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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    For those readers with a love for speculative fiction stories, this collection may not be entirely what you expected...and thank goodness for that!Ken Liu begins this collection with a brief introduction on the relationship between reader and author, and ultimately creating a zone for us to call home; perhaps even himself.Each story can in one form or another be seen alternately as cautionary tales, where from longing comes progress with a private favorite was “Staying Behind”, where the narrator introduces us to a time in the future where technology has advanced to the point where a human’s given the choice of abandoning their corporeal form in exchange for being Uploaded into a at there is a divide between those who help this fresh kind of afterlife, and those who deny it is to be expected, with the narrator’s ill mother representing the latter group.Time jumps forward thru generations, and as we see the narrator fighting versus “the dead,” he calls those who “Upload” themselves, he’s faced with fighting to keep onto his humanity through the preservation of his children’s.Another favorite, “Thoughts and Prayers” is a story with sub chapters written in the perspective of each member of the Fort family as if they’re being interviewed post historic e sudden death of a young college student in a public shooting, paired with a fresh memory-capturing device, leads to a worldwide trolling of the dead (err digital representations created from photos and memories, data).When I finished reading this collection, I came back to the very beginning, skimming the contents pages, matching titles with content. I did so because these stories are more than a collection of stories that any fan of “Black Mirror” would likely enjoy. There is so much sorrow and longing that comes in a a dozens of forms on these pages, that it was overwhelming to absorb all at once in the first read through.When I wrote that these were like cautionary tales - I mean that there will be themes we all aspire to - healthy families who wish the best for one another, yet can never obtain enough. High achievers who strive to succeed, only to be disappointed by what they search at the eas and people so a lot of can relate to, placed in a future reality that is full of possibilities, and consequences. Liu wants us to obtain comfortable in them, which is why I read each story twice - I enjoyed the feeling of being in the stories too much to leave them behind so quickly.A unbelievable collection - my first time reading Ken Liu’s work!Thank you to NetGalley and Saga Press for the review copy!

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    This intelligent collection of speculative short stories by Ken Liu is mostly science fiction, but contains a few works of fantasy (including the titular story, which is what one might call “martial arts-fantasy” – i.e. imagine “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” with more magic.) Depending how one counts up the stories, one could call the collection nineteen stories or sixteen stories and a novella. The novella, broken into three parts, is “storified” enough that its sections are interspersed among the other u doesn’t neatly include his stories within boundaries of genre. In some cases, he jumps through time -- including historical fiction, contemporary / near future, and distant future within a single story. He also takes on social problems like the Japanese internment during Globe Battle II in “Maxwell’s Demon” and the blight of technology on social interaction (best shown in “Thoughts and Prayers.”) There are hard sci-fi stories that present intergalactic travelers in a distant future, such as “The Message,” but there are even more that peer into the worries of the near future, such as artificial intelligence or the replicating of human consciousness in e novella imagines a globe in which companies have captured the consciousnesses of great, but dying, minds for their own purposes. It then explores considerations such as: what happens when a amazing mind gets tired of being trapped as an acorporeal intelligence for the benefit of a company, and what does humanity mean in the context of fully replicated human minds?I found these stories to be both intriguing and thought-provoking. I have fun a amazing story, but stories that create one think deeply keep that much more allure. I’d highly recommend this collection for fiction readers. Whether or not you read genre fiction, you’ll search stories of amazing appeal.

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    No fluff, here! Ken Liu comes out swinging ... using SF, Speculative fiction and Fantasy as a platform to spin yarns brimming with insight, inspiration and thoughtful commentary on society and the universe. A heady mix of thought provoking narrative and heart rendering sadness. Seventeen hand picked gems ... the best of the best from multi-award winning Ken Liu. This collection will certainly rival the acclaim garnered from his first collection, " The Paper Menagerie " There is no reason to lay out the plot of each story ... simply stated .... the stories transcend the genre and are steeped in both lyrical and poetic prose. He tackles such themes and ideals: the Singularity with dilemmas encountered with the uploading of the human. consciousness .... Artificial intelligence ... vagaries of Reality ... virtual reality .... environmental activism ... fear of death and battle ... embracing history of ancestors .... future path of humanity. .... and the multifaceted emotions of mankind: love, hate, courage and wisdom . The individual stories are a mix of 4 and 5 star nuggets ... all accomplished with awesome globe building , characterization .... demonstrating his ability to be a master storyteller. Thanks to NetGalley and Saga Press for providing an electronic Proof in exchange for an honest review. Ken Liu's releases are always met with amazing anticipation. ( at. )

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    This was an wonderful collection of mostly previously published work, primarily SF with a couple fantasy stuff thrown in. It being Liu there are obvious linguistic nods throughout the whole collection, but also a patchwork of related themes explored throughout – family bonds in odd time scales pop up frequently, societies grappling with dystopic conditions vs singularity as well. For me the majority of stories contained are 5-star near perfection, however the collection as a whole maybe felt like it should have been edited of a couple stories (including the title story) that just feel totally disconnected from what could have been a thematically cohesive collection – or maybe I’m just not quite intelligent enough for some of these. It also includes a short excerpt from Dandelion Dynasty Book 3, which I am sure everyone out there is hyped to check parate from the individual stories there is also a triptych of stories spread through the collection - The Gods Will Not Be Chained, The Gods Will Not Be Slain, and The Gods Have Not Died In Vain. This trio really could have been released as a novella, but they also have unbelievable interplay with the themes of other stories, so it makes sense how they are broken up. The story follows a young girl who discovers there are ghosts in the machine, and they speak to her via emoji. There is a brilliant storytelling approach mixing standard narrative, emoji conversations, and news briefings (bulleted lists of headlines) that create for something unique.-------------------------------------Ghost days - Snippets of various lives. Genetically engineered plant-human kids learn dead computer languages to honor the human past they are completely chop off from. A young Chinese man who came to America with parents as refugees around Tiananmen Square, has an honest conversation with his date's father. A forger of stuff in nearer modern xwell’s Demon - A prisoner in Japanese-American internment camp is coerced to renounce her citizenship in to serve her country. A very strong depiction of identity and e Reborn - Reverse alien abduction, partial memory wipes, and anti-alien terrorist plot. We are each composed of a lot of oughts and Prayers - The perspectives of family members of a girl who is a victim in a mass shooting. They all feel digital memories of her aren't enough for them, but they might be able to create a difference if shared. A chilling look at social media and online culture. (If this isn’t created into an episode of Love Death an Robots they have created a serious mistake.)Byzantine Empathy - A cryptocurrency/blockchain powered direct charitable donation program is launched (seems related to Kiva, but crypto), VR experiences of project applicants submitted are causing ethical disagreements from two women, former college roommates, who are now on opposing sides in prominent positions. Leads with the tech, then builds into a philosophical argument of extreme rationality vs extreme aying Behind - The globe is breaking down into a chaotic dystopia, people are escaping it by uploading their consciousness. Told in fragments of family life as they test to retain some normalcy that eventually turns into historical re-enactment and stagnation in absence of a globe where progress is al Artists - A woman has dreamed of working at Semaphore her whole life, then she finally gets a look behind the together Elsewhere Vast Herds of Reindeer, Memories of My Mother & Seven Birthdays - Explorations of parenthood in distorted time.Dispatches from the Cradle: the Hermit - Forty Eight Hours in the Sea of Massachusetts: A tech giant quits her job to settle as a hermit and poet floating above the drowned Boston ey Rabbit, Crimson Mare, Coal Leopard - In a society where shapeshifters keep the power, the least expected are most prepared to stand up to e Hidden Girl - A girl is raised as a thief and killer by a mysterious e Notice - A parent and his kid present up alone to research and understand an abandoned alien town before it is tting - An erasure poem of monks cutting away their holy book.

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    This is the second Ken Liu, collection of short stories I've had the honor of reviewing through Amazon's Vine Program. I have also read and enjoyed his expert translation of Cixin Liu's "Three Body Problem" into readable yet literary English. This multiple Hugo, and Nebula winning science fiction and fantasy author has also achieved significant professional attainments in law and computer programming. As always his writing is pure, unpretentious and yet literary in form. His two page preface has importantly for me as a developer of multimedia and computing technologies pointed to the importance of the audience consciousness in co-creating art and literature. The stories in this collection are at once enjoyable, predictive of future technologies, and a delight to read.I can only the highest praise for this technically cognizant and yet artistic author.

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    Those familiar with Liu's other work will search much to have fun in this collection. The prose is crisp and clear, and moves at a rapid pace. As a consequence, the individual stories feel even shorter than their word count which, combined with the fact that the stories don't necessarily have a sense of continuity, causes each work to feel like a bite-sized glimpse into a larger globe that we don't obtain to explore.While not homogeneous in theme, setting, or time, there are common threads throughout the stories. They predominately with identity (individual and communal), memory, oppression, and xenophobia. In addition, as other reviewers have noted, they often build to a clever twist at the end, a pattern that starts to feel formulaic and predictable after a while. In fact, I found my mind wandering as I read, trying to guess what the twist was going to addition, as a whole, the denouement of the stories tend toward the depressing or the cynical. I had to stop reading at times just because I didn't wish to expose myself to getting interested in a hero only to have something not good happen to netheless, Liu's deft worldbuilding and hero development are on full display throughout. The fact that I didn't wish to see more misery for his characters is indicative as how proficiently he created them come alive. All in all, this is a solid, if depressing and somewhat predictable, collection of huge ideas in little packages from a talented wordsmith.

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    All the stories in this collection are wonderfully written and equally good, even if my enjoyment of each one varied greatly. In the preface, the author explains how he didn’t write these tales to please the audience but himself, so it stands to reason that each reader connects with some stories and not favorites are the ones that with family and loyalty, like the titular Hidden Girl or The Message. Both these stories are also a amazing example of the themes, all are science fiction but the settings vary. Some take put in space, in the future or faraway locations closer to the fantasy genre. One of the most poignant is set in ree of the stories were too convoluted for me, mostly because two of them discuss a future political landscape in amazing detail.A few stories with humans leaving behind our flesh to upload our consciousness into computers. Kudos for the use of emojis in the “Gods” tales. The world-building is unbelievable and all the characters well-rounded. Every reader will search a favorite.I chose to read this book and all opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased. Thank you, NetGalley/Saga Press!

