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    The Lady Surprised by Love []  2021-4-6 23:29

    This is a amazing idea for a story. However, too much is left out or simply explained. Early chapters (or a Prologue) could tell the story of young Caroline and Miles, and then the story of young Miles and Susan. Also, how did Sophia and Edmund come to live with their relatives? In the end, there are two HEA’s. I would love to have truly experienced the romance of Sophia and Edmund. I would also have liked to hear the real repentance and forgiveness conversations between Caroline and Miles. It could have been so much more.

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    The Lady Surprised by Love []  2021-4-6 23:29

    Caroline has sworn that she will never marry after she was jilted by her beau. She lives with her younger cousin, Sophie. Sophie meets someone and falls in love. Caroline and her former beau meet again.

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    The Lady Surprised by Love []  2021-4-6 23:29

    I love that this is a story about love and second chances. The relationship between Sophia and Edmund shows the exuberence of young love, while Caroline and Miles exhibit the bravery required to take advantage of a second chance. This is a sweet story that will lighten your day and have you believing that love conquers all.

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    The Lady Surprised by Love []  2021-4-6 23:29

    Bridget was not one to take a man in marriage that doesn't respect her. She thinks this will be her latest season - she is getting old you know, , and does have two younger sister, you know. Then HE comes out of the crowd, and talks quite sensibly with her. Soon, he comes to the afternoon times, still talking to her as if she has a mind of her own. They agree to marry one another, because neither is playing mind android games with the other. Then she meets, I mean really meets, his sister!!!

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    The Lady Surprised by Love []  2021-4-6 23:29

    Ms Darcy never fails to please with her writing. This story was short and to the point; however, that did not hold it from being entertaining. Imagine being suddenly thrown into a room with the person who'd broken your heart. How does one act under those cirtances? And how to avoid them again in the little city where no one can avoid anyone for long?And why, by the way, does he still affect me just as before? Cute storyline. Thanks for a amazing goodread!!!

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    I created the mistake of purchasing this printing of C.S. Lewis' book without checking reviews. Although the book written by C.S. Lewis is a amazing one, I would encourage buyers of this book to purchase one from a various publisher. This edition was very difficult to read, because it has many, a lot of typographical errors, uses very little font size that is hard to read, and on every page, substitutes parts of words with symbols or the wrong letters, and occasionally leaves out words altogether. There is no editor or publishing house mentioned in the book itself.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    One of the must-read books in the Lewis canon. Surprised By Joy gives you the trajectory of Lewis' spiritual life from his early loss of faith and the appeal of "Northerness" to his arrival at critical thinking in the cauldron of the Amazing Knock's dialectic, the Amazing Battle not only WWI but the ongoing refinement of his intellect in contention with Owen Barfield where he lost his chronological snobbery. An ever more refined journey culminating in his return to faith, 'Surprised By Joy' is simply an essential work along with a few others like "The Abolition of Man" journeying into the mind of the most influential Christian apologist of the 20th century.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    I especially enjoyed how the writer points out that people should embrace fresh cultures, not just go to a fresh place, but do the same old things they did back home. This story rather personifies that saying "Be the change you'd like to see", as each of he and his family members experience this fresh culture by seeing such a huge change in themselves in the process.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    The author, Alan Lay, is a 50 year old Englishman who rather reluctantly moves to Spain with his sister and brother-in-law, and quickly falls in love with the country, learns the language and slips into the Spanish method of life. Reading it is like reading a letter from a mate that has moved to a fresh country, and he brings the people that he meets to life, and you wish to know about them, and hear more about his life in his fresh country. The book was written recently enough to be relevant, so it is even more appealing than reading about Spain from years (or decades) ago. I highly recommend it.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    A quick, light read. I love the quirky book and its humor. Obtain there is some substance there, too. Learning Spanish, making changes, embracing a fresh life. I am off now to buy his next book.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    Point: “Really, a young Atheist cannot guard his faith too carefully. Dangers lie in wait for him on every side.” Here is how God sought out a reluctant th: C. S. Lewis charts his path from childhood to belief in Jesus, the Son of God. He explains how a longing for “joy” drove him to the belief in Absolute, to Spirit, to God, to Jesus (“Joy is distinct not only from pleasure in general but even from aesthetic pleasure. It must have the stab, the pang, the inconsolable longing”). Along the method he points out signposts of where he was headed, logical fallacies he was believing, humorous anecdotes of mates and enemies, and an extremely persistent God following (or was he leading?) all urces: Lewis walks the reader through the necessary characters in the story of his life. From his disgruntled teacher, to rationalistic friends, individuals were part of the molding and moving process in his reement: This was a fascinating read of how one man was brought to his knees in faith. His philosophical exploration of science and the supernatural would be valuable to read and ponder in today’s rsonal App: Christianity is not illogical in the sense that it is without reason. It is the only reasonable explanation.Favorite Quote: “A young man who wishes to remain a sound Atheist cannot be too careful of his reading. There are traps everywhere—“Bibles laid open, millions of surprises,” as Herbert says, “fine nets and stratagems.” God is, if I may say it, very unscrupulous.”It would be worth another read and I would recommend it to someone who:- tells me that Christianity is devoid of reason- cannot ever see themselves believing in a private God- who loves philosophy- believes science has all the answers- likes the works of C. S. LewisOther books along this same theme would be:Chesterton, G. K. Mive. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2011.On the Gospels and the Resurrection:Craig, William Lane. “Did Jesus Rise from the Dead?” In Jesus Under Fire: Modern Scholarship Reinvents the Historical Jesus, edited by Michael J. Wilkins and J. P. Moreland, 141–176. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1995.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Surprised Under the Mistletoe by Krysta Fox is part of the multi-author The Sweater series. This is the first book I have read by this author and I enjoyed it. I found this to be a sweet, OTT insta-love with a mix of Christmas, family, Santa, food, romance and a lot of unexpected mistletoe. The story is about Whitaker "Whit" Morgan and Gentry "Gen" n is a chef who hates the chef she is working under. So when the head chef leaves at Whitaker Events, the company her best mate works at she is pushed into applying when Mel pushes her into it and tells her she will recommend her personally. When Gen is offered the position she is unsure but once Mel shows her the offer letter she jumps at it. It is just before Christmas and the first huge happening is next week. So she needs to give message at her job, try fresh recipes and work with her fresh staff to ensure they cook the method she wants.Whit is the spoiled son of the Morgan family. They are rich and run a number of companies. He did obtain his business degree but two years on and he is still traveling the globe on an extended celebration party with his friends. That is until he gets the call from his father that it is time to come home. His grandmother has decided he is to take over the running of Whitaker Events, the company she first started with her husband which they built their business empire on, and the one she loves the most. Whit is not satisfied but he is the dutiful son and heads back to do his duty. When he arrives and talks with his father he learns that there is more going on than he was told. His grandmother's cancer has come back and things do not look good. He resolves to carry on the running of the company and create his grandmother proud of him.What Whit and Gen were not expecting were to search each other at the party. Gen has to glad-hand with the guests, as they will also be people who will hire the company, and Whit is having to play Santa when the person they had hired got sick and he is the back-up plan. Let's just say that Santa gets caught kissing the chef under the mistletoe and then gets busy later on upstairs in the empty offices. But what happens when Gen discovers that Whit is her fresh boss, the one she has not met yet? Ooops...........she has actually met him very intimately and shook more than his hand.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Whit has been called home by his dad as his grandmother is dealing with cancer again and needs to retire from the business. She wants him to be CEO of her baby, Whitaker Events. Gen is just starting as the head chef at Whitaker Happenings and is excited that her dream is now a reality. The two hold crossing paths in that week before the huge holiday employee party and then it explodes into an intense romance. [email protected]#$%!&s as he takes his put in the company, but their banter eases the situation. These two work and fit like a glove. Amazing ending a year later.I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    "In the Trinity Term of 1929 I gave in, and admitted that God was God..." "I was driven to Whipsnade one sunny morning. When we set out I did not believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, and when we reached the zoo I did...it was...like when a man, after long sleep, still lying motionless in bed, becomes aware that he is now awake."For a long time I've been fascinated by the person, C.S. Lewis. What caused him to be the method he is?...to write the Chronicles of Narnia, a best-selling children's fantasy; The Screw-tape Letters, a dialogue; Mere Christianity, a layman's apologetic; The Zone Trilogy, a science-fiction; The Abolition of Man, a short treatise; Till We Have Faces, a mythology; Reflections on the Psalms, a commentary; The Pilgrim's Regress, an allegory; The Amazing Divorce, a novella; and now--Surprised by Joy, an autobiography!Can you say "prolific"? I haven't even scratched the surface. If we complied C.S. Lewis' diary, letters, poems, and essays, not to mention his scholarly work on Medieval Renaissance literature, and his reflections on love, evil, pain, and theology than we've got a truck load of sheer writing masterpieces. Few Christian authors are more well read than C.S. us, I'd almost forgotten that C.S. Lewis at one time in his life, was not a Christian, and for a long duration he even professed to be--yes--an t an atheist like the Fresh Atheists of today, but like an Old Atheist. The difference is that the Old Atheist simply believed Theism was false, but the Fresh Atheist, today, believes that Theism is not only false, but evil, even supremely the cause of evil. He respectfully denied God's existence.While reading Surprised By Joy I was, needless to say--surprised. C.S. Lewis' life was rather simple, even common. He was not good at sports, read a amazing deal, and thought a lot of of the same things I have thought in my child-hood. He went to a "normal" preparatory school, went to a common College, and joined the troops to war in WWI. Most of our amazing grandfather's have done e one thing that sets C.S. Lewis apart from the common hero is that he was, more than any person I've heard of--extensively well-read. He read books like a 3-week starved lion in front of a freshly killed antelope. He devoured them. Not Christian books. In fact, some notable influences in his life were Norse Myths like Thor, Odin, and Loki, fantasy tales, ancient literature from the likes of Virgil, Euripides, Dante, Homer... He read basically the entire western canon, and was influenced by agnostics like George Orwell (author of 1984), other popular authors like Faust, Wordsworth, Shelley... And in all honesty, if you were to mention a notable book from history, everything from Voltaire's Candide, to Darwin's Origin of Species, to the Wizard of Oz, he read it.And from the man who has read, been exposed too, dabbled in, and even believed for a short time, most ideas and human philosophies man has come up with, said this about his own reading: "A young man who wishes to remain a sound Atheist cannot be too careful of his reading."In short, it was C.S. Lewis' reading of books that pushed him from Atheism to Theism and then from Theism to Christianity. We as Christians, for the past how ever a lot of decades have been afraid of reading books that ought not to create us afraid. It is not the Christian that ought to be afraid of reading the Amazing Books of the past, it is the Atheist. The overwhelming testimony of the greatest of human philosophies give testament to the book that stands above them all--the Bible. Like a truth that rings so loudly on the hearts of men and women throughout history, you would have to plug your ears, and ignore your reason, selectively choose your literature, and shut your eyes to human experience to retain a sound belief versus a truth that so tugs on each of our ter reading the books confirming his Atheism for most of his higher education, C.S. Lewis interestingly makes the comment that it was not that the books and philosophies he began suddenly seemed so blatantly wrong, he remarked that they we simply boring, "Christians are wrong, but all the rest are bores." Atheism was boring. In short, he maintains that he was unsatisfied with the explanation of Atheism. Somewhere he calls Atheism, "too simple". It does not provide to complex explanation for the globe we live in; pain, evil, love, joy, hardship, friendship, beauty... You cannot maintain any of those fundamental human experiences with a consistent belief that the Universe was an accident of evolutionary tably, as the title is called Surprised by Joy, it was when C.S. Lewis realized joy was much more than an "aesthetic experience" that he began to find for a truth that was comprehensive enough to fit the human experience. He found that in a person--Jesus rprised by Joy was an perfect read! It is not like Augustine's Confessions, with attractive confessions of sin and testimony of struggle, or like John Bunyan's Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners with an astonishing pilgrimage to repentance. It is a book of pure honesty to how C.S. Lewis lived his early child-hood and what shaped his testimony of conversion.I highly recommend reading Surprised by Joy by C.S. Lewis! It's one of the best autobiographies I've ever read, and even though I've not read many, it is probably better than a lot of other autobiographies I'll read in the future.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    Read them all. Amazing story, your life. Believable, well written and proofed.Out loud chuckles, sympathy when the going got tough...I was with you all the way.Fabulous and hopefully not the latest we hear of ank you

