wealth of info on a dozens of topics. The level of understanding for the modern reader will range from easy to highly complex. The mental gymnastics are half the fun of a volume such as this and well worth the cost. So grab some Starbucks, kick back, and enjoy!

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    This could have been a much better book. I feel like the author lost interest at the end and took the simple method out with the ending.

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    Amazing gospel melody !! Thank you

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    I priceless journey with Kenneth Hagins as he has experienced the glory of God which was clearly seen through strong manifestation of His presence and power.

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    Storm of Arrows: Field of Glory late Medieval Army List []  2020-2-1 3:58

    The Field of Glory books are falling into nice step - each include about 20-24 troops "lists" - rules for composing a military force of the period outlined by the book. In addition to extremely well-researched lists with history, background, etc, you have art reproduced from relevant Osprey works, making these tutorials a GREAT resource for painting st amazing miniature wargame rules-sets have troops books/lists, as this allows you more zone critical to discover the historicity of the military forces of the period and define what makes these armies unique. Some rules white-wash history a bit and go for the simplistic approach. Warhammer Ancient Wars gives you nice flavour, but ahistoric and innacurate armies. Terry Gore's Medieval Warfare rules very generic troops lists that are often too abstracted or too vanilla. DBM and WRG/Warrior rich lists and history, but at a high level of complexity. It looks like Field of Glory is doing it just right!