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    ook Review: The Hidden Girl and Other StoriesAuthor: Ken LiuPublisher: Saga/Gallery PressPublication Date: February 25, 2020Review Date: November 14, 2019I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest om the blurb:“From award-winning author Ken Liu comes his much anticipated second volume of short n Liu is one of the most lauded short story writers of our time. This collection contains a selection of his science fiction and fantasy stories from the latest five years—sixteen of his best—plus a fresh novelette.”The blurb in no method describes how outstanding this book of short stories is. His stories are beyond sci fi. They are wonderful original speculative fiction. Method outside the box. To be honest, I barely understood what some of the stories were about, at least in a left-brain way. The ways are about the near future, the far future, about worlds I can’t start to imagine. But a lot of of today’s problems are included. Social media. Trolls. War. Things we experience today, but just a small beyond our current experience. And some method outside our experience.I highly, highly recommend this book. I am in awe of what the author conceives. The worlds, the ways of life. The dystopia. Life after the Singularity when people no longer live in bodies, but live for eternity as digital minds. This is one book you cannot miss this year, if you like sci fi or speculative ank you to the publisher for allowing me early access to this book. Amazing luck to the author with his is review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads and Amazon.#netgalley #sagagallerypress #thehiddengirl #kenliu

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    This is my first work of fiction by Ken Liu, so I had no idea what to expect going in. THE HIDDEN GIRL is a collection of short stories, most of which are science-fiction, that dwell on themes of artificial intelligence, the transmittance of culture over time (memes), global warming and climate change, and at its most fundamental level, what it means to be ing these stories created me think of the TV present Love, Death + Robots. Not only does it share a lot of of the same themes, it also shares the ability to really bum you the heck out. Even though I'm a quick reader, I couldn't really create it through more than three or four of these stories in a sitting, as they were almost all depressing and a lot of of them had truly tragic or even wretched endings. Do not read this book if you are easily upset and are looking for something uplifting, as I left THE HIDDEN GIRL feeling beautiful bummed and in need of a pressing content aside, most of these stories are excellent. I'm definitely interested in reading more of Liu's work, and liked the focus that he place on having powerful and smart women in these stories, a lot of of them being of Asian (and more specifically, Chinese) descent. It's hard to rate a short story collection as a whole, which is why I tend to break them down story by story, but this is a beautiful solid effort, and I was, on the whole, impressed with what I read, bar a few exceptions that were mediocre/confusing at d spoilers ahead!Ghost Days: ☆☆☆½This is a poignant story about an alien colonist who ends up taking solace in the multi-generational saga of a Chinese family's dealings with xenophobic white people as well as their struggle with dual cultural identities. The title is a play on the Chinese term (often offensive, so I won't write here) for white foreigners, which also refers, additionally, to spirits. Both meanings play a role in this xwell's Demon: ☆☆☆☆This is a story set during WWII about a woman of Okinawan descent who is taken from an internment camp and forced to renounce her citizenship so she can be deported back to Japan as a spy for the Americans. Working in a physics lab, she ends up being the assistant and lover to a scientist developing a weapon that runs on a type of magic, forcing Takako to create a choice about what it simple vs what is right, and which country she should choose to be loyal to when both are e Reborn: ☆☆☆☆This is a chilling story that occurs in the aftermath of first contact. After a brutal colonization, the invading aliens feel remorse and have turned the other cheek to instill compassion and peace in the very society they destroyed. But their compassion has a dark edge, and the body modifications needed of the humans they interact with have a sinister oughts and Prayers: ☆☆☆☆This is a multi-POV story exploring how a mass shooting affects the members of the victim's family, including the POV of a troll who is determined to see that the family zantine Empathy: ☆☆½Confusing story about cryptocurrency, virtual reality, and the dispassion with which we view global conflict when looking through the removed and sanitized lens of social e Gods Will Not Be Chained: ☆☆☆☆☆This is honestly my favorite story in the collection. It's heartbreaking, but ends on a note of hope. A girl being bullied ends up gaining the mysterious protection of someone who only speaks in emoji, but, through further attempts at contact, starts to seem kind of familiar...Staying Behind: ☆☆☆☆This is a haunting story about what happens when we obtain the ability to upload consciousness without a physical body to anchor it. What kind of temptation would a digital existence pose to a venal one, and what would this mean for those who choose to remain behind? This one reminded me of a Twilight Location episode, or maybe a kinder retelling of The al Artists: ☆☆☆☆☆Another stand-out story in the collection, True Artists is a rather disillusioning look behind the curtain at the sterile future of creativity, in this case, via the medium of film. I liked e Gods Will Not Be Slain: ☆☆☆☆½I loved the opening to this one, and had it continued in that vein, this probably would have been a solid five-- but no, it had to be depressing. This is a sequel to The Gods Will Not Be Chained, and explores the dangers of AI and the painful sacrifices we must create to do together Elsewhere, Vast Herds of Reindeer: ☆☆Meh. Another story about AI and the evanescent nature of all things. This one wasn't really a favorite, I think because it was too related in subject to several stronger stories that came right before e Gods Have Not Died in Vain: ☆☆☆☆The conclusion to the three-part miniseries revolving around AI. I really loved this small miniseries, even though it broke my heart. AI is like the Promethean fire, with advancement meaning tragedy for both the creator and the receivers. It definitely feels like a cautionary tale, like Icarus flying too mories of My Mother: ☆☆½A sad story about a woman dying of terminal disease who decides to hack time by going into stasis and visiting her daughter once every seven years to hack her 2 year prognosis. Interesting concept and heart-tugging idea, but the story was too short to package much of an emotional wallop.Dispatches from the Cradle: The Hermit-- Forty-Eight Hours in the Sea of Massachusetts: ☆☆☆☆Really more of a three and a half, but I rounded up for the attractive writing and interesting premise. In this story, earth has flooded in the wake of heavy climate change, and humans have moved on to colonize other planets. Here, two are deep-sea diving in the remains of Massachusetts, looking at coral and pondering the ey Rabbit, Crimson Mare, Coal Leopard: ☆Really confusing. I didn't understand what was event in this one at all.A Chase Beyond the Storms: NO RATINGThis is an excerpt from the upcoming third book in one of the author's series. I don't really like this, as it kind of feels like an advertisement masquerading as belong in the e Hidden Girl: ☆☆☆½The titular story. I always have high hopes for the titular story; I feel like if you're going to name your collection after a story, it should be your strongest work or the most representative of the themes. Neither is the case for The Hidden Girl, which is more fantasy than science-fiction and also very strange. It's about a girl who becomes apprentice to a Buddhist nun with powers, but ends up leaving her after being asked to slay a man, despite this meaning cutting all ties to the people she considers Birthdays: ☆☆½Another really strange story. I didn't obtain this one either, even though it was nicely e Message: ☆☆☆½This is a very sad story about an ancient civilization hiding a secret, the meaning of lost symbols, and a father and daughter who have bonded too late. Easily one of the most depressing stories in the collection, and what makes this even more infuriating is that it feels like it was handled tting: ☆☆☆A poem, and don't worry-- cutting, here, refers to cuttings of paper and not the more upsetting kind. I know, I had the same concern, given the content in this book. After a series of major downers, it was nice to end on a somewhat lighter there you have it, THE HIDDEN GIRL with all its ups and downs (mostly downs). It's a amazing work of science-fiction and I do recommend it for fans of Love, Death + Robots, but don't read it when you're having a poor day, as it will likely create you feel worse.And now, to read something happy! :)Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!3.5 out of 5 stars

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    The Hidden Girl and Other Stories []  2020-7-3 18:59

    Ahoy there me mateys!  One of the best short stories I have ever read was Ken Liu's the paper menagerie which in 2012 was the first work to victory the Hugo, the Nebula and the Globe Fantasy Award.  This lovely cover for his second short story collection caught me eye and I was excited to read more of his work.  This book has 16 stories from the past five years and a brand fresh novelette.  There were 19 all l short story collections are kinda hard to review.  I usually test to give thoughts about each story individually but I am not able to do that for this book.  This stems from the fact that the stories, as the author's preface states, have been arranged by the editor into a "meta-narrative."  The stories at the beginning seem to standalone but later stories have a lot of characters and plots reappear.  I think the beginning of the collection was the strongest but much of the middle blurred together and felt very slow for reasons I will obtain to.  Here are the stories that I loved:"Ghost Days" - The first story was cool and the historical fiction aspects excellent.  I didn't particularly love the ending but I did learn about bubi which are amazing Chinese coins.  After the story I went looking to search out more about them and found this cool page."Maxwell's Demon"- This was the second story and the best for me.  It with the Japanese internment in 1943 and ghosts.  Poignant and beautiful."Thoughts and Prayers" - A thought-provoking tale about the consequences of a mass shooting on one family and how the digital globe impacts how each member with grief."Real Artists" - A weird but fascinating look at how movies could be made."Grey Rabbit, Crimson Mare, Coal Leopard" - Cool magic.  Super fun characters.  I wouldn't mind this one being expanded into a longer form."The Hidden Girl"- Killers and magic.  Arrrr!"The Message"- Lovely story about familial bonds, alien archaeology, and tough choices.  Bittersweet.About 30% of the method through is where the tone switched.  Much of the middle of this book with the unforeseen impact of technology advancing.  One story dealt with what happens when ye crowdfund charity and the non-profits have to compete.  Multiple stories dealt with uploading the human consciousness to o repeating ones were 1) a girl, Maddie, who talks to her dead AI father and 2) the Singularity which is where people gave up their physical bodies.  A lot of of the stories with Maddie used emoji which I couldn't see very well on me Kindle and couldn't enlarge.  It irked me and I missed a lot of the meaning.  I enjoyed the Singularity ones better.  But the switching back and forth did lead to some whiplash.  And some of the tech created no sense to me so I was just confused about what was going 65% it switched to fantasy second with the "Grey Rabbit" story.  I loved that one.  Next from 76 - 81% there was an excerpt from the third Dandelion Dynasty book.  Horrible, horrible choice.  It didn't fit and should have been place at the end of the book if they wanted to promote it.  Blech.  "The Hidden Girl" was next.  Unbelievable story whose theme and tone matched the "Grey Rabbit" story.  The remainder of the stories were good.Out of the 19 stories, I loved 7, enjoyed 7, and didn't like 5.  That is beautiful darn amazing for me and a collection.  So while there were quibbles, I am very glad to have read this collection.I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for me honest musings.

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    The Girl Who Married a Skull: and Other African Stories (Cautionary Fables and Fairytales (1)) []  2020-8-31 18:53

    Well illustrated, fun stories, amazing read.

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    The Girl Who Married a Skull: and Other African Stories (Cautionary Fables and Fairytales (1)) []  2020-8-31 18:53

    'The Girl Who Married a Skull: and Other African Stories (Cautionary Fables and Fairytales)' edited by Kate Ashwin, Kel McDonald, and Charlie Spike Trotman with a whole host of artists, is a collection of really fun the title story, a beautiful, but vain, daughter won't listen to what her parents want. They wish her to marry, but she doesn't wish to. When she is swept off her feet by a handsome stranger, her parents are suspicious, as well they should be. This man is not what he e other stories are kind of like this one. There is the story of how Anansi stole wisdom, and why snake and frog don't play together. There is a story about Isis and one about Queen Hyena's e art and stories vary, but they are short, so ones I didn't have fun as much were over quickly. The art is in black and white and I [email protected]#$%! were in color. I love fables and fairytales and I can recommend this collection for young readers and older readers looking for something various and magical.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Iron Circus Comics and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

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    The Girl Who Married a Skull: and Other African Stories (Cautionary Fables and Fairytales) []  2020-1-16 8:32

    'The Girl Who Married a Skull: and Other African Stories (Cautionary Fables and Fairytales)' edited by Kate Ashwin, Kel McDonald, and Charlie Spike Trotman with a whole host of artists, is a collection of really fun the title story, a beautiful, but vain, daughter won't listen to what her parents want. They wish her to marry, but she doesn't wish to. When she is swept off her feet by a handsome stranger, her parents are suspicious, as well they should be. This man is not what he e other stories are kind of like this one. There is the story of how Anansi stole wisdom, and why snake and frog don't play together. There is a story about Isis and one about Queen Hyena's e art and stories vary, but they are short, so ones I didn't have fun as much were over quickly. The art is in black and white and I [email protected]#$%! were in color. I love fables and fairytales and I can recommend this collection for young readers and older readers looking for something various and magical.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Iron Circus Comics and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    My son couldn't obtain enough of this book when he was young. He wanted it read over and over again, and I was satisfied to do it for him, not only because it is so much fun to read, but also because it teaches so a lot of amazing values. He's now 34 years old and a truly amazing man. Years later when I was teaching middle school remedial readers, I used this book to demonstrate to them how to add intonation and drama when reading a story. When it was their turn to give it a try, they all had such fun taking turns reading it aloud and laughing at their own efforts. The real joy of reading.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    My all time favorite. This will teach your kids about how silly it is to prejudge, discriminate and even to constantly demand more! more! MORE! I think it puts into a child's perspective, bullying, fairness, being nice, being equitable in our daily relationships. To be more accepting of others and even ourselves as we are and not having to change ourselves to "fit in" with another's pre-conceived notions of who and what we should be.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    This is one of the best and most necessary Dr. Seuss books of all time because it helps to socialize kids into understanding the psychology of social class, tribalism, racism, etc.. That their sense of self worth/esteem should not be dominated by the social constructs of others.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    Fantastic. This was my favorite book as a kid and now I have just as much fun reading it to my son. I have read a lot of various books to my son, but Dr. Suess books are not only enjoyable for the listener but a blast for the reader. I like to do various voices for the characters and see my small guy laugh. Our fav is the Southern voice for the South going Zax and the Northern Voice for the North going Zax. GET THIS BOOK!

