Read the last train to zona verde reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all the last train to zona verde reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    bringg dispatch How to setup [For Panera Drivers]  2020-5-28 1:23
    [email protected]

    I the application ands it asks for my email and pads and I can’t see hint registration to use the application what’s their point no help page or nothing! Help me out

    1  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    need pin to play rsweeps []  2020-5-22 6:38

    Lost my pin for RSweeps

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    When you choose to take up the reading of one of Paul Theroux's travel books you are taking on a private story. This is nowhere more the case than with Theroux's recent trip and book ZONA VERDE. I am a huge fan of Theroux's travel books and have now read them all. Some I liked better than others but I always came away from each with the feeling that I too had taken the trip. Funny thing is that I have never read one of his novels. I cannot really explain why because his eye as a novelist helps his travel writing. But it appears that if I wish to read more Theroux I will have to pick up a novel or two as ZONA VERDE certainly appears to be his swan song to his solo travels. He is now 72 years old and his age and his questions of mortality flood the pages of this fresh book. He keeps asking himself, "What am I doing here." ZONA VERDE is best considered a second volume to his unbelievable earlier book DARK STAR SAFARI (5 stars) where he outlined his trip down the East Coast of Africa from Cairo to Cape City (Theroux lived and taught school in his 20s in Africa). In this fresh book he returns to South Africa and then travels north up the West Coast through Namibia and Angola. As with all of his books and travels Theroux is a bit of a curmudgeon with a sharp eye for meeting interesting people, exploring hidden and overlooked history, and the challenges of daily people. In other words the guy knows his items and his writing is sharp as a diamond glass cutter. During his trip he experiences taking a guided tourist tour to see the townships. Apparently tourist are willing to to go see slums. He meets a mate who runs a high end luxury safari where for $4000 a day you too can ride elephants. He stops to speak to students and finds the Chinese now create Angola home to their outcasts and convicts much the same method the Portuguese did when it was a colony. He recalls the Cubans fighting in Angola and the major slave port located there. Every story and incident is told with self-effacing honesty. His stories of his travels in Angola are heartbreaking with one person he meets saying, "This is what the globe will look like when it ends." No doubt with only a little minority profiting by the of oil and diamonds. This is a journey I recommend you take whether or not you have read DARK STAR SAFARI. It's truly personal!

    0  


    Add your opinion on the last train to zona verde or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    Listen up! Paul Theroux is my main man on the move and I'll not give him a poor review. We're exactly the same age and I really admire him for suffering through the trip so described in this book. This is the point to a travel writer: Does he/she write the truth or not? Paul Theroux is a writer who is known for giving us the unvarnished truth. On this trip, he's a cranky old buzzard who is in his 15th round and has a right to describe a dirt pile as a dirt pile. In fact, as a travel writer is has a responsibility to describe a dirt pile as such. Anyone keeping up with current affairs will not be surprised by the African experience passed along by Paul Theroux. Yes, it is unpleasant and very annoying to read so much of it, but that is what he saw, and that is what he described. And what was he doing there? That is a question we all ask of ourselves, especially when he pass 70. Chill out, Paul; next time pick an easier far more enjoyable country(ies).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    I have read probably every travel book Paul Theroux has written and enjoyed immensely every one. I enjoyed this one too. It is his classic narrative of locations and the people he encounters along the way. He has always traveled with a combination of romance and reality; the easy experience of traveling with him is the romance, and Theroux is honest enough about what he sees to give the reader a powerful dose of reality.But this time it was different. There was nothing the least bit romantic about the dried-up, broken-down, miserable small shanty towns of southwest Africa that were the topics of this journey, and the reader could sense Theroux's own descent into sadness and a melancholy coming partly from a remembrance of his first promising encounter with Africa over 40 years ago as a young Peace Corps volunteer. For all the time, money, the and efforts of millions of people to create this continent a better place, one could not support but sense we are still falling behind.And within this context, there seemed also to be a story of Theroux recognizing his own mortality. There is no escaping the fact that over time our bodies, like our planet, must present the accumulated effects of life. A younger Theroux might have seen the advances in technology, medicine, communication, and governance that will yet let Africa to heal. But this traveler had had his fill. He was tired and this is the end of his African e end of the book was worth the poignant read as Theroux provides a spirited promise to continue his life's adventure, he just won't do it this way. Those of us who have enjoyed his writing for almost five decades want him the best in whatever fresh method that turns out to be.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    Wish to know what was on Paul Theroux's mind in, probably, 2011 as he traveled in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana (briefly), and Angola? Well, this slightly crazed reader of THE LAST TRAIN TO ZONA VERDE categorized his underlines and then tabulated the results and his private take on Theroux's top-five concerns is: the connections between politics and corruption in Africa, 16 underlines; cultural anthropology and tribal histories, 13 underlines; squalor and pervasive poverty, 11; the presence of death in Theroux's life, 7; and the history and lingering effects of colonialism and apartheid, ong these top-five concerns, cultural anthropology and tribal histories were the most interesting to me. While Theroux explored these interests as he traveled in South Africa and Angola, they rose to the top in Namibia, where he tells what he knows and sees about what the Afrikaners once called the Bushmen, Hottentot, @#$%!&s, and so on. This following fact about the so-called Bushman was fresh to me and quite moving. "I was ducking among the thornbushes with slender, golden-skinned people who were the earth's oldest folk, boasting a traceable lineage to the dark backward and abysm of time in the Upper Pleistocene, thirty-five thousand years or so ago, the proven ancestors of us all, the real aristocrats of the planet."Theroux finds much to like in Namibia. This contains an effort to preserve native cultures, a freshly imagined and possibly effective structure for foreign aid, a flourishing environment for huge animals, and a welcome tidiness at the core of its cities and towns. Likewise, he enjoys himself in Botswana, where he spends a few days at a lavish elephant safari camp, which provides a taste of what he calls travel-magazine milarly, Theroux finds some (although fewer) things to like in South Africa. He takes sardonic pleasure in the lux life that is still possible in Cape Town. And he sees that some of the shanty towns he visited ten years before (Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Capetown) have progressed and now sturdier housing and sometimes even plumbing. Nonetheless, he is appalled by the squalor in which most black South Africans live and is repelled by several of its leading politicians, especially the venal and baleful Julius contrast, Theroux finds almost nothing to like in Angola. While he is happy to stumble upon the existence of ancient tribal ceremony in the ravaged countryside, he calls the Angolan government "...corrupt, predatory, tyrannical, unjust, and utterly uninterested in its people--fearing them..." Further, "...Angola was too busy with its commercial extortions to be a police state. It was a government of greed and thievery, determined to exclude..."I carp and say that Theroux would enrich his perfect travel books if they had indexes. Nonetheless, THE LAST TRAIN is an eye-opening and rewarding read. Paul gets the latest word. "In the broken unspeakable cities of sub-Saharan Africa, the poor--the millions, the majority--ignored by their governments, live a scavenging existence in nearly identical conditions, in shacks, amid litter of Chinese-manufactured household junk... They all suffer from the same inadequacies--food shortages, no plumbing, no clinics, no food, no schools--and the same illnesses--cholera, malaria..."Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    I was disappointed by this book. I have read almost all of his travel writings. In all of them, Theroux completes the tour that he sets out to do. There are a lot of adventures and encounters with people of various cultures. Everything is seasoned with humor. This book almost completely lacks it. There is a whiny, self-pitying tone throughout, that grates on you after a while. Eventually he gives up the wretched tour after three countries. Maybe it is just as well! The thing that created his books entertaining, wears how he dealt with the hardships of travel: the miserable hotels, the overcrowded trains and buses, the unspeakable meals and toilets; where they were amusing challenges to overcome, they have in this book become intolerable hardships that are apparently rendering his tour pointless. With that, for me the author has become rather dull and uninteresting