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    The author tells a amazing story about being an expat in a little city in Spain. Just like Under the Tuscan Sun, the story flows smoothly between meeting the locals and making huge changes to one’s own life and method of doing things.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Surprised Under the Mistletoe by Krysta Fox is the fifth instalment in the Sweater series, but don’t be dissuaded if you haven’t read any of the other stories, as each is a standalone Christmassy feast. A short quick read, Gen and Whit’s story is a unbelievable acc of people ending up where they belong and through the love of what they do, giving back to others. Sweet and romantic, Surprised Under the Mistletoe is everything you would wish in a festive story; likeable characters, a small angst and a lot of love.I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Santa is not coming so Whit needs to step in at the latest minute. Everyone is happy!! Whit's mom was getting him something to eat when she's pulled away, so he asks Gem to take the meal to Santa. Santa is satisfied the he gives her a kiss and it happens to be under the mistletoe. After the children he can't wait to see her n just got the job being the head chef for the Whitaker company. She goes up to the office to obtain something when Santa walks in to give her a gift. Neither one knows what each one is at the party for. Whits Grandmother created announcement that her Grandson is taking over. Gen is shocked, she runs into the kitchen but Whit finds her and he takes this possibility to ask her on a true date. He is thrilled she said YES! Their life only grows from that day forward.I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout atnd am voluntarily leaving a review.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    Take note - this product is "print to order" which means that when you order, it is printed and shipped out.Mine has a production date of November 4, 2016.Unfortunately, there are several attributable flawsSurprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life which create this a poorly produced item. The first printed page includes a easy listing of the content and a forward by C.S.L.1 - There are no page numbers2 - The typeset and layout are fatiguing to the reader with indistinct paragraphs and only vague chapter divisions with no break in pagination.3 - There are a lot of typos and "orphaned" words and sentences. I counted five on the 12th printed page alone.I suggest you seek a standard published and printed ver of the book.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    I was surprised by this book. I have read a lot of of C. S. Lewis's writings, but this was not what I expected. He is usually a friendly author that can write literary work that is simple to read and that inspires deep thought. He has a method of explaining things that I never this book, he explores his youth, his period of atheism, and his return to Christianity. It took me down a notch or two, because he quotes a lot of authors I have never read and a lot of I had never heard of, using snippets that would be more meaningful to a more well-read reader than to me. That's my fault, not his.I was also surprised as he described his early years in boarding schools and the casual manner he approached the schoolboys' hierarchy of the Bloods and the Punts. He could have easily described it like a horror movie, but seemed to be able to place himself above it all and emerge as a well-read scholar. Only C. S. Lewis could create that typical Lewis direct style, he describes his foibles on his journey from atheism back to Christianity. "I had as small want to be in the Church as in the zoo." Also, "I have a spiritual gaucherie which makes me unapt to participate in any rite."Anytime spent with his writing is time well spent. As he turns away from atheism and back to religion and eventually Christianity, readers will search the Lewis we all wish to read. Small gems like, ". . .then not a god, but God." As he speaks of his return to the Bible, "Here and here only in all time the myth must have become fact; the Word, flesh: God, Man."

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    Surprised by Joy is a prerequisite if one is to experience the maximum benefit of C.S. Lewis' apologetic works. That is, while one might not actually, and perhaps should not, read Surprised by Joy before some of his other titles it will certainly provide the reader with a fresh appreciation of Lewis' perspective. Throughout his life, as it is evident in his writing, Lewis returns time and again to face his own struggles, those questions born of his own thoughts, to explain and defend Christianity. As it might be imagined, some of the toughest questions that he ever presented were first shaped into a fit argument while he was confident that Christianity could not possibly be reality. Within this work, Lewis brings these difficulties to light, as well as his experiences which justified his thoughts at any given time and the thoughts which accompanied these e education, thoughts, and experiences of Lewis' early life are valuable enough in themselves with regard to an understanding of his adult conviction. However, it is also seen, after reading this work, that it was not only the Christian conviction which became finely tuned in his adulthood. Those difficulties which, at one time, prevented Lewis from accepting Christianity also matured over time into well developed arguments, positioning themselves contrary to his Christian faith. This, some believe, is what makes Lewis such a valuable asset; not only in terms of his ability to create converts out of secular society, but as an educator of Christians seeking clarification. He did not convert and completely forget his previous beliefs, rather his beliefs from any time grew in their ability to persuade and he continuously applied that which he understood to be greater truth to effectively demonstrate why, even the most persuasive and articulate, counter arguments and philosophical alternatives simply fell short of Truth itself. It is for this reason; the fact that much of Lewis' reoccurring topic material stems from difficulties created aware to him in his youth, that Surprised by Joy will provide the reader with a greater appreciation for C.S. Lewis' life's the title alone, one might be led to believe that this is an autobiography portraying the time before Lewis embraced Christianity, and his path to conversion. It is real that this work is a revealing look into Lewis' early life and, what appear to be, most personal thoughts. It is less about Lewis, however, than it is about the human struggle to achieve or even possess joy. Lewis seems to feel that any detail of his life, regardless of what the reader might wish to know about him as a person, is willingly sacrificed if it does not somehow tie into his pursuit of joy. What might surprise the reader even more is that Lewis actually ends this work at a period of his life prior to his conversion to Christianity. Nevertheless, Lewis conveys the most trying obstacles in his journey, leading him to theism, while presenting the reader with enough info to bridge some of the, albeit few, private gaps found in his presentations elsewhere. For a student of C.S. Lewis, Surprised by Joy is a must.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    The Reluctant Expat series by Alan Lay was extremely enjoyable!I was very surprised since a lot of of the ex-pat stories center on trying to re-create everything the method it was wherever they came from. Alan, on the other hand, tries very hard to fit in to his fresh country and encourages his brother in law and sister to learn the language as he did and hang out with the Spanish people. Alan might be a bit of a drifter, but I will drift with him. I am really looking forward to part four and hope he really writes it!

