Read the imperial cities of morocco reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all the imperial cities of morocco reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
    [email protected]

    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    This book gives the ambitious American home cook all the information required to make stunningly delicious Moroccan meals. Of the nine recipes I've created in the month I've owned it, eight--the almond milk drink, the cucumber and orange water salad, the crushed spiced carrot salad, the primary couscous recipe, the chicken tagine with apricots and pine nuts, the chicken smothered in tomato jam, the lamb tagine with toasted almonds and hard-cooked eggs and the tangier-style chickpea-lentil soup called harira--were lick your chops 'can we create this again tomorrow' amazing. The latest one, a carrot salad with cumin, cinnamon and sweet paprika, was beautiful amazing but given all the other awesome recipes in this book I probably won't create it use this book you need to be ready to begin the day before, if needed--as a lot of recipes have a few do-ahead steps such as soaking chickpeas or fermenting flour with lemon juice overnight. You can much of what you need at a regular supermarket, but the recipes are better if you follow the tip on ingredients at the beginning of the book. For example, for a lot of dishes, Ms. Wolfert recommends Ceylon cinnamon, a milder-tasting ver of the spice than the standard American version; I bought some on Amazon and it is delicious. If you are really ambitious, you can create your own preserved lemons...which marinate a month before they are r the most part, the instructions are detailed and clear. The book could have benefited from user testing in some parts. Occasionally there are unclear spots--for example, is the tagine supposed to be covered or not? One confusing spot in the Tangier-Style Harira recipe, for example, is the instruction to place beef marrow bones and diced lamb in a deep pot "without any added fat, cover and steam over medium-low heat." The use of the word "steam" here puzzled me at first...was I supposed to use a steamer? Add liquid? I puzzled over it with a mate who is a professionally trained chef; at first she, too, was confused and then she finally told me to just cook it on medium-low and allow it steam in its own juices. That worked great. But if this recipe had been user tested this sentence would likely have been is is a minor quibble and I only care because this book is SO amazing I wish to create all the recipes. But for those considering the pros and cons of this book carefully, here are a few other criticisms--and collectively the main reason I knocked off a star. My actual rating is about 4.5!1. **Too Rich and Meat Heavy:** The recipes are skewed towards those with a LOT of meat--at the expense of equally authentic and delicious "poorer" dishes. It is real that Moroccans love meat, and on feast days and in fancy restaurants, the dishes will be giant hunks of meat with sauce or veggies as garnish. But in the home cooking I ate at friends' homes, and in working-class restaurants, a tagine is often a little hunk of meat smothered in vegetables. Some of my favorites have been huge mounds of veggies and potatoes with a not good small piece of meat underneath. My mates taught me that, when sharing a tagine with others at the table, you eat the veggies first, exposing the meat---and then the little piece is divided into equal parts so everyone gets a bite. I love this "poorer" style, and I also think it is healthier. I would have loved to see at least several of these veggie-rich tagine recipes included. The book has a few veggie-only tagines but none where meat is show in a cameo role.2. **Too few practical photos/Too a lot of fun photos** This 500+ page book is full of gorgeous color photos, making it you know, massive enough to use for bicep curls in a pinch. But paradoxically a lot of of the recipes don't have pics of the finished product. For example, in the poultry chapter, only ten of the 29 recipes have images that present what the dish looks like when it is finished. This was a amazing artistic choice, allowing the author to showcase gorgeous National Geographic-style spreads of Morocco which I must admit create it a better coffee-table book than images of chicken style A, chicken style B etc. But I'm greedy gourmand in this just for the victuals--and I wish to see every recipe so I can decide if I wish to create it.3. **Fresh tomatoes? Please. Let's be realistic here.** A very huge number of recipes call for new tomatoes. But unless it is summer and you have your own garden or access to a farmer's market, the tomatoes you will obtain will be tasteless plasticey industrialized orbs that were picked green and gassed to create them look red before they place them on supermarket shelves. If you don't believe me, read the book TomatoLand. Anyway, given this sad reality, Ms. Wolfert should have acknowledged that canned tomatoes actually may be better and told us how much to use. In some recipes the author gives cups of tomatoes chop which makes it possible to substitute but in other recipes she uses pounds of new tomatoes as the measure, making it hard to know how a lot of canned tomatoes to used. I substituted canned San Marzano plum tomatoes in the chicken with tomato jam recipe with perfect results but I had a lot of anxiety about how much to use and ended up making another pot of jam later. (Note: At least one recipe, the tomato and caper salad, clearly needs to be created with awesome tomatoes in season. I'm talking about the cooked dishes only.)4.** Short cuts. What short cuts? ** One of the things I love about this book is that it gives the long method to do everything if it is the best way. And much of the time I'm satisfied to begin the day before or spend four hours cooking dinner. But on days when I'm not, can you give me a shortcut please...like the lesser of evils? For example, for the Harira, Ms. Wolfert has you soak chickpeas at least ten hours, then peel them (by running over them with a rolling pin). Results were spectacular. But if I'm just planning Tuesday a.m. for what I'm eating Tuesday evening, can we obtain a shortcut--like hints on inserting canned chickpeas in the recipe? And if I can't marinate the chicken overnight, will four or five hours do the trick?5.** No Harissa recipe. Really?** Granted that Harissa, this spicy chili-garlic paste, is actually from neighboring countries and has gained popularity in Morocco. And it's also real that no Moroccan I know actually makes it, as it is and new and delicious at your corner souk. But I don't have a corner souk and while yes, I can search it in Boston or it mail-order from one of the sources helpfully listed in her book, it's faster to create it than schlepping all over town--and given the quality available here, likely better and fresher. So why does Ms. Wolfert (who gives us the long method around for everything else) simply tell you to use pre-made Harissa paste? She does have a recipe for Harissa, available on the 'net, but chose not to contain it in this book. Pffft.And after all this criticism, I'll add one more thing I love. Ms. Wolfert gives a recipe for homemade tomato paste she calls "Tomato Magic." You take sundried tomatoes and place them in the meal processor with a good-quality jar of tomatoes, then cook for a half hour until color and flavor deepens. Honestly, I thought it would be more of a pain than it's worth but in fact it is absolutely delicious. And I LOVE her idea of freezing leftovers in tablespoonfuls on a cookie sheet then scraping them off and freezing them in a ziploc. It's better than commercial tomato paste and it solves the irritating issue of opening a can of tomato paste every time I need a tablespoonful and having the rest go to waste!Overall, this is an awesome book and I can't wait to create everything in it. As I test other recipes I'll add to this post.EDITED WITH UPDATES on August 31, 2014:Nearly 1.5 years after buying this book, I still use it regularly, and I have now created more than 30 of its recipes. My skill level has increased, and I'm in the habit of always pre-making primary ingredients--such as tomato magic, kama spice mix etc, and as a effect I now search a lot of of the recipes fairly easy. Compared with other cookbooks which can be hit or miss, this one has a amazing track record with me: Everything I created has been at minimum very very good, and at least half of the recipes in here are exceptional to my palate at least. A dozen of the recipes in this have become regular favorites in my household, including the awesome Eggplant Zaalouk cold salad, the cucumber-oregano salad with olives, the orange-romaine walnut salad, the dessert couscous (with golden raisins and almonds), fish charmoula, the baked red snapper or sea bass with almond paste and lamb kefta tagine with tomatoes and eggs. The chicken-apricot tagine, mentioned at the top of the review, has become a regular on my dinner table, and I often create several of the simple flatbreads in the book as well, my favorite being the Bread with Sesame and Anise 's refreshing to work with a book where I know in advance that the results will be good, even if it is the first time I'm making a recipe. I have had some problems (mainly cosmetic stuff) with a little number of recipes. An example is the baked fish with almond paste. You are supposed to decorate a whole fish with a beautiful design of almond paste before baking. In theory this is supposed to be done with a spatula. No method does this work for me...maybe I'm a klutz, but I end up with such an ugly, unappetizing design I just smooth it out to create a layer of almond paste. And also, serving a whole fish to several people when it is covered with almond paste in my hands still ends up as a mess. But it is a delicious mess and so far I've created it twice. Maybe by the fourth or fifth time I'll figure out how to create it not a mess. But in summary, all the recipes in this book are at least delicious...a few are just a little bit difficult so you do have to have fun a bit of adventure!Also, I wish to note that, while I complain above that there are no "poor" tagines with a little amount of meat above, I did explore that the book has three veggie dishes (not strictly tagines) which have a little amount of meat confit in them. I just created the first one, lentils with swiss chard, butternut squash and meat confit. It is absolutely STUNNING and will probably create the short list of items I create again and again.