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    This book is one that I’ll stay with me forever. Theroux travels so I didn’t have to. He writes so we can learn. This, perhaps his latest book (I hope not) shows what Eastern Africa really is this book and Allow Theroux take you on a journey that he experienced so others didn’t need to eroux is not a tourist, as am I, but instead he is a living witness to the method the globe is, or was when the books were written.I don’t wish to divulge much about the book, only to say that it is a reflective ace, Paul Theroux. Your writings are educating the globe whether they wish to hear it or not.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    This book is Theroux's description of an attempted trip up the West side of Africa, from South Africa, through Namibia, Botswana and on to Angola, where he decided to quit - wisely by the sound of it!It is vintage Theroux for sure and his eye for detail; his ability to dig beneath the surface, regardless of the social consequences; his brutal honesty and remarkable stamina and courage are all here in abundance.He is rumoured to be a "difficult" man at times. Backed by a formidable intellect which can assimilate the relevant facts, he has the ability to ask forbidden questions and hold asking. During a tour of a South African township, his tutorial and driver, Phaks, felt his wrath as he tried to rationalize how the 1993 brutal gang rape and murder of Amy Biehl, an American human rights activist, was now a symbol of Black South Africa's struggle versus white oppression. Gang rape and murder?! Phaks was left in no doubt that in Theroux's mind it was a brutal atrocity, nothing more or less. It led to an uncomfortable drive home.Oh what a mess it all is, awash in poverty, overpopulation, filthy townships, inequality and ubiquitous corruption. During the course of his travels, there are three unexpected deaths, one involved an idealistic young elephant handler, whom he met in a luxury safari camp in Botswana, who was later trampled to death. The other two were in Angola and one especially, left me at least with a "Hmm velly interesting", reaction. Theroux doesn't comment on this but it begged the question as to whether Theroux was drawing unfavourable attention toward Angola. OK likely just another "conspiracy theory", to which I am not, generally, prone. Regardless, after death number three, Theroux began to despair as to the point of continuing his journey and the book was , what did he achieve? Well, his writing shines a bright, harsh light on the state of these nations. As one expects from Thoroux, it is crammed full of well researched information. Some of his easy findings are the most damning. Angolan oil grosses a staggering $1billion every 5 days and yet small of this seems to penetrate to the ordinary Angolan. Why do we, through our oil thirst, continue to allow this happen? Thank goodness he didn't reach the oil polluted Niger delta area!I suppose he "failed" in his objective to travel the length of Africa, as he did, down the east side in 2004, (Dark Star Safari - 2004), but he lived to tell the tale, and, having suffered a card fraud in Namibia; been created aware of the latest deaths of a couple of his contacts in Angola; and facing the Congo and Nigeria, which by all accounts would up the ante even further, I think his decision was quite appropriate!You either like Paul Theroux or you don't. For me, just to have the courage to cross into Angola, on foot and alone, earned my admiration.I found this book educational and, as always, a amazing read. It gives a harsh insight into these troubled nations. I finished the book shaking my head at the tragedy of it all.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    Travel with Paul Theroux is always an enlightening, but rarely uplifting, experience. He is a gifted writer whose prose unlocks vivid photos and portraits of exotic locations and peoples, this time in southwest Africa. In "The Latest Train to Zona Verde" (a term used in parts of Africa to describe the "bush"), Mr. Theroux refuses to allow the reader turn a blind eye to the desperation, hopelessness, and plight of the swath of Africa through which he journeys. And that is precisely what we can most appreciate in him. Few would go where he has gone, and even fewer could write with such elegance and veracity about the Theroux was no stranger to Africa when he journeyed there for his final adventure chronicled in "Zona Verde". As a youth, he spent a lot of years in Africa; as a traveler, a schoolteacher, and a writer. In this final saga, he makes a nostalgic return to the continent almost a half a century later for what he senses from the outset will be his final journey Theroux struggles with what he characterizes as his own"voyerism of gawking at poverty". He starts out in Cape Town, eschewing the glamorous side of this fashionable city and clambering to "go slumming" in the outskirts of the city. High society and the attractive side of life seem to bore him. He rationalizes that his desire to travel is not like other "tourists" (he calls himself a "traveler"): he is a writer looking for mutability, what has changed over time, and to opine on whether change has been for the better. He rarely seems to conclude that it has.Who, according to Mr. Theroux, is a traveler? Ideally, it is one whose journey is a laborious quest into the unknown. Mr. Theroux admonishes that reading one of his books, although stimulating, is no substitute for travel. He takes us via every conceivable mode of public transportation and on foot, dragging us through the mud, so to speak, across hostile borders. I am no armchair tourist, but I think I will skip the fly-infested chicken legs and endless garbage heaps he describes, but am satisfied to experience all he encounters om sterility in the aftermath of the civil war, to the slow but steady ascendency of the fresh Chinese colonialism, Mr. Theroux, undeterred by warnings and, indeed, somewhat stimulated by them, takes us on a journey through one of the most corrupt and godforsaken countries on earth - Angola. He peels back layer after rotten layer of corruption and destitution in a country nonetheless dripping in gold, oil, and diamonds. This is Mr. Theroux at his best, and humanity at its t surprisingly, Mr. Theroux is not a large enthusiast of the multitude of NGOs and other humanitarian efforts in Africa and their attempts to raise the bar in education and living standards. He sees such efforts as largely having failed in their quest. He perceives corruption as the main impediment to success despite billions in aid poured into the continent.On his journey, Mr. Theroux finds one bright spot in remote Tsumkwee, in northwest Namibia. There he visits NGO-sponsored schools where he is invited to speak. But impressed as he is in this remote village by the cleanliness of the children, the level of their English, and eagerness of their desire to learn, he nonetheless expresses skepticism about the ability of these kids to search future opportunities in their own country. Here, at least, foreign aid dollars appeared to be making some Theroux is nostalgic in "The Latest Train to Zona Verde", not just for his earlier days of travel, but also for his youth. "As a young man, I never entertained this idea of death in travel. I had set off for Africa almost fifty years ago with the notion that my life had at latest begun." But time inevitably transmutes his perception, "During my latest few long trips I often thought that I might die. I was not alone in that fear; it is the rational conjecture of most travelers I know, especially the ones about my age."With this swan song, Mr. Theroux is at his zenith as a travel writer, but also as a travel philosopher now more in touch with his own mortality. "This is what the globe will look like when it ends," he writes as he nears his final destination outside Luanda, Angola. It is as though he traveled to the end of the earth to render the final strokes of his pen.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    Paul Theroux returns to Africa to once again experience the a lot of contradictions of the continent. He covers a lot of fresh territory, again insisting on traveling only by land - bus, train, whatever - and tries to see the true Africa of today. But he is older (70), somewhat wiser, and is often dismayed by by what he encounters. This is some of his best writing in years - a thoughtful, nuanced book that left me once again realizing how amazing a writer he can be. I highly recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde []  2020-6-10 20:12