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    I greatly enjoyed the Brit's acc of being an expat in Spain. His changed life from his humdrum life in England to an adventurous life in Spain was a pleasant surprise. Looking forward to part 2.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    I have a close relative who has moved to Spain and whom I plan to visit. So I have a powerful interest in the expat experience in Spain. Even without this connection, I would have read this and the other three books in this series as I found the characters and the experiences believable and interesting.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Surprised Under the Mistletoe by Krysta Fox is a short,fun, sweet and steamy instalove/holiday romance story of Gen and Whit..Gen is a curvy,sassy and gorgeous chef and landing her dream job is a miracle. With the largest happening of the season looming..She have a lot to prove on,that shes the right choice e job.. When a fun night at the company’s Christmas party contains a steamy kiss with Santa under the mistletoe she assume she drank too much,now she cant stop thinking about the man And everything else he has under that bright red suit. But a girl like her can’t obtain everything she wants for Christmas. Or can she? Whit is the fresh Boss when he takes over the company of his grandmothers company and his parent telling him to settle down..He truly became the Grinch. Forced to dress up as Santa Claus for the company Christmas party but he never expected to meet the most attractive woman he'd ever e’s the Christmas show he didn’t see coming after that hot kiss they shared under the mistletoe that left his head spinning..Now all he wish to do is unwrap her from top to bottom. But when he search her, will he be able to convince her that they can both have it all?I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Hes a playboy asked to come home, shes a chef wanting a change. Hes taking over for his grandmother and shes the fresh chef for the company. Hes dressed as Santa and she bring him something to eat. They kiss under the mistletoe and everyone sees. They meet up again and finds out he a the boss and they work things out.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Whit comes home to take over the family business when his grandmother retires. Gen is just starting as head chef at the Whitaker Happenings and is looking forward to working for them. When Gen and Whit meet sparks fly between them. Whit knows she is the one for him but doesn't know what to do. When Gen acts impulsively and kisses the Santa at the party she has no clue who is playing Santa. This causes some awkwardness and worries when she realizes who she kissed. Can Whit and Gen search a method to be together?This is an awesome holiday story that will place you in the spirit. this is a well written and very entertaining story. I would recommend this book to any book lover.I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    "But what, in conclusion, of Joy? For that, after all, is what the story has mainly been about. To tell you the truth, the topic has lost nearly all interest for me since I became a Christian." From final page of Surprised by is book describes C. S. Lewis's intellectual journey from Atheism to Christianity, and how the felt experience he calls Joy led him there. After conversion, the Joy that once created everything else in his life pale in comparison became a topic of disinterest to Lewis. His pursuit of the pearl of amazing price seems to end in an existential malaise. Was Joy just a cosmic bait-and-switch?Lewis's journey begins with early experiences that produced in his imagination "an unsatisfied desire which is itself more desirable than any satisfaction." (p. 18.) These inward experiences filled him with enormous bliss and made an inconsolable longing for something he knew not. The experiences would pass in a moment but they left behind "a longing for the longing that had just ceased" and "everything else that had ever happened to me was insignificant in comparison." (16.) Of this Joy, Lewis wrote that "the central story of my life is about nothing else." (17.)Yet, in connection with his final steps toward Christianity, "No kind of desire was show at all." (231.) Lewis did not attribute his eventual belief in Jesus as the Son of God to an intellectual or emotional decision, or even a determined will. Rather, he describes his conversion in existentialist terms: "[A] man is what he does; there is nothing of him left over or outside the act. As for what we commonly call Will, and what we commonly call Emotion, I fancy these usually talk too loud, protest too much, to be quite believed, and we have a secret suspicion that the amazing passion or the iron resolution is partly a put-up job." (237.)Looking back on Joy, Lewis wrote, "I now know that the experience, considered as a state of my own mind, had never had the kind of importance I once gave it. It was valuable only as a pointer to something other and outer." The experiences of Joy were relegated to the "lower life of the imagination." They conveyed no spiritual knowledge and imparted no spiritual life: "This lower life of the imagination is not a beginning of, nor a step toward, the higher life of the spirit, merely an image. In me, at any rate, it contained no element either of belief or of ethics; however far pursued, it would never have created me either wiser or better." (167.) No wonder, then, that the topic of Joy had lost nearly all interest for Lewis as a Christian.What leaves this book on a somewhat minor note is that Lewis never describes a true Christian spiritual experience that comes anywhere close to uplifting the soul as Joy did. Nowhere does Lewis speak of Christian experience that compared in any method to the Joy that had filled him with enormous bliss, made inconsolable longing, created all else insignificant in comparison, and of which he would say "the central story of my life is about nothing else." The book ends with the impression that the existential act of belief was the definitive tag of Lewis's Christian experience. There seemed to be no og for Joy in his own Christianity as there was, for example, with Bernard of Clairvaux who could write: "We taste Thee, O Thou Living Bread and long to feast upon Thee still We drink of Thee the Fountain Head and thirst our souls from Thee to fill"

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    As I write this (Dec 29 2012), I would say this has been the most influential book in my I re-read my initial review (Feb 28, 2014), I would say this book began phase 1 of my development after college. One of the first books I chose to read for myself. Very Very influential for me. I have since moved on and wouldn't call it the most influential, but I certainly wouldn't be where I am today without it. I am no longer in vocational Christian ministry, but anyone in Christian ministry should read this. The review:I would love to give it 5 stars except the middle third of the book was so dry! I don't understand why he place so a lot of info regarding his school days!He was raised in a nominally Christian family, but gave up his faith at 13. He was in a lot of various studying situations (if I remember correctly, even homeschooled for a couple years).In college he kept running into thinkers he deeply admired, who were also Christians. He would say they were perfect people, but couldn't believe they were Christians too...Tolkien was the culmination of these e method he describes his pursuit of god--like the mouses pursuit of the cat, is great.He also has some one liners like "I somehow had smuggled in the idea that what I wanted was pleasure, but I got pleasure and found out it wasn't what I wanted" and something like: pleasure is available on demand, but joy is available only as a side r better or worse, this book stops when Lewis is in his mid twenties...a grief observed is a snapshot autobiography of a few years at the end of his life, and offers his insights into his life more matured. It is another must read for Lewis lovers.

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    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life [Book]  2018-3-31 18:0

    This is an autobiographical acc of C.S. Lewis's life - which you probably already know - but it is a subjective acc not a chronology. If you are disinterested in reading an autobiography with a spiritual frame of reference skip this one.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    I'm surprised how much I like the 's an honest tale with just enough info to hold you interested,but not tedious. Alan makes his own adventures and describesthem without the overstimulated wordiness that other memoir authorssometimes fall into trying to be overly funny and just miss the ter finishing, I immediately bought Book 2. Hope it's as good.

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    The Reluctant Expat: Part One - Surprised by Spain []  2020-1-21 22:35

    An easy, breezy style of writing that makes this book enjoyable. I felt that I knew most of the folks in his tale b/c of his perfect descriptions. Can't wait to read book #2.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    With heartfelt moments and its delightful main couple, SURPRISED UNDER THE MISTLETOE is repeatedly entertaining with compelling developments. Whit has not taken life seriously since getting his degree, but an unforeseen situation has him taking responsibility for his future actions. Gen just wants to have an opportunity to demonstrate that she is an perfect chef, and she finally gets the chance. When the lives of these two repeatedly collide, the results are explosively unexpected. I was really drawn into the cirtances that occurred before and after this couple meet, as Krysta Fox created them believable and very engaging.When Whit Morgan’s grandmother wants him to begin overseeing her company that plans events, he reluctantly agrees. While he does have a business degree, he has never used it in the two years since graduating, but quickly realizes he is about to search out if he can hold the company profitable and its employees happy. A fresh hire is Gen McDonald who is going to be the head chef for any events, and she really wants to create a amazing first impression with the meal served at the company’s Christmas ere are some fun moments in this story in the Sweater series, and there are also instances where feelings are on display. Whit had been living a very carefree life, but he is starting to comprehend that he needs to do better. I liked how his inner thoughts allow me know what was going on in his mind, as they showed his reasons for why he often acted as he did. After not being satisfied at her latest job, Gen is thrilled to present everyone at the party her skills. What happens during the holiday celebration is a case of insta-lust, which might possibly turn into something much more lasting.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    Gem has been looking to expand her career and take on a bigger job for a while now. When she decides to be the head chef of the most prestigious happenings company she is extremely excited but not looking for a distraction. Whit on the other hand is all distraction and no focus. When he comes back to take care of business and learns of his grandmother's plans for the happening company he is hesitant about how this is going to work out for him. When Santa drops out at the latest min and he steps in for the day he doesn't expect a possibility and some mistletoe will change his life is was another amazing story in this series and while it was short it did not lack in steam or romance. The holiday season can be felt through the pages as well as the chemistry between Gem and Whit. The HEA was so worth the read.I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

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    Surprised Under the Mistletoe []  2020-12-24 21:2

    ** spoiler alert ** He has come back to take over the family business, she dreams of being a head chef. A small magic under the mistletoe changes everything. Will she obtain over the shock of who he is?This was a cute, fun read. I loved the fact that he gave her a choice flat out once everything was laid on the table, but that when it came down to it he stepped up to the plate. I didn't blame her for being shocked, but loved how she decided to still take that chance! Amazing read!

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    Surprised by Love: Historical Western Romance (Bayliss Brides Sweet Romance Book 1) []  2020-8-9 18:55

    I very much enjoyed this story! It was humorous, a small sad , certainly a various take than the books that I have been reading. It is refreshing for a change!

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    We gave this to our teenage daughter latest year, (I think Tim Keller had recommended it on a blog or in an interview?) hoping to expose her to an intelligent, Christian female voice. In a globe that can be lonely for Christians, and within a Christian globe that can be oblivious to or biased versus a sharp, questioning, and discerning young woman, Weber reaches out with a warmth, sincerity, and intellectual validity that was manna to my daughter. My daughter fell in love with everything about this book, created me read it, got her friends, Bible study leader, and others to read it, and now she has a battered, frayed, and well-loved book. It is a bonus on so a lot of levels--it's a amazing story, it's solid apologetics, it's a biography of a attractive woman, it's a romance, and it's a coming of age. Thank you for sharing your heart, mind, and soul, through your considerable talent, Carolyn Weber.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    In her beautifully written spiritual memoir Surprised by Oxford, Carolyn Weber makes us privy to three e takes us with her as she falls in love with Oxford—the town and the school.We experience the ups and downs of her relationship with TDH (tall, dark and handsome) who begins by patiently answering the a lot of questions of this atheistic Canadian scholarship student, and ends by posing a question of his ly, we follow Caro’s meandering journey toward Jesus, from sneaking into the back of a cathedral to read a pew Bible to a public baptism in the Thames ’s literary background makes this a book rich in quotes and allusions to classical writers like John Donne and George Herbert. But she’s no cultural recluse and so pop culture wisdom, like U2 lyrics, search a put as well.Her keen intelligence combined with feminist leanings informs and directs the apologetic narrative as she grapples with questions she needs to have answered before she will place her faith in any dogma or deity.Her authenticity and warm spirit shine through all over the put as she recounts memories of life in her Canadian home and Oxford dorm conversations, pub nights, and outings with fellow students and professors.I found Surprised by Oxford an altogether enjoyable read and am thrilled that it won the Grace Irwin Prize as the best Canadian Christian book published in 2013.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    Surprised by Oxford is the memoir of Carolyn Weber, a young woman who leaves her home of Canada to study literature in the ancient halls of Oxford. In the book, Carolyn shares her journey to faith in Jesus, starting from arriving at Oxford as one who knew very small about Christianity, through her struggles as she seeks answers and wrestles with the deep problems of faith, and up to her choice to follow Jesus and the finishing of her schooling at Oxford.I can't adequately describe the pleasure it was to read Surprised by Oxford. As a literature student myself, it was such a joy to read Carolyn's story, both because of its smooth and engrossing prose and its perspective of God. It reminded me much of C.S. Lewis' own memoir, Surprised by Joy. Since Oxford was the home of that amazing Christian writer, Carolyn's story (and I'm nearly certain the title of it) references him often, and I would gladly place the two books next to each other on my shelf. At nearly five hundred pages the book could have easily grown taxing and boring, but Carolyn writes so well that the length actually helped me, as one hero encouraged her, to "Pause. Rest. Reflect."Even a few months after finishing the book, certain scenes stand out in my mind, ones written so tenderly they nearly feel like fiction; ones deeply honest, such as Carolyn's struggle with men and feminism and a friend's excellent response to it; ones brilliant in their wisdom and understanding of God and our relationship with Him. Carolyn is honest with her struggles and pains, and walking with her as she wrestled her method to the Lord was encouraging to my own heart and relationship with ar the end of the story, Carolyn goes for a walk with a dear friend, who says, "If you look back on your life, you'll see His hand in it, and over you...." Surprised by Oxford is Carolyn's looking back, and I'm very satisfied and honored to have shared it with her.(I received this book free from the publisher through the book review bloggers program. I was not needed to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.)