    0  


    Add your opinion on the imperial cities of morocco or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    Clearly, this is more than just a cookbook -- it's a work of art! I wish to take my time turning each page to have fun it to its fullest. I'll write more as I start to cook the recipes, but I've rarely been this impressed upon first opening the pages of a fresh cookbook.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    Paula Wolfert is the ultimate go-to on Medterranean, and especially Moroccan, cuisines outside of the is book is her penultimate effort in teaching us Moroccan food. It will sadly be her latest due to her Alzheimer's diagnosis.If you are a reader of hers, or simply wish a thorough teaching book on the subject, this is it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    I love Moroccan food. Obtain this one.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    Very nice cookbook and informative.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    This book contains a broad spectrum of Moroccan meal and provides engaging background. Although I bought it after getting a traditional clay tagine pot, I found the tagine recipes rather complex for me to tackle. In contrast, it really created me wish to test the breads. For me, I think it will be useful mostly for inspiration. A more ambitious cook desiring truly authentic results will appreciate the detailed guidance.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    Paula Wolfert is a unbelievable writer and cook. i bought this when i returned from a trip and i've been using it ever since. i served the carrot salad to family and mates on Memorial Day and the comments were very interesting--my guests who passed when the bowl came around the first time and after people started oohing and aahing, everyone eventually tried them and loved them. i created enough for parting bonuses and no one refused. Special 'souvenir' of my amazing trip.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    If you're not just looking for a few choice recipes, but rather a full course in the why and how of Moroccan cuisine, this book is ideal. Beautifully place together and incredibly informative, as well as encompassing an extensive and diverse range of Moroccan recipes. I actually haven't tried any of the recipes yet as I just received it earlier this week, but the recipes and methods seem to be authentic as well as reasonable to adapt in a western kitchen.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    Attractive book & a unbelievable addition to the adventurous cook's collection.I've purchased my tagine & have create several delicious meals. The recipes are healthy with loads of veggies & spices in addition to meat. I am going to substitute pork in several of the recipes as son looks forward to the next lovely dinner.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Food of Morocco [Book]  2018-7-7 18:0

    Absolutely attractive pictures and tempting recipes that I look forward to making! Moroccan meal is famously delicious.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    Attractive to flick through or sit with to while away the hours. Would create a unbelievable coffee table book. The images give glimpses not just of outdoor views but of private everyday life - a tethered donkey, a view through an ajar door, iron work gates, road and bazaar scenes. There are glorious colours - blues, terracotas, white walls - of the magnificent tiled surfaces. Stunning woodwork. I would personally prefer more outdoor views of courtyards, but this book is delightful. For courtyards I recommend "Morocco Courtyards and Gardens" by Achva Benzinberg Stein which gives info on specific gardens.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    I throughly enjoyed this book. The text is well written and the chapters are organized by town with architectural varying accordingly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    This work is thoroughly researched and beautifully presented. As well as the delights of the photography and text, it includes really interesting aspects of social history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    Following a latest tour to the Imperial Cities of Morocco I wanted to read more about the parts of the country that were not available to tourists. This book provided the answers. The writing is poetic and the images were stunning. In addition to the writing style, enough background history was included that it felt like a "second" trip. I highly recommend owning the book and am very glad to have discovered it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    I showed it to my students.I explained to them about type of construction in ideas of design.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    The photography of this book is truly amazing, such masterpiece and delight, some of the photos are quite art pieces to which I am drawn time and time again to steal another pick. I like especially the ones with people in them who are caught in the mid of their everyday chores, it simply reveals astonishing moments. In confession I must say that I bought additionally three more books of the same category in depiction of Moroccan architecture and styles, but this book definitely stands out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    Arrived in amazing shape.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    It is an exquisite book, filled with photographs to create you drool and text that informs you of the nuances of homes so far from my own. Buy it! So worth the to have it sitting on your shelves!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    Nice book with amazing pictures.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Villas and Riads of Morocco []  2020-7-13 19:36

    I've always been fascinated with Morocco and plan to visit in the near future. This is a beautifully illustrated book that gives one an "inside" look at this enchanting country. A amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    Such a wealth of info for inquisitive young minds. My son who is 2 1/2 has all of the books (The Ultimate Book of Space, The Ultimate Book of Cars and The Ultimate Construction Website Book) and they provide endless opportunities for learning. We are so grateful that the authors have made these awesome books. I recommend them to everyone!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    I am 9 years old and with my mother's permission to use her acc to write the following review:I really enjoyed the book. I love how suspenseful it is. I loved how all the elves had cool powers. At first, I thought the book wouldn't be very interesting at all. However, it turned out to be the best book I ever read!!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    What a fun story. I saw Shannon Messenger speak at the Berkeley Book Festival on a panel of Young Adult Fantasy Fiction authors and was intrigued by her description, and the legion of fans in the audience, of her Keeper of the Lost Cities books. A young girl finds out she’s an elf and goes to live in the Lost Cities with the rest of her kind where she attends school and discovers more about herself and her powers. While comparisons to Harry Potter are unavoidable it is entirely original and just as enjoyable. Incredibly imaginable and lots of fun. I cannot wait to read more of the series.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The New Science of Cities []  2020-7-12 18:41

    The book has a promising title and I was excited to obtain my hardback copy. I have been studying and publishing urban economics papers for quite a bit now. Unfortunately, the book disappoints on a lot of levels. To sum up the issues, one could say that it feels like an educated conversation at tea time. The ideas are far reaching and broad, intellectually stimulating perhaps. But they lack a thorough and clear discussion. Primary mathematics is introduced and then left on the side (See "Ebb and Flow"), not to be used later in the book. The author moves from one town to the next in the same sentence. We're left with the impression that either (i) the book goes through too quick through all examples, or (ii) that the "new" "science" of cities is not quite at the level of rigor that we expect of a science.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    We have the ultimate book of cars so thought this one would be as amazing as the other one. Not even close. Much fewer flaps thus less interaction. But a lot more smaller info just to look at.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    This book was really interesting! The plot was really intriguing, bound to hook the most reluctant reader. It gets exciting right away but I think it keeps a steady pace. This is my favorite book of the series but the other ones are definitely worth reading! I can't wait for the 5th one, Lodestar, to come out!!! I can't say this was my favorite middle school series or anything but it I really think this series deserves some more publicity! Practically no one I know of has heard of it or read it but this series is just as amazing as the Percy Jackson series and everyone has read that! My 11-year-old brother actually says it is the best series he ever read! I absolutely fell in love with all the characters (especially Keefe) and Shannon does a amazing job developing the characters throughout the series and as much as I am anticipating the 5th I don't think I could ever say good-bye to Sophie, Dex, Fitz and Biana. They are like my best friends! Anyway, if you are looking for some decent middle school fantasy don't hesitate to this book and spread the word!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    Keeper of the Lost Cities is one of the best series debuts I’ve read in a long time. It combines the tales of fascinating stories of old, such as Atlantis, with modern-day worries and locations seamlessly. It is a unbelievable tale of determination and phie Foster is a kid genius who’s been avoiding unwanted attention her whole life. Then, suddenly, she’s whisked away to a fresh land of elves, to explore where she really belongs. The plot thickens as the mysterious, unidentifiable fires around San Francisco obtain bigger and worse. With her elvin school’s final exams approaching, Sophie turns to a fresh mate for help, but the pair are kidnapped. They must then search their method back to the Lost Cities on their own, but not without help. Even when they obtain back, Sophie still has to with the dangers of being unique in a unique eper of the Lost Cities will hold you on your toes, your heart beating in anticipation to see what will be revealed next!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    I bought the boxed set of this series for my nephew. He and I have fun a lot of the same books. the latest books we read at the same time were the 13th reality series by James Dashner. I am reviewing the audio book ver of this book. the pace was slow in the beginning to build the main Character. then the author introduces us to an inventive and fascinating fresh world. fresh characters are introduced as well as fresh obstacles.I loved this book. the narrator fit so well. It was a amazing story to hear out loud. I enjoyed the new fresh globe and detailed characters. I can not wait to read the next one in this series. I also can't wait until my nephew finishes it so we can discuss it. I highly recommend it to readers who love fantasy adventure books. it is not a book that is just for middle graders. Adults will love it too. read it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The New Science of Cities []  2020-7-12 18:41