    There is an end to every trip. The traveler is safely home; and, back among the familiar monster comforts of his life, he can tell us where he has been, what he has seen and what if anything it has meant to him and what if anything he has learned from his journey. So it is with Paul Theroux in this book. He's commenced his trip up the East Coast of Africa from Cape Town. He's seen the Cape City slums. He's travelled North the width of Namibia (half again the size of Texas), walked with the Bushmen seen, the bitter and the better in that part of Africa and, finally, in Angola (twice the size of Texas) he's had enough - the "broken, unspeakable cities" with chronic meal shortages, no plumbing, no clinics, no schools, no security and no hope; and with his onward journey to Timbuktu blocked by armed gangs and with no security in Nigeria and Islamist rebels out of control in the Congo, he finally says "What am I doing here?" and he gives his soiled traveling clothes to a lonely lady in the shop who tells him "these will fit my husband") and feels "beckoned home".There was no train - ever. There was really no "Zona Verde" (the Bush) any more at the geographical point where he was when he felt the "beckoning home". So after more than forty years of travel, more than forty years of telling us in some of the finest writing of any genre about what he has seen and where he has been, this book is his valedictory. And we shall miss him. Yes, he could be difficult, picky, opinionated, sulky at times, but he was an optimist - always was looking ahead, always ready for the next trip. He had an eye and an appreciation for beauty in the earth and goodness in its people. He could always see, sense, discern and tell us what lay beneath the surface; and he had no patience for cant, the false, the fake or the fatuous. He always traveled alone, unscheduled; he traveled with the ordinary travelers of whatever country he was in as his companions. No tours, no fancy items for him. And he was sentimental, a loving man. He loved trains. If one was available he would be on it. Above all he was (this is starting to read like an obituary!) - and is - a man of letters. In nearly every country he would take time out to conduct classes in English literature and composition; and, in reading all of his travel books, I was constantly amazed to learn that he always seemed to have with him some out-of-the-way book specifically relevant to where he was. He was a traveling reference room!Not only is he a man of letters, I think his heart is in teaching. That's how he started out fifty years ago - as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English in Malawi and Uganda - and I think an argument can be created that at least a part of his his heart has always been in Africa. When he created his trip ten years ago down the East Coast of Africa which was the basis for his Dark Star Safari he stopped again to teach at the school which had seen his first efforts; and he has frequently alluded to this satisfied period in his writings. So when his trip into Angola crashed and burned, when he saw and experienced nothing but chaos, poverty, trash, hunger and desuetude in the societal and governmental and economic train wreck that is now Angola I think a case can be created to he result that he just said "enough". It was looking like an old mate who had fallen on hard times, drunk too much, lived it up (and now down) and had reached bottom. There was nothing there - for Mr. Theroux or any of his is really being a book review I should say something about the trip into Angola. It was a trip into "the Africa of cheap, despised, unaccommodated people of seemingly unfixable blight, so hideous, really, it is unrecognizable as Africa at all. But it is, of course - the fresh Africa. ... Angolans lived among garbage heaps - plastic bottles, soda cans, torn bags, broken chairs, dead dogs, rotting food, indefinable slop, their own scattered twists of excrement - and in one city a stack of dead cows, bloated from putrefaction" (p.297)Angola has a issue - or issues - typical of a majority of African countries - poverty, disease, hunger, corruption, lack of infrastructure, lack of education and, above all the lack of a tradition of stable government. As an example, Angola was for Portugal the dumping ground of its underclass for four hundred years, never a country to be "developed" in the conventional sense but one to be pillaged; and I don't think anybody ever gave it a thought. Following a domestic revolution in Portugal in 1972 Angola achieved "independence" only to be thrust into a Civil Battle waged between three local and independent forces, two of which were supported by foreign powers. That, Civil Battle lasted more than 25 years. Nobody "won'. It left the country infested with land mines and disease. It broke apart whatever chances the natives had of maintain their traditional existence in the Bush and brought them into the cities which have expanded exponentially with grim poverty and grimmer futures for all. The android game has gone from the Bush. There is no tourist industry. Nobody comes to Angola - and for amazing reason. There is nothing to see any more, nobody really interesting to talk to, no "natives" to gawk at. They are all in city in the slums trying to exist.If you think this is a dystopian view of show day Angola you a right, but this is what Mr. Theroux walked into (and I mean this literally - he had to walk across the border.)Only a master craftsman like Theroux could describe it accurately. But he has done it and done it tom line. The book is a true downer of a travel tale because of the topic matter. The upside: Paul Theroux is, I think, the best, the most eloquent, the most insightful, most descriptive writer working today; and if for on other reason than to have fun and envy his use of the written word, his latest travel book is worth reading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    This book is Theroux's description of an attempted trip up the West side of Africa, from South Africa, through Namibia, Botswana and on to Angola, where he decided to quit - wisely by the sound of it!It is vintage Theroux for sure and his eye for detail; his ability to dig beneath the surface, regardless of the social consequences; his brutal honesty and remarkable stamina and courage are all here in abundance.He is rumoured to be a "difficult" man at times. Backed by a formidable intellect which can assimilate the relevant facts, he has the ability to ask forbidden questions and hold asking. During a tour of a South African township, his tutorial and driver, Phaks, felt his wrath as he tried to rationalize how the 1993 brutal gang rape and murder of Amy Biehl, an American human rights activist, was now a symbol of Black South Africa's struggle versus white oppression. Gang rape and murder?! Phaks was left in no doubt that in Theroux's mind it was a brutal atrocity, nothing more or less. It led to an uncomfortable drive home.Oh what a mess it all is, awash in poverty, overpopulation, filthy townships, inequality and ubiquitous corruption. During the course of his travels, there are three unexpected deaths, one involved an idealistic young elephant handler, whom he met in a luxury safari camp in Botswana, who was later trampled to death. The other two were in Angola and one especially, left me at least with a "Hmm velly interesting", reaction. Theroux doesn't comment on this but it begged the question as to whether Theroux was drawing unfavourable attention toward Angola. OK likely just another "conspiracy theory", to which I am not, generally, prone. Regardless, after death number three, Theroux began to despair as to the point of continuing his journey and the book was , what did he achieve? Well, his writing shines a bright, harsh light on the state of these nations. As one expects from Thoroux, it is crammed full of well researched information. Some of his easy findings are the most damning. Angolan oil grosses a staggering $1billion every 5 days and yet small of this seems to penetrate to the ordinary Angolan. Why do we, through our oil thirst, continue to allow this happen? Thank goodness he didn't reach the oil polluted Niger delta area!I suppose he "failed" in his objective to travel the length of Africa, as he did, down the east side in 2004, (Dark Star Safari - 2004), but he lived to tell the tale, and, having suffered a card fraud in Namibia; been created aware of the latest deaths of a couple of his contacts in Angola; and facing the Congo and Nigeria, which by all accounts would up the ante even further, I think his decision was quite appropriate!You either like Paul Theroux or you don't. For me, just to have the courage to cross into Angola, on foot and alone, earned my admiration.I found this book educational and, as always, a amazing read. It gives a harsh insight into these troubled nations. I finished the book shaking my head at the tragedy of it all.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Paul Theroux returns to Africa to once again experience the a lot of contradictions of the continent. He covers a lot of fresh territory, again insisting on traveling only by land - bus, train, whatever - and tries to see the true Africa of today. But he is older (70), somewhat wiser, and is often dismayed by by what he encounters. This is some of his best writing in years - a thoughtful, nuanced book that left me once again realizing how amazing a writer he can be. I highly recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    I have read probably every travel book Paul Theroux has written and enjoyed immensely every one. I enjoyed this one too. It is his classic narrative of locations and the people he encounters along the way. He has always traveled with a combination of romance and reality; the easy experience of traveling with him is the romance, and Theroux is honest enough about what he sees to give the reader a powerful dose of reality.But this time it was different. There was nothing the least bit romantic about the dried-up, broken-down, miserable small shanty towns of southwest Africa that were the topics of this journey, and the reader could sense Theroux's own descent into sadness and a melancholy coming partly from a remembrance of his first promising encounter with Africa over 40 years ago as a young Peace Corps volunteer. For all the time, money, the and efforts of millions of people to create this continent a better place, one could not support but sense we are still falling behind.And within this context, there seemed also to be a story of Theroux recognizing his own mortality. There is no escaping the fact that over time our bodies, like our planet, must present the accumulated effects of life. A younger Theroux might have seen the advances in technology, medicine, communication, and governance that will yet let Africa to heal. But this traveler had had his fill. He was tired and this is the end of his African e end of the book was worth the poignant read as Theroux provides a spirited promise to continue his life's adventure, he just won't do it this way. Those of us who have enjoyed his writing for almost five decades want him the best in whatever fresh method that turns out to be.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Travel with Paul Theroux is always an enlightening, but rarely uplifting, experience. He is a gifted writer whose prose unlocks vivid photos and portraits of exotic locations and peoples, this time in southwest Africa. In "The Latest Train to Zona Verde" (a term used in parts of Africa to describe the "bush"), Mr. Theroux refuses to allow the reader turn a blind eye to the desperation, hopelessness, and plight of the swath of Africa through which he journeys. And that is precisely what we can most appreciate in him. Few would go where he has gone, and even fewer could write with such elegance and veracity about the Theroux was no stranger to Africa when he journeyed there for his final adventure chronicled in "Zona Verde". As a youth, he spent a lot of years in Africa; as a traveler, a schoolteacher, and a writer. In this final saga, he makes a nostalgic return to the continent almost a half a century later for what he senses from the outset will be his final journey Theroux struggles with what he characterizes as his own"voyerism of gawking at poverty". He starts out in Cape Town, eschewing the glamorous side of this fashionable city and clambering to "go slumming" in the outskirts of the city. High society and the attractive side of life seem to bore him. He rationalizes that his desire to travel is not like other "tourists" (he calls himself a "traveler"): he is a writer looking for mutability, what has changed over time, and to opine on whether change has been for the better. He rarely seems to conclude that it has.Who, according to Mr. Theroux, is a traveler? Ideally, it is one whose journey is a laborious quest into the unknown. Mr. Theroux admonishes that reading one of his books, although stimulating, is no substitute for travel. He takes us via every conceivable mode of public transportation and on foot, dragging us through the mud, so to speak, across hostile borders. I am no armchair tourist, but I think I will skip the fly-infested chicken legs and endless garbage heaps he describes, but am satisfied to experience all he encounters om sterility in the aftermath of the civil war, to the slow but steady ascendency of the fresh Chinese colonialism, Mr. Theroux, undeterred by warnings and, indeed, somewhat stimulated by them, takes us on a journey through one of the most corrupt and godforsaken countries on earth - Angola. He peels back layer after rotten layer of corruption and destitution in a country nonetheless dripping in gold, oil, and diamonds. This is Mr. Theroux at his best, and humanity at its t surprisingly, Mr. Theroux is not a large enthusiast of the multitude of NGOs and other humanitarian efforts in Africa and their attempts to raise the bar in education and living standards. He sees such efforts as largely having failed in their quest. He perceives corruption as the main impediment to success despite billions in aid poured into the continent.On his journey, Mr. Theroux finds one bright spot in remote Tsumkwee, in northwest Namibia. There he visits NGO-sponsored schools where he is invited to speak. But impressed as he is in this remote village by the cleanliness of the children, the level of their English, and eagerness of their desire to learn, he nonetheless expresses skepticism about the ability of these kids to search future opportunities in their own country. Here, at least, foreign aid dollars appeared to be making some Theroux is nostalgic in "The Latest Train to Zona Verde", not just for his earlier days of travel, but also for his youth. "As a young man, I never entertained this idea of death in travel. I had set off for Africa almost fifty years ago with the notion that my life had at latest begun." But time inevitably transmutes his perception, "During my latest few long trips I often thought that I might die. I was not alone in that fear; it is the rational conjecture of most travelers I know, especially the ones about my age."With this swan song, Mr. Theroux is at his zenith as a travel writer, but also as a travel philosopher now more in touch with his own mortality. "This is what the globe will look like when it ends," he writes as he nears his final destination outside Luanda, Angola. It is as though he traveled to the end of the earth to render the final strokes of his pen.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Wish to know what was on Paul Theroux's mind in, probably, 2011 as he traveled in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana (briefly), and Angola? Well, this slightly crazed reader of THE LAST TRAIN TO ZONA VERDE categorized his underlines and then tabulated the results and his private take on Theroux's top-five concerns is: the connections between politics and corruption in Africa, 16 underlines; cultural anthropology and tribal histories, 13 underlines; squalor and pervasive poverty, 11; the presence of death in Theroux's life, 7; and the history and lingering effects of colonialism and apartheid, ong these top-five concerns, cultural anthropology and tribal histories were the most interesting to me. While Theroux explored these interests as he traveled in South Africa and Angola, they rose to the top in Namibia, where he tells what he knows and sees about what the Afrikaners once called the Bushmen, Hottentot, @#$%!&s, and so on. This following fact about the so-called Bushman was fresh to me and quite moving. "I was ducking among the thornbushes with slender, golden-skinned people who were the earth's oldest folk, boasting a traceable lineage to the dark backward and abysm of time in the Upper Pleistocene, thirty-five thousand years or so ago, the proven ancestors of us all, the real aristocrats of the planet."Theroux finds much to like in Namibia. This contains an effort to preserve native cultures, a freshly imagined and possibly effective structure for foreign aid, a flourishing environment for huge animals, and a welcome tidiness at the core of its cities and towns. Likewise, he enjoys himself in Botswana, where he spends a few days at a lavish elephant safari camp, which provides a taste of what he calls travel-magazine milarly, Theroux finds some (although fewer) things to like in South Africa. He takes sardonic pleasure in the lux life that is still possible in Cape Town. And he sees that some of the shanty towns he visited ten years before (Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Capetown) have progressed and now sturdier housing and sometimes even plumbing. Nonetheless, he is appalled by the squalor in which most black South Africans live and is repelled by several of its leading politicians, especially the venal and baleful Julius contrast, Theroux finds almost nothing to like in Angola. While he is happy to stumble upon the existence of ancient tribal ceremony in the ravaged countryside, he calls the Angolan government "...corrupt, predatory, tyrannical, unjust, and utterly uninterested in its people--fearing them..." Further, "...Angola was too busy with its commercial extortions to be a police state. It was a government of greed and thievery, determined to exclude..."I carp and say that Theroux would enrich his perfect travel books if they had indexes. Nonetheless, THE LAST TRAIN is an eye-opening and rewarding read. Paul gets the latest word. "In the broken unspeakable cities of sub-Saharan Africa, the poor--the millions, the majority--ignored by their governments, live a scavenging existence in nearly identical conditions, in shacks, amid litter of Chinese-manufactured household junk... They all suffer from the same inadequacies--food shortages, no plumbing, no clinics, no food, no schools--and the same illnesses--cholera, malaria..."Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    I was disappointed by this book. I have read almost all of his travel writings. In all of them, Theroux completes the tour that he sets out to do. There are a lot of adventures and encounters with people of various cultures. Everything is seasoned with humor. This book almost completely lacks it. There is a whiny, self-pitying tone throughout, that grates on you after a while. Eventually he gives up the wretched tour after three countries. Maybe it is just as well! The thing that created his books entertaining, wears how he dealt with the hardships of travel: the miserable hotels, the overcrowded trains and buses, the unspeakable meals and toilets; where they were amusing challenges to overcome, they have in this book become intolerable hardships that are apparently rendering his tour pointless. With that, for me the author has become rather dull and uninteresting