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    The C. S. Lewis book titled “The Weight of Glory” is actually a collection of essays or lectures created by Lewis. The title of the book comes from the first of these lectures and is also the most quoted of them. Since this book is a compilation, I provide below a brief overview of each essay e Weight of Glory 6/8/1941 – In this address, Lewis first talks about the longings we each have: the deep longing for something which no experience on earth satisfies though we have faint glimpses of, like a memory of something long ago. It’s the desire that beauty stirs within us, the longing to be fully immersed and joined into the beauty. It’s what others have described as the God shaped void within us. Lewis argues that this longing proves that there must be a globe where this longing can be fulfilled and that we are created for that world.Lewis takes some time to discuss the idea of rewards received for work. First, there are rewards which are not directly connected to the work, such as being to clean for example. Then there are rewards which are clearly organically tied to the effort to get them, such as a amazing marriage is the reward for loving one’s spouse. Lewis points out that while the former can be accused of only doing the work for the reward, this makes no sense to say in the latter case. Lewis also notes that some rewards, while organically tied to the effort taken to get them, aren’t recognized as desirable until one has obtained them or is at least closer to that goal. Lewis uses the example that one wouldn’t know they have fun Greek poetry until after they had gone through the work of learning Greek.Lewis believes that heaven is like this. I think he conceived of everything in heaven as being of a higher than things of this world. Thus he talks about how we improperly long for worldly things, which are really a false substitute for the heavenly things we ought to long for.Lewis spends most of the remainder of the lecture talking about glory. He thinks that while seeking fame on earth may be conceited, desiring to please God is not. This is the first sense of glory. The second is in how we will “shine” as God’s masterpieces. Lewis considers this idea that God can take delight in us to be something so awesome that we can barely believe it—the “weight or burden of ly, Lewis discusses how we ought to hold other’s glory in mind when considering those around us and how this ought to hold us humble.Learning in War-Time 10/22/1939 – Lewis addresses how study can seem to be a trivial pursuit during battle time. His argument is primarily that we must engage in normal human activity whatever the circumstances are. And there is always some crisis or matter which may seem more important. For example, the matter of heaven and hell is always show and more significant than war. Study is a important undertaking to which some have been called and which they should work at despite distraction, frustration and fear.Why I’m not a Pacifist 1940 – Lewis first lays a foundation from which he will build the rest of his arguments. The foundation consists of Lewis’ view of the conscious as having two parts: a drive to do what is right and beliefs about what right and wrong are. Lewis next explains his concept of reason by which he will address the latter portion of the conscious. A reasonable argument, says Lewis, consists of facts, “intuition”, and a series of linked, logical propositions. What Lewis means by intuition is that which can’t be argued but with which virtually everyone agrees, such as love is amazing and hate is bad. (Lewis believes that people “must be trained in obedience to the moral intuitions…”, an idea he also addresses in The Abolition of Man.) Authority is also an necessary consideration in deciding a matter, both because we don’t have time to examine every belief and because our beliefs are liable to be ter all this groundwork, Lewis finally begins making his case. First, he considers the fact of whether or not all battles do more hurt than good, concluding that “history is full of useful battles as well as of useless wars.” He next examines whether the intuition of love as better than hate (or helping as better than harming) leads to pacifism or not. First, he recognizes that we are incapable of helping everyone so that to support one means not helping another. He then states that if two parties are in conflict, for an observing party to do nothing would violate the intuition. (He assumes that action would come in the form of physical intervention and violence.) From here says, “The question is whether battle is the greatest evil in the world…”. This shows that he thinks of pacifism as the view that battle should never be engaged in. And the only reason he could see to take this position would be if it could be argued that battle is always worse than the alternative. After this, he argues that pacifism is impractical, because pacifists will be overcome by those who are not.Turning next to authority, Lewis argues that human authority, both specific (England at that time) and general (“righteous war” praised throughout history) help war.Examining at latest divine authority, Lewis argues that current Christian authority and Christian history both help violence. The only verse which Lewis apparently can think of which might help pacifism is Matthew 5:39, “Do not resist an evil person”. Lewis believes Jesus here is addressing private revenge and considers Paul and Peter’s talk about government using the sword as help for Christians using the sword. Lastly Lewis considers his bias and argues that since it would be more convenient to be a pacifist, it is more likely for one to be biased towards it. In other words, not finding a logical reason to be pacifist nor authoritative support, Lewis concludes that people must be pacifist because it is easier and more convenient for them to do so.1Transposition 5/28/1944 – Essentially, as I understand it, Lewis is addressing the argument that since alleged supernatural works of the Holy Spirit manifest as naturally explainable phenomenon, isn’t it more reasonable to believe all such instances are simply natural, not supernatural? Lewis’ argument is that the “higher” spiritual must be transposed into the “lower” natural globe and must therefore use otherwise natural means to do so. He uses the metaphor of how we attempt to represent three-dimensional reality in two-dimensional Theology Poetry? 11/6/1944 – Lewis addresses the question of if our beliefs about God (and even in the existence of God) are merely fanciful and quaint ideas we keep sentimentally but without any real reality behind e Inner Ring 12/14/1944 – Lewis speaks about the desire to be “in” and accepted along with the fear of being left out and rejected. He warns versus the danger of doing wrong in to fit in as well as the fleeting nature of the sense of being mbership 2/10/1945 – Lewis refutes the idea of Christianity as a private, individual, private matter alone. He takes some time to differentiate between groups whose members are various but complementary (metaphor of church as a body) and mere collections of like people or things. Lewis also touches on hierarchy and authority. Overall, Lewis basically argues versus isolated individualism on one hand and homogeneous collectivism on the other.On Forgiveness 8/28/1947 – Lewis talks about God’s forgiveness of our sins. He explores the difference between excusing (I understand, no huge deal, etc.) and real forgiveness as well as how this relates to forgiving others.A Slip of the Tongue 1/29/1956 – Lewis warns versus the temptation to “play” at Christianity which comes from the desire to keep onto the things of the world. Refusing to allow go of these things causes one to not obtain too spiritual to the point which would require true change in their life.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    The Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis writes with a very intriguing and interesting style, especially in one of his amazing books titled The Weight of Glory. He is a very logical writer that is able to tie in emotions to hold the reader engaged and be able to relate to the topics. The book is organized in various sections with various topics. The title of this work refers to the connection to Christianity in all of his topics. C.S. Lewis is a powerful Christian that directs his writing at other Christians and non-Christians; he makes the reader think about how he/she can change for the better for whatever subject is being discussed. The arguments in this piece are set up from a logical standpoint therefore, the reader will search a lot of powerful warrants for each claim that Lewis states. The subjects that Lewis will be discussed from Lewis’s piece include: “On Forgiveness,” “Learning in Battle Time,” “The Inner Ring,” and “Membership.” The overall background of the writings contains resolving common problems in the context of Christianity. The first subject that Lewis discusses is forgiveness. An example of how he relates the subject of forgiveness to Christianity is how a lot of Christians will ask God to excuse them instead of confessing their full sin and truly believe in God’s forgiveness. Lewis (2001) makes this claim and then backs it up with evidence immediately by writing, “If you had a excellent excuse, you would not need forgiveness; if the whole of your action needs forgiveness, then there was no excuse for it” (p. 179). This is very logical help from Lewis and it is shown by his “if, then” statements.Another subject that Lewis brings up is titled, “Learning in Battle Time.” This reading describes the daily battle that Christians endure. It really struck me when Lewis said he believes that all humans are called to be righteous in the duties we participate in within this war. He then continues from a logical standpoint by saying that every duty is a religious duty, thus it is absolute that it’s our obligation perform every duty in the name of God. This statement caught my attention because it teaches me that I can do every duty I am called to do in my life to the glory of God. The method that Lewis warrants this statement comes from a very emotional standpoint, which gives the reader a powerful example to try their morality in a certain situation. Lewis (2001) attacks the reader’s emotions when he writes, “Thus we may have a duty to rescue a drowning man and, perhaps, if we live on a risky coast, to learn lifesaving so as to be ready for any drowning man when he turns up” (p.53). Not only was I able to relate to this example, but it definitely tested my morality. Before Lewis even said in the next sentence, “It may be our duty to lose our own lives in saving him,” I already thought to myself that I would be willing to die for another person through my own moral/emotional mindset. As mentioned, I was also to be able to relate to the situation. For example, I have taken a few CPR and childhood safety classes because my mom runs a daycare; therefore, I always have to be ready to act if any of the kids ever had any health implications.“The Inner Ring” dilemma is another subject that Lewis presents. Logic is, once again, used by Lewis in the strongest method in explaining this concept and relating it to Christianity. The inner ring represents an individual always wanting to be involved in something for the lone reason of just wanting to be “in.” Unless we can search virtue, happiness, loyalty, and kindness in the things we’re involved in, we will always feel excluded and we will always be looking for more. This is exactly what Lewis explains before he boldly states his two reasons behind this dilemma. The first reason he stated was that passion for the ring is the most skillful thing in causing a amazing man to do poor things. In his second reason, he said that until one conquers the fear of being an outsider, an outsider that individual will remain. He even makes a clear comparison to the reader for better understanding, which is something Lewis is very effective at. He is the type of author that can create the subject easily relate to the reader, which helps with better understanding for the e latest subject that Lewis discusses is the problem on “Membership.” This is another case of Lewis showing his strength in logic by making a statement and then supporting it with two bold reasons. There were two reasons behind why he stated for religion to be solitude is dangerous. He then proceeded with his logical reasoning by quoting the modern world, “You may be religious when you are alone, and I will see to it that you are never alone” (p.160). Of course, he explains in detail what this means by saying it is basically banishing all of Christianity to believe in this statement. Supporting the claim with a second warrant, he says, “There is the danger that true Christians who know that Christianity is not a solitary affair may react versus that error by simply transporting into our spiritual life that same collectivism which has already conquered our secular life” (p.160). When Lewis clearly states a few reasons a claim is true, it shows how sharp his logical reasoning mentioned before, the book appealed to me in an extremely logical way. Lewis also incorporates an emotional result on the reader in a few various subject areas. The writing was very simple for me to understand and relate to, which makes the reading much more intriguing. Even though I am the type of audience that Lewis is mainly targeting (Christians), I do believe that non-Christians would also be blown away by Lewis’s strong writing style. The book, The Weight of Glory, showed the importance of recognizing certain topics/issues show in our globe today and being able to relate them to Christianity to understand how we can create a difference for the better in the glory of tationsLewis, C.S. The Weight of Glory. (1963). Fresh York. (2001) Print.