    This book wraps up all the progress created in the urban science for the latest 10 or 15 years, and certainly will illuminate the next ones.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    Super fun for my toddler to do finger pretend play. Ours fingers will wonder around the city, hop onto subway, play in the park, visit the zoo, join the parade, go shopping, drive on the street, all activities you can possibly think off in a town setting, this book got it. Amazing piece to increase toddler's vocabularies. We play with this book so much, we have to a second one to replace the broken first book. My toddler absolutely loves it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    We bought this book because we loved The Ultimate Book of Cars by the same author. This book is also amazing and has lots of flaps and tabs and things to pull and move...my only complaint is that there is a lot more very detailed and high-level text, unlike the Book of Vehicles. Some of the text is so detailed that it seems a small out of put in a book for the 4-6 age group...but overall still a amazing book

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    This is a amazing interactive series of books. Lots of flaps and tabs to lift and pull. Lots of interesting facts too! Arrived in excellent fresh condition with a cellophane wrapping.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    This was meant for a kid.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The New Science of Cities []  2020-7-12 18:41

    If you're a student or expert in spatial analysis -- say, a reader of Environment and Planning B, a journal that this book's author (MJB) has edited for a lot of years -- it's very possible you'll search this book a masterful survey and extension of the professional literature.If, however, you're a general reader interested to learn fresh and stimulating facts about properties that the world's cities have in common, you'll almost certainly be disappointed. There's very small empirical discussion of cities in this book, and a amazing of math (mostly matrix algebra, with a bit of graph theory thrown in). A more descriptive title for this book might be something like "Mathematical modeling of cities and the planning process." You should also be advised that this fresh "science" is essentially economics. There isn't any biology or ecology involved, or anything about how the built environment affects the local weather (as it sure does here in Tokyo); and even the bit of physics the book includes is sometimes off-kilter.I came to the book as one of those general readers, albeit with a fairly high tolerance for math-heavy exposition. I found the book frustrating on several levels, as I'll describe below. Nonetheless, I admire the author's attempts to synthesize his field, and also the modesty with which he makes claims for this purported fresh "science." Throughout the book he is scrupulous to point out the limitations and the tentative or even metaphorical nature of a lot of of the techniques he describes. For these reasons, as well the book's possibly being intended for an expert-only readership (notwithstanding the MIT Press's marketing that roped me in), I give the book close to a 4-star rating despite my own problems with it.While that's the short of it, the rest of this rather long review delves into the things that disappointed or even troubled me about the book. In fairness again, I should note that some of those things -- maybe even more of them than I recognize -- arise from the conventions of spatial analysis and its sister discipline, urban economics, rather than from the specific approach taken in this book. And the following long list notwithstanding, I suppose it's to the book's that instead of giving up on it, I kept hoping it would obtain better. I'll begin out commenting on style, and obtain more substantive as I go farther down the list. I hope that at least some of the earlier points might be addressed in a subsequent edition of the book.A. There's a lot of room for improvement in the illustrations. First, this book is really crying out for an insert of color plates or color printing within the text -- some illustrations are almost unintelligible in black/white. Unfortunately, the publisher followed a latest trend and punted the color pictures to an online website. There have been some delays in uploading them, but a bigger question is how long will the website stay active. Not an problem if they were in the printed book, which might latest r other illustrations, it wasn't just lack of color but lack of context that created them hard to use. To obtain the most out of the maps and hierarchical diagrams in Chapters 2 and 3, you'll need to know something about the geography and sociology of London neighborhoods (I don't). Chapters 6 and 7 show "spatial syntax" and "heat map" illustrations of a French city called Gassin; the reader is advised that these maps don't give a amazing visual portrait of the town's physical layout -- but we're never given a conventional map or aerial image of Gassin to see for ourselves. Ditto for Cardiff in Chapter 8, where we're shown results of computer simulations of its growth, without any schematic of the un-simulated town for comparison. (BTW the problem described in this paragraph itself illustrates how models are the featured actors in this book, with true cities merely the supporting players.)B. The text, too, could be more user-friendly. Paragraphs are long and dense, with necessary points or definitions sometimes buried in the middle (e.g., the definition of "hierarchy" @152). Other concepts are often explained by reference to the specialist spatial analysis literature instead of to sources more accessible to a general readership. E.g., when MJB takes pains to distinguish his sense of a "dual" graph and a "more common" sense of that term, he points the reader to an out-of-print 1971 design monograph by March and Steadman (@182-183). But if you check a amazing standard graph theory textbook, like Diestel, or even just Wikipedia, you can quickly learn that MJB's use of "dual" already has its own name: "line graph" (Diestel @4).C. Readers with a natural sciences background may also be confused or even exasperated by some of the analogies to physics and the treatment of some mathematical topics. Here are three examples:(1) Chapter 2 discusses "gravitational" models of flows of people between two cities. These are based on equations with the formT_{ij} = K P_i P_j (d_{ij})^{a} [1]where the P's are populations of two cities and d is the distance between them; it's supposedly like Newton's equation for gravitational force, F = G M_1 M_2 r^{-2}.Different to the physics approach, though, the treatment of [1] in this book doesn't obey the rules of dimensional analysis. T_{ij} is sometimes described as a "flow" and sometimes as a "force," even within the same sentence (@ 48, 52) -- but a flow contains a dimension of [time]^{-1}, whereas a force has [time]^{-2}. Later, MJB rearranges equation [1] to make certain quantities that he likens to "potential energies or summations of forces (Stewart, 1941)" (@64), even though energies and forces aren't dimensionally comparable, either. And a few pages later, he splits the proportionality constant K into a product of K_i K_j, and then considers the case when "K_i = K_j = K" (@71). This can only create sense if K is a pure number (equal to 1, BTW), in which case the left- and right-hand sides of equation [1] can't be dimensionally balanced. Also disappointing is that equation [1] is never compared to empirical data in the rest of the book, so we're never told what a real-life value for the exponent /a/ might be.Another problem here is that the Stewart 1941 reference doesn't provide an explicit expression for demographic potentials and doesn't mention summations of forces at all. Moreover, as is clear both from that paper and from his longer 1948 paper in Sociometry on "demographic gravitation" (not cited in the book), Stewart developed his "potential" in the context of a static gravitational field, which is quite various from this book's context of population flows. (Incidentally, I hope that in a future edition MJB will drop Stewart altogether, because the man was a galloping racist. In his 1941 model of rural population density, he blames the inaccuracies in his model on the "concentration [of] the Negro population" in certain states -- i.e., he hadn't counted them in his calculations. In 1948 he proposed that the (metaphorical) "molecular weight of negroes [sic] in the Deep South averages only 1/3" that of the (predominantly white) residents of the Northeastern and Midwestern states. That's even worse than in the 1789 US Constitution, where a slave was reckoned at 3/5.)Economists usually cite to Jan Tinbergen's "Shaping the Globe Economy" (1962) as the source of gravity models. That would have been appropriate here, too, because his equation for flows of international trade has roughly the same mathematical form as [1], albeit with a significant difference: Tinbergen's equation was dimensionally kosher. Tinbergen himself didn't use the gravity analogy, perhaps because he found empirically that the distance exponent in his model has a rather un-gravitational value of around -1.(2) In Chapter 8 we're told,"In cities, filling the two-dimensional plane with particular forms of development from the parcel to the road line and at various densities suggests that their fractal dimension lies between 1 and 2. Thus this dimension becomes the signature of urban morphology, which is the outcome of processes that generate fractal shapes" (@250-251).This passage doesn't create it clear that on a 2-dimensional surface it will be the *boundary* of the town that has fractal dimension -- not the town per se, which, being an area, has dimension 2. Moreover, a fractal dimension between 1 and 2 is the "signature" of *any* fractal curve on the plane. (See the definition in Mandelbrot's classic book, which appears in MJB's reference list, of a fractal as a set for which the Hausdorff dimension strictly exceeds the topological dimension (Mandelbrot 1982 @15).) If one took this passage at face value, every island would count as a city, since its coastline shares the same fractal "signature."