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Listen up! Paul Theroux is my main man on the move and I'll not give him a poor review. We're exactly the same age and I really admire him for suffering through the trip so described in this book. This is the point to a travel writer: Does he/she write the truth or not? Paul Theroux is a writer who is known for giving us the unvarnished truth. On this trip, he's a cranky old buzzard who is in his 15th round and has a right to describe a dirt pile as a dirt pile. In fact, as a travel writer is has a responsibility to describe a dirt pile as such. Anyone keeping up with current affairs will not be surprised by the African experience passed along by Paul Theroux. Yes, it is unpleasant and very annoying to read so much of it, but that is what he saw, and that is what he described. And what was he doing there? That is a question we all ask of ourselves, especially when he pass 70. Chill out, Paul; next time pick an easier far more enjoyable country(ies).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    There is an end to every trip. The traveler is safely home; and, back among the familiar monster comforts of his life, he can tell us where he has been, what he has seen and what if anything it has meant to him and what if anything he has learned from his journey. So it is with Paul Theroux in this book. He's commenced his trip up the East Coast of Africa from Cape Town. He's seen the Cape City slums. He's travelled North the width of Namibia (half again the size of Texas), walked with the Bushmen seen, the bitter and the better in that part of Africa and, finally, in Angola (twice the size of Texas) he's had enough - the "broken, unspeakable cities" with chronic meal shortages, no plumbing, no clinics, no schools, no security and no hope; and with his onward journey to Timbuktu blocked by armed gangs and with no security in Nigeria and Islamist rebels out of control in the Congo, he finally says "What am I doing here?" and he gives his soiled traveling clothes to a lonely lady in the shop who tells him "these will fit my husband") and feels "beckoned home".There was no train - ever. There was really no "Zona Verde" (the Bush) any more at the geographical point where he was when he felt the "beckoning home". So after more than forty years of travel, more than forty years of telling us in some of the finest writing of any genre about what he has seen and where he has been, this book is his valedictory. And we shall miss him. Yes, he could be difficult, picky, opinionated, sulky at times, but he was an optimist - always was looking ahead, always ready for the next trip. He had an eye and an appreciation for beauty in the earth and goodness in its people. He could always see, sense, discern and tell us what lay beneath the surface; and he had no patience for cant, the false, the fake or the fatuous. He always traveled alone, unscheduled; he traveled with the ordinary travelers of whatever country he was in as his companions. No tours, no fancy items for him. And he was sentimental, a loving man. He loved trains. If one was available he would be on it. Above all he was (this is starting to read like an obituary!) - and is - a man of letters. In nearly every country he would take time out to conduct classes in English literature and composition; and, in reading all of his travel books, I was constantly amazed to learn that he always seemed to have with him some out-of-the-way book specifically relevant to where he was. He was a traveling reference room!Not only is he a man of letters, I think his heart is in teaching. That's how he started out fifty years ago - as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English in Malawi and Uganda - and I think an argument can be created that at least a part of his his heart has always been in Africa. When he created his trip ten years ago down the East Coast of Africa which was the basis for his Dark Star Safari he stopped again to teach at the school which had seen his first efforts; and he has frequently alluded to this satisfied period in his writings. So when his trip into Angola crashed and burned, when he saw and experienced nothing but chaos, poverty, trash, hunger and desuetude in the societal and governmental and economic train wreck that is now Angola I think a case can be created to he result that he just said "enough". It was looking like an old mate who had fallen on hard times, drunk too much, lived it up (and now down) and had reached bottom. There was nothing there - for Mr. Theroux or any of his is really being a book review I should say something about the trip into Angola. It was a trip into "the Africa of cheap, despised, unaccommodated people of seemingly unfixable blight, so hideous, really, it is unrecognizable as Africa at all. But it is, of course - the fresh Africa. ... Angolans lived among garbage heaps - plastic bottles, soda cans, torn bags, broken chairs, dead dogs, rotting food, indefinable slop, their own scattered twists of excrement - and in one city a stack of dead cows, bloated from putrefaction" (p.297)Angola has a issue - or issues - typical of a majority of African countries - poverty, disease, hunger, corruption, lack of infrastructure, lack of education and, above all the lack of a tradition of stable government. As an example, Angola was for Portugal the dumping ground of its underclass for four hundred years, never a country to be "developed" in the conventional sense but one to be pillaged; and I don't think anybody ever gave it a thought. Following a domestic revolution in Portugal in 1972 Angola achieved "independence" only to be thrust into a Civil Battle waged between three local and independent forces, two of which were supported by foreign powers. That, Civil Battle lasted more than 25 years. Nobody "won'. It left the country infested with land mines and disease. It broke apart whatever chances the natives had of maintain their traditional existence in the Bush and brought them into the cities which have expanded exponentially with grim poverty and grimmer futures for all. The android game has gone from the Bush. There is no tourist industry. Nobody comes to Angola - and for amazing reason. There is nothing to see any more, nobody really interesting to talk to, no "natives" to gawk at. They are all in city in the slums trying to exist.If you think this is a dystopian view of show day Angola you a right, but this is what Mr. Theroux walked into (and I mean this literally - he had to walk across the border.)Only a master craftsman like Theroux could describe it accurately. But he has done it and done it tom line. The book is a true downer of a travel tale because of the topic matter. The upside: Paul Theroux is, I think, the best, the most eloquent, the most insightful, most descriptive writer working today; and if for on other reason than to have fun and envy his use of the written word, his latest travel book is worth reading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    When you choose to take up the reading of one of Paul Theroux's travel books you are taking on a private story. This is nowhere more the case than with Theroux's recent trip and book ZONA VERDE. I am a huge fan of Theroux's travel books and have now read them all. Some I liked better than others but I always came away from each with the feeling that I too had taken the trip. Funny thing is that I have never read one of his novels. I cannot really explain why because his eye as a novelist helps his travel writing. But it appears that if I wish to read more Theroux I will have to pick up a novel or two as ZONA VERDE certainly appears to be his swan song to his solo travels. He is now 72 years old and his age and his questions of mortality flood the pages of this fresh book. He keeps asking himself, "What am I doing here." ZONA VERDE is best considered a second volume to his unbelievable earlier book DARK STAR SAFARI (5 stars) where he outlined his trip down the East Coast of Africa from Cairo to Cape City (Theroux lived and taught school in his 20s in Africa). In this fresh book he returns to South Africa and then travels north up the West Coast through Namibia and Angola. As with all of his books and travels Theroux is a bit of a curmudgeon with a sharp eye for meeting interesting people, exploring hidden and overlooked history, and the challenges of daily people. In other words the guy knows his items and his writing is sharp as a diamond glass cutter. During his trip he experiences taking a guided tourist tour to see the townships. Apparently tourist are willing to to go see slums. He meets a mate who runs a high end luxury safari where for $4000 a day you too can ride elephants. He stops to speak to students and finds the Chinese now create Angola home to their outcasts and convicts much the same method the Portuguese did when it was a colony. He recalls the Cubans fighting in Angola and the major slave port located there. Every story and incident is told with self-effacing honesty. His stories of his travels in Angola are heartbreaking with one person he meets saying, "This is what the globe will look like when it ends." No doubt with only a little minority profiting by the of oil and diamonds. This is a journey I recommend you take whether or not you have read DARK STAR SAFARI. It's truly personal!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Not good Paul! Having vested himself and all of his youthful idealism in Africa (Peace Corps teacher) he has had to watch as it declined, rather than improved and evolved, despite his dedication, and those of his generation, despite the fly-in Pop Stars, White Jeep Cherokee aid organizations and billions of aid (our taxes). His latest African trip and book Dark Star Safari was a reflection of his rather bitter disappointment. This book and the trips conclusions are rather over 70, but still vigorous and eloquent (see a MSN latest interview on the Fan Site) Paul traveled up through the South West African states "like a backpacker". As keen and enquiring as ever, but perhaps a small more cautious and restrained in his admirations and enthusiasm for his beloved "dark star", what, he asks repeatedly, am I doing here?The respond is that, as usual with this author, probably the best travel writer of our century is that he is providing readable, fascinating insights and the truths that our media often deny - Africa is still a disaster, despite all our best efforts.Unlike Paul I, as a youngster, entered Africa from its darkest side (in fact the South West, the zone of his journey) as an idealistic, unprejudiced, truth-seeking youth. After being robbed, stoned and a witness to an unspeakable brutality on a brother officer, I held various views from the young revolutionary Paul er in life, of course, I found deep satisfaction from working and training my peers and colleagues in our sister African companies. On my latest visit, to my favorite country, I was just seven weeks in-country when they threw a party in my honor, in Pretoria as Jo'Burg had become "touie ploddy dangerous". I was confronted by a red-faced (Dutch) Boer who demanded of me "What d'ya tink of our niew sud Africa"" I confessed I preferred the , it seems does Paul - we still had hopes for it then.A dark conclusion, a `Last Train' not (uniquely with this author) taken) - no offered solutions to an ongoing issue probably without solution, but another fine e latest word could be taken from a review in the UK Guardian "But as a wake-up call (and possibly the author's travel-writing swansong), The Latest Train to Location Verde is an uncompromising, unsettling work.'