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    I wasn’t sure what to expect when I purchased this book. There aren’t too a lot of cycling fiction books I can think of other than The Rider, which I haven’t read. I though the cover looked amazing so I gave it a go. I love to read and I love riding my bike. I’m not a racer, but I don’t think I required to be to have fun the story. While I certainly think it could help, the author did an adequate job, helping me relate to what the racers/characters were going through. It’s an interesting read as there are multiple perspectives and twists throughout the book. The largest shocker happens at the end of the book, and I wasn’t expecting it. The book is well written, and I’m satisfied I took a possibility and picked this one up.

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    I really enjoyed this book! A captivating story. Guy wrenching at times, motivating, an emotional roller coaster. The cycling bits are thrilling and hold you intrigued, and the emotional turmoil of the hero keeps you on the edge of your seat.

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    Like

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    When I first received this little booklet I was a small surprised. It was smaller than I expected. Now, I am satisfied it can fit in a suit coat pocket or purse. The author gets right to the point and covers his topic thoroughly. When you don't have a lot of time this little book is perfect. As I read his work I can feel an wonderful presence of God. I have recently ordered several more of these little travel books. At a stop light, or in the grocery shop line you can whip this out, read a paragraph and be fed.

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    If you are a student of the Bible or just beginning to study scriptures you will love this book. Dr. Hagin is one of the greatest prophets ever place on this earth, and in this book he writes in a straight forward, simple to understand fashion. If I were in an end times scenario this book would be a definite part of my bug-out kit. Perfect read!

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    Storm of Arrows: Field of Glory late Medieval Army List []  2020-2-1 3:58

    Amazing book for the pictures and a wee bit of history with each army. Too poor that the gaming system is beautiful much defunct.

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    Storm of Arrows: Field of Glory late Medieval Army List []  2020-2-1 3:58

    This proved as useful as a reference as well as a android game manual.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    I would definitely recommend The Weight of Glory to any Christian with questions about living a life of faith. Lewis especially targets the college student population with his amazing understanding and use of logical arguments. He with practical concerns and pragmatic solutions. He serves the truth of the Bible with the hope found in God. In this book, Lewis attempts to address common problems young Christians struggle with as they test to own their faith in a post-World Battle culture. For example, in the chapter “Learning in Wartime,” he says, “If we allow ourselves, we shall always be waiting for some distraction or other to end before we can really obtain down to our work.” Procrastination: every college student has experienced it, and Lewis responds to it. He demonstrates an understanding off the issues, along with the feelings and emotions young people would have concerning them. He’s thorough in his logic and has obviously thought things through. In The Weight of Glory, he begins by emotionally tugging on the reader, then hits him with a sound argument, and leaves him with practical tip on how to continue living as an enlightened Christian. He brings himself on the same level as his readers; he doesn’t leave them with the lofty opinions of a scholar, but with the guidelines of one experienced Christian to a younger. In his explanations and arguments, Lewis uses a lot of analogies. This is extremely helpful as he tries to explain himself and illustrate his point, however, he sometimes takes the analogies too far. He overuses some analogies and stretches them too far. This book has created my faith stronger and inspired me to live a more thoughtful life as a Christian. I wish to read more of Lewis’ works and delve more deeply into his doctrine.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    C.S. Lewis died 55 years ago, yet much of his writing remains fresh. Unfortunately, these collected lectures (not letters as the Kindle edition subtitle calls them) present they are from a various age. Perhaps it is a matter of audience. These lectures were delivered to all male university audiences in the 1940s and one consequence is that Lewis seemingly has no need ever to say anything positive about women. They contribute small that Lewis didn’t say better in other, better known works. Unless you are determined to read everything Lewis wrote, you can skip this volume.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    This book by C.S. Lewis includes a dozens of sermons and essays. Each one follows an impeccable stream of logic, each provides deep meal for thought and each one encouraged me, though in various ways. Sometimes I felt as if a whole fresh globe of understanding opened up before me, and sometimes they caused a weight in my heart to lift and dissipate. I heartily recommend this collection.

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    The Weight of Glory []  2020-1-18 20:58

    I came to this book understanding it to be a selection of letters, when. In reality this was a collection of lectures given by Lewis. I read the first half of the book, and having felt the words on the page to be impenetrable, finished as an audiobook,, which helped with my understanding.While there was some insight to be gained from these lectures, I feel the context was one of which I simply could not relate. A mid 21st Century American has only so much in common with a Globe Battle II era British man. A amazing of the references were lost to me.I think I will stick to Lewis's Christian books, like Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters.

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    I just love the in depth teachings that Kenneth E Hagin left for us all. I have read other of his material and never been disappointed but bless. His examination of the word on the glory of God packs insightful truths and it ministers to me greatly. I will continue to be moved and engaged by his life experiences but more his honesty in that seeking the giver is so far greater. I am never disappoint and glad when people share their faith based accounts of what God still does today. Amazing reading and he makes it easy enough that you don't miss it!

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    Once again a clearly understandable, well written book; explaining the glory (the manifested presence) of the Holy Spirit. Reminders of both biblical times & in the here and now. What a amazing faith builder!

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    The Glory of God []  2020-1-31 18:49

    I give God all the glory for allowing Kenneth Hagin to leave us this amazing book.

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    What a amazing novel to read for any and all cycling enthusiasts. A amazing fictional work around the real harsh realities of competing in the Tour de France.

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    The Road To Glory []  2020-1-13 19:25

    "The Street to Glory" - I don't read a lot of books. Since I spend a lot of time on the bike, I'll listen to about a dozen books a year. When I was handed an advanced copy of Lawrence Brooks' novel "The Street to Glory" I thought I'd begin it and see what happens. From the opening pages, the action and characters pulled me and I set a fresh PR for pages per day and I completed the book in record time. As a competitor and fan of cycling for 35 years, I appreciate that Mr. Brooks' incorporated private struggle and successes, what's on TV and in the press, and a behind the scenes look at Globe Tour plots and politics. It's all in there - tactics, politics, sponsors, fans, dedication, and pain...Oh the pain of the lungs, legs, heart, and spirit. Pain management is significant part of cycling at any level. Everyone manages it in a very private method to survive until they can't.