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    One of my favorite books from my childhood. Now, as I read it to my 6 year old, I realize how impactful the lessons are from each of the stories. The Sneetches learn the value of living in a more accepting society and that you should not judge someone based on appearances but rather love them for who they are on the inside. (It also shows how simple it is for someone to take advantage of those that search their value only in their e north and south going zax present us that being stubborn and inflexible will not allow us grow and will hold us stuck as the globe continues without e green pants with no legs has a lesson about fear and e mom with all the Dave’s.... well, that is beautiful straightforward. It’s does present the value of stepping outside your box and being unique. Though really it just reminds us to not name all of our children Dave because it will cause so much problem in the long run. The random alternate name suggestions are still funny.Overall, it’s still a fun read and a amazing opportunity to begin up necessary conversations with your kids.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    This was one of my favorite books when I was a child. I ordered it a couple months ago, since I remembered how much I had loved it. I laughed so hard I cried, through almost the whole book! It's awesome to me that this man could have come up with the necessary lessons that he did, and obtain them across in such funny ways and while making the unbelievable rhymes that he did! The book amazed me as I was laughing and crying! The story of the Sneetches that thought they were better than everyone else getting their comeuppance had me in stitches. The northgoing and southgoing zax with their lesson on stubbornness and "I won't budge" created me think that everyone in my whole family (up,down and sideways) must have read this story and instead of learning NOT to be stubborn, used the zaxes as their heros in learning TO be stubborn (don't budge EVEN if they build the highway over you)!!!! And the guy being scared of the pants with nobody in them, and it turns out the pants were depressed and scared too!!! It shows that others have the same feelings you do (even if the "others" are strange personless pants)!!! These lessons are SO amazing and useful for everyone . . . (Okay! So I didn't understand the lesson in the 23 Daves!) This book, to me, is pure genius. It is as timely today as when it was written in 1961.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    The Sneetches and Other Stories is unbelievable reading for your child. It's not just that perfect first story in the title, but also three others that range from fun to e Sneetches is about monsters who separate into two groups based on appearance. With the star-bellied Sneetches looking down on the non-star-bellied Sneetches, tension builds...until in walks an entrepreneur who can instantly erase the differences with a "star-on" machine. I've heard reviewers crank about this story being pro-welfare, or liberal propaganda, but the lesson is more about prejudice, and while I won't spoil the story for you, there is a very P.T. Barnum-styled ending that helps the Sneetches realize that snap judgements lead to blinding one to what e story "The Zax" is another blindered example where two monsters hate each other so much they allow life pass them by. The rest of the globe moves on, while they can't seem to obtain over their mutual dislike of each other. This story is very en we have "Too A lot of Daves". Hilarious and silly, this is practically a short two-page poem, all about a mother who created the mistake of naming all of her kids Dave. My daughter was always delighted when I read this story because of all the silly words in it.Which brings us to the unsung gem at the end of "The Sneetches and Other Stories": the tale "What Was I Afraid Of?" Dealing with a child's fear of the unknown, this spooky small tale resolves itself sweetly, and I really have fun the method Dr. Seuss shows a kid that perhaps with a bit of determination, one might search that one's fears and anxieties really aren't so poor after all. The fact that the main hero is afraid of a pair of green pants is silly enough that a kid can instantly grasp that there are reasonable fears...and then there are unreasonable ones.Whatever stories you choose to read, read to your child. You will see a large difference in their learning, because you took the time to be with them and encouraged them. I loved The Sneetches and Other Stories because its lessons to me are the sorts of things every kid should learn about dealing with others and with themselves.

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    THE PILOT: AND OTHER STORIES []  2020-8-6 18:33

    Outstanding... just outstanding. It’s like reading Earnest Gann again. I loved every word.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    This is a perfect book that teaches easy morals and life lessons that are simple to understand and identifiable. The first story teaches about pride and envy and how you can end up unhappy and broke if you allow those govern your life. In the end they learn that one is no better than the other. The next book is about being stubborn and how you can waste a lot of time being stubborn. The third book is silly and refers to having a lot of children named very special names and then regretting it. The latest book is my favorite. I have read it to my boys a lot of a lot of times and they love it too. It has a monster who is scared of a pair of empty pants. He is afraid of them not because they are sinister or malicious, but because they are so very various from him and he has never seen something like it before. I won't elaborate any more other than to say we really have fun this book.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    No dimensions listed or image showing scale. Turned out to be very little with little print inside. Especially difficult to read when some of the text is black over a dark background. We have to turn the lights method up, not amazing for bedtime or my eyes. Still giving two stars because the book itself was in amazing shape, the shipping was fast, and the stories are great. Just disappointed in the actual product dimensions. I'll probably pick up a bigger copy when I search it for a amazing price.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    This is my favorite book from my childhood. I also read this to my small sister. When she grew up, one of her first tattoos was a red star on her bellybutton. My mother referred to her as “our star bellied sneech” (not the expected response). Making this book a forever satisfied memory of her. I even had the joy of reading it to her daughter and sharing the story about her mom.

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    THE PILOT: AND OTHER STORIES []  2020-8-6 18:33

    Occasionally I stumble upon a remarkable book and, though I rarely leave reviews, I am compelled to leave one here. This book should not go without notice. Whether you are interested in flying, the thoughts that run through your captain's mind, or just like to be completely taken away with a talented writer's prose, you will not be disappointed by getting yourself a copy of this rst off, this is a collection of stories. There are so a lot of thoughtful, evocative, exciting vignettes that one long book would not do it justice. The author takes the reader through the a lot of trials and tribulations of flying an airliner in so a lot of conditions: landing in a snowstorm at night, thunderstorms in Florida, hurricanes, and yes, dealing with Beelzebub (you will have to read about this nemesis yourself).It is a sad reality that after Covid 19 so a lot of pilots are on the street, and so a lot of people are unable to experience the fun side of flying (just test to describe a sunset from 35,000' over the pacific), but at least through this book you can be swept away into the mind and soul of The Pilot, and what it means to fly hundreds of people in a "giant metal albatross" through thick and thin.I highly recommend this book. See for yourself, Robert Turner's mastery of words is inspiring!