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    There is an end to every trip. The traveler is safely home; and, back among the familiar monster comforts of his life, he can tell us where he has been, what he has seen and what if anything it has meant to him and what if anything he has learned from his journey. So it is with Paul Theroux in this book. He's commenced his trip up the East Coast of Africa from Cape Town. He's seen the Cape City slums. He's travelled North the width of Namibia (half again the size of Texas), walked with the Bushmen seen, the bitter and the better in that part of Africa and, finally, in Angola (twice the size of Texas) he's had enough - the "broken, unspeakable cities" with chronic meal shortages, no plumbing, no clinics, no schools, no security and no hope; and with his onward journey to Timbuktu blocked by armed gangs and with no security in Nigeria and Islamist rebels out of control in the Congo, he finally says "What am I doing here?" and he gives his soiled traveling clothes to a lonely lady in the shop who tells him "these will fit my husband") and feels "beckoned home".There was no train - ever. There was really no "Zona Verde" (the Bush) any more at the geographical point where he was when he felt the "beckoning home". So after more than forty years of travel, more than forty years of telling us in some of the finest writing of any genre about what he has seen and where he has been, this book is his valedictory. And we shall miss him. Yes, he could be difficult, picky, opinionated, sulky at times, but he was an optimist - always was looking ahead, always ready for the next trip. He had an eye and an appreciation for beauty in the earth and goodness in its people. He could always see, sense, discern and tell us what lay beneath the surface; and he had no patience for cant, the false, the fake or the fatuous. He always traveled alone, unscheduled; he traveled with the ordinary travelers of whatever country he was in as his companions. No tours, no fancy items for him. And he was sentimental, a loving man. He loved trains. If one was available he would be on it. Above all he was (this is starting to read like an obituary!) - and is - a man of letters. In nearly every country he would take time out to conduct classes in English literature and composition; and, in reading all of his travel books, I was constantly amazed to learn that he always seemed to have with him some out-of-the-way book specifically relevant to where he was. He was a traveling reference room!Not only is he a man of letters, I think his heart is in teaching. That's how he started out fifty years ago - as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English in Malawi and Uganda - and I think an argument can be created that at least a part of his his heart has always been in Africa. When he created his trip ten years ago down the East Coast of Africa which was the basis for his Dark Star Safari he stopped again to teach at the school which had seen his first efforts; and he has frequently alluded to this satisfied period in his writings. So when his trip into Angola crashed and burned, when he saw and experienced nothing but chaos, poverty, trash, hunger and desuetude in the societal and governmental and economic train wreck that is now Angola I think a case can be created to he result that he just said "enough". It was looking like an old mate who had fallen on hard times, drunk too much, lived it up (and now down) and had reached bottom. There was nothing there - for Mr. Theroux or any of his is really being a book review I should say something about the trip into Angola. It was a trip into "the Africa of cheap, despised, unaccommodated people of seemingly unfixable blight, so hideous, really, it is unrecognizable as Africa at all. But it is, of course - the fresh Africa. ... Angolans lived among garbage heaps - plastic bottles, soda cans, torn bags, broken chairs, dead dogs, rotting food, indefinable slop, their own scattered twists of excrement - and in one city a stack of dead cows, bloated from putrefaction" (p.297)Angola has a issue - or issues - typical of a majority of African countries - poverty, disease, hunger, corruption, lack of infrastructure, lack of education and, above all the lack of a tradition of stable government. As an example, Angola was for Portugal the dumping ground of its underclass for four hundred years, never a country to be "developed" in the conventional sense but one to be pillaged; and I don't think anybody ever gave it a thought. Following a domestic revolution in Portugal in 1972 Angola achieved "independence" only to be thrust into a Civil Battle waged between three local and independent forces, two of which were supported by foreign powers. That, Civil Battle lasted more than 25 years. Nobody "won'. It left the country infested with land mines and disease. It broke apart whatever chances the natives had of maintain their traditional existence in the Bush and brought them into the cities which have expanded exponentially with grim poverty and grimmer futures for all. The android game has gone from the Bush. There is no tourist industry. Nobody comes to Angola - and for amazing reason. There is nothing to see any more, nobody really interesting to talk to, no "natives" to gawk at. They are all in city in the slums trying to exist.If you think this is a dystopian view of show day Angola you a right, but this is what Mr. Theroux walked into (and I mean this literally - he had to walk across the border.)Only a master craftsman like Theroux could describe it accurately. But he has done it and done it tom line. The book is a true downer of a travel tale because of the topic matter. The upside: Paul Theroux is, I think, the best, the most eloquent, the most insightful, most descriptive writer working today; and if for on other reason than to have fun and envy his use of the written word, his latest travel book is worth reading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    I was disappointed by this book. I have read almost all of his travel writings. In all of them, Theroux completes the tour that he sets out to do. There are a lot of adventures and encounters with people of various cultures. Everything is seasoned with humor. This book almost completely lacks it. There is a whiny, self-pitying tone throughout, that grates on you after a while. Eventually he gives up the wretched tour after three countries. Maybe it is just as well! The thing that created his books entertaining, wears how he dealt with the hardships of travel: the miserable hotels, the overcrowded trains and buses, the unspeakable meals and toilets; where they were amusing challenges to overcome, they have in this book become intolerable hardships that are apparently rendering his tour pointless. With that, for me the author has become rather dull and uninteresting

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    Listen up! Paul Theroux is my main man on the move and I'll not give him a poor review. We're exactly the same age and I really admire him for suffering through the trip so described in this book. This is the point to a travel writer: Does he/she write the truth or not? Paul Theroux is a writer who is known for giving us the unvarnished truth. On this trip, he's a cranky old buzzard who is in his 15th round and has a right to describe a dirt pile as a dirt pile. In fact, as a travel writer is has a responsibility to describe a dirt pile as such. Anyone keeping up with current affairs will not be surprised by the African experience passed along by Paul Theroux. Yes, it is unpleasant and very annoying to read so much of it, but that is what he saw, and that is what he described. And what was he doing there? That is a question we all ask of ourselves, especially when he pass 70. Chill out, Paul; next time pick an easier far more enjoyable country(ies).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    Wish to know what was on Paul Theroux's mind in, probably, 2011 as he traveled in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana (briefly), and Angola? Well, this slightly crazed reader of THE LAST TRAIN TO ZONA VERDE categorized his underlines and then tabulated the results and his private take on Theroux's top-five concerns is: the connections between politics and corruption in Africa, 16 underlines; cultural anthropology and tribal histories, 13 underlines; squalor and pervasive poverty, 11; the presence of death in Theroux's life, 7; and the history and lingering effects of colonialism and apartheid, ong these top-five concerns, cultural anthropology and tribal histories were the most interesting to me. While Theroux explored these interests as he traveled in South Africa and Angola, they rose to the top in Namibia, where he tells what he knows and sees about what the Afrikaners once called the Bushmen, Hottentot, @#$%!&s, and so on. This following fact about the so-called Bushman was fresh to me and quite moving. "I was ducking among the thornbushes with slender, golden-skinned people who were the earth's oldest folk, boasting a traceable lineage to the dark backward and abysm of time in the Upper Pleistocene, thirty-five thousand years or so ago, the proven ancestors of us all, the real aristocrats of the planet."Theroux finds much to like in Namibia. This contains an effort to preserve native cultures, a freshly imagined and possibly effective structure for foreign aid, a flourishing environment for huge animals, and a welcome tidiness at the core of its cities and towns. Likewise, he enjoys himself in Botswana, where he spends a few days at a lavish elephant safari camp, which provides a taste of what he calls travel-magazine milarly, Theroux finds some (although fewer) things to like in South Africa. He takes sardonic pleasure in the lux life that is still possible in Cape Town. And he sees that some of the shanty towns he visited ten years before (Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Capetown) have progressed and now sturdier housing and sometimes even plumbing. Nonetheless, he is appalled by the squalor in which most black South Africans live and is repelled by several of its leading politicians, especially the venal and baleful Julius contrast, Theroux finds almost nothing to like in Angola. While he is happy to stumble upon the existence of ancient tribal ceremony in the ravaged countryside, he calls the Angolan government "...corrupt, predatory, tyrannical, unjust, and utterly uninterested in its people--fearing them..." Further, "...Angola was too busy with its commercial extortions to be a police state. It was a government of greed and thievery, determined to exclude..."I carp and say that Theroux would enrich his perfect travel books if they had indexes. Nonetheless, THE LAST TRAIN is an eye-opening and rewarding read. Paul gets the latest word. "In the broken unspeakable cities of sub-Saharan Africa, the poor--the millions, the majority--ignored by their governments, live a scavenging existence in nearly identical conditions, in shacks, amid litter of Chinese-manufactured household junk... They all suffer from the same inadequacies--food shortages, no plumbing, no clinics, no food, no schools--and the same illnesses--cholera, malaria..."Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    Paul Theroux returns to Africa to once again experience the a lot of contradictions of the continent. He covers a lot of fresh territory, again insisting on traveling only by land - bus, train, whatever - and tries to see the true Africa of today. But he is older (70), somewhat wiser, and is often dismayed by by what he encounters. This is some of his best writing in years - a thoughtful, nuanced book that left me once again realizing how amazing a writer he can be. I highly recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    When you choose to take up the reading of one of Paul Theroux's travel books you are taking on a private story. This is nowhere more the case than with Theroux's recent trip and book ZONA VERDE. I am a huge fan of Theroux's travel books and have now read them all. Some I liked better than others but I always came away from each with the feeling that I too had taken the trip. Funny thing is that I have never read one of his novels. I cannot really explain why because his eye as a novelist helps his travel writing. But it appears that if I wish to read more Theroux I will have to pick up a novel or two as ZONA VERDE certainly appears to be his swan song to his solo travels. He is now 72 years old and his age and his questions of mortality flood the pages of this fresh book. He keeps asking himself, "What am I doing here." ZONA VERDE is best considered a second volume to his unbelievable earlier book DARK STAR SAFARI (5 stars) where he outlined his trip down the East Coast of Africa from Cairo to Cape City (Theroux lived and taught school in his 20s in Africa). In this fresh book he returns to South Africa and then travels north up the West Coast through Namibia and Angola. As with all of his books and travels Theroux is a bit of a curmudgeon with a sharp eye for meeting interesting people, exploring hidden and overlooked history, and the challenges of daily people. In other words the guy knows his items and his writing is sharp as a diamond glass cutter. During his trip he experiences taking a guided tourist tour to see the townships. Apparently tourist are willing to to go see slums. He meets a mate who runs a high end luxury safari where for $4000 a day you too can ride elephants. He stops to speak to students and finds the Chinese now create Angola home to their outcasts and convicts much the same method the Portuguese did when it was a colony. He recalls the Cubans fighting in Angola and the major slave port located there. Every story and incident is told with self-effacing honesty. His stories of his travels in Angola are heartbreaking with one person he meets saying, "This is what the globe will look like when it ends." No doubt with only a little minority profiting by the of oil and diamonds. This is a journey I recommend you take whether or not you have read DARK STAR SAFARI. It's truly personal!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    Not good Paul! Having vested himself and all of his youthful idealism in Africa (Peace Corps teacher) he has had to watch as it declined, rather than improved and evolved, despite his dedication, and those of his generation, despite the fly-in Pop Stars, White Jeep Cherokee aid organizations and billions of aid (our taxes). His latest African trip and book Dark Star Safari was a reflection of his rather bitter disappointment. This book and the trips conclusions are rather over 70, but still vigorous and eloquent (see a MSN latest interview on the Fan Site) Paul traveled up through the South West African states "like a backpacker". As keen and enquiring as ever, but perhaps a small more cautious and restrained in his admirations and enthusiasm for his beloved "dark star", what, he asks repeatedly, am I doing here?The respond is that, as usual with this author, probably the best travel writer of our century is that he is providing readable, fascinating insights and the truths that our media often deny - Africa is still a disaster, despite all our best efforts.Unlike Paul I, as a youngster, entered Africa from its darkest side (in fact the South West, the zone of his journey) as an idealistic, unprejudiced, truth-seeking youth. After being robbed, stoned and a witness to an unspeakable brutality on a brother officer, I held various views from the young revolutionary Paul er in life, of course, I found deep satisfaction from working and training my peers and colleagues in our sister African companies. On my latest visit, to my favorite country, I was just seven weeks in-country when they threw a party in my honor, in Pretoria as Jo'Burg had become "touie ploddy dangerous". I was confronted by a red-faced (Dutch) Boer who demanded of me "What d'ya tink of our niew sud Africa"" I confessed I preferred the , it seems does Paul - we still had hopes for it then.A dark conclusion, a `Last Train' not (uniquely with this author) taken) - no offered solutions to an ongoing issue probably without solution, but another fine e latest word could be taken from a review in the UK Guardian "But as a wake-up call (and possibly the author's travel-writing swansong), The Latest Train to Location Verde is an uncompromising, unsettling work.'