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    I love everything with "Mississippi Mass CHOIR" stamped on it. :)

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    Mississippi Mass Choir takes you right to Church with their singing! You feel God's Glory on the inside and outside of your soul. I am determined to do God's Will because Mississippi Mass Choir is singing God's praises with me.

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    God Gets the Glory []  2020-1-23 3:23

    I don't remember how I got this cd. I'm not even sure whether this choir is a combination of several other choirs or just one large group. What I do know is that this is a unbelievable cd, and one of my favorites. Sometimes, in the car, I will place on track #13 (The Lord Keeps Blessing Me) and it lifts up my spirit and makes me sing and wave and I don't care if the people in the next vehicle are staring. It transports me to a place-- a huge concert hall half-full of choir and half-full of audience-- where the melody and spirit are alive.If you haven't listened to Gospel music, this might be a amazing put to start.

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    Storm of Arrows: Field of Glory late Medieval Army List []  2020-2-1 3:58

    Interesting "non-review" by a previous poster...I understand the criticism in not wanting multiple list books. But the production value and the inclusion of Osprey artwork added to the pictures of painted miniatures makes these books a very nice value. If you count the plates alone in the books, they are a solid value. And yes, I know the illustrations are available elsewhere. But for the novice and the gamer that doesn't have an extensive library of painting guides, these list books are a amazing start.I have read just about every rules system out there on ancients and medievals. I have even played over 10 various rules sets. I search these rules to be well written and to simulate what "I" feel ancient and medieval wars looked like. From my reading of historical battles, they were rarely actions with "quick kills". The rules simulate the ebb and flow of wars nicely. To be sure, there are situations where a fast rout can happen but these happen more with the luck or lack of luck in die rolls or when multiple troops gang up a single unit. Very realistic to what "I" know of historical war accounts.We can sit here and argue with what rules system is the "best". I feel that these rules compromise very small in simulation with relation to android game play. As a whole "system", the rules show a refreshing approach to this arena of has brought a lot of "retired" gamers from other rules back to gaming. It has also been bringing in fresh players for all the right reasons. Both trends that have been sorely required in historical miniature gaming for some , join the rest of us who have brought an objective and willing attitude to just sit down and play! Come on in, the water is more than fine.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    This volume of early American history is limited in its scope, covering a period of about 300 years from Columbus through the colonial era, the Revolution, and the Washington presidency. Its purpose, however, is not merely to chronologize these events, but to examine them from a spiritual perspective. Peter Marshall and David Manuel, both Yale alumni, seek to explore our country's earliest spiritual heritage and how it relates to the moral and cultural degeneration they were observing in 1977, and that continues today. While the book is not without its flaws, I think it a critically necessary and often purposefully omitted piece of the historical puzzle regarding the roots of e authors start with Columbus, whose early missionary ardor to bear the light of Christ to the Fresh Globe was ultimately corrupted by the strong lures of wealth, prestige and power. Next come fairly detailed examinations of the colonies at Jamestown, Plymouth, Salem and Boston. Of particular emphasis, again, were the spiritual actors, such as the Franciscans, Jesuits, Pilgrims and Puritans. Throughout, the authors provide a quite unvarnished look at the shortcomings of all of these personalities, but also strip away the false photos and caricatures of them that are so prevalent in modern scholarship. In particular, they restore some desperately required balance to the discussion of the Pilgrims and e thing that gives this book such powerful credibility, as with any amazing history, is the authors' massive reliance on basic sources, particularly from Columbus, Bradford, the Mathers, Winthrop, Washington, Adams and a lot of others. Their own writings reveal much about the deep Christian faith of our country's founders, much that is never mentioned or even considered a valid subject of discussion in most modern (i.e., revisionistic) history books. Over and over, the hand of God's providence is highlighted, whether in the survival of the early colonies, or the battle for independence, or the unlikely success of the Constitutional key criticism of the book, however, is the extent to which the authors presume to tell us what the will of God was or was not in different situations. In so doing, they depart from the demands of the documentary evidence, and thus take what are, in my opinion, speculative leaps that are impermissible for historians. I understand the authors' tendency to surmise such things from surrounding circumstances, but just as I found this kind of speculation to be objectionable in the work of Will Durant, that is equally real ill, this history was written by Christians for Christians, and the authors create no bones about that. As a result, they are prone to occasionally slip into sermonizing as they consider spiritual parallels between conditions in the 17th and 20th centuries. The book also ends with a call to national repentence and a reestablishment of the Covenant Method that marked the lives of the first colonials. As a committed Christian, I am comfortable with this perspective because all knowledge is God's knowledge and may be fairly integrated in this way. Secularists, however, will likely search this aspect of the book distracting. Nevertheless, the value of this book for filling in an necessary gap in most people's historical knowledge cannot be overstated.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    Learn about the founding people of our nation. The trials, hardships and humility to submit to Jesus Christ. How humbling to see the pain and anguish they went through!