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    Not bad, still left me wanting more, but considering that this was part of an unpublished sequel to the Lewis's Zone Trilogy, it's worth the read.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    C.S. Lewis is read for his wit, insight, scholarship, freshness, and discernment. His writings lift the heart and sharpen the mind.. In the late 1970s I was introduced to Lewis through Sheldon Vanauken's book, A Severe Mercy. Lewis's Mere Christianity, Narnian chronicles, Issue of Pain, Till We Have Faces, Screwtape Letters, and other works followed. Then I borrowed the Dark Turret and Other Stories, read it, and ran it past another Lewis reader, a biblical scholar. We expressed our mutual disappointment. The Lewis we had expected was not in its sophomoric, squalid, resolutionless, puling pages, disjointed development, and commonplace obscenity. It was a marsh with no fruit. This same sense of being cheated was expressed by Ursula Le Guin in her 1977 review, and a year later by Lewis reader and sci-fi expert Richard Hodgens. Hodgens concluded that the title story, The Dark Tower, was a tangle of unoriginal fragments. Only the seventh chapter of this tale, Hodgens thought, was to some degree equal to Lewis's previously published stories. The Dark Turret has a strange history, including alleged rescue from a bonfire on an unknown date after Lewis's death. (The alleged witness to the fire wrote that it never happened). Neither Lewis's mates nor his surviving brother had ever heard of it. Supposedly written in 1938, the story echoes sci-fi plots of the 1950s and '60s. The story contains other anachronisms, as well as a blatant Americanism, and some ink on the manuscript did not exist before 1950. There has been no authoritative handwriting or chemical analysis of the manuscript, now in Oxford's Bodleian Library, but the language has been subjected to computerized analysis. In 1986, graduate student C.F. Jones, using the Literary Detective program of letter and letter-pair frequencies, showed that the story did not match Lewis's other adult fiction. Five years later, A. Q. Morton, co-originator of the Cusum program--which analyses sentence patterns--applied his statistical system to The Dark Tower. (Cusum is used in the British courts to validate authorship, and by Interpol and forensic experts elsewhere.) Except for the first 25 sentences of chapter seven, Morton concluded, the story was not by Lewis. Publishers of The Dark Turret and Other Stories have refused to investigate the evidence of forgery, or to topic the Dark Turret manuscript to objective forensic testing. (Some of the other tales in the book--as well as other posthumously-published "Lewis works"--are also disputed.) A lot of academics and people involved in C.S. Lewis endeavours disregard the evidence provided by Jones, Morton, critic Kathryn Lindskoog, and others (including this writer) that the title story, at least, is not the work of Lewis. Why is this? Possibly because reputations, grants, access to Lewis archives, critical works based on the posthumous "Lewis canon," and--especially--profits from book are at stake. Lewis has pointed out that while evil can never come from good, amazing may come from evil. Reading the suppositious Lewis tale, The Dark Tower, will persuade the discerning reader that it is not a genuine C.S. Lewis work.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    It took me a while to read this one because I had to pause at the end of each story, sometime for days, to think about it, mentally study it, and let it to enter my memory stores where it wanted to reside. The stories are varied in length, are wide in range and subject, and are all unforgettable. When I started with "The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species", I knew this would be unlike anything I'd read lately. And it just got better from there. A sly combination of history lesson, science fiction, revisionist history, and social commentary, Liu deserves every award and accolade he has received for this compilation, which are numerous. I highly recommend this gem. Here are a few memorable quotes:•"We have always faced a precarious existence, suspended in a thin strip on the surface of this planet between the fire underneath and the icy vacuum above." Mono No Aware•"The desire to freeze reality is about avoiding reality." Simulacrum•"...a boy stands in darkness and silence. He speaks; his words float up like a bubble. It explodes, and the globe is a small brighter, and a small less stiflingly silent." A Brief History of the Trans-Pacific Tunnel Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    This book draws one in gently, but soon travels to dark e first two stories introduce the reader to the delicacy, originality and beauty of Liu's imagination, expressed in science fiction and in fantasy. The more pervasive themes of this collection contain the historical (and alt-historical) interactions between Americans, Chinese, and Japanese, in different combinations; the internal conflicts of those whose heritage or history contains two or more of these; and, more generally, the mystery of how human beings can commit and justify atrocities. When stories with such a focus introduce SF or magical elements, those elements are sometimes well integrated, but sometimes oddly u is so compelling a storyteller that he pulled me into and through the horrific info some of these stories include. I hope this warning does not discourage a lot of readers from taking the same journey.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    The short stories are amazing and remind me of some of L Frank Baum's. Definitely ever there is a issue with the formating. I suspect that some of the words we're supposed to be in italic but instead the words became much much larger than the normal size text. It could also use a bigger indent for paragraphs. It currently has a one zone indent.I recommend getting the book and also sending a note to the publisher.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    As always, a amazing read, especially for young readers (including the young at heart).Entertaining stories of sheepboys of the wild west of Wales, the little people of Even Moor going versus giant difficulties, and the ever-popular weird stories of Blackburry, are part of this collection of unbelievable adventures you are sure to enjoy.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    If you are a NoFX fan, and can read. You have to obtain this. If you can't read just obtain the audio book from FAT. If you aren't sure about it, go to the photos and search the first chapter that Mike starts. If the first sentence makes you feel uncomfortable, then just hold reading because you'll feel more 's a unbelievable book. I learned quite a bit about one of my favorite bands. The audio book is amazing too because all the guys read their own chapters.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    This is one of the most intense and brutally honest "rock" biographies I've ever read. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll gag, you'll actually throw up. You'll wonder what pee tastes like....and you'll love every min of it.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    I am a fan of Holly Black's dark creepy writing, where characters search themselves in very sad dark places. So, imagine my happiness when I found this audiobook and that Holly herself narrates this compilation! I took amazing little pleasures with this book, listening in short walks, errands, and taking small moments, making it almost a year to finish.During the course of this year I have a handful of memories of these stories: some where just forgotten, some lingered and others I am already ere are 12 stories in this book:The Coldest Girl in ColdtownA Reversal of FortuneThe Boy Who Cried WolfThe Night MarketThe Dog KingVirginIn Vodka VeritasThe Coat of StarsPaper Cuts ScissorsGoing IronsideThe Land of Heart’s DesireThe Poison EatersFrom these, I loved the first one, which also became a full length standalone novel, The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, The Night Market, The Coat of Stars and Paper Cuts Scissors. These are all dark, gritty, sad, satisfied and hopeful.I personally believe that the beauty of this collection is how each hero must challenge or face a obstacle that forces them to create choices and learn something about themselves. It also has superb descriptions, happenings and surroundings, so various from one tilda, from The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, is scared about her infection and wants to hold away from everything and everyone she knows so she wont pass her vampiric disease. But then, she restores to highlight how horrible and un-human is this disease once it hits you, in an attempt to shatter any romanticized notion of vampirism. This tidbit is a unbelievable put to begin with Holly's masa from The Night Market, is a real heroine. Her sister is sick because and enkanto's spell. Her determination and resourcefulness are a real beauty to enjoy. I loved the ending of the story!Rafael Santiago from The Coat of Stars, is also a tale of bargaining with supernatural characters, but a tale of love. I found it intelligent and crafty! I really really liked that we have queer characters in here.Justin from Paper Cuts Scissors, wants to understand why his girlfriend left, as she disappeared inside a book. He is a library student, who is scared of books and is hired to classify a heavy underground library. I found this particular story fascinating. The notion to change books, endings and happenings sounds fun! It reminded me at some point of Woody Allen's film Midnight in Paris. I was mesmerized by the classification of books in sections according to the ten broad categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification System, used in this favourite quote from this story comes from Justin's musings when describing who he was going to library school with and how he avoided the hipster kind of girls: "Those girls seemed as risky as books that unexpectedly killed their protagonists". It created me my experience, this book shouldn't be read in one sitting. It is excellent for keeping you company in odd life moments when you really can't devote a lot of hours. I will miss having this unfinished title in my audiobook library.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    Holly Black's writing always seems to creep on the edge of being totally out there and original, but this volume reads sub-par in comparison to some of her other novels. No true stories stand out in what is generally a ho-hum collection of prevoiusly published material and the first time additions don't add very much. The best stories are "The Coldest Girl in Cold Town" about a teenage girl who is trying to sweat out the vampiric virus in her blood but gets sucked in to support a friend. The title story, though interesting, never quite reaches the equivilent of the first.A couple of stories are bold, though, in particular "In Vodka Veritas" about a boy who tries to avoid prom and ends up there anyway in a shocking method that involves, among other things, a cult and alcohol. "Paper Cuts Scissors" is another of those stories that has a small bit of a surprise effect and may in fact be the best story in the book. This particular piece should sit well with the literary crowd, especially librarians, as it cleverly uses Dewey Decimal classification as section headers (300 = social science; 800 = literature; etc.).But die hard fans of Black may be a bit disappointed with these outings. The writing is decent but the storytelling is not up to par with her full length work and a bit of Ironside knowledge is useful for a couple of the stories, without which, one may search oneself confused and certainly lost. Overall, not the worst of collections, but I was expecting better.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    As per usual, Holly Black's writing draws me in and makes me feel joy and discomfort, beauty and bitterness from her characters and concepts. She was my favorite author as a teen and is perhaps even more so as an adult because she never shies away from difficult, dark, or edgy storylines and concepts. While I prefer the worldbuilding of her full-length novels I will say that this collection of short stories was a fun look into her brain and other concepts she enjoys playing around with. If you like her other works, you will love this as well!

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    I'm a large fan of Neil Gaiman's work having read most of his writings (including his comic book work) but I did not have fun this book. Maybe I am missing the point of what he is trying to say but I don't search turning the story of Narina into an adult horror story enjoyable. And it is a very adult story so you shouldn't allow kids read this thinking it is another book like The Graveyard e other 3 stories are better but not up to the usual amazing books I have come to expect from him.Looking forward to what other people think. Maybe one of them can explain why this book is worth reading.

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    As always with Neil Gaiman you go along for the ride. Where it is going to take you doesn’t end with the words. The stories continue, the thoughts linger, the Art remains. I would love listening to this book, and then Reading it because the art is so beautifully done, but I wonder what my imagination would have presented first. Highly recommended for all adults, and older YA. Parts are very graphic as original Grimms. All of it intriguing and thoughtful and delightful.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    Received item quickly....just as described!

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    This story will bring joy to the reader, nice copy.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    I received no message that it had shipped but it did arrive before Christmas. Book was Christmas show so I cannot review it.

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    This set of connecting stories was very well thought out and definitely interesting! I only gave 4 stars though because I felt it started to lose momentum towards the end and I didn't care for the ending as it seemed weak and too abrupt which was disappointing. The latest story in particular was a bit of overkill and could have been deleted as it really didn't complete the connection in a satisfying method but seemed more of a 'quick fix' ending. Also it just got too gruesome for my taste. If you like gruesome and gory then it might be the story for you.

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    The method the stories all connected to each other was fascinating. The author did an perfect job of weaving the stories together,but you could read each story on its own without missing anything. I especially liked the one about Paula and Jasper, and the one about the pier. I went back and reread those, I liked them so much. I'm going to read more books by Amy Cross.

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    This was an ok read, it has its moments but the ending is bit confusing.

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I first read the short story "The Lottery" in junior high at age 14, and I remember being utterly shocked…and scared. Very scared. Quick forward 50 years, and even though I remembered the plot and so I knew what would happen, I still had the same visceral reaction when I read it now as I did when I was a young teenager.While author Shirley Jackson is arguably best known for "The Lottery," she wrote more then 200 other short stories, as well as six novels and two memoirs before her death in 1965 at age ill, I purchased this particular volume of short stories because it included "The Lottery," and while I think it is the strongest of the 23 in this collection, a lot of others are just as evocative and imaginative and a few are almost as chilling in the underlying story buried within.And that is the genius of Shirley Jackson. Not everything is as it seems. On the surface of any given story, it is what it is—but scratch a small and things become very different. That "scratching" requires the reader to think, to ponder, to consider and to actually work a bit at deciphering the true meaning.I imagine almost every junior high school student in the 1960s read "The Lottery" as part of the English curriculum, but is it still being taught today? I surveyed my three grown kids and their spouses, and two of the six had read it in middle school. And one of those two is now a high school English teacher, who continues the tradition of teaching this short story that such valuable lessons buried in its imagery and symbolism—tradition, religion, fear, human cruelty and blind, unthinking evil. There is so much to learn from this short tale that takes only 10 mins to read but will haunt you for a lifetime.

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    26 short - and often disturbing- stories. Shirley Jackson lures you into a rose coloured Walt Disney /Bells of St Mary all American world, then with the slightest poke she reveals the petty hatreds , bigotries , prejudices and lust for cruelty; created all the more shocking as you can recognise them-sometimes in yourself. These "Hits" are often brutal. A young boy on a train with his mother and baby sister. A man chats to the boy telling him he chop his sister into pieces, and he's "Just joking" but the result on the boy is untold by Jackson. She leaves you in the nightmare. Then there's the well intentioned-initially-Mrs Wilson towards Boyd, her sons young black friend, where her deep rooted racism surfaces when the boy tells her his family are doing well and don't need the worn clothes she is offering. There is the constant out casting of people who are "different"; don't share the bigotries of the mob society or the class etiquettes. Then at the end you have "The Lottery"... Shirley Jackson's themes and style of portraying them are unique. No one else can write stories like these in this way. Main Road was never so dark and disturbing.

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I'd read the title story in grade school, of course, and it's famous, but I actually like 2 other stories better in this collection -- The Demon Lover and The Tooth. I like most of the stories here and am glad I read this book. There's another story I wish to find, that must be in another collection. Shirley Jackson's work is special and timeless. I also liked her novels.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    Is there anyone with the creative genius to [email protected]#$%! for him? It was maddening having to stop at such an exciting part of the story!I loved seeing Ransom, MacPhee, and Lewis himself in another context. I thought the characterization of Ransom was especially well done. It showed him as something in-between the timid "modernized" Ransom of Out of the Silent Planet and the Messianic character of Perelandra. And MacPhee is a amazing character, and really loveable in his way. It's interesting to see Lewis himself appear as a character; that was a particularly creative stroke.

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    Grand artwork, brilliant writing.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    A terrific collection of short stories from a truly awesome author! I like that I'm able to have fun this collection so much and also share it with my 12 yr old daughter on her Kindle reader. The stories in this collection are very imaginative and well written.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    I bought the book to use in Common Core, but I already had the short stories I chose to use in my old literature book.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    Quick paced, candid, fun, simple to read and shocking (if i had not grown up with a lot of of these guys - but I did). And honestly, even I was surprised at some of their antics, and that they documented them! This book is written with humility and self-deprecating humor. Two qualities not often achieved in autobiographical books about “rock stars” and very refreshing. The author and the band were able to give us four various life stories, and present the reader how they got from there to here. They also chronicled the progression of alcoholism and addiction perfectly, in a method a lot of people will relate to in some way. I especially like the method they showed the extreme level of denial that is involved in alcoholism, and leaves us wondering when Mike will really admit to himself (out loud) and surrender his disease. Hopefully before it costs him his life. That adorable daughter he clearly loves, deserves to have her father show physically, emotionally and spiritually. My father was an alcoholic man child, and while it could be fun and “cool”, it also left me wondering what it would be like to have a true parent. Children do what they see, whether we encourage them to do what we say or not. This book was an honest look at the LA/Hollywood punk rock stage in the 80s which was a historically important, and really fun time. It was an inside look at the melody business, and the reasons why so a lot of got into punk early, and what the costs were physically, financially and socially to the pioneers of LA punk rock. It wasn’t always safe to walk around Los Angeles with a pink Mohawk, or in drag, even in Hollywood. The probability of getting in a fight, getting kicked out of locations and being discriminated versus was high to 100%. We were not even allowed in to Disneyland back then unless we dressed “acceptably” and hid our dyed hair and Mohawks, (it’s a family park, is what they told us and they got away with that crap back then!). So all you with pink streaks in your hair, and bondage pants during the 90s, or even now, can thank people me, and these guys, for paving the way, and paying the price. This book really communicates the tribe mentality and camaraderie among the punks in the beginning. Even though there was a lot of in-fighting amongst us, we had to stick together versus the non-punks back then. I rate a book on a lot of things, first and foremost: did it hold my attention, was it well written to the point that I forget the story teller and become immersed in the story, did I feel something or learn something from it, and did I have fun it? All answers are absolutely! Read this book, unless you’re offended by poor language, addiction, alcoholism, criminal behavior, fighting, sex, kinky items and debauchery. Then you probably won’t like it. I loved it. Read it in a few days before bed. Fell asleep laughing. Bravo for this book NOFX.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    Finally finished this masterpiece! 🤣 It's much more well-rounded than I had anticipated. A lot of unknowns about NOFX's history and origin revealed... some disgusting stories... at times appalling... sentimental... vulnerable... hilarious... depressing... uplifting... sexual... raw... and honest. It was actually a amazing read. Dozens of stories about a lot of of my other favorite punk bands. Learned a few fresh terms. Lol. Definitely recommend!