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    Travel with Paul Theroux is always an enlightening, but rarely uplifting, experience. He is a gifted writer whose prose unlocks vivid photos and portraits of exotic locations and peoples, this time in southwest Africa. In "The Latest Train to Zona Verde" (a term used in parts of Africa to describe the "bush"), Mr. Theroux refuses to allow the reader turn a blind eye to the desperation, hopelessness, and plight of the swath of Africa through which he journeys. And that is precisely what we can most appreciate in him. Few would go where he has gone, and even fewer could write with such elegance and veracity about the Theroux was no stranger to Africa when he journeyed there for his final adventure chronicled in "Zona Verde". As a youth, he spent a lot of years in Africa; as a traveler, a schoolteacher, and a writer. In this final saga, he makes a nostalgic return to the continent almost a half a century later for what he senses from the outset will be his final journey Theroux struggles with what he characterizes as his own"voyerism of gawking at poverty". He starts out in Cape Town, eschewing the glamorous side of this fashionable city and clambering to "go slumming" in the outskirts of the city. High society and the attractive side of life seem to bore him. He rationalizes that his desire to travel is not like other "tourists" (he calls himself a "traveler"): he is a writer looking for mutability, what has changed over time, and to opine on whether change has been for the better. He rarely seems to conclude that it has.Who, according to Mr. Theroux, is a traveler? Ideally, it is one whose journey is a laborious quest into the unknown. Mr. Theroux admonishes that reading one of his books, although stimulating, is no substitute for travel. He takes us via every conceivable mode of public transportation and on foot, dragging us through the mud, so to speak, across hostile borders. I am no armchair tourist, but I think I will skip the fly-infested chicken legs and endless garbage heaps he describes, but am satisfied to experience all he encounters om sterility in the aftermath of the civil war, to the slow but steady ascendency of the fresh Chinese colonialism, Mr. Theroux, undeterred by warnings and, indeed, somewhat stimulated by them, takes us on a journey through one of the most corrupt and godforsaken countries on earth - Angola. He peels back layer after rotten layer of corruption and destitution in a country nonetheless dripping in gold, oil, and diamonds. This is Mr. Theroux at his best, and humanity at its t surprisingly, Mr. Theroux is not a large enthusiast of the multitude of NGOs and other humanitarian efforts in Africa and their attempts to raise the bar in education and living standards. He sees such efforts as largely having failed in their quest. He perceives corruption as the main impediment to success despite billions in aid poured into the continent.On his journey, Mr. Theroux finds one bright spot in remote Tsumkwee, in northwest Namibia. There he visits NGO-sponsored schools where he is invited to speak. But impressed as he is in this remote village by the cleanliness of the children, the level of their English, and eagerness of their desire to learn, he nonetheless expresses skepticism about the ability of these kids to search future opportunities in their own country. Here, at least, foreign aid dollars appeared to be making some Theroux is nostalgic in "The Latest Train to Zona Verde", not just for his earlier days of travel, but also for his youth. "As a young man, I never entertained this idea of death in travel. I had set off for Africa almost fifty years ago with the notion that my life had at latest begun." But time inevitably transmutes his perception, "During my latest few long trips I often thought that I might die. I was not alone in that fear; it is the rational conjecture of most travelers I know, especially the ones about my age."With this swan song, Mr. Theroux is at his zenith as a travel writer, but also as a travel philosopher now more in touch with his own mortality. "This is what the globe will look like when it ends," he writes as he nears his final destination outside Luanda, Angola. It is as though he traveled to the end of the earth to render the final strokes of his pen.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    This book is Theroux's description of an attempted trip up the West side of Africa, from South Africa, through Namibia, Botswana and on to Angola, where he decided to quit - wisely by the sound of it!It is vintage Theroux for sure and his eye for detail; his ability to dig beneath the surface, regardless of the social consequences; his brutal honesty and remarkable stamina and courage are all here in abundance.He is rumoured to be a "difficult" man at times. Backed by a formidable intellect which can assimilate the relevant facts, he has the ability to ask forbidden questions and hold asking. During a tour of a South African township, his tutorial and driver, Phaks, felt his wrath as he tried to rationalize how the 1993 brutal gang rape and murder of Amy Biehl, an American human rights activist, was now a symbol of Black South Africa's struggle versus white oppression. Gang rape and murder?! Phaks was left in no doubt that in Theroux's mind it was a brutal atrocity, nothing more or less. It led to an uncomfortable drive home.Oh what a mess it all is, awash in poverty, overpopulation, filthy townships, inequality and ubiquitous corruption. During the course of his travels, there are three unexpected deaths, one involved an idealistic young elephant handler, whom he met in a luxury safari camp in Botswana, who was later trampled to death. The other two were in Angola and one especially, left me at least with a "Hmm velly interesting", reaction. Theroux doesn't comment on this but it begged the question as to whether Theroux was drawing unfavourable attention toward Angola. OK likely just another "conspiracy theory", to which I am not, generally, prone. Regardless, after death number three, Theroux began to despair as to the point of continuing his journey and the book was , what did he achieve? Well, his writing shines a bright, harsh light on the state of these nations. As one expects from Thoroux, it is crammed full of well researched information. Some of his easy findings are the most damning. Angolan oil grosses a staggering $1billion every 5 days and yet small of this seems to penetrate to the ordinary Angolan. Why do we, through our oil thirst, continue to allow this happen? Thank goodness he didn't reach the oil polluted Niger delta area!I suppose he "failed" in his objective to travel the length of Africa, as he did, down the east side in 2004, (Dark Star Safari - 2004), but he lived to tell the tale, and, having suffered a card fraud in Namibia; been created aware of the latest deaths of a couple of his contacts in Angola; and facing the Congo and Nigeria, which by all accounts would up the ante even further, I think his decision was quite appropriate!You either like Paul Theroux or you don't. For me, just to have the courage to cross into Angola, on foot and alone, earned my admiration.I found this book educational and, as always, a amazing read. It gives a harsh insight into these troubled nations. I finished the book shaking my head at the tragedy of it all.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Zona Verde: Overland from Cape Town to Angola []  2020-1-22 21:52

    I have read probably every travel book Paul Theroux has written and enjoyed immensely every one. I enjoyed this one too. It is his classic narrative of locations and the people he encounters along the way. He has always traveled with a combination of romance and reality; the easy experience of traveling with him is the romance, and Theroux is honest enough about what he sees to give the reader a powerful dose of reality.But this time it was different. There was nothing the least bit romantic about the dried-up, broken-down, miserable small shanty towns of southwest Africa that were the topics of this journey, and the reader could sense Theroux's own descent into sadness and a melancholy coming partly from a remembrance of his first promising encounter with Africa over 40 years ago as a young Peace Corps volunteer. For all the time, money, the and efforts of millions of people to create this continent a better place, one could not support but sense we are still falling behind.And within this context, there seemed also to be a story of Theroux recognizing his own mortality. There is no escaping the fact that over time our bodies, like our planet, must present the accumulated effects of life. A younger Theroux might have seen the advances in technology, medicine, communication, and governance that will yet let Africa to heal. But this traveler had had his fill. He was tired and this is the end of his African e end of the book was worth the poignant read as Theroux provides a spirited promise to continue his life's adventure, he just won't do it this way. Those of us who have enjoyed his writing for almost five decades want him the best in whatever fresh method that turns out to be.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    What an awesome story. The author found masterful ways to bring the lives of the main characters together. I was engaged throughout the entire book and the had surprises unfolding up until the very end. I also really appreciate how she uses historical happenings as the backdrop of her stories. This was a very enjoyable read!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    I was pulled into the stories of these characters from the beginning. Narrated by 3 women from various circumstances whose paths cross in the Florida Keys just before the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, this was an engaging historical setting.Mirta is on her honeymoon, having married a virtual stranger in Cuba and traveling to her fresh home in Fresh York. Elizabeth is a Fresh York socialite trying to support her remaining family survive, but needs to search someone she thinks may be staying in the work camps in the Keys. Helen is a Key West local waiting tables, going home each night wondering what mood she will search her husband in.Each woman has an entirely various story to tell, and their voices are clear and distinct. Though they have an endless number of differences between them, they have a lot of threads in common as they each go about their business in the days leading up to the storm. Their stories weave together brilliantly. I had sorted out a few of the more surprising connections prior to their huge reveals, but I was still caught up in the drama in the face of the storm and recovery.Speaking of the storm, I wasn’t altogether familiar with this specific hurricane prior to reading the book, but the info described by the characters created it clear that this was a special storm approaching. During and after, the descriptions were almost visceral, with the desolation evident throughout the area.I loved all three women for their courage and grit, as well as the people who helped each on their way. I wasn’t sure I liked Anthony (Mirta’s fresh husband) at the beginning, but it was mostly the reputation that preceded him that caused me caution. Elizabeth’s helper had his own air of mystery about him, and Helen’s helper had a softness that belied his e hero growth over the course of this short time period is yet another reason I loved this book. I think of the three latest books from the author set in Cuba & South Florida this is the strongest. (And that’s saying a lot because I loved the other two as well.) The lessons each woman takes away from the storm drastically change the directions of their lives.I loved every moment of this book and found myself thinking about talking about it even after I was finished. The storms, both literal and figurative, developing in this story created for amazing background tension as Mirta, Elizabeth, and Helen navigated the unknowns in their lives.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    I am enjoying reading this book. Every guess I like to read? It is a true page turner. The one woman, Helen, reminds me of the film Waitress. Love both.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    I purchased this book on the recommendation of another author I follow, and I was not disappointed. I'd call it romantic intrigue, and I think it would create a amazing movie. The story is told in first person by three women whose lives intersect at different points. Because the book is limited to each woman's perspective, the author employs surprise relative to the lives of the men in the story. In a movie, we could see how their lives will intersect, and I think it would be more suspenseful than using surprise.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    I don’t know why I don’t read more historical fiction but when I finish a book like this one I feel that first love feeling all over again. The story about 3 women living through hurricane season, one a newlywed on her honeymoon, another running away, and another having a baby all just trying to survive a horrible storm and what life throws at them. I will say at the end it felt pieces together but it didn’t feel like it got there naturally. It’s not my favorite by Cleeton but it’s still so good!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    Loved loved this book. After living thru 4 hurricanes myself I really liked how true Chanel created it. I will miss these unbelievable characters.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    The Latest Train to Key West differs from Chanel Cleeton's previous outings with the Perez family. Cleeton's backdrop for this novel is the devastating hurricane of 1935 that hit the Florida Keys on Labor Day, 1935. This novel, set far earlier than those in her Cuban duology (Next Year in Havana and When We Left Cuba) involves Mirta Perez (yes, a Perez, Beatriz and Elisa's aunt, who married the improper American) who has married the improper American) who has married Anthony Cordero, a man she barely knows, to support her Cuban family after Batista's coup in 1934 has nearly bankrupted the Perez family, Helen Berner, a waitress at the Ruby's Cafe, the put with the best key lime pie in Key West, and Elizabeth Preston (yes, a Preston!), a young woman whose family is reeling from the stock shop crash and perhaps something more, who is looking for a lost family member in the veteran camps in the Keys. A series of happenings bring these three women to Key West just as one of the worst Category 5 storms ever to form in the Atlantic bears down on the islands. Each of these women has a distinct story to tell and their connections to one another are revealed over the course of the eeton weaves the story of these three women together skillfully, holding your interest as the intensity of their stories steadily increases as the ominous storm approaches. As someone who spent much of my life in South Florida, the fame of the Labor Day hurricane that hit the Keys is etched in Florida history. It is still considered to be the strongest hurricane on record to have hit the United States. In some respects, the storm itself is a presence in the e audiobook is narrated by Kyla Garcia (familiar from the Cuban duology) as Mirta, Rachel L. Jacobs as Elizabeth, and Karissa Vacker as e Reader Tutorial for the novel (for audiobook listeners, since the tutorial is part of the print edition of the novel) can be found here.I received a Digital Review Copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    Once again the author captivated me with her stories and her unbelievable method of weaving historical facts into a attractive story I was heartbroken when I realized I had finished the book! Was ready for more!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    The Latest Train to Key West by Chanel Cleeton is a very slight, and very trite book that I don't recommend. It can't compare to the very unique and really well written 2 earlier books; When We Left Cuba and also Next Year in Havana. Those two books were both well written, with interesting characters, and situations unlike this book which was very contrived and boring. this was basically a book that could be skimmed in a very short period of time, as there's no substance to it. I was really looking forward to this recent Chanel Cleeton, which I assumed would be on a par in terms of writing with those 2 earlier books.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Last Train to Key West []  2020-6-26 18:38