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    This book reads like a romance novel. It is more well-written and less annoying than most romance novels, but I am just not a fan of romance novels. I was really expecting a bit more of an erudite treatise on an intellectual journey of faith, but in truth, this journey was a journey of the heart. For some people, this may be exactly what they would like to read, but what can I say--"Dammit Jim, I'm a doctor, not a romantic." I did like the poetry in the book. Most of the poems were old familiars from English class, allusions to Prufrock and bright tigers and such. But nicely worked is book suffers from overly excellent dialogue, irritatingly cool characters, and disturbingly wise professors. Don't obtain me wrong, the notice was amazing and the story was interesting, but I am the sort of person who--okay, well, call me cynical. This book reminds me of the kind of TV series that is famous today where impossibly beautiful young intellectuals finish one another's sentences with increasingly brilliant insight in most unrealistic fashion. That doesn't actually happen in true life unless everyone is drunk, or everyone is a college student overawed by that recent philosophy e author is right about one very necessary thing. Her insight into the life of a Christian academic is spot on. The thing that surprised me about Oxford was that the other academics were, for the most part, begin minded. How a lot of times have I choked on my chardonnay at some tail party listening to some academic ranting about how poor Christians are. Then they look at me and say, "well, not YOU, of course." Okay, thanks, points about this book:1-Maybe, just maybe, someone will read it and learn to begin his/her mind.2-I think I will buy a volume of John Donne poetry. "Kind pity chokes my spleen" is possibly the best line I have ever read.Worst points about this book:1-It was not what I was expecting2-It isn't really my styleOf course, neither of these criticisms should deter anyone from the purchase of this book, especially if their journey is a heart journey. Some may say that all journeys of faith are journeys of the heart, and that is real to some extent. It is definitely real that a private journey is not "open to debate." I'm sure this will touch a lot of readers out there.

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    Surprised by Love: Historical Western Romance (Bayliss Brides Sweet Romance Book 1) []  2020-8-9 18:55

    I've been enjoying this series of stories about the three sisters, they where kept under their father's thumb. The gentleman had passed on, what would happen to the Women now. Read the authors unbelievable story of their adventures.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    Dr. Carolyn Weber taught literature to undergrads for 15 years, but now works from her home as an author and poet. She lives in London, Ontario, Canada with her husband and 4 Surprised by Oxford, Carolyn Weber provides us with a private and detailed acc of her life at Oxford University and how, eventually, she became a Christian while studying there.Her book is not the usual kind of chronological biography, but is instead an interactive story of mates and acquaintances that benefitted her life and, eventually, led her to faith in Christ—or detracted her at times. Central in the story is the man (whom she calls TDH, for tall, dark and handsome) whom she several years later marries. He is a mate and debater with her throughout her journey to faith and one in whom she finds integrity and at Oxford is intellectually stimulating, with huge doses of hedonism and post-modernism thrown in, as the reader is taken into the confines of classrooms and pubs, parties and isolated philosophical reflections. Throughout the foray, Weber provides verse by a range of poets and theologian-philosophers, including C.S. st of her “memoirs” involve creative conversations, somewhat difficult for me to imagine. For example, her interaction and exchange with Professor Von X (the title of chapter 19, but referring ot a Dr. Condorston) seems overworked and contrived. Nevertheless, his antagonism toward Christianity undoubtedly represents the attitudes of other professors at the does, however, throughout her dialogues with peers and colleagues, cover most of the familiar criticisms of Christianity in general and God in particular, with Jesus receiving his share of university antagonism as well. In a lot of chapters she is tangled with a continuing battery of doubts and confessions and her discourse about them forms the central part of her is an accomplished author and poet so, as we would expect, the book is highly readable and enticing. She weaves poetry and photos throughout the book in the method that only a lover and learner of literature can. The photos of Oxford are beguiling, where smells and sights abounding as conversations with her mates take place.I bought the book expecting to read more about the inspiration of C.S. Lewis, in that the title reflects Surprised by Joy. In that respect, I was somewhat disillusioned but, as other readers have observed, the book is “honest and entertaining” and well worth reading.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    I search that I tend to give lots of stars to memoirs, particularly those that focus on the author's growing relationship with God. Each story, in its particularity, reveals something universal. So Caro goes to Oxford to study the Romantic poets and encounters God in their writing and in believing professors and in reaction to ardent atheists, and in conversation with the Tall Dark Handsome son of an American r more memoirs like this, the title suggests Surprised by Joy (CSLewis). For some very various ones, test Sara Miles, Nadia Bolz-Weber, Rachel Held Evans, Glennon Doyle Melton, Elizabeth Esther, Susan E. Isaacs, Carol Howard Merritt. Various stories, one loving, transforming God.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    From the opening line in the preface:“The following story is based on happenings as they actually unfolded during my first year at Oxford University, the oldest surviving university in the English-speaking world. As a effect of moral delicacy and pragmatic condensation (an apt phrase, since it conveys the compression and sweat behind selection) needed of a memoir, most names have been changed, some features altered, and a few natures, at times, have been collapsed into one. But the re-created conversations, conflicts, crescendos, and conversion are, to the best of my feeble ability, real in spirit.”I’m going to give this book a possibility but I bought this thinking it was a memoir not a made-up story.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    NT Wright does it again, delivering a thoughtful and thorough treatment of heaven, hell, salvation, and the mission of the church."Surprised by Hope" is a very necessary book, as it exposes some of evangelical Christianity's largest misconceptions about some very necessary subjects. But Wright doesn't just create outlandish claims. His premises are backed up with solid exegesis and biblical support.I like the fact that Wright is not content to just wax poetic on deep spiritual truths. He has a deep desire that we not only thoroughly understand and grasp scriptural truths, but that we direct this knowledge to application. That it actually changes our actions and approach to life. And he spends the latest few chapters of the book outlining what such a change looks e book is a bit dense at times, but fairly accessible to the average Christian. Highly recommended.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    Surprised by Oxford, a memoir by Carolyn Weber, is a relatable and inspiring acc of a journey to faith. A Canadian academic, Carolyn comes to Oxford for a graduate degree in Romantic-era literature, dragging massive baggage both literal and metaphorical. She grew up poverty-stricken, with an erratic and usually absent dad, and this scholarship to Oxford is her huge break. As soon as she arrives in England, she falls in with a fresh group of friends, several of whom are Christians. Her old perceptions of Christianity as an antiquated, intellect-killing belief system are shattered by these fun, brilliant, vibrant people - especially a man she refers to as TDH (Tall, Dark, and Handsome). As the year goes on (the memoir is structured around the term calendar), Carolyn's mind and heart are further opened by discussions with mates and respected teachers. She teeters on the edge of faith, afraid to fully commit. Finally, she becomes a Christian, but of course, that's not the end of the story. Even as she finds deep joy and fulfillment in her fresh faith, she continues to struggle with the Huge Questions of life and how God fits into her private past and favorite thing about this memoir is that it doesn't pull any punches. It's raw and honest, deeply thoughtful, asks hard questions, and doesn't provide simple answers. I appreciated the emphasis that becoming a Christian has consequences and might cost you things, and relationships, that you keep dear. That's not a notice you'll hear often. At the same time, this is a private story - I enjoyed Carolyn and her friends, and to be honest, I wasn't totally hooked until I started wondering where this thing with TDH was going. :) Her descriptions of Oxford are also beautiful. I was already interested in the city and campus because of Lewis and Tolkien, but now I really wish to see it for myself!I felt that this book got bogged down by exposition at a few points. Some of the conversations were so massive and fact-laden that they seemed created up, and I even got a small bored - I was like, Who talks like this? But if anyone does, I believe these people would. My academic mates can probably back that up.Overall, I highly recommend this memoir!

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    We read this for our small book club group and attended a discussion of it at Fresh College in Franklin,TN. I'm so glad we did! It was a well-written and engaging story that walks or entices the reader through the author's struggles and delights with accepting Christianity. I enjoyed her kindness in describing her wonderfully brilliant friends, belivers and unbelievers alike. The insights into literature, history and British culture were also intriguing. It makes me wish to visit and/or send one of my children to school there. Deep theological insights, clever word-smithing, and enticing story building create for perfect reading. Thanks, Carolyn! I'm looking forward to reading another one of your books.

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    Surprised by Oxford: A Memoir []  2020-12-16 20:25