(3) Chapter 9 develops expressions for "entropy" and "free energy" in connection with flows of people between home and work. We search "the total energy C = S + F," where the right-hand side "expresses energy in two varieties -- 'unusable,' which is entropy S, and 'usable,' which is the energy F," citing Atkins 1994 (@282-283). In physics, though, entropy and energy don't have the same dimensions: S has dimensions of energy divided by temperature. BTW that's what it says in Atkins's 2010 physical chemistry textbook and all of the other thermodynamics, stat mech and chemistry textbooks on my shelf -- so although I don't have it to hand, I'd be surprised if Atkins 1994 said something different.Of course the "science of cities" is NOT physics, so one could object that its formulas don't need to be precisely analogous. I would agree, but this then begs the question of whether the analogy is illuminating at all.D. If a fondness for physics analogies coupled with loose dimensional bookkeeping calls to mind neoclassical economics (NCE), that's no mere coincidence: NCE provides substantive inspiration for the "new science of cities" as well. (I leave aside here the question of whether NCE deserves to be called scientific at all.) Consider:"Cities exist primarily to bring individuals together to trade the products of their labor. Historically, clusters of individuals formed at points where their labor could best exploit natural resources while providing sustainable areas where production could be achieved." (@16-17.)Reading this, I couldn't support thinking of those just-so histories of mankind one finds in 17th and 18th Century philosophical works, confidently stating as fact conjectures that conform to the writer's favored theory. Can anyone really know that ancient town websites always afforded the "best" exploitation of resources? And that this was always the "primary" reason for their founding? I don't think, say, Hobbes, Locke or Rousseau would have ignored the role of military and spiritual considerations in the founding of ancient e NCE influence perhaps also explains why the reader must occasionally slog through descriptions of highly artificial mathematical models, such as one in which cities' populations change only by swapping residents (@124-128). It may also explain why certain dissociated points of view are accepted as reasonable, such as the rather disquieting prospect of "an entire fresh class of models [that] is generated if the population is allowed to become negative, as is the case when the population might be considered as capital or wealth." (@127-128.)But the influence of NCE and its expansionist aspirations is nowhere stronger than in the method the book brands a blend of economics and fashionable math as "the" science of cities, with an exclusive emphasis on flows of commercially significant goods and services. What about cities' numerous impacts on biology, ecology, meteorology, geology, and much else? For example: the method waterfront high-rise buildings have changed Tokyo's climate over the past 15 years; the heat island result that's increased the number of thunderstorms in Phoenix AZ; the proliferation of sinkholes around that same town due to the population's demands on the water table; the nationwide impact of the growth of Beijing and Tianjin on China's water supply; and so on. Why are these and other related concerns unworthy of being integrated into a "new science of cities"?E. Part III, a set of five so-called "normative" chapters, disturbed me the most. They incorporate the all-too-typical discourse about "governance" -- the idea that what works in running a business should be applied to public affairs -- but go beyond this, by replacing politics with mathematical notions of equilibrium. Sometimes this fits explicitly into an NCE framework, such as the allusion to Walrasian "tâtonnement" in averaging the difference between a matrix summarizing actors' interest in land, and another matrix summarizing their control over it (@414). All interests are of course measured in money values.An even loopier idea is to use the theory of Markov matrices to reach decisions about public policy; the idea here is that when you crash these matrices together often enough, they often reach an equilibrium or "stationary" state -- embodying your "optimal" decision -- in the long run. (By "loopy," I mean that it sounds like what 1st-year grad students who've recently learned about Markov matrices dream up on a cocktail napkin after a couple of beers. Nonetheless this line of thought has a long academic pedigree, apparently.) To make such matrices requires that each actor in a planning decision be able to quantify a priori his, her or its interests vis-à-vis all others', and possibly to modernize these with each iteration (or possibly not). People are removed from the process once their set of matrix entries has been tabulated by the master planners cranking everything through its Markov paces. No matter that MJB tells us occasionally that such models are metaphorical -- the metaphor is a beautiful chilling reover, no case is created for why an "equilibrium" decision should be the best decision. Even if there were a powerful case, the chance of realizing such a decision is about as plausible as the NCE notion that an economy can reach an equilibrium when each household figures out a priori how what its preferences are for every possible bundle of goods during, say, the whole year ahead. Or even less plausible than that, because certain issues identified by NCE economists are entirely ignored here. E.g., Kenneth Arrow pointed out that it's impossible for a set of voter preferences to be aggregated in a method that they are transitive for the whole community, given certain prima facie desirable constraints (please check Wikipedia if you need more specifics). MJB never tells us what happens if the community preferences are intransitive -- and much less if different individuals' preferences suffer from this drawback, thematical issues aside, the true problem here is that equilibrium is the negation of politics. Nothing in this book contemplates a situation where an actor makes a concession on an problem today because she expects reciprocity in the future; where an actor makes an apparent concession today because he's giving an enemy enough rope to hang himself; or where power simply wins. Machiavelli, not Markov (and not the Prince but the Discourses) would have been more apt here: the basis for the greatness of a town lies in providing appropriate institutions for the conflict between rich and poor. Or, as a French children's book (Godard & Pilon's « Les démocraties ») wisely place it, achieving democracy is always a battle. The task of achieving it shouldn't be taken out of the hands of citizens and place into the hands of "planners."In sum, I wanted to like this book better than I was able to. I should mention that MJB was very gracious in a few brief emails we exchanged about it, early in my reading. Also, some of his editorials in Environment and Planning B (available on his website) are more down-to-earth and humane than one might guess from the rather detached perspective of this book. I hope he will place those amazing qualities to use in a sequel.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    As a diligent reader of all of these books to date, I have absolutely loved them! Throughout each of the books, she consistently keeps you reading, something not all authors can do. As you dive into the first book, you’re presented with exciting mysteries, and themes that continue throughout the entire series, not a single detail is left unthought of. Besides, even if you weren’t interested in the storyline, the intense cliffhangers following each book will hold you reading, but will be resolved to a manageable status within the next book, that is, until she leaves you another one! These books aren’t just about adventure, or drama either, they have enticing themes of family, friendship, bravery, and even a small bit of love involved. I can’t instruct anyone on what books thay should read, but this series is incredible, and I would recommend it for adults and kids re specifically for the first book:The first book is one of my favorite within the series. As you are introduced to the characters, you form private bonds with them in a method that not a lot of authors can capture. As you follow their journey, you feel the pain, joy, and sadness as described within the book. A lot of first books consist of mostly introductions, which often becomes dull, but somehow Shannon Messenger has a method of making these introductions personal. I highly recommend this book, and the rest of the series!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    Overall, the story was beautiful good. I do feel like the book ended with more unanswered questions and dangling threads than I care for, but it is the first book in a series. There is quite a bit of typical middle grade gross-out humor. The is a bit of violence, but no swearing. The "romance" is beautiful non-threatening early teen girl-likes-boy stuff, but doesn't overwhelm the plot.Julia Roundtree wasn't one of the better narrators that I've listened to, and I would never purposely another Audible edition she narrated. I hate to be mean, because I don't read aloud terribly well myself (I am an perfect reader just not aloud, I trip over my tongue when I try)... But I just didn't have fun her narration.I picked up book two became I wish to follow the story some more. The Audible edition of book two, _Exile_ has a various narrator and is in Audible's children's that ends on 11-27-17 for $3.95. Seems worth a try, although I message books three through six don't have audio editions and text-to-speach is disabled in the Kindle editions (I just now noticed that), so that may be as far as I go. My vision isn't poor enough that I totally require text-to-speach, but shame on publishers--especially of youth-oriented books--that disable it. Text-to-speach on the Kindle Fires could begin literary doors to worlds of wonder for so many, if the bigger publishing names would stop disabling the feature in Kindle books.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    Messenger made a very detailed globe and introduced the reader to it as her main hero discovered it. A 12year old girl with unique abilities discovers this fresh globe when she is “found” after 12years. What unfolds is equal parts fantasy, adventure, and mystery as Sophie tries to explore who she is and why she is so different. Messenger captures the thought process and emotions of her tweenaged hero perfectly, a confused mix of kid and adult, struggling to figure out who she is and who she wants to be. The only thing that would improve the story is a link to Messenger s website, where she has drawings not only of her characters but also of the fantasy monsters that she introduces to the reader (and she is an perfect artist). This series is sure to appeal to 9-13 year old fantasy adventure lovers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    Love these books, but something wasn’t affixed right on the first page, and upon first opening, one of the sliding strips tore off completely. Such a bummer. Now the vehicles don’t slide and there’s a large tear on the first page. Kind of ruins the experience and for some reason it’s no longer eligible for return.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    My small boy loves this book. He is engaged with each page and can read it a lot of times a day.I highly recommend it (and "the ultimate book of car " too).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    Cute book. My son is 3 and loves it!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The New Science of Cities []  2020-7-12 18:41

    I have not been able to read the book MODERN SPATIAL ECONOMETRICS IN PRACTICE that I bought. The book has serious issues of format and graphics and equations cannot visualize themselves and they obtain cut.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The New Science of Cities []  2020-7-12 18:41