    Loved! Loved! The story is captivating and the intertwined lives of the three women created this a hard to place down read!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River's End []  2020-7-8 19:3

    Book Review | Jon Fuller’s ‘Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River’s End’C&K editor-at-large Alan Kesselheim on why 'Verde River Elegy' chronicles his kind of tripMarch 6, 2019 By Alan KesselheimJon Fuller's Verde River Elegy chronicles my kind of trip. Quirky, even gnarly, quixotic as all obtain out. His top-to-bottom 'float' of the defiled Verde River, in central Arizona, is a combination of memorial, humor, mile-by-mile log, and how-to tutorial wrapped in one. This isn't really a floater's guide, despite the detailed description of his route and experience, because few people will wish to take it on. Not because the Verde isn't deserving, mind you. It is a lovely desert river covering almost 200 miles of canyon, pool, and riffle from north of Prescott to the confluence with the Salt River. It is full of otters and bald eagles and other wildlife. It is replete with history, full of surprises and scenic as e issue is that it is dying, and we are responsible for killing it. Its demise is Fuller's driving motivation. In his book he brings this year-round watershed back to life, despite the diversions, withdrawals, and depletion visited by humanity. Once a rare and attractive channel running through the arid high desert, the Verde now, where Fuller began his two-week, fall sojourn, is small more than puddles connected by unnavigable trickles. He dragged and portaged and thrashed through days of desiccated channel to finally reach a flow that would float his om there he descended through sandstone canyon, past historic ranches, through still-lovely habitat. The river is the very resource humanity requires to exist, and yet it has been so trashed, abused and shrunken that it barely qualifies as a flow much of the year.Fuller takes us along with self-deprecating humor, with honesty, with sadness and anger. His acc features blunders and mishaps as well as insights and regional context. His anger and sadness we should all share, because we have related flows near our homes. I know I do. If you look close enough, you'll search yours.Fuller's book is a worthy read for its simplicity, its notice and for the example it sets; the quest of a man paying attention to his home and then paying homage when required. Read it, and then go search your own sacred, doomed river to paddle.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River's End []  2020-7-8 19:3

    This book is a fun read for anyone who enjoys kayaking, canoeing, or rafting in the southwest. The author describes his multi-night paddling trip along the full length of the Verde River, contrasting what seems today in locations like a low-water creek with the higher-flow river from decades past. His story contains fun, private info about running the river, its rapids, and camp-life. If you've done some kayaking or canoeing, you'll be able to imagine and sympathize with what he writes along the trip, from the strainers to the bugs to the rarely-successful find for the excellent campsite along the riverbanks. I didn't know anything about the Verde River before I read this book, but it sounds like a fun river to ermixed into the story is an insider's view of how water management and the river navigability judgement process happens in the west, and what that does to a river up close. It's an interesting primer from a true expert in the subject. The book also shows, all from the perspective of a canoe, how the various sections of the river are affected by development and water st of the book seems like the author is pessimistic about the fate of the rivers of the west, largely due to complacency, mismanagement, and bureaucracy. But ultimately I think that the author wants us to be hopeful, or at the very least, wants to remind us to obtain out there and paddle more.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River's End []  2020-7-8 19:3

    This is the story of a river journey on par with A Walk in the Woods. Jon Fuller's book is an opinionated, somewhat cantankerous journey on a river on the edge of doom. The Verde River is close to my heart; I have been a Verde paddler since I was 10 years old, and I loved every page of Fuller's wild, passionate and extremely funny book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River's End []  2020-7-8 19:3

    This book was interesting, intriguing, funny, informative and a bit sad. The story of the Verde parallels the path of lots of other wild locations we have in Arizona that have lost their wildness and pristine environment because of overuse and lack of respect for the land. Jon is a amazing writer and his adventure makes me wish to discover fresh locations on the Verde River and re-explore those I have not seen in too long.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River's End []  2020-7-8 19:3

    A amazing book for outdoors types in the Amazing State of Arizona (and other places). The book info the journey of a outdoor loving engineer/geomorphologist as he paddles his canoe from the headwaters of the Verde River near Paulden, Arizona to it's confluence with the Salt River east of Phoenix. If you have fun the outdoors, canoeing, playing in rivers, or just like a amazing book you should read this book. It is exciting, adventurous, fun, and even a small sad. Broken up in sections of the river, the book describes detailed everyday activities that contain visits with otters, beavers, deer, skunks and other monsters of the forest. Jon's insights and descriptions of the Verde River and its plight paint a vivid picture of his trip. It gives you pause about the river's future and makes you wish take a trip yourself! I will read his book again!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Verde River Elegy: A Paddling Journey to the River's End []  2020-7-8 19:3

    I recently had the pleasure of attending an perfect slideshow presentation by the author on his 196-mile, 15-day Verde River canoe journey, at a local Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI) store, so I knew a small about his trip prior to purchasing the book. I’m in agreement with other reviewers who say the book is a excellent, fun and educational read. Although I have boated (kayaked in my case) on some several Arizona lakes and also Arizona’s Salt River (which the Verde River flows into), I have not been on the Verde River. I hope to do that some day as the author states in his book that the Verde River contains the state’s only Wild and Scenic River e author talks about his early boating history as a small child and how he grew up paddling canoes, he recalls a image of his grandfather and grandmother in a canoe, and how he selected his canoe for this trip. He also talks about the four reasons he decided to create this journey, his main reason was that he wanted to create this trip before the Verde River dries up as so a lot of other rivers have done due to population spite of the gloomy title of the book (Elegy), the book actually is upbeat and documents the author’s pleasure in boating the Verde River on this journey (and even other earlier, shorter trips on the Verde River). The book contains a lot of amazing color images showing the breath-taking scenery along the Verde River, which the author breaks down into 5 sections, from the Upper Verde River section to the Lower Verde River section.Each day of his trip is described in a separate chapter and contains some amazing maps illustrating where the author was on each day, his begin point, his end point, areas where he camped out, where he took spills in the river and other areas of e author also reviews the on-going legal battles, over the navigability of the river and water rights, that have been going on for years. The author is a hydrologist and geomorphologist and is an expert on the legal roughout the book the author gives to his wife Kate for her participation in his journey, she created it happen with her shuttle service.I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in canoeing or kayaking in general, or just interested in the history and geography of the Verde River. My main take-away from reading this book is that the Verde is a unbelievable river to canoe or kayak, and I hope to do that one of these days, not the entire 196 miles (way too much for me, my camping days are behind me) , but at least a one-day paddle.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Skaville [Vinyl] []  2020-7-28 21:28

    Excelent compilation of the Soul Brothers era of Jackie Mittoo, from 1965 to 1967, which was the greatest years, when he made one of the greatest sounds of Jamaica.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Skaville [Vinyl] []  2020-7-28 21:28

    Bless Soul Jazz for the awesome collections of instrumental Jamaican melody they have released from the island's golden era. This amazing set fits right in with their releases "Jackie Mittoo; The Keyboard King at Studio One," and "Studio One Scorcher (volumes 1 & 2)." Those are three of the greatest CD releases of Jamaican instrumental music, EVER. Soul Jazz also released the more collector-oriented "Sound Dimension: Jamaica Soul Shake, Vol. 1," featuring rare cuts from that Mittoo-led house om Soul Jazz:"Following on from Soul Jazz Records' earlier Jackie Mittoo 'The Keyboard King at Studio One' comes Jackie Mittoo and The Soul Brothers 'Last Train To Skaville'.Jackie Mittoo is one of the most necessary artists in the history of Jamaican music. As founding member of the legendary Skatalites, as in-house arranger/producer at Studio One and as a solo artist in his own right leading groups such as The Soul Brothers, Sound Dimension and Soul Vendors. These classic and rare recordings were created in the mid-1960s at Studio One. The Soul Brothers bridged the gap between Ska and the arrival of Rocksteady mixing it all up with Funk, Jazz and Latin styles."This is brilliant, timeless stuff. Check it out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Skaville [Vinyl] []  2020-7-28 21:28