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    This is an interesting departure from much Amy's storytelling. More than that, I love the method the stories are similar and interwoven! Fantastic!

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    So here's the thing: I had no clue that Shirley Jackson wrote any other short stories beyond The Lottery. I hadn't read that one since high school and it is just as creepy as ever. Going into this book, I thought that a lot of of the stories would follow a related haunting, creepy theme. Boy was I wrong . . . but in a very amazing way. These stories were all so different. Some were funny, some moving and some were of my favorites was The Daemon Lover, where Jamie searches fruitlessly for her boyfriend who was supposed to meet her at her apartment so they could run away and obtain married. There was sadness in Trial by Combat, where Emily suspected an old woman in her boarding house of breaking into her room and stealing from her. I laughed reading My Life With R.H. Macy, in which a young woman describes her one day working at Macy's. I have worked retail before so I similar to the main character's feeling that she wasn't even a person, just another employee number. I was mad while reading Flower Garden and felt sorry for Mrs MacLane, whose neighbors turned versus her after she hired a black woman to work on her garden. Those were just a few of the stories in this collection. There are twenty five short stories and I enjoyed them all, though The Lottery still remains my favorite. The only thing I disliked about the collection was that some of the stories were too short. But I guess that is why they call it a short story, right? In some of the stories, the length prevented as much hero development as I liked. Due to the length and the ambiguousness of some of the endings, it was left up to the reader's imagination to determine the characters' motives.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    Very Creative! Written by Ken Liu, and published by Saga Press, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc. in 2016, this book is a collection of fifteen short stories that are of the Science Fiction & Fantasy genre. Some of the stories include elements of both genres, and some are much more realistic (The Literomancer). I will list each short story and add my observations about them:• “The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species” is a story about how various species in the universe might produce or read books. It was an interesting read with some creative thoughts. The author concludes the chapter with the words: “Everyone makes books.”• “State Change” is a story about a young woman named Rina who believes that her soul resides in an ice cube that she keeps frozen and keeps near her at all times. She has multiple refrigerators in her apartment, and one underneath her desk at work. She carries the ice cube in an insulated carrier. She has a girlfriend named Amy who believes that her soul resides in a package of cigarettes. They believe that if the ice cube melts, or if the cigarette package becomes empty, they will die. Rina meets Jimmy at the office. His soul resides in a salt shaker. Eventually, the cigarette package is empty, and the ice cube melts.• “The Excellent Match” is a story about a mega-corporation named “Centillion.” It is reminiscent of Google, Apple, Amazon and Facebook, all rolled into one. Its marketing thrust is like that of Google. It has a female persona that speaks to its clients like Siri or Alexa does today. The voice is named “Tilly.” Tilly is ubiquitous. She tells people what to eat, what films to see, who they should date, everything about their lives. Sai meets his fresh neighbor, Jenny, and they decide to abandon Tilly and Centillion, and to work actively to destroy the company and regain their individual freedoms. Needless to say, the plan fails. This story is spooky because it has already begun—started by the companies I just listed.• “Good Hunting” is a story set in Southern or Southeastern China, not too far from Hong Kong. Liang and his father are demon hunters. Father has a sword named “Swallowtail” that he uses to slay the demons, who are shape-shifters. The particular demons in question are able to change from human form into the form of foxes. Although intended to follow in his father’s footsteps, Liang befriends a demon who can transform into the shape of a white fox. Instead of killing her, he hides her from searchers and brings her food. The British arrive in Hong Kong, and they build a railroad. Soon, the demons disappear, and father and son no longer have work. Liang moves to Hong Kong and becomes an engineer with expertise in metal working and steam power. After a time, he meets his demon friend, who has also traveled to Hong Kong in to survive. The story takes some interesting twists after this.• “The Literomancer” is a story that is set in Taiwan, beginning on September 18, 1961. The protagonist is a fourth-grade American girl named Lilly Dyer. She had recently moved to Taiwan from Texas with her family when her father was transferred by his employer. Lily is picked on by the other small girls at the American school where she attends classes, and she is not accepted by the Chinese kids in the neighborhood. She meets an old man named “Kan,” and his adopted grandson named “Teddy.” Kan is a man who came to Taiwan from the mainland of China to escape both the Communists and the Nationalists. He was educated in America at Harvard. Teddy wants to play baseball for the Red Sox. Lilly finds parts of a classified letter written by her father, and she reads it. Later she shares one of the words in the letter with Kan, and then tells her father about it. That was a very huge mistake.I was living in Taiwan during all of 1961, and I found at least one aspect of the story to be not very believable. The author has a political axe to grind, here, and he takes the side of the mainlanders versus the native Taiwanese people. One of the stories he tells is one that I heard a lot of times while I was in Taiwan, except that the roles of villains and innocent people was reversed. Mainlanders absolutely controlled the government, the military, the educations system, and the financial systems in 1961. I know. I was there. Also, a classified letter with the words that her father allegedly wrote, and that Lilly found and read, would never have left the confines of a secure location, nowadays called a “SCIF” (Secure Classified Info Facility). It could never have been found in somebody’s home, like Lily’s. The part of the story that referred to the origins of the Chinese written language was, however, quite good. Even though Mr. Liu did not use the conventional term “radical” to describe the roots of the more common Chinese characters (although he did in a later story in the book), his descriptions were still accurate, as were his Wade-Giles romanizations of Mandarin words. (The Chinese language has no alphabet.)• “Simulacrum” is a story about a man who invents, develops and uses simulacra. Paul Larimore is a technical entrepreneur who has invented several models of simulacra, including a very realistic artificial intelligence for them. He even uses them as a substitute for pornography. One day, his thirteen year-old daughter, Anna, is sent home from school early because she is ill. She walks in on her naked father and four female simulacra engaged in a simulated fantasy. She is disgusted, and by the time she leaves for college, she will no longer speak to her father, or have any contact with him. Eventually, Larimore makes a simulacrum of his daughter Anna that is frozen at about the age of seven. The story is mildly interesting, but I really didn’t like it much.• “The Regular” is an perfect story about the method a female ex-cop, and now personal detective, tracks down a serial assassin who preys on prostitutes. He murders them, mutilates their bodies, steals all of their valuables, and then uses movies that they have created to blackmail their clients. He is called the “Watcher.” The detective is Ruth Law, and she was fired from the police department when she failed to use her firearm in a hostage situation that, ultimately, resulted in four deaths. Leave out the sci-fi element of the story, and this is just as amazing as the best of the police and crime genre of fiction written today. This author could easily transition from sci-fi and fantasy to police procedurals and murder mysteries if he wished. The story is excellent.• “The Paper Menagerie” is about a small boy named Kan, whose Chinese mother is able to create origami paper animals and then breathe life into them using magic. The paper animals then become animated and lifelike, with behaviors mimicking their real-life templates. The first animal she makes is an origami paper tiger created from leftover Christmas gift-wrapping paper, so the tiger has the stripes from the candy-cane design on the paper. Not only can the tiger move around, it can also growl. The boy loves his paper menagerie, which also contains a goat, a deer, a water buffalo, and a shark created from tin foil that chases goldfish around their bowl.Kan’s father is an American, and the family lives in Connecticut. His mother was selected by his father from a catalog of Chinese women that, supposedly, came from Hong Kong and spoke English. This wasn’t true, of course, but Kan’s father purchased and married his mother anyway, and they traveled back to Connecticut. Kan, also called “Jack,” was born a year later. I thought this story was very poignant. I liked it a lot.• “An Advanced Readers’ Picture Book of Comparative Cognition” is about different forms of smart life in the universe, and how they perceive, remember and think. The author describes giant single-celled beings living in a warm sea who briefly merge and exchange all knowledge, becoming two identical individuals. He also describes a race that travels in ships that accelerate forever, traveling to the end of the universe. The protagonist is a woman who grew up on a boat and now wishes to join a group of humans who have decided to journey to the focal point of the Sun’s gravitational lens, which is fourteen times the distance from Pluto to the Sun out into empty zone in the hope of hearing radio signals from extraterrestrial smart life. I didn’t really like it much.• “The Waves” is a story about a group of humans who have decided to travel directly to the stars in a form of generation ship that will travel for 400 years. Their goal is a star system known as 61 Virginis. Unexpectedly, the ship receives a notice from Earth that changes everything. As a background, traveler Maggie Chao is reading old Chinese fables to some of the kids on the ship. When the pilgrims arrive at their destination, they learn that the system is already inhabited—by humans. Or, at least, what used to be humans. The pilgrims have been passed by in their journey by ever faster ships that have reached the planet ahead of them. It was interesting to see where the author went with this concept, because he didn’t stop there. I thought this story was beautiful good.• “Mono No Aware” is a story set in deep zone in the not-too-distant future. An asteroid has been detected heading for earth, and America has decided to build amazing “generation” zone ships to travel to a distant star system in the hope of survival. Hiroto is a young Japanese boy whose mother has arranged for him to board the only starship life boat to survive the ensuing battles on earth. He is the very latest surviving member of the Japanese people. Later, at age twenty-five, his job aboard the ship is to monitor the vast light-sail that powers it. He detects a tear in the fabric of the sail, and it is driving the ship off course. He volunteers to repair it, and takes a repair kit out to the sail. He succeeds, and becomes a character to the others—but not without cost. His tactic is modeled after the Japanese board game, “Go.”• “All The Flavors” is about a group of Chinese immigrant placer miners in Idaho City, Idaho who arrive there shortly after two outlaws, Obee and Crick (who call themselves “The Missouri Boys”) burn the city after murdering a saloon proprietor. The year is 1865. Lily Seaver is a small girl who lives in the city and is fascinated by the melody of the Chinese men, and by the smell of their cooking. Her father is a merchant whose shop was destroyed in the fire, but who is now rebuilding. Lily likes to roam around the zone outside the town, and she comes across the placer mine being operated by the “Chinamen.” She hides behind a tree and watches them and listens to their singing. She is there when Obee and Crick arrive with guns to rob the miners, and she sees their leader, Lao Guan (called Logan by the locals), obtain shot by the outlaws. But after Lao Guan has been shot in the shoulder, he is still able to slay one of the outlaws with a stone he has picked up and thrown. Lily tries to run, but she falls and is injured. The miners treat her wounds, and they treat and suture Logan before they all return to the miner’s house in town. They use traditional Chinese herbs and potions, along with e next stage shows Logan teaching Lily the rudiments of the android game “Go,” known as “Wei Qi” by the Chinese, by scratching a board grid in the dirt with his knife, and using lotus and watermelon seeds as android game pieces. He tells Lily the story of Guan Yu, the Chinese God of War. He relates how Guan Yu was taught to play Wei Qi by his father, using lotus seeds and watermelon seeds as android game pieces. The story proceeds from there, and the author presents a couple of footnotes at the end. This story is much more like historical fiction than science fiction or fantasy. At 87 pages, it is a bit long for a short story. It is closer to being a novella in my view. I enjoyed reading it, however.• “A Brief History of the Trans-Pacific Tunnel” is alternative history fiction in that it is supposed that a two-tube tunnel has been built between Seattle, Tokyo and Shanghai. It is set in the early to mid-twentieth century. It took ten years to construct the 5,880 mile long tunnel: 1929 to 1938. Seven million men worked on the project, the majority of which were furnished by Japan and the United States. The breakthrough between the two ends of the tunnel took put in e protagonist is a Formosan (Taiwanese) who calls himself Charlie. Charlie was one of the diggers who dug the portion of the tunnel between Shanghai and the halfway point. There is a rest zone midway through the tunnel, under the Pacific Ocean, where travelers can rest and eat on their journeys between Asia and America. It is called Midpoint City, and a number of people live there permanently, including Charlie. The trip from Shanghai to Seattle takes about two days due to the maximum speed of the monorail carriages that travel through the tunnel being only 120 mph, although it is hoped that it might soon be increased to 200 mph. Still, it is much faster than the zeppelins, aeroplanes or ships that currently carried passengers at the time. The story is a metaphorical description of the history of how the Japanese military treated the Chinese and the Manchurians from the 1920s until the end of WWII. It is well worth reading.• “The Litigation Master and the Monkey King” is a story that tells us how, perhaps, the massacre of the town of YangZhou came to be known, even after a brutal suppression by the Manchu emperors. Apparently, the populace of the entire town was wiped out— murdered by the Manchus on the of Prince Dodo. The slaughter lasted ten days, and every single Chinese witness was killed, but one was able to write a book about it. The book was hidden, and later smuggled out to Japan, but the Manchus searched relentlessly for it. Later, the words of a children’s song in the form of a puzzle led scholars to track down the book and reveal the truth. This is a amazing story, and it tells us something of the history of China.• “The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary” is a story about a Chinese-American husband (Evan Wei) and his Japanese-American wife (Akemi Kirino) squad who invent a way for anybody to travel back and look at a time in the past. She is a physicist. He is a historian. The only issue with their technique, which uses quantum entanglement between two previously undiscovered sub-atomic particles related to photons, is that once the put and time has been viewed, it is lost forever and can never be viewed again. (Thus, the title of the story.) The historian husband is the lead member of the team, and he decides that, rather than let scholars and scientists to use the technology first, it should be reserved for the families of the Chinese victims of Japanese military atrocities in Pingfang, on the outskirts of Harbin, Manchuria in the early part of WWII. This arbitrary viewing of the past leads a lot of people to believe that history is becoming like Swiss Cheese, with a lot of holes in is decision by Dr. Wei turns out to be quite controversial, however, and Congress holds hearings that effect in the US government shutting the project down. A lot of people, called “deniers” do not believe that the technology is real, and Dr. Wei loses his teaching tenure. It seems that a unit of the Japanese Imperial Army, called Unit 731, engaged in not good atrocities under the guise of medical research at the that put during the war. As the battle ended, the camp was destroyed leaving small trace, the unit was disbanded, and everybody involved was sworn to secrecy. Parts of this story are historically true, and have been validated. The Japanese government, however, has never formally apologized for this particular horror of war, and the United States was complicit in the cover-up so that it could get the results of the bio-warfare and medical e author, like very a lot of other Chinese, is very much focused on this horrible chapter in human history. To this day, a lot of Chinese keep a visceral hatred for the Japanese and their government. What everybody seems to have forgotten, however, is that human history is rife with happenings where the innocent have been tortured and slaughtered. Has the author forgotten his own words in an earlier story: “The Litigation Master and the Monkey King”? It wasn’t the Japanese who slaughtered the people of HangZhou, China. It was the Manchus. Or how about, more recently, the persecution of the Falun Gong in modern-day China? In a report compiled by “World Organization to Investigate the Persecution of Falun Gong,” we learn that, as recently as 2004, the persecution continued. According to the report:“Today the persecution of Falun Gong still continues in China. As of the end of March 2004, 918 Falun Gong practitioners have been confirmed to die from persecution. More than 100,000 Falun Gong practitioners have been detained and imprisoned. Those who openly express and practice their belief are met with tortures, arbitrary arrests and detentions. Forced Labor camps, mental hospitals, state-owned media and the law have been misused as tools of severe human rights violations. Force [sic] labor and organs of executed prisoners are still common.”People should read this report, which is available on the Internet. We can see from it that atrocities are not special to the Japanese. It’s event now to the Rohingyans. It’s going on in Syria. Have we forgotten the Cambodian genocide: “The Cambodian genocide … was carried out by the Khmer Rouge (KR) regime led by Pol Pot between 1975 and 1979 in which an estimated 1.5 to 3 million Cambodians died or were killed by the regime.” (Wikipedia) Humans have been acting like this for thousands of years. We humans are a deeply flawed speciesThe book, while meriting a four-star award, would have been complete without this final story, in my view. I don’t think it was as well-written as most of the other stories, and it was too overtly political in nature to fit with the rest of the book. I thought “The Regular” and “The Paper Menagerie” were the best of the stories—definitely worth reading. This is a four star work that will both entertain and educate. I recommend it.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    Some stories were light and easy, others (particularly the last) were much darker. But it would have been hard to read a book created up entirely of stories like the latest one.Just about all the stories were about immigrants in America, to a amazing or lesser extent. But that is not all they were about. In a nuanced fashion, Liu weaves the past and present, fact and fiction into considerations for humanity, nationality, and the relationship (and even responsibility) we have to the past. What was clever was the Mini-Bibliography after certain stories so readers become more aware of the historical record just by realizing there is a historical basis and can discover more if they so e writing itself was also a pleasure to read. I cannot say if my impression is correct, but some stories (e.g. that of the Chinamen in Idaho) have a lyrical quality that bring to mind the lyricism of the East (to a white Westerner, anyway).