    I fully agree with the detailed review provided earlier by A.J. Sutter, including the potentially misleading title and marketing, the lack of readability posed by the prose style and communication through mathematics, the impossibility to interpret the b/w illustrations in the book without downloading the colour web versions (i.e. dark red that represents high connectivity is the same shade of grey as dark blue that represents low connectivity), the neoclassical economics bias, st problematic I found however that the book attempts to advance a 'science of cities' without paying much attention to true cities. The mathematical formulae proposed are only applied to simplistic diagrams with limited resemblance to their real-world models, and there is no discussion of how the results of the analysis relate to actual urban environments. Thus for example when analysing networks in fig.7.3-7.4 the conversion of roads into axial lines around London's Regent Road misses about a third of the connections and glosses over the issue of converting a curved road into linear axial lines, fig.7.5 calls a square grid "Manhattan grid", while fig.7.9-7.13 present a map of Melbourne CBD that omits tons of roads but contains several connections between the rail and road network that do not actually exist. In none of these examples is there comprehensive discussion of what the results of the analysis could mean, and there is no comparison with data about true flows. This is consistent with the absence in the list of references of much of the relevant urban sociology, environmental psychology and urban design studies e risk of a 'science of cities' that simplifies urban morphology to a level where its geometry is mostly lost and doesn't due attention to human social behaviour is that it can lead to the kind of results that modernist planning led to. While Castells and Jacobs are briefly mentioned in the book, their criticism of theories/doctrines that lack empirical grounding hasn't been heeded here.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ultimate Book of Cities []  2020-1-16 7:54

    My children absolutely love these books and they learn a ton

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    I love books for kids and young adults. I'm picky though and not every book that graces my reading glasses is worthy of finishing aka I did not finish this book. I might in future when I run out of better books to read, but as of now I just cant.I bought this book originally because I wanted to be transported to a unbelievable fresh world. Yes I'll admit I was craving Harry Potter but couldn't muster up the strength to reread them. So right off the bat I've already set this book up for failure. Still I was hopeful.While the fantasy concept and globe building is great. The characters are terrible. These elves are incredibly racist versus humans. Every single one I've met so far act high and mighty. Not a single one is down to earth and relatable. I suspect and hope this will be addressed in future e main hero is method to agreeable. She agrees to give up her loving family for a better one (not a amazing notice to be sending kids). She agrees to give up on the human race for a better one (also not a amazing message) She agrees to letting people walk over her and ignore her questions. She is always sorry for her actions, apologizing for everytime she mess up. Plus she's a bit vain always noticing looks before personality. Overall not a amazing female role model. Maybe she'll grow into one, but I'm not seeing any seeds plantedI haven't totally given up on this book I'm sure I'll pick it up later. The globe building is amazing and the author does have imagination. I just don't relate to the Elves (probably because I'm an ugly, not intelligent human...their words not mine) and the main character.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Keeper of the Lost Cities []  2020-1-19 21:47

    Keeper of The Lost Cities starts like this: “Miss Foster!” Mr. Sweeney’s nasal voice chop through Sophie’s blaring melody as he yanked her earbuds out by the cords. “Have you decided that you’re too intelligent to attention to this information?”We are introduced to Sophie who is trying to fit into her school and her family. She doesn’t understand why it is so hard for her but she keeps trying to be what everyone thinks she should be. Then she meets a stranger and is swept into a fresh world. In this globe she is an elf. She is enrolled in school for elves and she doesn’t fit into this globe any better than she fit into the old ever, as the protagonist of this story, Sophie grabs our attention and our sympathy. She makes friends. She works hard. Everyone around her is keeping secrets. The action of the story grabs us. It is inventive and interesting. Sophie adventures are unpredictable and e dialogue is entertaining and realistic. The setting is well written and believable for the alternate universe. When I first picked up the novel, I thought elves, what a cliché, but the author was able to overcome my objections by drawing me into the story, creating well defined and interesting characters.I give this story a five out of a possible five. I recommend it for all the readers looking for a powerful heroine with lots of adventure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The New Science of Cities []  2020-7-12 18:41

    Too scientific for me

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    Both travel narrative and love story, Lawrence of Marrakech invites the reader to experience Morocco’s culture, people, and traditions in a method that only one intimately connected to the region can offer. A master storyteller, Lawrence captures the emotions of and love for these memorable characters and documents an oral tradition we should treasure all the more in this digital age. The turn of every chapter brings fresh adventures, special friendships. Like all amazing books, this one stays with you.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    Have not completed the book yet but we are going to his book signing in Santa Fe tonight. Should be fun !

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    if you ever wondered how someone got into the international art and antiques trade, this is a amazing read! How business is conducted in exotic locations is very various than what we know in the West, and Lawrence's tales of learning the ropes in Morocco are funny, enlightening and hugely enjoyable. A unbelievable chronicle of a time that's gone , but that was well-lived by TR and his wife Linda.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    This beautifully written and enthralling story brought me right into the pages of Mr. Lawrence’s tales of his and his wife, Linda’s adventures of Morocco. Having never been there I reveled in the sites, smells, tastes and magic of his serendipitous travels and find for Moroccan treasures. I was captivated from the beginning and it never allow up. Only disappointed when it ended but the impressions are deeply embedded. Thank you for this delightful tale! Looking forward to the next tales to come from this enchanting writer.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    This a such a colourful book about TR and Linda's business and pleasure adventures in Morocco!! I could visualize every one of the exotic locations he was describing since my husband and I have been to Morocco. ...but TR's adventures go beyond any average tourist experiences!! They're more fun, more risky and more exciting! Well worth the read!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    I loved The Latest Storytellers a collection of unbelievable traditional tales with the usual cast of innocent maidens, love lorn viziers, shepherds,djinns, holes in the ground and so on and so forth.I used to watch the storytellers by Cafe France in Djemma elFna when we lived in Marrakesh--and now I know what they were ese stories are elegantly translated and read beautifully --they obviously would read well aloud to all ages!The globe of A Thousand and One Nights meets the globe of Grimm.Terrific stuff.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    A amazing history of storytelling. The stories are interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    Fascinating experiences, info and tales of Morocco, it’s people, culture and environment. Realistic, clever, well told and evocative.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    This book is very well done and fun/interesting to read. It brings back a lot of thoughts of the courageos adventures we thought we could do when we were younger, but most never had the ability to pull it off. TR and Linda did that in spades!The book paints a vivid picture of life and people in Marrakech during a time that unfortunately is no longer. You are placed back into that time in one of the world's most interesting places.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    TR Lawrence's Morrocan adventure began with an ill-fated surfing trip in his 20's, and became a life-long love affair with Marrakech and his lovely bride, Linda. As they surf the souk's together, Lawrence's memoir is a travelog, love story, and primer on business-building through risk-taking, luck, curiosity and cultural savvy. You'll taste the baby shrimp omelette, smell everything from olives to rustic bathrooms, and obtain to know fascinating Moroccan merchants, customs agents and other assorted characters.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    This book captivates you from the beginning to the end! For TR to accomplish doing business in Morocco all those years meant he had to obtain to know the culture well! He had to learn specific trading methods and certain Arabic expressions in to gain the vendor's respect. How he survived some of the harrowing experiences in the dark back alleys of the souks is amazing. I was so engaged as a reader and highly recommend this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawrence of Marrakech: From the Magical Markets of Morocco []  2020-1-19 21:24