    Carolyn Weber’s Surprised by Oxford is a window into the thoughts of a progressive literature student as she considers, and then accepts, the Christian worldview. One of this book’s greatest strengths is its ability to point out one of my greatest weaknesses: my ignorance of poetry and literature. Weber begins each chapter with a snippet of poetry appropriate to the plot of her story, and allusions to classic literature are found on almost every page. I recognized the names of most of the authors, but found my knowledge of the world’s best writing to be quite pitiful. Weber tells her intimate story of arriving at Oxford as a very devout feminist man-hater to continue her education in English literature. She then meets a man who challenges every horrible male stereotype she has absorbed into her mind. He is kind, selfless, confident, protective, knowledgeable, intelligent, honest, and ..... a Christian. Weber takes her readers through her confusion as she tries to explain how this man could so boldly defy her tightly-held beliefs about “What men are like”, and “What Christians are like.” This leads her into a quest to investigate the Bible and determine if it can explain the largest questions of life. Weber gives her readers a look into the mind of an English major. She thinks about theology and spirituality very differently from a lot of others. This insight is very valuable to those of us who do not see the globe through the same lenses. On the lighter side, since this book was written by a literature student, and most of the main characters are also literature students, this book may set a fresh globe record for “Most Metaphors per page.” Congratulations, Ms. Weber.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    When people say N.T. Wright is the foremost theologian in the west and so a lot of other accolades, it’s quite off putting. I recently saw an interview, and there were no self deprecating remarks when he was exalted this method by the interviewer. It created me somewhat mad because he is the product of a Christianity that left the tracks in a lot of ways, somewhere in the first 3 centuries A.D. He's trying to obtain back but he's like a person who's method out to sea and trying to swim back--it's a long way. You need to be swept back into the first century, to start to understand what is necessary and what Jesus and his followers understood. To create the point, I’ll take a plain statement of Paul that Mr. Wright tries to create muddy. I'm not mentioning rapture, because the bible doesn't and because I think that is causing Mr. Wright to here's Paul's statement (Moffatt translation, but any would do):1Th 4:13 We would like you, brothers, to understand about those who are asleep in death. You must not grieve for them, like the rest of men who have no hope.1Th 4:14 Since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, then it follows that by means of Jesus God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep.1Th 4:15 For we tell you, as the Lord has told us, that we the living, who survive till the Lord comes, are by no means to take precedence over those who have fallen asleep.1Th 4:16 The Lord himself will descend from heaven with a loud summons, when the archangel calls and the trumpet of God sounds; the dead in Christ will rise first;1Th 4:17 then we the living, who survive, will be caught up along with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air, and so we shall be with the Lord for Mr. Wright takes easy straight statements and tries to tie them to what "he" sees as Pauls influences and reason for writing what he does. Paul only is answering what happens at the moment of Christ's return, but Mr. Wright assumes that the latest part about meeting the Lord in the air means we are whisked away from the earth to the heaven where God lives. But that is NOT what Paul said, and the disciples would have known better. What did the disciples expect, and how would they have very naturally understood these scriptures?After Jesus had been resurrected he was meeting with his disciples. They asked him a t 1:6 Now when they met, they asked him, "Lord, is this the time you are going to restore the Kingdom to Israel?"Act 1:7 But he told them, "It is not for you to know the course and periods of time that the Father has fixed by his own tice what they knew and expected: Jesus was born messiah-- to be a king and to rule from Jerusalem over the restored Kingdom of Israel. Jesus didn't correct them or contradict them in any way. He just said the Father had reserved that moment, and not allow it be known. The point is that when Jesus returns, he will come back to Jerusalem, his feet touching on the Mount of Olives. This is clear from what happened 2 verses later:Act 1:9 When he had said these things, as they were looking, he was taken up, and a cloud received him out of their t 1:10 While they were looking steadfastly into the sky as he went, behold, two men stood by them in white clothing,Act 1:11 who also said, “You men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into the sky? This Jesus, who was received up from you into the sky, will come back in the same method as you saw him going into the sky.” (Other translations use "clouds".)So Pauls statement in Thessalonians meshes perfectly. He leaves in the clouds and returns in the clouds. But he is not alone when he returns.Jude 1:14 It was also about these that Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied, saying, “Behold, the Lord comes with ten thousands of his holy ones,When He comes those who have served him (hopefully you and I) will be with him. So Paul is answering the question, what about the saints who have died? He tells them straight and plain that the dead saints will be resurrected first of all, to meet the Lord in the air. And then those believers who are alive will be changed: Paul writes: 1Co 15:51 Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed,“1Co 15:52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the latest trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed.1Co 15:53 For this perishable body must place on the imperishable, and this mortal body must place on immortality. “--and all the saints will rise to meet him. And where do they meet him? In the clouds! Not heaven, as in God's heaven, but the physical atmosphere above the earth. So Paul is explaining the moment in the process of Jesus return where the saints do go meet him in the air.And N.T. Wright is correct here in part: they will accompany him back. Back to what? Back to rule. Where is that rule? In Jerusalem! Where do they go after meeting the Lord in the air? Back to Jerusalem and down to the Mount of Olives as the angels told the disciples after he ascended!Then the reign of Christ and his Church will begin. And by the way, they are the Kingdom of Israel, believing gentiles grafted into the tree of Jacob and Jews who believed and were never broken off, or were re-grafted after unbelief. God’s plan for the earth will be completed with Israel led by her Messiah, King and the first question the disciples asked will happen at last, because at that time Jesus will restore the Kingdom to Israel and all of the prophecies about Messiahs reign in all the Prophets will at latest be fulfilled. Mr Wright is "right" when he says we are to deal with the earth. Paul says the saints will judge or manage angels! Remember the parable of the talents where those who bear fruit are given rule over cities? You as a Christian have a large future in the fully restored Kingdom of God on earth.Our lives are in preparation for that; what unbelievable news, and, as Mr. Wright says eventually, the Holy Town will descend with a fresh heavens and fresh Mr. Wright gets some right, some wrong and a lot of speculative items in the middle. Overall, I believe first century Christians would have found his calls to political action to be strange. Rome had large injustice everywhere, but neither Jesus nor his disciples were involved on a political level with resisting it. Christians in China now are trying to live peaceably with a government that is clearly evil, just like in Rome. If they go and test to obtain active politically, they will lose their freedom to meet (what small they have), and be unable to live peaceably and serve tan would like nothing better than to have Christianity in China seen as a political subversive group there. It has grown tremendously and they are threatened in the government. The government needs to know that Christians are commanded to be amazing citizens. They are too busy fighting their own natures and Satan be subversive. They war on their knees. Paul said to submit to authorities, amazing and bad. Christianity is not of this world; Jesus Kingdom is not of this world. But the fullness of it is coming TO this world. That is our hope as we live Godly lives in the light of day.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    If you are serious about your faith, in my opinion, there is no one on the planet who is a better resource to provide you solid interpretations of the Bible and biblical history. I am on my 4th NT Wright book now and they are incredible. Allow me add, be careful what you choose to bite into first. This book is very reasonable and with an average background in this area, you will leave with info I have found no where else. The explanations are at a level that I understand and it leaves me looking for my Bible to read and finally understand, to a greater degree. But, there are volumes of Wright's work available which will leave your head spinning for hours. He holds nothing back, if you wish to learn, learn from NT Wright. I cannot say enough about him, absolutely an wonderful resource. This book will clear up what the Resurrection of Jesus is and what it means to us. Also look for his youtube videos, amazing!

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    I don’t read an poor lot of Christian books. Most of the famous ones seem to be focused on either apologetics or how one is to live properly within the Christian camp. This book by Church of England Bi N.T. Wright is much various from the norm of what most readers are familiar. For starters, this guy is deep. This guy is well educated. This guy reminds you of one of those stuffy Oxford-like professors that’s very high in the ‘knowledge’ department, but doesn’t always speak simplistically enough for the layman. This is not a book that one can read over a weekend. Such characteristics can be seen as a drawback, but in most cases, I found his prose to be a welcome change of pace. If you’re a fan of someone such as C.S. Lewis, I would imagine you would be able to have fun this author’s writing style as e topic of this book focuses on the misunderstanding that centers around a lot of western churches when discussing the eternal destination of the Christian. According to Wright, the common misconception is that we will dwell in heaven forever. Instead, Wright argues, Heaven is only a temporary resting spot, and one day in the future, all Christians past and show will again live on the earth under Jesus’ e main drawback for this book is that Wright seems to wish to overly convince his readers of this fact. He states scripture after scripture, hymn after hymn, story after story, to prove his point. It’s a bit much. I think the reason that such confusion exists is because, for most people, the debate of “where” we will be is not that significant. Instead, most people when discussing eschatology are more concerned with “how”. As long as we’re in a put “like” heaven, we don’t seem to mind exactly where we’ll unpack our suitcase for Wright makes his arguments, he seems more driven towards left-brain thinking than right-brained thinking. He doesn’t spend too much time talking about what this fresh globe will be like and what everyone will experience. He assures us that even though we will all be working and have some sort of job in God’s kingdom, all souls will, in fact, relish the experience. When it comes to such matters that are somewhat mysterious, the author doesn’t claim to offer massive handed explanations based on what he might feel. If he doesn’t know, he doesn’t know, and has no problem at all stating this in the e huge challenge that he gives Christians is that if we are to one day live in this globe with Jesus as our king, we must take care of the globe as it is now. We must “get it ready” for the glory of God. I think this is where his true struggle is with a lot of Western thinking. Too often, a lot of Christians today have “End Times” syndrome. They’re so convinced that Jesus will rapture the saints at any moment, that they don’t seem to care about things such as acid rain or global warming. After all, this is only our temporary home, right? This is what the author is trying so hard to dispel. Being a Christian, he says, involves a lot of ‘doing’ in addition to ’s quite interesting (although a lot of would search it insulting) when the author finds faults in a lot of practices that Western (particularly U.S.) churches engage in every Sunday. He’s not a fan of “check off the box” salvation, and he clearly doesn’t believe in such widely held beliefs as the rapture of the church. I’m not one with a degree in theology, so I can’t challenge him on such sentiments, but he seems think that as a body, Christians definitely need to be doing more both within their church and community, and within the globe itself.He doesn’t spend very much time talking about “who gets to inherit the Kingdom of Heaven”. He states that he’s clearly not a Universalist (although he confesses that such a concept might not be completely foreign to God), and the main reason behind this thinking is the wickedness that some people possess. I confess I would have liked to have him expound on this a bit more. He makes references to such obvious atrocities such as Nazism and slavery, but where exactly does he draw the line? Aren’t all evil without the blood of Jesus? Then, some of his “evils” that he describes didn’t create a whole lot of sense to me. He quickly mentions “Hiroshima” for example. Hiroshima? What exactly is “evil” about this? I’m assuming he’s referring to the atom bomb, and yes, this was truly a very evil event, but who was ultimately responsible? Some would argue Harry Truman, but others would say it was the mayhems of Japan and their treatment of American POWs that actually caused the unfortunate event. So his failure to go into more depth left me a bit disappointed.I still felt this was an perfect book. If anything, it causes one to rethink and reevaluate such predispositions that a lot of Christians have had, say, forever. Such debate is healthy, I believe. Although he doesn’t argue that one must “work” towards salvation (at least that wasn’t the impression that I got), he does plainly say that once one is saved, the converted heart should wish to work for God’s glory – both in this life and the next.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    This book is a well-reasoned, new approach to understanding the impact of the resurrection of Christ on our collaborative work to serve our globe in our callings at work, home and community service. The book addresses the vital notice of the gospel that brings spiritual and social transformation. N.T. Wright's depth of historical research in understanding the Jewish, Greek, and Roman first century cultures brings new insights that peal away the layers of cultural overlays that have colourful our interpretations and hindered the effective work of Christians to believe the notice and apply it in our own day to as we faithfully deal critical social issues. At the core of the book is a renewed emphasis on understanding the uniqueness of Christ's resurrection at the first fruits of what will one day happen at the second amazing resurrection. His insights contain a renewed emphasis on a Christian view of ecology, a powerful point of view regarding what happens at death, a reaffirmation of a bodily resurrection, the assertion of a unified body and soul, and a fresh understanding of the relation of heaven and earth. This is one of my favorite books that I have read in the past 5 years.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    While I took my time reading this book, off and on for almost a year, there was amazing reason for it. N.T. Wright gives you the opportunity to take a deep look at the cross and the power of the resurrection and how we as Christians should be reflecting this amazing news to the world. I always knew that there was hope in Christ's resurrection, but I never thought of it through the lens of current responsibility as a Christian. I am filled with hope after reading this book and I recommend every Christian to take the time to read it and to thoughtfully ponder what N.T. Wright is teaching us.