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    This book is a masterpiece. It has so much going on in, what on the surface is a easy story, that I'll be rereading it to obtain more out of it. It takes put in Mexico during the 1930's when a Socialist government has outlawed the Catholic Church. Church activities are illegal and Priests are executed. The story is told mostly through the eyes of the, on the run, whiskey Priest. He has lost almost all the things that go with Priesthood, except his own faith which is shakey. He is like a hunted animal, a martyr, a Christlike figure. Without ruining the ending, I'll just say that the method Greene handles it is genius. The entire novel is sparsely written making the dismal landscape stark, with lurking danger. I would recomend this novel to everyone although with a Catholic background you might bring a greater understanding. Tolle Lege.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    I felt the same method before reading this book that God has a plan for America and America must be the fresh Jerusalem not only for the Jewish people but also for those who claim Jesus as their Savior. God has chosen to bless our nation and has shown much grace. My hope is in the Lord in spite of the destruction taking put in America today by those who hate God.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    This is my second time to read this book with a lot of years between readings. I highly recommend this book if one is begin to the idea that God has a plan for America. The authors view of American history from Columbus' discovery to the 20th century gives powerful evidence that God does desire that His people come together to express Him as a nation -- one nation under God. The conclusion is that we need to obtain back to our roots and have both a horizontal and vertical relationship with God and with one another.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    I picked up this highly regarded work because I like books that place an interesting spin on meaning-of-life problems and religion in general. I had heard that this book was ranked as one of the greatest 100 books written in English in the twentieth century. It did not e author Greene was a Englishman who travelled in Mexico – the setting of this novel. He wrote about a “whisky priest” – an alcoholic. The (Roman Catholic) church was under persecution in fictional Mexico by a military group. Most priests had forsaken the faith or had been killed. He was the latest priest left. He was in high demand from the common folk to hear confessions, administer the sacraments (if he didn’t drink the wine first), perform burials, etc. Of course, he had to do this all while he was on the run from the local is whisky priest is a sad but triumphant character. Usually, priests are not amazing candidates for the proverbial “everyman.” After all, they are set apart from society by education and by class. Nonetheless, Greene makes this priest relatable through his drinking. He becomes a sad (despicable?) figure. Despite being mired in doubts and having a low self-image, this priest continues to confess and suffer for the faith. He is Greene’s ver of a tragic hero, with the tragedy being his alcoholism and the character part being his inability to renounce the a Protestant, I had a tough time relating to all the classic (pre-Vatican II) Catholicism in this tale. After all, veneration of the elements is less my thing; administration of the Word is more of it. Despite this, the hero of the whisky priest still communicated with me. Saints, after all, are not created by being excellent but by arising out of the mud that lift consists is book also addresses one of my favorite subjects – the integration of the secular globe with the spiritual world. It follows along the traditional lines of the secular globe persecuting the spiritual. This may have been the case during Greene’s day, but I search that the relationship between these two realms is more complicated than that. Still, the ending of this novel shows a more sophisticated relationship that contends that human nature will always possess some religious element to it and that when true, religion will always exist in some form.Overall, this classic work is fairly accessible and an enjoyable and thought-provoking read. I see why it has been so highly regarded in the decades since it was written. It will appeal especially to literate religious audiences and to those who go to church but long for some various light to shine the path of their life.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    Perfect read on the founding of America (1492-1787). Marshall and Manuel do an perfect job at analyzing the causes behind the effects that resulted in America's birth as a nation. To this end the authors looked to ascertain the moral principles operating in the lives of the significant players, and how these influenced their thoughts and actions, and thus the result it had on their individual lives and more generally the communal bodies. In the end it is created clear that the successful religious, intellectual, and social lives of the Puritans and the Pilgrims came to serve as the primary model for the American method of life. And without this model America would not be what it is. The authors are able to strip circumstances to the fewest and most significant variables thus revealing the hand of Israel's God working in the lives of people and specific events, with the effect being America's emergence as the greatest and most successful experiment in modeling a society on the principles of God's Kingdom, and thus a people where all are made bably the most interesting thing revealed by the book is the linear relationship between cause and effect. The degree to which people pursue the will of God and the desire to practice the principles of His Kingdom, is the degree to which society works well. The more self-serving and hedonistic people become, the more society begins to reflect the "jungle" rather than the "Kingdom." A corollary is how easily this guiding rule is lost when distracted by all the clamoring of life's different egregious sensual offerings and indulgences (unbridled dissipation of the libido, recreational drug use, the unchecked wish of material things, addiction to extreme adrenaline rush, etc.). Unless specifically guarded against, the inexorable outcome is toward corruption and thus toward the "jungle" of life. Simply put, man becomes a bottom feeder. Thus the state of America as a nation is but a reflection of which has the upper hand in the war for the focus of the l-in-all, a very illuminating and engaging read on American history.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    This is at least the third time I have bought this book to give away. It presents an acc of North American history, from the early explorers (Spanish, French and English) to the United States of America's founding. It emphasizes the godly influences which brought about the favorite takeaway regards the 2 early Atlantic settlements: "Jamestown founders came for GOLD" (meaning riches), while "the Pilgrims came for GOD" (escaping persecution from the established Church in England).