    Simply put, I loved this book. TR's journey into the mysteries of Morocco, in all it's a lot of forms, is both humorous and compelling. As a young college student searching for the excellent wave, he discovered a people and method of life a long, long method from Tennessee. His story draws you in (his description of the bathroom at the CTM Hotel is priceless), as it brings you along on the adventures of a lifetime. This is a captivating read, and not to be missed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    These are unbelievable stories, wonderfully told. Some are very short--a page more or less--and some longer. I read some of these out loud to my guests on a tour of Morocco, and they were enchanted. Highly recommended for anyone visiting Morocco, to be taken one at a time at appropriate moments on the trip. Which moments? Search your own.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    Fascinating collection of traditional Moroccan tales, each one more enchanting than the last. I couldn't place the book down, and am ready to begin reading it again.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    "The Latest Storytellers" is a collection of 37 oral tales from five storytellers in the main marketplace in Marrakesh. They were collected by BBC Correspondent Richard Hamilton between 2006 and 2009 and cleaned up and are now presented in written form for your e stories cover a lot of ground, from literary tales to fantasies, and some of them are a lot like Western tales (like a Cinderella story) while others feel much more like the Middle East. A lot of of the stories are quite short, just a few pages, though there are some longer tales as well. A number of the stories are quite grisly, so they would not create appropriate reading to children, though most would. If you're going to read these tales to kids it would behoove you to read ahead to pick appropriate stories.Hamilton said in an interview that his translator had sketchy English skills and that he had to clean up the stories a amazing bit, and I have to say that the tales as they are presented are quite smooth and well-told. That said, I am also reading "The Arabian Nights" right now, and I search the Nights to be better stories. They evoke more of a sense of wonder and have a sense of timing which Hamilton's tales do not do as well at. I also thought that Hamilton's tales give in to a malicious sense of justice a small too often (like an evil stepmom who is served the chopped-up body of her daughter for a snack) for my tastes.Overall, however, Hamilton's stories are an enjoyable read and serve as an perfect introduction to the current oral storytelling in Marrakech. I often found myself chuckling as I read these stories, and I finished the collection with the feeling of having learned something about the state of modern Arab storytelling, which was valuable in itself. For the most part these are stories in the classical tradition, Once Upon A Time-type tales, and they keep up well to the modern reader. They are a amazing companion to "The Arabian Nights" and an enjoyable read. Obtain them, and enjoy!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    Some stories are wonderful, especially since I spent some time in Marrakech. Some are a bit strange. Overall this is a amazing book of folk tales from a very, very old oral tradition.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    I bought this book prior to a trip to Morocco but it didn't arrive until I had returned. In the end this was the best effect as I'd traveled to a lot of of the locations featured in these stories so reading the ancient tales meant so much more to me. The riding (mostly translations of ancient stories) is like putting a hot knife through butter...effortless and easy. I've already read the book twice and will read again before returning to Morocco.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    This book took into a voyage on the back of a magic carpet to a unbelievable put called Morocco. Where fantasy, Djinns, Sultan, Beauty, Love, Betray, Sorecellerie, Amazing and Poor lived all together.... This book presents amazing stories, meaningful and full of morals. This is definitely a must read for those who love to travel to a magic put and experience various tales......I simply enjoyed reading these fairytales, and i ceratinly didn't wish to come back from that magic world!!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    I lived in Morocco for a year, so spent a lot of time with my nose in books about the country. This is my favorite one for it's readability and accessibility to Moroccan culture, especially if you are going to Marrakech - and if you wish to have even more understanding on this lost art form, I recommend a excellent complement to this book called "Al Halqa: In the Storytellers Circle" (Vimeo: On Demand, $1.99).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco []  2020-1-23 0:33

    A bit too much background before a unbelievable series of local stories, tales and ballads. Amazing selection of stories.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Morocco: In the Labyrinth of Dreams and Bazaars (Armchair Traveller) []  2020-1-17 22:43

    I felt like I was there breathing the air, seeing the sights ,and smelling the spices every time I turned a page.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Morocco: In the Labyrinth of Dreams and Bazaars (Armchair Traveller) []  2020-1-17 22:43

    very little book - no photos

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    This book was SO GOOD. I liked the going to zone part the best. Can't wait for book nine! And there was a lot of drama, but in a amazing way. It was really tense and exciting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    The book released, and I read it before my 3 fan kids could. ***cue evil laugh (I have no bedtime-ha!)***I can see why some people may obtain frustrated with this book. Not a whole lot of action happens until the latest 1/4. *I* enjoyed it immensely, because spending time with my favorite fictional people is a treat no matter what. And more importantly, I trust Shannon Messenger to have a purpose and tell the background stories WELL. And she did just that. AND the story went exactly as I hoped/expected on 2 fronts, so that is pleasing. Now if only book #9 was going to be here before an entire year. Sigh. #ADULTKEEPERFAN #TEAMKEEFE

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Unique Eats & Eateries of the Twin Cities []  2020-7-27 19:38

    Got as gift. Not updated. Old news

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    I love LoVe LOVE this series I was SO excited for this book but then I read it and in all honestly it was AWFUL. If I could rate lower than one star I would. Shannon could've done so much better. Nothing happened in this book and I expected it to be the most exciting and the peak of the series but it just wasn't. I feel like if you wanted to you could read flashback and then the next book you could. Everyone is a jerk, everyones personalities are WAY different. The book is basically Shannon messenger throwing up on the pages. It had no plot, it was all over the put and it was basically a repitition of all the other books just method method worse. This book ruined kotlc for me. You've been warned DO NOT BUY.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Unique Eats & Eateries of the Twin Cities []  2020-7-27 19:38

    a useful information

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    So disappointed. Small action,drawn out, no positive or satisfied parts. This is supposed to be for kids! They turn to books to distract them from the despair of the true world. I'm sick of unhappy endings! The 1st few books were amazing for that reason! Sophie has long deserved to be in love and see what that feels like. Yet you take even that away from her. You do that she's going to lose hope/faith that there's anything worth fighting for. This book just seemed like a "filler". No true plot or excitement. If the next book is similar, I'm washing my hands of the series. Fits is a better person than to just dump her so harshly when he's cared for her for so lo g. And after all that's happened with his family, he's changed enough not to allow something like that immediately walk away from the girl he cAres so deeply for, especially without talking to his family or Sophie about it. It felt like the book was written by someone else. I'd would have liked to see Fits and Sophie try. And yet it felt as if the author was rushing it up to say " See, I place them together for you but my heart wasn't in it to present them fighting FOR each other, so I split them up as soon as I could. Incredibly disappointed. And let's not forget the rest of the story was as full or pitiful as everything else.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    Ok, allow me just say, I'm a large fan of this series. HOWEVER, I really think it should have ended a long time ago. I think since at least book 6, the series has been unnecessary info with small action. It just feels like the author is drawing out the series as long as she possible can, and it's getting painful to read in places. For example, the whole thing about Sophie and Fitz. Ugh, it created me so mad! Shannon required to wrap that up a loong time ago. But instead, everytime we think it's coming to an end, some other unnecessary drama comes into play; Oh no, Sophie is unmatchable! Oh no, Fitz wants them to break up! Oh no, Fitz is having a meltdown for no reason- yet again! That was another huge thing- Sophie didn't realize what a not good 'boyfriend' Fitz was being. If anything doesn't go how he wants it, he freaks. I honestly don't like Fitz's hero at No hate to the series, but the latest few books just haven't really it for me.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    thos book is amazing. it is very intense andat some points I was raedy to one of my favorite parts I got a tad bit mad. if you read this you will feel that you need to read even more than you already have. I could not recomend this book more. It is just a need to read series. It had my hopes a small place down by the first chapter, but they went sky high just by reading the next couple chapters. Can't wait for the next book of the series!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    During the Summer I was introduced to the series "Keeper of the Lost Cities" - I read through all seven books and loved them all. I couldn't wait to read this book, however, when I finish reading it, (I am a quick reader.) I was greatly disappointed. It didn't quite live up to the earlier books. It didn't have the same excitement, action or adventure as the previous seven books-it felt dragged out... The story seems to be told through Sophie's perspective, but she is worry all the time, is in constant fear of failing or hurting someone's feelings, lacks confidence, she seems to think Fitz's abusive behavior is okay, because she is smitten by him & she is constantly distracted by private issues. Sophie is appointed the leader of Squad Valiant and is basically absent from that role because she is consumed with private distractions… Sophie has a restart of her manifested powers but there isn't a true development in her usuage of those powers. There were no fresh powers introduced, (the suggestion was in book 7 about other powers manifesting) maybe something from the genetic pool from her biological parents or others from the genetic manipulation from the Black Swan. I thought that the main hero hadn't grown much. It seems that the Councillors, The Black Swans and Squad Valiant were always several steps behind the Neverseen-they always seemed to know what the Amazing guys will do?-How's that?? The book is 789 pages long and the true action doesn't begin until page 692, there are a few little skirmishes- but it felt as the Neverseen was brought into the story as an afterthought in to tie into Keefe's legacy. There are more loose ends that need tying. I hope that Book Nine can obtain the groove back!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    I started reading the keeper of the lost cities series latest year. I was entranced. I cannot tell you how awesome it felt to search a fantasy series that starred a female character. The 8th book is at some points reallyg intense. In my opinion the whole "unmatchable" scheme was not as well thought out as I would have liked but overall you learn a lot of missing information. Shannon Messenger has a method of making you truly feel for her characters. At times I felt like banging my head on a table because at times Sophie is unnaturally oblivious. Throughout the book the Neverseen were rarely seen. I would have liked more action. In the end we were left with an incredibly unfair cliffhanger so if you hate cliffhangers as much as I do it might be a amazing idea to wait for the 9th book to come out before starting this one. We did learn who Sophie's mom was so I definetly reccomend this rry my thoughts are a small unorganized, hope you found this helpful.-10 year old keeper fan 100%

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    This book completely amazed me. After waiting a year for it to come out, this was just simply great. Sophie grew so much stronger in this book. The main thing I hated was Fitz and hers childish "relationship". Sophie deserves so much better and Fitz rushed everything by calling her his girlfriend right away. I found that so annoying. Also Fitz is barely even in this book until the end and when he is mentioned, he's always getting angry with Sophie and giving in to his stupid anger issues! Meanwhile, Keefe has always been there for Sophie and she trusts him and he is the one she goes to throughout the book-not Fitz. The end of the latest book created me so triggered because I have always been TeamKeefe and didn't wish her to be with Fitz, but then she ended up unmatchable anyway. Oh, and the whole Oralie thing was so dumb. I always k we that she was Sophie' s mother- it was beautiful obvious. But I don't know why Sophie had to hate her and everything when she found out. Oralie had always been super kind to her. And she wasn't selfish for not telling Sophie-she wasn't allowed to. I really hope that in the he ninth book when we search out Oralie's secret that her and Sophie can bond a small better. And I wish Sophie and Keefe to be like together. I wonder what Keefe' s Fresh ability will be...