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    Thanks

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    He has the most awesome voice.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    In Surprised by Hope N. T. Wright makes a convincing case on why Easter should be celebrated more than Christmas. While the incarnation gives us amazing joy, the resurrection, Wright contends, brings us wonderful hope.Wright rightly states, “Take Christmas away, and in biblical terms you lose two chapters at the front of Matthew and Luke, nothing else. Take Easter away, and you don’t have a Fresh Testament; you don’t have a Christianity; as Paul says, you are still in your sins.” (256-257).The book sets out to respond what is the ultimate Christian hope and what hope is there for true change and transformation within the globe in the present.Wright spends a amazing deal of the book sharing his view that heaven is not some put where our souls will live for eternity in a disembodied state but that Christians will live in a resurrected physical body reigning with Christ on the fresh heavens and the fresh earth. In several passages in the book (148,169) Wright refers to the resurrection as “life after life after death.” He also makes the very provocative claim that, “The ultimate destination is (once more) not ‘going to heaven when you die’ but being bodily raised into the transformed, glorious likeness of Jesus Christ.” (168)The subtitle of the book, Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church, is not a call for a fresh method of looking at these concepts but a plea to look at these themes as the first century church viewed them.Going to heaven when we die needs to be understood as the first scene of a two-stage process. Wright believes that the second scene is far more necessary – living in a physical resurrected body in a newly remade e resurrection represents far more than a one-time miracle to Wright. He sees this as the sign of an entirely fresh beginning – the first of a lot of more saints being raised to newness of ly Wright believes that with this proper understanding of heaven and the resurrection the real mission of the church can be carried out in our show time – to not just save souls but to support to transform our globe to reflect the glory of God.While Wright gives convincing arguments that support us to see that we need to orient all of our theology around the resurrection of Christ he seems to go off on tangents into locations that I have a hard time agreeing r example it seems like Wright advocates praying for the dead. He shares on page (172), “Once we rule out purgatory, I see no reason why we should not pray for and with the dead and every reason why we should-not that they will obtain out of purgatory but that they will be refreshed and filled with God’s joy and peace.” I see no warrant for this in Scripture.On page (177) Wright states that, “Jesus simply didn’t say very much about the future life.” This statement flies in the face of the a lot of times that Jesus talked about hell in the Fresh Testament. I am not sure how Wright can create this claim.Wright’s theory on hell also seems unscriptural. He says on page (182) that, “beings that once were human but now are not.” To Wright sinners that don’t repent are banished to exist forever in an ex-human state. What this means is totally unclear but it seems to lead one to believe that these lost souls will not have to endure the eternal suffering that the Bible clearly indicates lost sinners will experience in ly while Wright makes a lot of thought provoking points surrounding the resurrection and heaven the book is rather redundant at times and is a small too massive on the social gospel and a small too light on the all-important zone of saving souls.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    Wright really hits the ball out of the park in this book. I found it to be a delightful read. I've never seen a better apologetic treatment on the historicity of the resurrection of Christ. He really dismantles John Dominick Crossan and the Jesus Seminar. Wright shows masterfully the implications of Jesus resurrection from a historical context, and what it means for the church in our life, preaching, mission, and our future.Where he misses it, which almost caused me to give him 3 stars, are in a couple locations that I was very surprised to stumble across. Wright doesn't believe that Jesus ever taught about his own 2nd advent. His reasoning is that in the historical context, the disciples couldn't have understood such talk about a second coming, because they couldn't even understand he was going to die and resurrect in the first place, so Jesus wouldn't have taught them this, in spite of Matthew 24-25 clearly being about such. Wright affirms the doctrine of the 2nd coming is clearly taught elsewhere in the Bible, but just not by Jesus prior to his death and resurrection. His logic about the historical context is flawed. Jesus regularly taught things his disciples didn't understand... Like his death and resurrection... But that didn't hold him from teaching it anyway.Wright so clearly teaches about the implications of the resurrection of the dead like few I've ever heard before him. But he strikes out huge when it comes to the eternal fate of the wicked in the resurrection. He says he's no universalists, and he doesn't believe those in hell will ever escape their judgment, but he ever so "humbly" says he isn't quite sure what to do with the doctrine of hell, and admits there could be more grace than he realizes. He leans towards the traditional view of hell being a put of conscious eternal torment, but then backs away. He doesn't commit to any position. In my opinion, Wright is being cowardly. He's too amazing of a bible student not to have developed and committed to a position on this topic. He mocks His American audience (the people primarily reading his books!) for being too fixated on the doctrine of hell, to which he doesn't understand.His vague theology of hell, in my opinion, undermines the thrust of his book and it's implications for the gospel. While he believes in regeneration and the fresh life Christ came to bring all who place their trust in Him by faith, he seems to downplay this key biblical doctrine. Wright isn't very huge on "saving souls" and spends more time talking about we as the church finally finding a proper theological foundation to engage in social justice and Eco friendly missions. He's so caught up in the broader mission of the implications and eschatological hope of Romans 8 and God's redemption of all creation and the creation of a fresh earth, that that he almost glosses over the idea that there are people who are going to be resurrected and forever tormented in hell. Had Wright established a clear theology of hell, he might see the gospel having far weightier implications for the individual in their private salvation and relationship with God. Instead he only briefly acknowledges these truths, but sorta stumbles over them in the spite these major flaws in Wrights theology, I still give this book 4 stars instead of 3. What he has to say about Jesus and his resurrection, and our bodily resurrection versus the idea of us all going to heaven forever in some disembodied Platonic soulish state, is simply outstanding. These subjects are the basic thrust of the book, and are very brilliantly stated.

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    Amazing sound

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    I interviewed his son just recently on my Blog talk radio. My dad was a musician and DJ, Lou Rawls is the TOP male vocal artist that set the tone here in Chicago as well as in the Melody industry.

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    Cannot go wrong with Lou Rawls. His voice and sound is one of a kind and missed. Something no one will ever replace.

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    amazing to add to collection

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    Attractive voice and song. Brings back high school memories for me.

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    An all time favorite!

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    AAA

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    Lady Love []  2021-3-12 20:22

    Solid Romantic Melody from a Bass Voice!

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    Surprised by Paradox by Jen Pollock Michel is quite an interesting book. The book was so good. It brought up a lot of various things that caused me to think through a lot of things. I really enjoyed the first chapter a lot. It’s hard to boil down the amazing parts of this book. I highly suggest reading it. There are so a lot of various paradoxes that Jen brings up throughout this book. If I were to tell you one paradox in this whole book that really was enjoyable is the Amazing I And."The incarnation is God's burning bush: a mystery demanding a closer look" (24)- this is a really interesting idea. Not something that I would have ever thought about. It makes sense though with the knowledge that Moses did go up to the burning bush to check it out. I would say the incarnation is something that causes me to see the paradox of "The Amazing I And". The use of Psalm 19 in this chapter was done really well. I think that it is used well because it shows evidence for the incarnation of God being a burning bush.I really appreciated and enjoyed the lines “In the incarnation, God embraced contradiction in his own being and sustained tension in his own flesh. The incarnation suggests to God’s people the holy possibilities of and, this small word that rests at the bottom of every paradox” (28). The paradox of Jesus being fully God and fully man as he became incarnate to walk with humanity is both a contradiction and tension.I highly recommend this book and I am so thankful for the opportunity to have had the opportunity to be a part of this book begin team. The theology of paradox is complex and not very simple to understand. It is not something that I am afraid of but something that I really wish to dive into further. There are so a lot of various paradoxes throughout the scriptures.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    We required Patrick Madrid's book back in the 1970s!!!!!!!This book was 10 times easier to understand (and fun to read) for a novice like me. Karl Keating's book Catholicism and Fundamentalism was a struggle for me to understand.Our country's Catholic schools failed us in the 1970s here in the midwest and this book required to exist back in the day!