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    If you are looking for a light, funny read, this is your book. It was like watching cartoons or Monty Python. Very poor for a bedtime book for me. I found it hard to stop reading, well, actually, listening to this one. 3:00 came too quickly. So, sorry if this sounds more disjointed than my usual reviews.Oh, I listened to the Audible using the whispersynch. Julian Rhind-Tutt (Narrator) is facinating! His voice changes with every character. He tells the story with so much gusto that sometimes I think I missed story for enthusiastic energy. Even still, at the end of each story I had that sigh of e stories themselves are sadly, mostly, male. In fact, the very first one ended with the main hero marrying the witch with us hardly knowing a thing about the witch except that she was a witch. I wanted more about her and that parrot. Please forget that you just read the latest two sentences if they seem spoilers. After all, the title of the book is The Witch's Vacuum. Seems like there should be a lot more witch and vacuums than men in the form of police or gnomes. But hey, Mr. Pratchett wrote this when he was a teen and the adage says 'write what you know'. Sadly, Mr. Pratchett knew nothing about the other half of society then. Later he did write some fun books that did have fems but mostly they are witches. Is it any wonder how the globe is now if this is all anyone has read most of their lives?Still, I have loved Terry Pratchett's writing, so creative! Magick exists, but sadly without fems. Even colors we have never heard of exists. Don't obtain me started! YET, I love his writing. Fun, fun stories!So take it with a grain of salt that in male authors' worlds, fems hardly exist. We will test to change that with our own writings and making sure they see us as the other humans. After all the whole language system leaves us behind. Even human. We could be called hu.But it is for this teeny-tiny issue that I am giving the book four stars instead of five. If you can obtain the audio ver you are in for the best story telling around--save for girls, fe=iron.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    I have to admit that I was disappointed by most of these stories. I am large fan of Pratchett's Discworld novels, so I was expecting a bit more than half-baked, poorly developed stories and characters. These stories feel like drafts. There are one or two really amazing short stories, but I'd consider the majority not worth reading.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    FUN if you are a Pratchett fan. Not as well done as his later works but amazing for children and adults who love anything Pratchett.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    I had a lot of hope for this one when I picked it up out of the bargain bin at my LBS. Shame it didn't turn e cover is compelling and haunting. A tad creepy, which I appreciate as well. I despise horror movies, but I like a amazing horror story so I turn to books for this aspect and I was suspecting that maybe there would be a small bit of that represented in the stories. Not so much.A few things:Well, more than a few things really, but I'll stick to the most obvious for was a hit-miss with each of the short stories but mostly misses. Some of them simply created very small sense to me. "Virgin" especially was a story in the book that I just couldn't fathom. Maybe that's just me but I had no idea how in the globe a road girl suddenly wants to devirginify a young man that claims he can see Unicorns. Her main motivation seems to be getting the boy laid will somehow renew his lost sense of reality. Okay, fine, that makes sense in a twisted teenage sort of way... but we never know anything more about the boy, the Unicorn, why he can see it, or why he HAS to be with the beginning on this particular story I saw SO MANY WAYS that it could go well but nothing was ever explained or expounded upon. In general it just ended up seeming to me another method for the Author to introduce another sexy situation.Holly Black is gritty, but to me it's not the amazing kind of "Tackling hard subjects" gritty or even the "I don't give a crap, I'm writing this" gritty. It's more just... dirty to be e first story really had me, though. It was short, quick, and to the point but it actually had a decent plot. A meaning. A purpose. I could see the first story being turned into a full novel... but none of the others. There just wasn't enough there in any of the others to justify wishing for a full particular I found the story centered around Bacchus both impressive and groanworthy. Again. SO MANY WAYS that story could have been awesome...but then it just wasn't. It was centered around a bunch of prom people groping and kissing and writhing around with each other. Maenads, which were referenced in this story, were wild. They ripped their victims LIMB FROM LIMB. They existed in an exact opposite sphere of life than they were supposed to as women (and sometimes as men), and that could have really been used. But again... just the aspects were utilized. I think she did mention that maybe someone was fighting... but that was it. Just a small drop in the bucket.I believe that this particular story was just an instance to use Latin knowledge to impress readers (and I was impressed. Not going to lie.) but that was all. Just smoke and mirrors to cover up the general lack of any sort of true plot or meaning.Her writing style isn't hard to read at all. That's what kept me going, actually, despite the lack of substance to the experience. I don't suspect that she's a poor author and she probably appeals to a lot of a lot of readers. Just not me.I wasn't able to throw out a 1/5 on this one mostly because the book reads well and I have books like "Iron Witch" to compare it to for perspective. But I can't give it any more than a 2 because I just didn't have fun it. However... I recognize that it would be enjoyable to other readers so that's why I think I'll recommend it to you 's a fast read. Amusing if nothing else. Not a total waste of time. So go for it.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    I love Holly Black's imagination, I read her series: Tithe, Valiant and Ironside, and I really enjoyed them, so when I found out that she was writing The Poison Eaters and other stories, I couldn't wait to read them.But, when I obtain the book, I was a bit disappointed, I didn't search the stories as compelling as the e main story "The Poison Eaters" is nice but I feel there is something missing, a lack of substance, for the whole story, so I just read two more and then place down the book. I still wish to give Black another possibility so I will read the book again later, but that never happened to me with Tithe, which I have read four times now.Anyway if you are a fan of Black's work, you can risk and this book, it still have amazing ideas, but I think that Black is better with long stories, so I hope that the Curse Workers series are as amazing as her first books.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    For the fan of Mr. Lewis, this is a amazing look at some potential stories that would have been even better if the author had lived long enough.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    A lot of who are familiar with the work of C.S. Lewis, would be surprised to know he was working on a companion to the first book of his science fiction trilogy. It is, unfortunately, unfinished, but the portion that is presented in this book is intriguing reading. As the title chop of the book, "The Dark Tower" raises all sorts of questions about time, time travel and displacement theory. It also presents a face of evil that is beyond "hideous."The extra stories are each the kind of thing one reads not just for enjoyment (as the writing is Lewis's, after all) but to chew on various questions, such as, what is Light, after all? Light and seeing seem to be a common thread, if one can be found, among these stories. And who can resist reading on after one has encountered, "For several mins now Yellowhead had thought seriously of moving his right leg"? That's the closest Lewis came to writing strictly historical fiction.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    There were a lot of stories and I adored so a lot of of them, it's a longer book and that's usually not the case with these collections but I enjoyed all of it. Most of the stories have Asian main characters either Chinese or Japanese set in their home countries and sometimes America as immigrants. They were almost all about some form of humans and our ability to love and even grieve. There were a few that just broke my heart after reading like the title story and Simulacrum but so good. Liu really connects to the emotions in these stories with family members moving on from each other and often hurting each other. Parent kid relationships getting twisted is something I can relate to myself I guess. I enjoyed the method science and history often melded together. There were some stories that were just science fiction and those weren't important my favorite but that's just not my genre go too. The historical fiction ones were so good! I could read a whole entire book set in All The Flavors, it was beautifully written. Anyways, it was a delight, I love short fiction and I'm so glad I found this one through the Levar Burton reads podcast. It was unbelievable to hear him read Paper Menagerie himself. If you like short fiction this is a amazing pick.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    I have read the paperback ver of 'The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories' before and I still own it. Definitely pick it up if you have not already. However, I wish to own a hardcover ver where it was fresh condition to be on display on my bookshelf; yes I am book snob. The book with black sharpie markings on the page and the dust cover was already disfigured, dirty and ripped in places. In my case, I should have just settled with being happy with the paperback I already owned. But I did not and now I am stuck with a hardcover ver that is WORSE shape than the original paperback, hence why I am only giving this review 3 stars...granted I was going to give it only 2, but I calmed down a bit. I hope others have better luck in their purchases.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    I love Terry Pratchett's stories and his imagination, even in his earlier years, brings a lot of wit and entertainment to the table. So why the low score on this one? Simply put, extremely not good formatting by the publisher. It was as if this project was slapped together in a hurry, without anyone looking to see whether or not the words were 3, 4, or even 5 times bigger than they should be. In each story there are words that are incredibly huge, font-wise, alongside the normal texted words. This did not let me to have fun the stories, but simply pulled me out of them altogether. I suggest the publishers pull the ebook, go back and test this the low star rating is certainly not reflecting Pratchett's unbelievable work (I am a fan), but rather the very not good formatting that came with this ebook edition. I am sorry to say I cannot recommend this read to anyone.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    Terry Pratchett, a man who wrote wonderfully, and was willing to go that additional mile to give my sweety an autograph when she was still recovering from chemo.God rest, Terry. I hope the Huge Editor in the Sky gave you all the paper and ink in creation.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    Long time Holly Black fan, so let's be honest: it wasn't likely I'd be rating this one at said, I'm not typically a person to go for anthologies.But I was in something of a reading-rut, and too busy to pick up a book, so I went ahead and got not only the Kindle, but also the Audible Audiobook as well.I absolutely loved it. And! As a on the audio, I so spectacularly enjoyed the audiobook that I went in find of anything else potentially narrated by the same woman...only to explore that Holly Black did the recording 's got a unbelievable array of stories sure to sate any fan of her particular series, or otherwise be enjoyed just by those in find of tales delightfully dark and fae.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    Uneven short stories that at times really don’t go anywhere. A few plodded along then abruptly t a amazing collection.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    Unbelievable short stories with a nice twist at the end of each!