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    This is a beautiful awesome book. I've always been interested in American history, especially in American political and military history. The more I've read through the years the more it seemed to me that God was performing miracles for us--and so a lot of of our Founding Fathers--and others--felt the same way! This book is a book of American history, and the authors did an perfect job of showing how God really influenced people and happenings along the way. The book begins with happenings that shaped the life of Christopher Columbus and led him to America, happenings that present the result of God in his life which enabled him to do what he did, happenings that most people are unaware of--unless they read a book like this. And the fact that we had so a lot of outstanding leaders come together just when conditions and happenings took put which enabled us to victory our independence from the most strong nation then in existence was not just a "coincidence". Too a lot of "coincidences" have taken put in our country's history for them all to have just been "coincidences". They present that God has been in control and has used people and happenings to carry out His long range plans for the world. And that should give us all hope for the future, in spite of all the poor things that have been taking put in latest years both here in America and all over the globe besides.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    Not sure I can say I loved this book, but I’m glad I read it. I liked the latest 20% of the book best, especially the dialogue between the Lieutenant and the priest after the priest was caught and ’s a story of demons, the demons that chase all of us as we test to live our lives. Under the anti-Catholic regime in the Mexican state, churches, priests, are all banned. To be caught with wine (with its ability to be used in the Mass) is an act of treason. Some priests renounce their faith, marry and live sad lives. The protagonist of the story, the Whiskey Priest (he’s an alcoholic) lives a various kind of desperation. On the run from the authorities, he’s afraid and weak. His is the desperation of those on the run from not only the authorities but from roughout the story are the stories of the lives of different people. Also lives of desperation (it’s a rather depressing book!).In the end, after capture, facing death by firing team for treason, the priest seems to summon up a strange courage. This latest part of the book created the rest of it worth ’s a book that will stay with me, yes, depressing, but with a message. More than anything, even though the Church has its faults, it provides hope for many. Not only hope but a comforting rhythm to life. The alternative is not a globe without the Church.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    Perfect book, the research about our nation is amazing. Everyone who is a citizen of the USA, or who is interested in the founding of our country needs to read this book. It will create you appreciate your citizenship; and will see God's providential Hand on this country. It doesn't just present all good, it discloses how flaws as well as when we humble ourselves and follow His plan.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    Inspiring book. This book has strengthened my faith, gave me peace leading up to the election, and inspired me to live a more Godly life. The facts are informative and the text is written in an interesting fashion. I bought this book for me and have since bought 2 more as bonuses for others. Highly recommend.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    It is a terribly sad, but amazing book. I had never read Graham Greene, although I had certainly heard of him. I had earlier dismissed him as a sort of John Le Carre, writing about the complexities of international espionage. However, then Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa praised The Power and the Glory in Vargas Llosa's series of essays on different writers entitled The Truth of Lies, and so I thought that I would give the book a is not an simple read nor, at first glance, an uplifting one, although one can seem moments of redemption and revelation laid out in the book. Everything is set in a Mexican state that I believe is meant to represent Tabasco during the 1920's, shortly after the Institutional Revolutionary Party's ascension to power. At that time, and in that state, it seems that the Mexican government was carrying out a pitiless purge of Roman Catholic priests, and although there were a number of believers, they observed the Catholic rites underground. It appears that the government effected the purge using philosophical observations akin to Lenin's observation that religion is the opiate of the e had spent time in Mexico prior to writing the novel, and wrote a memoir that expressed his loathing for the country and all that he saw. And certainly, both the foreigners and the natives living in the novel's setting are deeply unhappy. The former suffer from a profound sense of dislocation, and often dream of going home. The latter are oppressed by unbelievably cruel hardships, including political repression and rgas Llosa explained that the novel presented a conflict between the upright Lieutenant, who is totally committed to his secular beliefs and hopes to extirpate the church in to do away with obscurantism in the hopes of bringing paradise to this world. His bite noire is a priest, who is sinful, guilty of fornicating and drinking and yet, much more human than the rigid ever, I did not see it that way. The Lieutenant is admirable in his own way, particularly when compared to his corrupt and complacent superiors. However, Greene paints the Lieutenant in broad brush strokes and spends relatively small time with him. Greene spends far more time with the corrupted "whiskey-priest," and the true conflict is between the whisky-priest's attempts to discern the nature of his own calling, which he pursues with increasing diligence, which is remarkable considering horrific suffering that he passes through, including near starvation. Still, the whiskey priest cannot decide if he was closer to God when he was a younger priest, relatively well to do and with a parish, or if he is closer now, even if he spends the night in jail and even if he robs rotten meat from a dog because he is r me, Greene uses the whiskey-priest to discover different theological conundrums. As the novel progresses, we see that the whiskey-priest is becoming weary of life, which is understandable because he has been on the run for eight years. And yet, when he returns to the very state where the police are chasing him, ostensibly to hear the latest confession of a murderer, Greene makes clear that in part, the whiskey priest has begun to despair of this life. Thus, Greene asks us to ask if the priest's decision to return is a Christ-like gesture, in which he willingly sacrifices his own life for the betterment of another? Or it is a selfish gesture - in which his desire to die is in a method reflective of a selfish desire to cease living and thus cease suffering?On that note, a remarkable aspect of the novel is the tremendous hatred that nearly every hero feels towards this world. And yet, that contributes to the novel's power, because Christianity indeed and indeed to a degree condones a contempt for this gardless of the feelings that he may have harbored about Mexico, Greene sets out the priest's struggles with amazing subtlety and precision, showing him advancing towards a nearly beatific state at times while alternatively feeling repulsed and disgusted by the people around him. At each point, we are encouraged to ask if the priest is moving closer to God, or indeed farther away.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    "The Power and the Glory" has been called Graham Greene's masterpiece and after having read it I must admit I agree. I am hesitant to compare any novel to Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" but I would be remiss to say that it did not remind me of what a lot of scholars consider one of the greatest novels ever t in a remote part of Southern Mexico where the Catholic Church and priests have been outlawed and hunted down by a political/military group called the Red Shirts (Communists), it reveals the undying faith of the peasant classes and the corrupt leaders and fat cats who are suppose to be God's representatives on earth (the church, priests, bishops, etc.).The lone priest left in the area, a person all to human with a woeful record of debauchery, is hunted down throughout the book by the Red Shirts and a reward has been placed on his head. It is through the priest's capacity to allude capture that we learn how the situation in this part of Mexico developed. This book is based on true life happenings and Mr. Greene's analysis of the situation (he was a reporter during the upheaval) is both fascinating, enthralling, and heart wrenchingly accurate. As a Catholic, it had me cringing and yet I would strongly recommend this book to all Catholics and all people of various faiths. An amazingly strong piece of writing.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    There is no plot, there is no character ... turned off yet? A priest in Mexico is on the run from the Government that has outlawed Catholicism. From the standpoint of purity, the priest has failed. Known as the "Whiskey priest", he has also sired a kid and is guilty of greed along with other human faults. During the course of his escape he reflects inwardly and a lot of conversations take put with himself. He seeks to escape but, from what? Inner turmoil cannot be escaped from but only grows more intense. The threats of mortal men should not stop the work of the church ...should it?Other priests have married and renounced their faith to pacify the Government, why can't he? Who's failed?Along the way, there are characters who pry into the priests mind and the conversations between them stab at each other's heart and bring forth feelings and reasoning that have the reader looking inward e has that power to begin an inner dialogue within the reader. You search yourself nodding in agreement or raising an eyebrow in query. Not too a lot of authors can evoke this emotion. Also, upon closing the book, his work tends to stay with you for sometime as you mull over the exchanges between the characters.I discovered Greene somewhat late but now he's firmly cemented on my list of authors whose work I wish to can't gloss over this as, it is by no means light. You have to focus, sometimes refocus and, in certain case, re-read some of the paragraphs. It can be a chore in locations but, it's all worth ve Greene a try.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    Obviously, this is a classic in our times. It has been in print over 70 years now. There have been tons of hardcover and paperback reprint editions since the author first wrote it. I just bought the third audiobook edition. No wonder that Graham Greene and others have held this to be his greatest we search in a lot of classics, this is a book that causes us more than a bit of self-reflection. Maybe it reflects the meaning of C. S. Lewis' saying, "We read to know that we are not alone." Is it the author's intention to create this known to us? It's quite possible, if you agree with my feeble attempt to summarize the main point is that it forces us to ask ourselves, "Do a few mistakes, or our faults, wipe out the amazing we have done in our lives and create us unworthy of a satisfied eternity we wish others, especially our loved ones, to search and attain?" Also, "If so, how do we live out the remainder of our lives?" This is the struggle of the "whisky priest" being hunted as a wanted man as he searches for his own peace. This is an underlying concern that has to be resolved before he is caught and executed before a firing squad. In the intervening time, his goodness is seen to unfold and to be revealed to everyone but himself. It is filled with suspense that does more than hold our interest. It is very engaging. The ending is the audiobook version, the superb narration by Bernard Mayes introduces an element of sluggishness to the telling of the story that seems to prevent the reader from moving too quickly through the book as the suspense builds. This infuses an aspect of dread that adds to the effectiveness of the telling of the story.