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    A mate of the family gave my husband this book as a gift. He is a fresh convert. I was the one who ended up reading it. I was so impressed by how the Bible was used doent it’s arguments that I actually bought a couple to send to a “doubting Thomas” hoping it will bring him back to the faith.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    Nicholas Thomas Wright (born 1948) is an Anglican bi (Bi of Durham from 2003-2010), and is currently Research Professor at St Mary's College in Scotland; he has written a lot of other books such as The Fresh Testament and the People of God Vol. 1,Jesus and the Win of God Vol. 2,The Resurrection of the Son of God Vol. 3,Who Was Jesus?,The Original Jesus,The Contemporary Quest for Jesus, etc.He wrote in the Preface to this 2008 book, “At the first level, the book is obviously about death and about what can be said from a Christian perspective about what lies beyond it… I approach the question as a biblical theologian, drawing on other disciplines but hoping to supply what they usually lack with what I believe the church needs to recapture: the classic Christian respond to the question of death and beyond, which these days is not so much disbelieved … as simply now known… At the second level, then, the book is about the groundwork of practical and even political theology---of, that is, Christian reflection on the nature of the task we face as we seek to bring God’s kingdom to bear on the true and painful globe in which we live.” (Pg. xi-xiii)In the first chapter, he outlines, “This book addresses two questions that have often been dealt with entirely separately but that, I passionately believe, belong tightly together. First, what is the ultimate Christian hope? Second, what hope is there for change, rescue, transformation, fresh possibilities within the globe in the present? And the main respond can be place like this. As long as we see Christian hope in terms of ‘going to heaven,’ of a salvation that is essentially AWAY from this world, the two questions are bound to appear as unrelated… But if the Christian hope is for God’s fresh creation, for ‘new heavens and fresh earth,’ and if that hope has already come to life in Jesus of Nazareth, then there is every reason to join the two questions together. And if that is so, we search that answering the one is also answering the other.” (Pg. 5)He observes, “the robust Jewish and Christian doctrine of the resurrection… gives more value, not less, to the show globe and to our show bodies… The classic Christian doctrine, therefore, is actually far more strong and revolutionary than the Platonic one… A piety that sees death as the moment of ‘going home at last’ … has no quarrel with power-mongers who wish to carve up the globe to suit their own ends. Resurrection, by contrast, has always gone with a powerful view of God’s justice and of God as the amazing creator. Those twin beliefs give rise not to a meek acquiescence to injustice in the globe but to a robust determination to oppose it.” (Pg. 26-27)He points out, “much Christian and sub-Christian tradition has assumed that we all do indeed have souls that need saving and that the soul, if saved, will be the part of us that goes to heaven when we die. All this, however, finds minimal help in the Fresh Testament, including the teaching of Jesus, where the word ‘soul’ … reflects not to a disembodied entity… but rather to what we would call the whole person or personality… the idea that every human possesses and immortal soul, which is the ‘real’ part of them, finds small help in the Bible.” (Pg. 28)He strongly rejects “the revisionist position on Jesus’s resurrection… that the earliest Christians believed that Jesus after his death had been exalted to heaven or that they had a strange sense that his mission… we now going ahead in a fresh method and that this kind of belief allow them to say he’d been raised from the dead…We all can have visions. Plenty of people dream about recently dead friends… That doesn’t mean they’ve been raised from the dead… this [revisionist] solution isn’t just incredible, it’s impossible… A small bit of disciplined historical imagination is all it takes to blow away enormous piles of so-called historical criticism.” (Pg. 48-50)He observes, “the resurrection narratives in the gospels never, ever say anything like, ‘Jesus is raised, therefore we shall go to heaven when we die.’ … No. Insofar as the happening is interpreted, Easter has a very this-worldly, present-age meaning: Jesus is raised, so he is the Messiah, and therefore he is the world’s real Lord… so we must act as his heralds, announcing his lordship to the entire world, making his kingdom come on earth as in heaven!” (Pg. 56) He concludes, “Jesus’s tomb really was empty… the disciples really did encounter him in ways that convinced them that he was not simply a ghost or hallucination.” (Pg. 58)He suggests that in 1 Corinthians 15, “Paul is clearly articulating a theology of a NEW CREATION. Every force, every authority in the whole cosmos, will be subjected to the Messiah, and finally death itself will give up its power… Death as we now know it is the latest enemy, not a amazing part of the amazing creation; and therefore death must be defeated if the life-giving God is to be honored as the real lord of the world. When this has happened… Jesus the Messiah… will hand over the rule of the kingdom to his father, and God will be all in all.” (Pg. 99-100)He states, “The word ‘eschatology’ … doesn’t just refer to death, judgment, heaven and hell, as used to be thought… It also refers to the strongly held belief of … virtually all early Christians, that history was going somewhere under the guidance of God and that where it was going was toward God’s fresh globe of justice, healing, and hope. The transition from the show globe to the fresh one would be a matter not of the destruction of the show space-time universe but of its radical healing.” (Pg. 122)He argues, “People often assume that the early church used ‘parousia’ simply to mean ‘the second coming of Jesus’ and that by this even they all envisaged, in a quite literal fashion, the scenario of 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17 (Jesus coming down on a cloud and people flying upward to meet him). Neither of these assumptions is in fact correct… Now suppose that Paul…wanted to say two things… first, that the Jesus they worshipped was near in spirit but absent in body but that one day he would be show in body and that the whole world, themselves included, would know the sudden transforming power of that presence. A natural word to use for this would be ‘parousia.’ At the same time, supposed they wanted to say that the Jesus who had been raised from the dead … was the rightful Lord of the world… so the absent but ruling Lord of the globe would one day appear and rule in person within this world… Again, the natural word to use for this would be ‘parousia.’” (Pg. 128-129)He asserts, “People who believe that Jesus is already Lord and that he will appear again as judge of the globe are called equipped… to think and act quite differently in the globe from those who don’t.” (Pg. 144)He notes, “My proposition is that the traditional picture of people going to either heaven or hell in a one-stage postmortem journey… represents a serious distortion and diminution of the Christian hope. Bodily resurrection is not just one odd bit of that hope. It is the element that gives shape and meaning to the rest of the story we tell about god’s ultimate purposes.” (Pg. 148) He adds, “Resurrection … was a method of talking about a fresh bodily life AFTER whatever state of existence one might enter immediately upon death. It was, in other words, life AFTER life after death.” (Pg. 151) Later, he reiterates, “The ultimate destination is (once more) NOT ‘going to heaven when you die’ but being bodily raised into the transformed, glorious likeness of Jesus Christ.” (Pg. 168)He contends, “The word ‘immortality’ is often used to mean ‘DISEMBODIED immortality,’ and it is sometimes used in a sharp contrast with resurrection. As a result, we easily forget Paul’s point about the resurrection body. It will be a body, but it will not be topic to mortality… There is a globe of difference between this belief and a belief in an ‘immortal soul.’ … In the Fresh Testament, however, immortality is something that only God possesses by nature and that he then shares, as a bonus of grace rather than an innate possession, with his people.” (Pg. 160-161)He explains, “I do not believe in a purgatory as a place, a time, or a state… In fact, Paul makes it clear… that it’s the show life that is meant to function as a purgatory. The sufferings of the show time, not of some postmortem state, are the valley through which we have to pass in order to reach the glorious future… The myth of purgatory is an allegory, a projection from the show onto the future. This is why purgatory appeals to the imagination.” (Pg. 170-171) However, “Since both the departed saints and we ourselves are in Christ, we share with them in the ‘communion of saints.’ They are still our brothers and sisters in Christ… Why then should we not pray for and with them?” (Pg. 172)Of the final judgement, he says, “I search it quite impossible… to suppose that there will be no ultimate condemnation, no final loss, no human beings to whom, as C.S. Lewis place it, God will eventually say, ‘THY will be done.’ I [email protected]#$%! were otherwise…” (Pg. 180) He continues, “My suggestion is that it is possible for human beings so to continue down this road, so to refuse all whisperings of amazing news, all glimmers of the real light, all promptings to turn and go the other way… that after death they become at last, by their own effective choice, beings that ONCE WERE HUMAN BUT NOW ARE NOT, monsters that have ceased to bear the divine photo at all. With the death of that body… they pass simultaneously not only beyond hope but beyond pity. There is no concentration camp … not torture chamber in the palace of delight. Those monsters that still exist in an ex-human state, no longer reflecting their maker in any meaningful sense, can no longer excite in themselves or others the natural sympathy some feel even for the hardened criminal.” (Pg. 182-183)He argues, “As long as we see salvation in terms of going to heaven when we die, the main work of the church is bound to be seen in terms of saving souls for that future. But when we see salvation… in terms of God’s promised fresh heavens and fresh earth and of our promised resurrection to share in that fresh and gloriously embodied reality… then the main work of the church here and now demands to be rethought in consequence.” (Pg. 196-197)The latest part of the book goes into political implications. (E.g., “the major task that faces us in our generation… is that of the heavy economic imbalance of the world”; pg. 216)Wright’s ruminations will be of keen interest to anyone studying such ‘eschatological’ matters.

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    Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church []  2020-7-13 19:59

    This was my first N.T. Wright book, and, geeze, was it a workout to obtain through. His writing is awesome but dense. His truths are glorious, but his style is a slow march through deep theology. I have to say I connect much more with C.S. Lewis’ books (Mere Christianity for instance) or even Dallas Willard’s books (ex. The Divine Conspiracy) when it comes to massive theology. Or maybe my brain just has a hard time digesting true dense theology these days. In all, glad I was able to read this book though. Like I said, awesome writing, just dense.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    I feel now that if confronted with questions from non-Catholics, I have some ammunition to let myself to be engaged in a discussion (with the support of the Holy Spirit of course), and not be so afraid.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    Everyone should read this series of private testimonies. It will change your life!! Patrick Madrid is brilliant when it comes to finding people whose life have been transformed by finding the Truth.

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    In our current cultural moment, the idea of holding two ideas in tension feels like a lost art. Tribalism demands that we choose and defend one option in an either/or statement. We often prefer to distill complex ideas into over-simplified statements leaving small room for nuance, listening, or the both/and of paradox. Author Jen Pollock Michel has long been a favorite of mine because her writing shows how real orthodoxy embraces these tensions. Jen doesn’t just generate thoughtful, articulate arguments, though. She showcases them as a master storyteller who uses words as 216 well-crafted pages, Jen examines the Biblical paradoxes of the incarnation, the Kingdom of God, grace, and lament. It is the best book I've read in the latest few years because it tackles each of these tricky subjects with the richness and humility they deserve. Though each section is incredibly rich, the section on lament is worth the cost of admission alone. Here is a favorite quote from that section.“When Christians lament, they also rehearse a story: the story of God's breakable body and the power that place it back together again...If God's body broke, the resurrection stakes this bold claim: lament will have no latest word. Brokenness is a middle act, not a final scene...”“God did not simply author the songs of lament: he sang them...God's own lamenting God's own suffering has proved that he does not remain indifferent to the anguish of the world, turning the dial for happier news than geopolitical crisis, natural disaster, local violence...God has practiced the truest form of compassion--suffering with...And even if the cross does not place to rest all the questions we have for the troubles we face, it assures us that God is fit to comfort. Like Job, we may not be able to create fundamental meaning of our suffering today: abuse, rape, the loss of a child, widowhood, terminal illness. Although we can confidently believe that God works all things according to the counsel of his will...although we can look expectantly forward, as Jesus did, beyond affliction to the joy set before us...
life can still deeply hurt. Faith is not the same thing as stoicism...But God, merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love, chose a various method to keep the laments of the world. Not dispassion and distance. Not practiced acceptance of dissolution and all things perishing. Instead tears and even outrage...Lament tells us there are complaints worth raising, and God's suffering assures that someone hears."