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Legacy (8) (Keeper of the Lost Cities) []  2020-1-19 23:31

    First off, I am Sophie and Keefe fan! With this being said Sophie and Fits are trying to search their method around being an item and Sophie being unmatchable might become an issue. Sophie is thrust into a leadership role with her fresh squad appointed by the Councillors, and we search out one of her opponents is actually not as poor as she has been portrayed. Of course there was a few mysteries to solve and people to save. Sophie finds the answers to two questions she has been seeking and one is life changing for her. I could go on and on, but I love these books and the characters, places, and humor within the pages. I reread every book before I begin the newest edition, because they truly are well written. I can't wait for the next one, and it was a particularly harrowing cliffhanger!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Music of Morocco / Various []  2020-7-28 21:26

    fnb

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    AVITOPIA - Birds of Morocco []  2020-2-10 18:56

    For bird lovers , this is an ideal book to take with you to Morocco. Only thing is that we dis not see a lot of birds on our travels!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Rhythms of Morocco []  2020-1-18 23:9

    She was looking for more modern melody and this was really more of the traditional flavor. She came back from Morocco and wanted melody but could not give me any names so I tried. She still liked it but not what she was looking for

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Rhythms of Morocco []  2020-1-18 23:9

    Chalf Hassan has made a competent album of Moroccan music, but it's far from my favorite. The instruments tend to sound repetitive, and there is small variation between songs. "The Rough Tutorial to the Melody of Morocco" is a much better work, as is Nour Eddine's "Morocco: Traditional Songs and Music." For that matter, Chalf Hassan has done better work himself, on the album "Arabic Songs from North Africa." "Rhythms of Morocco" is simple listening that has some zest to it, but it's too much of the same thing, over and over again. He required to think about this for a bit longer and test various things. I'd only obtain this album after I got the other albums I mention above, as a secondary album. You could probably skip it entirely and not miss a thing. Mr. Hassan has place out several albums, and I'll be getting them all to see how they sound.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    This is the first book I have read by Pearl Buck. My wife recommended it and she nailed it. It is a very interesting story. I have never read anything like this before. I have no idea as to the accuracy of the story but I felt I was in nineteenth century China in a very various globe from what I know. I highly recommend this book for people like me who do not know much about China. The Latest Empress was a very interesting woman. Clever and ruthless. Guess you had to be.I liked the book so much that I will now read "The Amazing Earth" next. I love it when you are taken to a totally various put from where you are or what you know and it feels so real.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    Having lived in China for the past 8 years, I was familiar with the locations mentioned in the book which have long since changed in name. This is a sort of "rags to riches" story about a girl who works her method up through the complex maze of Chinese bureaucracy within the Forbidden Town and what she has to give up in to achieve power and status. The prose is formal since the book was written a lot of years ago, but the story is beautifully written and gives the reader a true glimpse behind the scenes as it were, of the intrigue and android game playing that went on in the palaces, just to survive. Decisions were, and still are created based on superstitions and beliefs in what we Westerners might consider absurd, but the book is historically accurate and a must-read for anyone interested in Chinese history as well as reading about a rich attractive culture.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    Pearl S. Buck once again presents an intriguing story of the Asian culture in real literary form. This story follows a young girl who becomes the Latest Empress of China. From her humble beginnings to her rise, Buck kept me reading page after page of an very interesting look into the Forbidden Town and life there. Following her secret love, her desire for her husband, and then her son, to succeed as Emperor, her love for her country and the people, her fears of the invading Westerners into their method of life and religion, and her thirst for knowledge of the history of her country and insight into the globe at huge are a lot of of the avenues that Buck takes one on this journey. I would read it again!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    Pearl S Buck not only told an interesting story, but she gave us amazing insights into the Chinese people. The Chinese's 4,000 year old nation has had a lot of traditions, customs and layers of is story is how a lowly impoverished small girl created her method into being the sole ruler and Empress of a magnificent country during troubled times, several wars, famines, and on the brink of technology and modernization. Imperial Woman (Orchid) resisted change, but when she realized she had no choice, bravely and graciously led her nation into the modern e only issue I have with Ms Buck's books is her very long paragraphs. Perhaps the style of writing at the time of her novels dictated this, so very various than today's writings. Nonetheless, it is difficult to concentrate at times with such long arl S Buck's novels should be considered classics and are perfect works for understanding the Chinese culture.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    Pearl Buck states in her Forward to this book that she has tried to portray Tzu Hsi accurately based on "available resources" and her "own memories" of how the Chinese that she knew in China, growing up there as the daughter of missionaries, felt about the sovereign. Buck says that Amazing and Evil mingled in Tzu Hsi in heroic dimensions, and Buck's story-line describes instances of both qualities. Consequently, being pulled back and forth between sympathy with and aversion to the main hero makes for a conflicted and not very satisfying emotional trek for the u Hsi is given the personality and hero traits of a "Tigress." She is someone who is, therefore, capable of seizing and holding ruling power over a long period of element in her personality, as presented by Buck, is fixed stubbornness. She can't be persuaded even by counselors whom she loves and respects that she would be wiser to ameliorate her hostility toward the Imperialist Westerners that have pushed into China. She disapproves of their modern innovations that destroy age-old traditions, she is angered by their planting of a fresh religion, and she is incensed versus them for invading the empire and having forced their privileged treaties on the Chinese. Versus advice, she spends extravagantly in to build glorious, exquisitely-furnished palaces and wondrous outdoor parks even though the costs are a not good burden on the people who must be taxed ever more heavily in to for the luxuries that she loves.Unlike most Chinese women, the Empress was eager to study and learn, spent much time mastering the learning available to her in the royal library into which she gathered whatever extra resources she was able to discover. Her learning about Chinese history aided her from a political standpoint. From behind the scenes, she was able to help the emperor and later her young son when she became empress dowager. In this story, Buck shows Tzu Hsi spending a amazing of her leisure time in reading and study. Also, she seems to have been angry about theatricals and plays, and the reader would guess that she must have contributed much to traditional theater art by her craving for that kind of entertainment.On only two occasions Buck shows Tzu Hsi becoming able to change her stubborn attitudes and opinions about how China ought to act in certain critical situations. Once convinced that her actions have been very unwise, she created immediate turn-arounds and took absolutely fresh courses that were as stubbornly fixed as the previous courses have perial rulership in China strongly linked its rulers with divinity, seeing them as almost divine. The Chinese imperial mother was customarily termed "Holy Mother," for instance, and the male ruler was called the "Son of Heaven." Tzu Hsi had a devotion to the Chinese goddess of Mercy, Kwan Yin, and Pearl Buck depicts the empress at her devotional prayers to this goddess and to Buddha in such a method that she appears to be worshiping in a style very related to typical Roman Catholic devotion. She prays in a shrine, uses prayer beads, addresses the goddess in prayerful requests for divine wisdom and guidance. The Empress is depicted bringing her deep emotional feelings to the merciful Kwan Yin. Likewise with her devotions to the Buddha.Buck's narrative also depicts for the reader the elaborate traditional devotional rituals of royal Chinese funerals and the traditional elaborate rituals asking divine support for the nation in time of e Chinese people themselves apparently associated Tzu Hsi to a huge extent with Kwan Yin and the quality of Mercy, despite her a lot of cruel act. They also associated her with Buddha, their name for her in the latter part of her life being "Old Buddha." They seemed to love her as a matriarch who cared for them and took care of them. According to Pearl Buck, they lamented her passing, felt bereft without her, wondering who would take care of them when they learned she had died. (Many Chinese in isolated parts of the empire didn't know of her passing until some years afterward!)Possibly so that the story will be more interesting and satisfying for the reader, Buck weaves together the Empress' lonely court life with a romantic love interest based upon a supposedly hidden love existing between the lady and her kinsman, Jung Lu. She attributes the fathering of the then ruling Emperor's son to Jung Lu. The two apparently loved one another before "Yehonara" became the favorite concubine of the Emperor. The emperor is portrayed as having become too wasted by dissolution and opium addiction to be capable of engendering any vigorous offspring. Supposedly, the one act of love between the concubine and Jung Lu is the only intimate contact that ever occurs between the lovers, with the Empress remaining celibate for the rest of her life while she goes on loving Jung Lu, just as he continues to love her and serve her conscientiously over the years. If it were not for the love element, the "political" story Buck has to tell would not be very compelling for most readers and the reportage of the "Imperial Woman's" cruel acts would probably be more thoroughly alienating than they are, even in this rather sympathetic story about merous students of this mysterious ruler's life have developed widely varying claims about the true facts of it. It seems that anyone who wants to explore the real facts about her and her reign should delve into all other fictional and scholarly books available about her, not taking Buck's book about her as the latest word or the absolute truth about her. A latest biographer has been historically astute enough to rescue Empress Dowager Tsu Hsi from the false rumors of disgusting immorality that blighted her reputation over the latest century. Another writer has created a case versus her supposed conservatism and has hailed her as a quite progressive ruler--a very unexpected turn of events.I found this biographical novel a bit difficult to read. It was for me not really what I'd call a "page-turner." I had to repeatedly create an effort to focus and attention to what I was reading. I had a hard time keeping the different identities of counselors and eunuchs and concubines sorted out.I felt that one of the best things about the story (just in my personal, untutored estimation) was the perspective it affords for Westerners on the point of view of a lot of Chinese regarding the "Imperialist" Westerners' aggressively forced presence in a China where a lot of Chinese preferred to remain isolated and traditionally fixed in their old ways. The book does not shed light on the machinations of the a lot of Chinese who, on the other hand, wanted to bring down the Qing Dynasty and who helped to further the Nationalist movement that was taking firmer keep in China after the turn of the century.Another amazing thing (actually a very informative thing) about this book is the running descriptions throughout of the splendid Chinese buildings and parks, artwork, jewelry, and elaborate formal clothing typical of the Qing period court and gentry. The book is replete with descriptions of the glorious marvels of artisanship and architectural creativity that are typical of China. Here it appears as the marvelous and incomparable culture that it is! And all these beauteous surroundings are just what the Empress Tzu Hsi loved to make and to enjoy. In the arts and in learning (according to Pearl Buck's creation of the Empress Dowager), she found respite from her cares, not least of which was aloneness.(If you wish to see some very interesting images of Empress Tzu Hsi and people associated with her, go to your Google Search, or other find box, and "Images," then insert her name in the find box and Enter.)(Because I wanted an edition that would match other Pearl Buck books in my collection, I ordered a 1956 hardback edition of Imperial Woman through Amazon. Published by The John Day Company, in amazing condition, and the was comparable to more contemporary editions that are available on Amazon right now. I mention this just in case other readers might be interested in old hardback editions, which Amazon usually has available from time to time.)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    I would like to give this a 4.5. I enjoyed the book, although perhaps not as amazing as some of Buck’s previous works. I take off the .5 because I had problem keeping up with the characters. Maybe my fault, or not enough time spent on development of those characters. This a very detailed telling of the life of The Latest Empress, filled with the nuances of ancient Chinese culture, the inner workings of the palace, and romance. Having recently returned from a trip to China including a tour of the Forbidden Town and Summer Palace (obviously another rebuilding), I was especially interested in the detailed descriptions of each. I believe I have read every book Pearl S Buck has written, a lot of more than once. She continues to be my favorite author.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    While the author writes so beautifully and with amazing detail, I found some of the story to be a bit long and at times weighted down with so much historical and factual information. I did come to appreciate the main characters and they were so beautifully drawn. More than her other work though this one really got massive in the info of the Dynasties of China and sometimes the political info overshadowed the story itself. At times, I felt as though I were reading a Historical Text book. Still, I heartily recommend the story to any fan of this author. You will not be disappointed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    Somehow, as a high school student I missed having to read Pearl S. Buck's book THE GOOD EARTH. Possibly because we moved in the middle of the year. Therefore, I never read one of her novels until I read PAVILION OF WOMAN, a Previous of the day. I loved it! When IMPERIAL WOMAN became a of the day I was fast to it. This is an awesome book as well. It was so interesting to follow the life of a young woman who became probably the greatest Empresses China ever had. Buck uses words to to paint photos of the extravagance of the imperial court, and the beauty of the countryside. In my mind I could feel the elegance of the silken robes or the smoothness of the gems that adorned them. I could cringe with those who displeased her. I truly felt transported to that put and time and place. I look forward to reading more books by Buck in the future.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Morocco Plane Reader - Get Excited About Your Upcoming Trip to Morocco: Stories about the People, Places, and Eats of Morocco (GoNOMAD Plane Readers Book 15) []  2020-1-14 19:55