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    Makes them wish to read to be scared.

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    Awesome book! Love all the stories in it. The artwork is phenomenal.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    Beautiful rare for me to create it through a whole book (thanks dyslexia), also beautiful rare to read a melody bio book that goes into the info of how screwed up people can obtain but also has some light at the end of tunnel redemption. This is not just a laundry list of all the dumb sh*t each band member got into although there is a fair amount of that. Its also an interesting read on one of the few bands that is truly an independent and has been doing it for a very long time successfully and on their own terms to say the iks story takes center scene here and rightfully so as it could be used as a model for anyone whos life has gone totally off the rails and needs to know that they can come out the other l admit I am biased because I was lucky enough to call Erik a mate of mine when I lived in California for a few years. I knew some of the back story already just not in the vivid detail in the book.. Its even more awesome when you know the guy because he is one of better quality people you will ever meet. Just glad I met post rehab Erik and not the one who would have d*ck punched me for yeah.. I read it in one day and Ill give it five stars and I hate to read.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    Wonderful to hear some of the first hand stories of what the L.A. punk stage was like in the 80s. If you liked Mike's SXSW Cokie the Clown set, definitely check this out, as it has countless stories like those - a lot of that are even more shocking. The audiobook is interesting too, but not as "animated" as I'd have hoped. Hefe definitely has the best "performance," as well as Jelo Biafra, but the rest of the band's reading is a bit monotone and boring. I want they did a couple takes, because it sounds like they found their rhythm halfway through.

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    Read this book for one reaction: gasping "whaaaaaat!" or perhaps "whaaaaat?" (punctuation varies) after reading the final sentence of every irley Jackson is the indisputable master of the "whaaaaaat!/?" Some stories end ambiguously, leaving you scrambling back through the pages searching for a clue or alternately racing to begin Google to read others' wise analyses. Other stories end completely and absolutely unambiguously, leaving you to question not what actually happened but to wonder how such a not good ending could come to pass. ("The Lottery," Jackson's most popular tale, falls in the second type.) But no matter if the ending is ambiguous or unambiguous, what I wish to emphasize is that Shirley Jackson knows how to end. I have now read tons of her short stories and one of her novels and I am convinced that I know of no author who finishes every piece with such decisive [email protected]#$%!'s an wonderful skill, knowing how to end something. I often search short stories forgettable. Any novel of 300 pages will indubitably engrave itself in my mind by mere virtue of the hours needed to read it. A story of less than 20 pages, however, is at a clear disadvantage. A short story must shock to be memorable. Luckily for us, Jackson has one setting: shock the reader. On the latest page, or more often, the latest sentence.But her shocking endings are of the mild, ungratuitous variety. Two of my favorite stories--"The Daemon Lover" and "Like Mother Used to Make"--finish with the protagonists questioning their sanity and autonomy. They don't run screaming to mental hospitals; rather, they stay quietly and desperately in their homes, wondering who they are and if this is--if this truly can be--their life, and to me, such an ending is much more strong than any louder ere is something so mundane to Jackson's writing, which makes the fact that most of the stories are categorized in the horror genre more, well, horrifying. Because it suggests that the quotidian is horror. Jackson is wonderfully aware of the fact that the daily lives of the normalest of the normal are the most frightening things in the world. No need for ghosts or murderers, everything you need is right there inside of r Jackson, horror is the casual racism of a little Fresh England town, the irrepressible distress of a 30 year old unmarried woman searching for a husband, the monotonous everyday routine of a department shop salesperson, a badly misbehaving kid and his oblivious parents, the terrifying anonymity of an individual in a metropolis of millions. In short, horror is true ese stories have a rare rereadable quality. I know that I will reread this collection for the rest of my life, and at the end of every story for the rest of my life, I will say "whaaaaat!/?"

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    Amazing book with interesting stories, not one being the same. Perfect writing, that kept your interest in every page that you turned.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    I am always nervous when I have read a amazing of an author I can’t obtain enough of, and something further is drawn to my attention that is of uncertain merit. What if the author is diminished in my eyes by his further work? Having read and adored The Chronicles of Narnia as a child, read and been confused by the Zone Trilogy as a pre-teen (it was too early; I need to give it a second try), and read and delighted in The Screwtape Letters, Till We Have Faces, and several of his nonfiction theological works such as Mere Christianity as a young adult, I am not a newcomer to Lewis. The fragmentary novellas and stories contained in this slim volume, thankfully, did not puncture my love of Lewis as a person or an ere are six works contained in this collection, two of which have never been published before in any form and four that were previously included in an earlier collection, Of Other Worlds: Essays and Stories. The first, “The Dark Tower,” is a marvellous fragment that seems to have been intended as a sequel to Out of the Silent Planet, and features Lewis himself and Dr. Ransom, a portrait of Lewis’s mate and fellow Inkling Charles Williams. Discussions about appearance vs reality and the nature of time are place to the try when the men observe a horrendous Otherworld through a chronoscope. Then one of the men plunges through the device, and the story really gets cooking! What remains of the story is highly disturbing and intriguing, and I heartily want that Lewis had continued it. I award this piece five stars, minus one for being tantalizingly e four short stories that follow are fairly short and not incredibly memorable, but neither are they particularly flawed. “The Man Born Blind”, never before published, plays with the experience of sight and blindness; “The Shoddy Lands” gets inside the head of a stupid Fresh Woman; “Ministering Angels” is a playful jab at those who thought that zone travel would necessitate the relaxing of taboos; “Forms of Things Unknown” is a brief thought experiment about the reality of myth. Four stars all around.“After Ten Years” would have become another Till We Have Faces, a retelling of a Greek myth ‘with a twist’. Troy has just been sacked on the pretext of recovering Helen, but––Helen is apparently just a faded, aging woman. What have the Trojans done with the true Helen, or could this really be her? What to do now? The first four chapters and a fifth that was intended for the later middle of the novel survive, but I was not as captivated by them as I was by the few dozen pages of “The Dark Tower”. I give this fragment three stars, possibly four.Harcourt has done the literary globe a amazing favour by releasing this complete collection. The introductory essays by the eminent scholars Walter Hooper, Roger Lancelyn Green, and Alasdair Fowler, all private mates and intellectual colleagues of Lewis himself, are simply superb. However, the cover has small to do with the interior contents, the back material could have been better composed, and the per page is quite high. At least the overall cover design and printing are satisfactory.Lewis devotees will leap at the possibility to add more of the amazing man’s work to their shelves. Appreciators of fantasy and speculative fiction, especially that dating from early- to mid-century England, would also be well advised to give this collection a try.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    I don't care what C. S. Lewis has written -- it is worth reading. This book includes some short stories written by e main story, after which the book is titled, is "The Dark Tower." Somewhat like the stories of Narnia, a mate of Lewis travels to a parallel globe and gets trapped there. Lewis contains in this story some interesting remarks about the nature of time. Sadly, it is unfinished, and leaves the reader wondering how the story would have e book includes several other stories as well. I really enjoyed reading "Ministering Angels" which is the story of how our globe sends prostitutes to support boost the morale of men at a colony on Mars. It sounds perverse, but the story is quite humorous and touching. The five insights of the priest at the end of the story create this short story one of the best I have ever r pure entertainment sake, I also enjoyed "Forms of Things Unknown." It has a surprise ending, which I will not spoil for you here.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    I search that I don't have fun Liu's straight science fiction as much probably because his sci-fi veers towards a dryer, hard-science style and I don't really have much a feel for his aliens. The more spec-fic mash ups are beautiful good, but it's his Asian fantasy that really comes the top of the list is, obviously, The Paper Menagerie -- it's hauntingly beautiful; the poignancy of a boy torn between his Chinese roots and his American reality and a man finally coming to terms with being both. Similarly, in All the Flavors, Liu seems to be creating a fresh mythology for the Chinese-American, combining Chinese-type myths with the story of Chinese migration to America in the 1800s. The Literomancer, in turn, brings you to Taiwan where Mr Kan extends a magical globe and an odd sense of belonging to Lilly Dyer, a Texan transplant.I suppose it's this sense of transience that Liu manages so well -- his characters are in-betweens, never quite fitting in, never quite finding who they are, always searching and yearning. Even in Amazing Hunting and The Waves there's an unsettling sense of change -- whether it's because the magic is leaving the land, or that science is changing ere's also a sense of guilt and the need for redemption -- Liu bases his some of his stories (The Litigation Master and the Monkey King, The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary) on injustices long hidden in history, as if he is apologising for e stories in this collection are mostly hard-hitting. They're not light, bubbly type reads; but shorts with depth, often reaching into the dark sides of humanity. It's about balance and how humans can't, won'@#$%!&? past and future, hope and fear. And that muddly thing between that makes humanity what it is.