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    The Light and the Glory []  2020-7-26 20:22

    It should be required, or elective, read in High School. It is a quick read which touched on the high points of Gods hand in our nations early history. Peter Marshal uses a lot of source documents; although, he does pontificate a few times. I have completed my history at our local state university where I learned that George Washington was a fornicator, but in this text, I learned about Gods hand guiding Mr Washington. The book was very inspiring, except for 1609, starving time, in Jamestown. I call it the creators absence. Chapter 2, was thrilling as I learned of Squanto's adventures and God using him to save the Pilgrims from starvation. It was awesome to read how Squanto opened the meeting-hall door to search the frightened beleaguered settlers, only to ask, got beer? I will leave it there. You will have to finish the book.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    With some shame, I admit this is the first Greene novel I've read. And it's said to be his most powerful. However, I found myself indifferent to the individuals involved, and, most specifically, to the central figure of the "whiskey priest" who mea culpa's his method through his flight, especially after his own realization of his "indifferent piety" of the years of living comfortably and being respected. I did, however, sympathize with his inability to confess the sin of breaking the vow of chastity when he had loved the outcome of the 'sin' - his kid (perhaps loved more in theory, as he had small if any contact with it). Coming to the end, and with complete lack of interest in the fate of the priest, I was left with an appreciation of fine writing and uncomfortable insights into the human hero (this after reading Tolstoy's Resurrection which is teeming with such insights). Certainly I'll continue with other Greene novels - but will not revisit this one.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    Graham Greene, underrated as a literary giant in my view, always delivers brilliantly written novels and The Power and the Glory is no exception. Set in 1930s Mexico, it depicts one of the latest surviving Catholic priests on the run from a revolutionary government trying to eradicate religion. This period of Mexican history does not obtain a lot of attention perhaps too much else was going on in the globe in the 1930s. To me, the power of the novel comes from the moral ambiguity of the characters - the "hero" priest has a lot of flaws and his government pursuer has a lot of amazing characteristics (at one point unknowingly giving alms to his prey). The ancillary characters are all well drawn - the British dentist, the other priest who gave up the cloth, etc.

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    The Power and the Glory []  2020-9-8 18:15

    I'm generally not a fiction reader, but I picked up a reference to this book in an op-ed piece in a major U.S. newspaper that caught my interest. I read it when I finished a major piece of decidedly nonfiction work, and was looking for a method to unwind.I couldn't place the book down. It grabbed me and pulled my through the entire story in a couple of days. I'm interested in academic theology, but this book place an entire various spin on the notions of "redemption" and "salvation." I'm still digesting it, but would recommend it to those interested in prepared: it's not conventional.

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    The Glory of Early Music []  2020-7-26 22:23

    Most frequently, the melody of the early baroque is liturgical. This cd pulls multiple selections of secular melody of this period from other Naxos releases resulting in a remarkably enjoyable and new sounding listening experience. The similarity of the melody of the 14th and 15th with certain fusion compositions of today was startling. I highly recommend it.

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    The Glory of Early Music []  2020-7-26 22:23

    This is the best early melody cd I have heard. Its the true music, and not like a lot of other cd's where it sounds like it was redone. These songs sound like they were recorded during the period and therefore it sounds authentic. A safe bet for the true thing.

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    Glory []  2020-1-18 23:12

    Must agree with Joe Nathan here: there is no "two". If you meant the singer(s) and the guitarist, they're completely in sync, just not in a BPM club style. If you meant the (single) guitarist, Joseph Spence, he's completely in sync with himself. I search him one of the greatest original guitar players of all time. Again, he's as far from a metronomic, studio-driven rhythm player as you can find: constantly and fluidly moving from behind the beat to before the beat, never boring. I search his melody to be always uplifting and cheering, always fresh to my ear. He stands alone.

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    Glory []  2020-1-18 23:12

    Disappointed. I just can't believe how poor this melody is. The two are just not in sync with one another.

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    The Glory of Early Music []  2020-7-26 22:23

    It wasn't what I was looking for at all.

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    The Glory of Early Music []  2020-7-26 22:23

    A unbelievable blend of early melody by different ensembles, including my very favorite, The Ensemble Unicorn. This album has a small of each western European country's melody from the medieval period. Though three or four of the recordings aren't of the best quality recording (the musicians are top notch, it just sounds like an old recording) It was an perfect purchase. I initially purchased it because I was buying anything by the Ensemble Unicorn, and found several other ensembles on this cd I enjoyed just as much. All in all, a VERY amazing for the early melody enthusiast!