    Unbelievable travel stories about Morocco. Reading it gets me excited about a forthcoming trip.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Morocco Plane Reader - Get Excited About Your Upcoming Trip to Morocco: Stories about the People, Places, and Eats of Morocco (GoNOMAD Plane Readers Book 15) []  2020-1-14 19:55

    I enjoyed the a lot of diverse stories gave a wide description of Morocco's different regions. I'm looking forward to being there!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Morocco Plane Reader - Get Excited About Your Upcoming Trip to Morocco: Stories about the People, Places, and Eats of Morocco (GoNOMAD Plane Readers Book 15) []  2020-1-14 19:55

    amazing stories

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    This is a very respectful and admiring acc of the rise of the amazing Chinese Empress, Cixi, or Tzu Hsi as her name was written in English during the life of Pearl of Pearl Buck will certainly like this book, as it is very well written. Buck has such a deceptively easy style that paints layer upon layer of the ch of this story is fictional, as it tells Cixi's story from her private viewpoint. Buck has most likely invented a romance with one of her cousins, Jung Lu, who became an necessary statesman and general in her service. I had no issue with that, whether it was totally fictional or not. I hope the true Cixi did search romance (in fact, a lot of people believed she was in love with one of her eunuchs). She must have been desperately lonely at times.I was, however, a bit unhappy at how Buck portrayed her co-Empress as a "frenemy." That was totally unnecessary, and I'm always irritated at how authors so often feel the need to show women as rivals and backstabbers. It's so unfair and so unnecessary. In fact, the two women for the most part got along very well, and thanks to that, they were able to come up with a plan to jointly seize power after the death of their mutual husband, the former emperor. They did not always agree, but over several years, who does?Other than that, Buck does a fine job of showing Cixi's life, considering what was known at the time. Since the book is about Cixi as a person rather than as a ruler, it does not extensively with the complexities of the political situation. For the full story, I would very highly recommend Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China, an extensive and spectacular acc of Cixi's life and reign. That book includes much info that was not known to Buck as a amazing of documents have only recently been discovered that explain Cixi's motives and e true Cixi was an awesome woman, and a amazing but not perfect, empress. This book is an perfect introduction to her.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Imperial Woman: The Story of the Last Empress of China []  2020-2-6 20:37

    When reviewing a hisorical novel, we should take into acc not only whether or not a book is historically accurate but also whether or not it describes the customs of the country at the time of the action. We should also consider the choice of lexicon and the style used. When the author speaks about procedures we are not familiar with, an explanation should be provided.On all these points, Ms. Buck has done what was the standard in her day and age. She had lived in China almost all her life, and been home-schooled by her mother and by a Chinese tutor who doubtless explained to her the customs of the host country. She was in China at the time of the revolution and probably heard all the rumors that circulated. She had also attended the university in the United States, and had a amazing command of language and Buck presents us with an idealized vision of what might have been, if Tsu Hsi was as determined to cling to power as Pearl S. Buck would have liked her to be and if she had shared the ambition of a Macchivalli by making first her own son, then her nephew, Emperor but replacing them personally when she saw they were not as powerful as she member, this is not a historical document. It is a story of what could have been, seen by a person who was in China at the time the happenings took place, and who has an wonderful vocubabulary and a unbelievable command of the English tongue.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Morocco Plane Reader - Get Excited About Your Upcoming Trip to Morocco: Stories about the People, Places, and Eats of Morocco (GoNOMAD Plane Readers Book 15) []  2020-1-14 19:55

    TRAVELED TO MOROCCO AND LOVE TO READ EVERY BOOK ON MOROCCO. A WONDERFUL EXCITING COUNTRY THAT IS SO EXOTIC AND AN ADVENTURE AND REMAINS FOREVER IN YOUR MEMORY.

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386