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    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 18:46

    I have been reading Ken Liu stories, and his fine translations, for years. Reading this fine collection I found several old favorites that grew with a second reading, and a lot of more truly perfect u handles the science so smoothly that you rarely if ever message he is teaching you.He writes from within the skins, or wearing the shoes, of 3-D, well realized characters. The vivid individuals are incidentally of several various races or ethnicities, and they do powerfully illuminate their experiences for a white bread guy like me, but the grand unified field theories never intrude. True folks confront, among other things, race hatred - vividly drawn but never clanking stereotypes for any "for instance" is a detective living with a McGuffin (new tech device) that "regulates" your emotions, as when an armed peace officer decides whether or not to shoot a terrorist using your daughter as a human shield. The dilemma and arc of hero shine - the McGuffin and some ethnicity just create the story even better.And often wryly funny, as you digest the action and re-read the pithy and elegant prose.

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    The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner and Other Stories []  2020-1-11 19:22

    Even as a teen, Pratchett''s quirky sense of humor came through. These are all fun to read and I'm sure the grandchildren will have fun them as well. I'm less enthusiastic about the method they played around with the fonts to emphasize certain words--rather like attaching a laugh track as if the reader couldn't figure out what's important.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    Vampires, fairies, and ghosts are just a few of the topics Black covers in this terrifically written collection of short stories. But she does not follow the traditional trajectory of these well used subjects, she turns them on their head. In her first short, "The Coldest Girl in ColdTown" she doesn't create vampirism seem glamorous or sexy, in fact she makes it terrifying which it definitely is. In fact it's about a girl who is desperately trying to not become a vampire even though she has been bitten. In the second story "A Reversal of Fortune" it's about a girl who lives in a trailer park and has found an abused pit bull who gets injured and how she makes a pact with the devil to save her dog. The third story is the weakest "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" about a boy and his family who go on a sailing trip and he finds flowers that turn people into wolves. The next story is entitled "The Night Market" about 2 sisters and one who gets cursed by an elf and the lengths the other sister goes to to save the fifth story "The Dog King" is about castles and risky wolves who attack whole towns in packs and a King and a mysterious boy who lives in the castle. The next story "Virgin" is about children who live on the roads and how one boy lives in the woods and says a unicorn is in this woods where he lives. The next story "In Vodka Veritas" is about a prep school where 2 not so famous boys are worried about who to take the prom, when one of them gets a date and the other doesn't. The one without a date wanders into the Latin Club having a secret meeting and gets sucked into it and it's very interesting what happens when the Latin Club goes to the prom and spikes everyone's drinks. A very entertaining story. "The Coat of Stars" is about a guy who has become successful in the huge town and hates going home to his little city but is on his method home when the story opens. While he's home he runs into some fairies in the woods and finds out they have stolen his best mate from high school and he is not really dead and the story is about what he does to obtain him back. The next story "Paper Cuts Scissors" is one of my favorites. It's about a guy who is going to graduate school to obtain his library science masters degree and accepts a job with a reclusive millionaire who wants him to organize his library. What he finds out is the man can bring the characters from the books to life at night but the characters go back randomly back into different books. It's interesting when Justin, the graduate student, runs into his ex-girlfriend from one of these books. "Going Ironside" is a short 3 page story about elves who test to live temporarily in the human world. "The Land of Heart's Desire" is my other favorite story from the collection. "If you wish to meet real-life members of the Sidhe - true faeries - go to the cafe, Moon in the Cup, in Manhattan" (175). You can see right off that's it about humans and fairies co-existing in Manhattan. Roiben and Kaye are a fairy couple and they are surrounded by Kaye's human mates who support her run the cafe. One of these human friends, Corny, insults Roiben and it's interesting to see what happens to him. The final story is "Poison Eaters" a story told by a father to a son about 3 sisters who all sleep together and can't obtain warm and are very pale. When any of the sisters touch a human they die. Eventually 2 of the sisters die and the father attempts to use the 3rd daughter to obtain revenge on his old enemies.Her stories are worth reading again as they are so well written and they will stay with you long after you have finished the stories. Most of her characters are unforgettable and you will wish to spend time in their world. This is a definite must for anyone who loves fantasy and/or fairy tales.

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    The Poison Eaters and Other Stories []  2020-1-14 19:25

    I originally borrowed and read the book from my local library. I really enjoyed it...particularly the title story...it is sad and dark, but sweet in it's own way. Holly Black does a amazing job giving the reader a mix of various mystical-creature based stories (12 in all), from vampires, to werewolves, to faeries, to ghosts. I search myself coming back time and time again for a fast read.

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    Loved it. Why isn't it longer?????Seriously, I wish more.I've read lots of Gaiman, but I really have fun his short stories.

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    The Problem of Susan and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:8

    Gaiman has a method of bringing fresh angles of stories into view...he makes the eye of the mind look in fresh directions. This book was a pleasing journey.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    Must admit that I first thought I’d lose interest in this book once the timeline of NOFX’s success kicked in—after all, it would have most likely signaled the end of the addiction and tales of desperation, which, sad to say, I first thought I’d search myself most interested in. But this collective autobiography plays across multiple lines the same method the band itself has played with expectations of what is DIY punk rock entrepreneurship. Yes, there are a lot of battle stories and antics, and homage to the dead, but also regrets and sadness and struggles and confessions. Melvin, Smelly and Mike admit to their shortcomings and mistakes, but also take for their triumphs. And along the way, expect nothing less than their candor and humor. This rock autobiography avoids so a lot of of the usual pitfalls into snoozeville—there’s no thinly veiled self-promotion (only the occasional shameless one), or pop-music theory to connect Life to Melody (merely reminders of what’s accurate in a song every now and then). These guys have been through the wringer and begged for another squeeze, and their stories don’t fear embarrassment. NOFX has place so much of themselves out into the globe already, but be ready for even more confessions in these pages.

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    NOFX: The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories []  2020-2-2 15:14

    I loved NOFX as a kid. I still love them as an adult but melody has played a smaller and smaller role in my life as I obtain older. I was worried my now adult self would search this book to be immature or sophomoric. I read it in one sitting. I couldn't place it down. This book is so incredibly written, and the lives that these guys have lived couldn't be created up. This book is intense at times, other times it will create you laugh, create you tear up, and sometimes you'll say out loud "what the hell?".. This is honestly one of the best non-fiction books I have ever read. Even if you don't love NOFX, or punk music, this is the kind of book that will create you reflect on your own life.

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    My first introduction to Shirley Jackson was via 1963's The Haunting. The whole spiral staircase thing really creeped me out as a kid. I believe I later read the book purchased during one of those Bookmobile (remember them?) visits to my grade school. My next encounter with Shirley Jackson was The Lottery when, as I'm sure a lot of others have experienced, it was needed reading in high school. While it's one of those reads that stuck with me, I never read any of Shirley Jackson's other works.I admit that I'm not a fan of short stories but I was drawn to this title because of a review I read earlier this year that simply raved about this collection. Not really a fan of Kindle reading (although I really do prefer my Paperwhite over my original Kindle) I will admit that my limited lunch reading is better suited to my Kindle than an actual book. I also admit that I really enjoyed several of the short stories in this collection but I was basically left very others have reviewed, and I don't need tidy endings, so a lot of of the stories just kinda stopped with, IMO, the reader left to ponder what happened. As I've mentioned, I've not read a lot of Shirley Jackson so my inexperience with her writing style might be l that being said, I see this collection working really well in a setting--for example, school or book club--where instead of just pondering "what happened?" it's begin to discussion.

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    The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    3.5 stars!It's no secret that I love Shirley Jackson. I have been known to engage reviewers about what I consider to be less than amazing ratings for The Haunting of Hill House and/or We Have Always Lived in the Castle. One of the things I'm always honest about is books, and despite the fact that this book was written by Shirley, I wasn't crazy about it.I was aware going in that this was not a collection of horror tales, though certainly, some of them are horrific. Even so, I didn't search a point to a lot of these tales. I liken them to someone peeking into the window of a normal American family-it's mostly boring. One or two of them (The Tooth, for sure), were just plain ever, a few of these tales have serious topics without seeming to-a few of them are outright diatribes on racism-without stating the word and without private commentary. The fact that some of these families were so racist and didn't even realize it was commentary enough. I also found that a few stories seemed to be about the put of women in society, which was quite various in the 40s as compared to now. Lastly, a few of these stories were horror, in my opinion, The Lottery the most well known and the most ere is a whole 'nother thing going on with James Harris, a hero that is featured in some of these stories. There's some talk in blogging communities about who he is, exactly, and what his presence symbolized. I don't pretend to have a complete handle on the whole thing, but it deserves a mention.Overall, this was a well written collection, (from Shirley Jackson we would expect no less), but I found it to be slightly confusing at times and overall, I was not completely happy with this collection.

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    Where the Jackals Howl: And Other Stories []  2020-1-25 0:5

    Fantastic, wonderful, great-- what else do you need to know? Amos Oz (pronounced "Oh-z") is arguably the greatest living writer. He writes about Israel, which he knows best; he delves into personalities and history and amusing events, tragic events, the whole panorama of life in a very little place. He's very liberal in his politics, very sensitive to the nuance of personality, and comes from a long line of brilliant minds. His humor is wry, his grief at times is palpable. He's a master. By all means, read as a lot of of his books as you can obtain your hands on.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    A lot of of us remember reading Dahl's stories as kids and may consider him to be a children's author: his adult fiction is very good. His short stories are the excellent length for bedtime reading, the plot moves quickly and there is generally an enjoyable twist at the end. Recommended for anyone who would like to spend 10-15 mins at a stretch with some non-serious reading.

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    The Umbrella Man and Other Stories []  2020-1-23 0:8

    I'm holding back on a five-star until I see something really outstanding. Still, Roald Dahl can absolutely grab your attention. He's someone you can pick up and read and still wish more.

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    the stories did not create much sense and attemps were created to connect them together but for me it didnt work

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    The Butcher's Husband and Other Stories []  2020-2-4 7:19

    So glad I decided to take a possibility on this book! I loved it. Definitely need to read Larry what a amazing story.

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    The Dark Tower: And Other Stories [Book]  2017-10-18 18:0

    As a amazing fan of Lewis' Sci Fi Trilogy, and especially the strong imagery he creates, I was very eager to read this 'lost' manuscript. We may never know where it fit into Lewis' vision - an unfinished work or an abandoned one - but one can obtain lost in it and wonder what might have been had he had a possibility to [email protected]#$%!.

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