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    Jen Pollock Michel is one of the most thoughtful, astute Christian thinkers and writers I know, and this, her third book, shows why. If you've sometimes scratched your head at the inconsistencies you seem to search in scripture, if you've had questions or even doubts about God, if you lament about the suffering all around you . . . you need to read this book. Jen isn't afraid to think deeply about the mysteries in Scripture (of which there are many), and in this book she shares some of what she's learned. But she doesn't test to respond all the questions. Instead, she sits comfortably in the tension Paul found in the "profound mystery" of Christ (Eph. 5:32), trusting God with the answers.

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    With so a lot of walking away from their Christian faith, we need wise and winsome voices to write about truth for a grown-up faith. We don't need more info -- we need theologically robust writers like Jen Pollock Michel who can capture the grand arc of scripture with complexity, relevance, and empathy. Looking at four themes in scripture -- incarnation, grace, kingdom and lament -- Michel helps us to see how paradox is at the root of a mature faith. If you're tempted to slide into black and white answers or you're finding faith to be a list of rules, this book will invigorate your faith, reignite wonder, and support us all learn to love one another and Jesus better. Highly recommend.

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    I was given a copy of this book to read before the release date. This book knocked my socks off. I never thought about paradox and Christ in the same sentence. At the end of each chapter are questions that create you rethink the mysteries of Christ. I never saw Bible happenings this method before. Questions create this a amazing Bible study. This is definitely a reread book.1 like

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    An exploration of the paradoxes intrinsic to Christian faith requires both a firm grasp of truth and begin embrace of tension. Jen Pollock Michel delivers a beautiful, compelling case for followers of Christ to ponder how and why His ways transcend our polarized perceptions. In mining Scripture for these seeming inconsistencies, Jen unearths the treasury of two adjoining realities created possible only through Christ – who is God and man, the Word created radox in the Bible has always fascinated me, though I've wondered why few Christian authors have addressed it, allow alone mentioned its existence. To some, acknowledging mystery might represent compromise. Jen and I don't see it that way. On the contrary, paradox confirms the truth that God is wholly unlike us. He who reigns over the whole Earth hides His kingdom in a field, and sends salvation in a excellent Son who dies to save unrighteous n's observations are provocative, rich, and engaging. I hope others will read this book and be as challenged and intrigued as I was. What grace that God allows us to marvel at His glorious mystery.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    I read this book in no time and bought more to hand out to " Evangelise ". It's eleven 20 page stories by various converts and how they journyed home to the Catholic church. Hard to place down.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    Some of the best conversion stories around are included in this book. These men and women were some of the best and brightest Protestant apologists and ministers until they came to realize that despite their real aversion for and hatred of the Catholic Church, Roman Catholicism is the real Church, started by Jesus and taught by the apostles and earliest Church fathers.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    Words cannot express the emotion you feel when reading these two books 1 and 2. As a Catholic trying to explain to my fiancé of another faith - just trying to respond his questions was beyond difficult, I felt like I was under attack because he memorized the bible, the bible doesn't even mention ANY where sola scriptura - bible alone, it is tradition and the unbelievable bible. Until I read these two books. I am a cradle Catholic (born into my faith not a convert) and I have to admit I took so a lot of things for granted! I saw through the eyes of these converts the most attractive religion in the globe (MINE) and the only one traced all the method back to Jesus when He created Peter the first Pope. Thank God for my faith!

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    I love Patrick Madrid and I am a loyal listener ad relevant radio enthusiast. It is a amazing testimonial book on people who have changed religion and found God in the Catholic Faith. Thank you Patrick... I will be getting the other parts, 2 & 3 as soon as I finish this one. Very excited. A must have book!

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    I’ve been a follower of Jesus for a long time, but I didn’t realize how much I just accepted the things that were told to me. In the latest couple of years I’ve been asking more questions, and it hasn’t shaken my faith; it’s expanded it. Jen Pollock Michel is not afraid to ask questions either. “What if?” Is not a poor question. Searching the Scriptures will present us just how much is unknown, but still attractive and faith-filled. I’m so thankful for this book! I’ve shared passages with my college-age son, and I believe that seeing that it’s OK to wonder will only deepen his faith.

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    In Jen Pollock Michel's third book, we see this author pulling on themes she explored in her first two books, but this time from a posture of wonder, awe, and mystery. She doesn't write about paradox from "the other side," as someone who used to be confused about how two seemingly opposite problems could coexist ... but now she's the expert who understands. Instead, Michel takes readers by the hand and walks them through a globe where paradox is everywhere, into a faith that seems to thrive on paradox, and toward a God who saved the globe through the paradox of his Son Jesus. This book asks more questions than it offers answers, diving into subjects like suffering and grace and even our role in a kingdom built by God. Fans of Michel's earlier books will search another feast here, and those fresh to her work will search this a welcome introduction.

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    If I quoted all my favorite passages from Surprised by Paradox, the effect would be another book. With theologically sound thinking written with perfectly chosen words and poetic phrases, Jen Pollock Michel invites us on her journey of wondering as she examines the paradoxes and mysteries in the Christian faith. With amazing vulnerability, she shares both her own story and God’s story, taking readers through the major of happenings of Christ’s life. Along the way, we stop and view with awe a lot of of the paradoxes and mysteries in Scripture: Death and resurrection. A spiritual life that is body and material. God’s severity and His love. Grieving hope. Jew and Gentile. Give and enjoy. Jesus with us/Jesus absent. A spiritual life meant for Sunday—and the other six days.I especially loved the Annunciation chapter which follows the meal in Scripture, emphasizing how the life of faith is both bodily and spiritual: God feeds hungry people. The fall from grace involved food. God’s goodness has taste and smell. God’s generous bonus of meal needs to be received with thanksgiving. In Joel, God takes away meal because of the people’s idolatrous betrayal. Jesus becomes the bread of life, his blood the wine. We are reminded our future with him “is promised as a feast.”Ultimately, the author wants us to know mystery brings us to wonder and worship—and ultimately to our knees with humility. This is a book I wish to give to all my mates and family.

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    Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of "And" in an Either-Or World []  2020-7-4 18:53

    With the wisdom of a theologian and the skill of a master storyteller, Pollock Michel weaves together the "and" stories of Scripture. From the incarnation to lament, from the sinner/saint paradox to the joy and suffering of Jesus, this book will stand the try of r churches and individuals wishing to study it, there are tutorials at the end of every section with discussion is will be a stalwart in my library, and I look forward to rereading it and referencing it in the years to come.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    I'm a protestant, and this book gave me a lot of meal for thought. It asks valuable questions and traces strong testimonies as God calls people from all walks to faith.

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    Surprised By Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic []  2020-9-20 19:47

    Amazing book for apologetics!

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Awesome life changing book

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    One could say there's not much fresh in this book. But more important, a lot is left out. Left out are cultural preferences that influenced what Christian hope should look like. Left out are general shallow conclusions that not cover half of the truth. Left out are remarks that should please one or another theological what do we have? A easy acc of what Christian hope looks like when listening to the biblical witness on the subject. After laying a solid theological foundation Wright does well in applying these principals in eat book, simple to read yet profound, refreshing and stimulating.

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    I chose this rating because there are few books that deal fully with the topic of hope. We live in an age that has no hope after death and Tom Wright catches the reader up in the surprise that is really ours as people of faith in the Man Jesus.

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Excellent

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    I really enjoyed this book. N.T. Wright has written an insightful and theologically deep book which was very simple to read. Having read this book and Love Wins by Rob Bell Surprised by Hope is a superior exploration of life and life after death.Have a read, it will challange and intrigue you.

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Surprising

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    This is an awesome book on why we as Christians should have hope and why we might be surprised by it!!!!

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    The book is written for a lay person like offers wisedom for e author does not say this is the absolute method heaven is but rather provokes the reader to consider that heaven may be closer than we have ever 's worth a second read after pondering it the first time around.I do recommend Surprised by Hope.

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Always have fun NTW's method of writing and making me think. He has opened up fresh insights into the Lord and His ways for me...

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    Surprised by Hope: Original, Provocative and Practical []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Thanks.

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    The Lady in the Palazzo: An Umbrian Love Story []  2020-6-29 19:19

    Did I fall in love with Umbria? No matter, I fell in love with the story told by Marlena di Blasio. Maybe she doesn't end a sentence and start a fresh one in the appropriate method as another reviewer has suggested, maybe she doesn't give enough travel information or tell the story that you had in mind as others have complained. She's a story-teller, she tells it her own marvelous, unique, and captivating way. She's a gypsy in her heart and she digs into life with gusto. Read her and be inspired.

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    The Lady in the Palazzo: An Umbrian Love Story []  2020-6-29 19:19

    This book is a beautifully and masterfully written memoir about living in Umbria. Any Italophile will relish this book and delight in its sensory indulgences.

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    The Lady in the Palazzo: An Umbrian Love Story []  2020-6-29 19:19

    There are a number of unbelievable things about De Blasi's book and one somewhat irritating aspect. I'll slay off the irritating one first. For some reason, she uses a mechanism that works in speech but, for my taste, fails in writing. She ends a sentence and then finishes the thought in the next sentence without using a connecting word or phrase. An example: "Like the ladies up in Buon Respiro, we forage, too. For wild asparagus...or pirates beard...or the silky transparent cress..." At times, I found myself falling out of the enchantment of the writing as my brain searched for the connector. Shaking my head in irritation. (I'm sorry. Couldn't support it...)Otherwise, this is a attractive book. I was expecting another thin offering written by an enthusiastic ex-pat with marginal writing skills and was pleasantly surprised to obtain pulled into a skillfully crafted narrative. In short, the author and her husband find for a home in Umbria and search it, but the struggle to create it their own is long one. Along the method they bring together a set of people from various classes of Umbrian society and ply them with food, color, and music. Also, along the way, the author did just what a amazing author should—she created me wish to be Blasi is a first class observer of people and her descriptions of them are rich and earthy. She, herself, comes across as mildly eccentric and satisfied about it. She is willing to reveal some of her own private insecurities, but does not dwell on them, which i found to be an endearing trait. As the work progresses, she introduces other mild eccentrics, each with their own beauty, scars, and weaknesses. In the end, she brings the reader to a dinner party in their remodeled home (the ancient ballroom of a noble family near the duomo in Orvieto) and seats them around a table with pineapple legs. Around that table are a collection of persons that she was warned could not be brought together in Umbria...l in all, a amazing read.

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