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    The Glory of Early Music []  2020-7-26 22:23

    This CD begins with medieval Turkish and Macedonian music, and goes through the Italian, French & English Renaissance. This is a amazing CD and every number is worth listening to. I like to place this on and dance like a wild woman. If you're fresh to early Western classical melody and your idea of it is polite and slightly boring scratchy instruments, then this CD. It will toss your preconceptions and introduce you to the unbelievable diversity of Western melody origins.

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    The Glory of Early Music []  2020-7-26 22:23

    Any fan of medieval, renaissance, or early melody in general will love this. The musicianship and songs on display are equally fantastic, and definitely worth checking out

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    Losing the Field (Field Party Book 5) []  2020-1-21 22:24

    Let's face it, high school can be rough. Who ever said it's the best times of our lives clearly didn't go to my school. I think for most people high school goes 1 of 2 ways.1. You're popular, your fit it and and it's great.Or2. You're not popular, you're an outcast and it's when you manage to search maybe even just 1 person that makes those days a small bit easier it can be everything. That would be Nash for Tallulah. That is until she over hears him laughing at someone calling her fat. The one thing she is most critical of herself for is her weight. Now her globe is shattered. She vows to obtain back at him. All summer long she has one goal in mind.... n Nash obtain back into her amazing graces?Will Tallulah search what she was looking for with her revenge?I want Tallulah hadn't had to go through that. It broke my heart when the one person she thought was on her side betrayed her. Her turmoil is probably very related to the method a lot of girls go through during high school. A very relatable young adult book for sure.

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    Losing the Field (Field Party Book 5) []  2020-1-21 22:24

    This book is amazing! The lessons here are deep. An I had written a story to obtain lost in, but also combined it with life lessons that a lot of of us need to be reminded of. This isn’t a book about a girl who thought she was [email protected]#$% after losing weight or a football star who was whiny after being hurt. It’s a story of a girl that transformed on the outside, but was still the same on the indeed regardless of how a lot of people chose to “judge a book by its cover.” It’s a book about a football star who had his life planned out before it all came crumbling down after an injury and having to learn a fresh path for the first time in his life. It’s a book about acceptance, struggle, friendship, forgiveness, and love with some awesome snark thrown in. I love Abbi’s writing and you will too.

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    Losing the Field (Field Party Book 5) []  2020-1-21 22:24

    Abbi Glines does it again! Each book in the series has touched on true life situations that can affect a teenager. This book took it to the next level.Tallulah struggled with weight and once she changed she had a whole lot thrown at her. Attention she didn’t know how to cope with (not just from her peers).Nash struggled with an accident that defined his future and destroyed his ese are all true situations. Anyone that attended High School knows how cruel some people can be. I applaud Abbi for bringing these to light.I’m looking forward to the next book in this series! Bring it on!

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    Losing the Field (Field Party Book 5) []  2020-1-21 22:24

    1 HORRIBLY SUPERFICIAL STARWhy did I read this book?Overweight all her life, Tallulah diets and exercises before senior year, spurred on by her longtime crush Nash laughing at a fat joke. No longer a football star following an injury, Nash is now interested her.LOSING THE FIELD wouldn’t have been a poor story if Abbi Glines had stayed away from making Tallulah focused on fat being the only issue teens faced, if Nash hadn’t though students could seduce a teacher and if the entire school wasn’t comprised of slut-shaming mean girls. Glines’s word building is readable but her plots and characters are paternalistic and anti-female.I haven’t liked the anti feminism in any of her books, but I’m a sucker for a or kindle book.

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    Losing the Field (Field Party Book 5) []  2020-1-21 22:24

    I am a large Abbi Gaines fan. I have read just about every book she has written and I must say I liked her earlier books and series better. She is really the only YA author I read, but I prefer her college level romances. The high school ones are method over the top drama, angst, and read like a poor soap opera.Anyway, this book is the story of Nash, a high school football star who recently suffered a career ending injury, and Tallulah is a girl who went through school very over weight till her senior year and always loved Nash from afar. So there is a lot of poor teenage decisions and silly young girl drama event all around these two children but their lives take much more serious turns. The characters are fully developed, this full length story is written well. Here is my dilemma. (Light spoilers) Something huge and poor happens and Nash believes the worst and is a complete self absorbed jerk. Tallulah forgives him in one paragraph at the very end after a lot of chapters of heartache and crushed trust and it just wasn’t credible or entertaining. No matter how quickly or neatly you wrap it up it does not create up for how Nash acted or what he did. I lost respect for Tallulah especially towards the end because she keeps looking at Nash like a lost puppy no matter that he believes and buys into the rumors and assumptions created about her. If you like super angst over the top teenage soap operas then this book and series are for you. If you wish a small older YA romance with some drama mixed in then read Ms. Glines earlier series. I would return this one if I could but its been to long since I bought it. I gave it three stars because it wasn’t written badly it just wasn’t my kind of ill a fan Ms. Glines but I am staying away from your high school series. Hope this was helpful. Enjoy!

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    Losing the Field (Field Party Book 5) []  2020-1-21 22:24

    For the 4th book in a series I had really enjoyed, I had high hopes for this one. Unfortunately the book fell short in my opinion. The amount of time that the book's main characters, Nash & Tallulah, actually spent together was beautiful slim. The characters themselves were fine, but you never got a possibility to much about their relationship. And when they finally overcame the obstacles placed in their method during the book, it was the very latest chapter and 96% complete. The book just seemed to be rushed throughout, but especially at the ending. It was the method you'd wrap something up just because it had a due date, not because you were actually done. Not a horrible book, just not worth the wait, the cost, or Abbi's writing skills. I've really enjoyed just about every other book she's written (and am anxiously waiting for more books in the South of the Mason Dixon series) - this one just didn't do it for me.

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