    This album includes material by Jackie Mittoo and the Soul Brothers, who were the transitionary group in between the Skatalites and and the more reggae oriented Sound Dimension. Also featured on this release are ex-Skatalites members Johnny Moore on trumpet, Lloyd Brevett on bass and Roland Alphonso on sax. There is some amazing instrumental ska and early reggae melody on this disc, with some flourishes of calypso and Latin influences thrown in for amazing measure. Stand out tracks contain "Voodoo Moon," "Ska Shuffle," "From Russia With Love" and the floor stompin'"Ska-Culation." A testament that ska didn't just disappear when rocksteady hit the Jamaican melody scene. BUY IT.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Skaville [Vinyl] []  2020-7-28 21:28

    What more can you say about the melody of the Jackie Mittoo? This is a lively concoction of Jamaican melody styles that will bring a smile to your face and a boogie in your bones. This CD includes absolutely essential recordings that Mittoo did as a member of the Soul Brothers from 1965-67, a time when he was developing fresh style that, to quote the liner notes, "bridged the gap between Ska and Rocksteady."Mittoo had been a member of the legendary Skatalites, and then left with a few other musicians from that band (Roland Alphonso, Johnny Moore, and Lloyd Bevett) to form the Soul Brothers. The band's lineup apparently changed a few times during their short existence, with five other musicians coming and going to play trumpet, bass, sax, guitar, and drums. Through it all, though, there was the distinctive jazz-like organ stylings of Jackie Mittoo. But the liner notes also create it clear that this was much more than a one-man show, the songs a collective effort by the band. And these guys could play up a storm!The only knock versus this CD is the lack of info about the recordings. The liner notes mention different musicians who played with the Soul Brothers, but they don't a full lineup of who played what on which songs. I couldn't search the song credits at first, but then found them hidden under the plastic CD tray! I guess they were trying to save zone in the booklet or something, but it's not like the booklet gives you any extensive essays or info about the group, just a primary overview along with some unnecessary graphic art.Oh well, at least the melody is first rate. If you've heard any of the other recordings by Jackie Mittoo, particularly the perfect collection " Keyboard King at Studio One," you will be satisfied with this one too.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Soul of Cape Verde []  2020-7-12 19:35

    If you can search this, do obtain it. It's a great, ethnic, unusual collection of Cape Verde. Voices, drum, instruments have a amazing endearing quality!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Soul of Cape Verde []  2020-7-12 19:35

    Different Artists "THE SOUL OF CAPE VERDE"(Tinder Production, 1996)-------------------------------------------------------------------One of the best globe melody compilations ever, and certainly one the best -- if not THE best collections of melody from Cape Verde. One gorgeous song after another... a true must-have record, worth tracking down. (DJ Joe Sixpack, Slipcue Tutorial To Globe Music)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Soul of Cape Verde []  2020-7-12 19:35

    Even though this recording is not new, it was fresh and unbelievable to me. The mysterious blend of African and Portuguese melody is captivating, and all the singerts and musicians are superb. I went straight to Amazon and ordered it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    This is a interesting book. Those who don't like it (see their 1 star reviews) take problem with the writing style. I would say the style is journalistic. The psychological and hero exploration tends to be somewhat subtle - related to an impressionist painting where messages and info are sometimes hinted at -- without allowing the reader to delve deep and identify with the characters. But this is not a flaw - unless the reader is expecting a various writing style. So, this fault is rather the fault of the reader's own e story is very captivating and educational. It's amazing to read and learn about the WW II experience and actions of a country other than England, France, Germany, and the US. Turkey deserves a amazing of admiration for its efforts to protect its citizens regardless of religious beliefs. It's to be hoped that this book will inspire the country to remain real to its commitment to its citizens of all faiths -- something that can't be taken for granted to the story, it's principally about 2 sisters who took various paths in life - one with a traditionally-accepted marriage with social prestige and the other who chose a Jewish man and was disowned by her family. The one with the traditional marriage suffers from the guilt borne of her own jealousy of her younger and taller sister - despite her own celebrated beauty. Her deep seated guilt turned her into a cold wife and mother. With the support of a psychiatrist - who actually fell in live with her - she may be able to rise out of that long unacknowledged jealousy and guilt and save her own motherhood and marriage. The other sister is somewhat opaque from the psychological angle. She is intelligent, strong-willed, and compassionate - something of a superwoman. She moved with her husband to France hoping to establish a life far from ostracism of the families but instead found herself in occupied France, where the noose of danger was tightening around Jews of all nationalities living in France. Her struggle is not a psychological one like her sister's but the true and physical danger and degradation based on her husband's faith.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    A poignant story of Turkish diplomats who refused to buckle under tremendous pressure from Germany and France during the Battle and insisted Jews born in Turkey were released from custody and permitted to be transferred to their homeland. A rich multilayered characterization of Turks, both Muslim and Jewish, who worked tirelessly to help their escape from France. Diplomats who demanded they be heard, their rights under diplomatic and international law not be broken. They took extraordinary measures to insure thousands of Jews were returned to Istanbul and thousands of others through Turkey and on to Palestine. From a young couple married without their families blessings to a young and intellectual Turk who joined the French Resistance, the story moves at a rapid and satisfying pace. A terrific read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    Historically beautiful good. Amazing story line. Well place together. Method too a lot of exclamation points. Why! Why so many! Too many! Method too many!And the dialogue... Why are people in 1942 Turkey saying things like "What's up?" And "what the hell?"It's like reading text messages. Not at all believable the method these characters e story is amazing and keeps the pages turning, even if the writing style is annoying.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    Most of the action came in the latest quarter of the book. Other than giving some interesting insights into Turkish family life in the early 1940s, the book had few merits. But it did present what Jews went through as the Nazification of Europe progressed and the heroic efforts of the Turkish government to rescue Turks from Nazi-held Paris -- including some who were not Jewish. Not an exciting book but it added another facet to my knowledge of life during Globe Battle II

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    I shouldn't blame the author for Turkey's sexism but that is what bothered me most about this story, which is actually a unbelievable testament to the generous and brave nature of the Turks who place themselves in harm's method to shelter as a lot of victims from Hitler as they were able to. The action takes put from 1933 to 1941, and the main characters are sisters Sabiha and Selva, who grew up in Istanbul as happy, well-educated, and attractive blondes who wish for nothing. Older sister Sabiha marries Macit who works directly under President Inönü's Foreign Minister, they and their attractive kid live a charmed life enjoying all the advantages of their wealth and prominent standing, and yet Sabiha is too depressed to care. Sabiha is ravaged by guilt at having had a hand in her younger sister Selva's decision to marry jewish Rafael Alfandari, which led to the couple's complete ostracization and subsequent flight to southern France where they search themselves hiding from Nazis.I really like the historical aspect here, but it's hindered by too much romance. The men are all tall and handsome, the women are all blonde and beautiful. The women here are presented as so dependent and helpless and needy (begging prostrate and with their arms around a man's legs, or standing in shock having ones period). The men obtain whatever they want, create their decisions without consulting their wives, belittle them for nattering on about babies and children and marriage, a male psychologist even goes so far as to hit on his female patient.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    "After all is said and done,what life anyway? Aren't we all going to die in the end? I believe life is only worth living if, while we are on this earth, we can do honorable things." These words spoken by Tarik, one of the characters in this novel, are the foundation of this novel. Selva is the youngest daughter of a Turkish pasha and Rafael is the son of a well-known and highly respected family of doctors. The y fall in love. Both families oppose the union because she is Muslim and he is Jewish. After they marry and to avoid being shunned by their families, Selva and Rafael move to France. After Hitler occupies Paris, Selva and Rafael move south to Marseille to distance themselves from the [email protected]#$%!&ler's net now covers all of France and life becomes increasingly more tenable for Selva, Rafael, and their son, Fazil (named for Selva's father). At this point in the war, Turkey is neutral and is concerned about all its citizens living in France. They need to return home. Turkey has established a delicate balance between themselves and their strong neighbors. Can Turkey bring its citizens home safely and without incident?

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    This is the story of a Turkish Muslim girl Selva the daughter of a retired government official who marries the son of a well respected Turkish-Jew family. The two families don’t approve of the marriage so the couple decides to move to France just before the begin of the second-world war. The story info how Selva with the dangers and constant fear of occupation and how those left behind in Turkey, like her sister, brother-in-law and parents cope with the separation; the chance that their daughter/sister might be in e plot is very clever and interwoven in this fiction story are some interesting not very well known factual historical events. The book also tells the real story of a brave group of Turkish diplomats who save a huge group of innocent people, a lot of of whom are Turkish citizens of Jewish descent, from the Nazi the story develops very interesting characters are introduced, each with their own story. Slowly their individual futures are interwoven in the plot but all of them have one thing in common - their lives are in danger. Their individual plights become one after they board the latest train to is is a attractive tale of human courage, survival and endurance, set versus a background of battle and despair while demonstrating a spirit of compassion and hope.Overall the story is well researched but the writing flow takes a bit of getting used to in the beginning. It felt a bit unnatural however this might be due to the effects of its translation from Turkish; perhaps because Turkish sentence structure differs from English.Anyone who likes reading amazing historical fiction will have fun this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    Interesting story. I "read" the audio version, and I had some difficulty with the narrator's reading inflection ... not his words, which were very clear and simple to follow, but the dictionary's definition of inflection: a change in the form of a word (typically the ending) to express a grammatical function or attribute such as tense, mood, person, number, case, and nonyms: stress, cadence, rhythm, accent, intonation, pitch, emphasis, modulation, lilt, e story is about Turkish citizens and their quest to obtain back to Istanbul (and the reasons why) from their residences in Paris during WWII. It speaks well of the Turkish government and their struggle to remain neutral ... not just in battle matters, but in matters of religion. Turkey was a very secular country at that time, and it created no difference what kind of religion a person had. In WWII, obviously, that meant problem because some of the citizens who wanted to obtain back to Istanbul were Jewish. Germany had already advanced into Paris at the time of the story and was leaning hard on anyone, no matter what nationality, who was Jewish.I really enjoyed the audio book. The story sticks to its point - "Last Train to Istanbul" - and the development of the story concerns how the passengers on that train got there, the people who joined with them on this trip, the difficulties they had in collecting this group, and the further difficulties they had once they were on the e story could have held more drama, but was entertaining and educational nonetheless. Most situations were resolved quickly, and in a amazing way. We know that didn't always happen in these situations for true people. I don't usually associate Turkish people with WWII because the history we hear most often is about Japan, Germany, our allies, and the final end of the war. Amazing book, simple read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    Fortunately, I did not for this book. It is a Kindle selection. While the story of Turks rescuing Jews during WW II is interesting, the interminable explanations for every hero and happening led me to speed reading. On occasion a character, e.g. David Russo, shows up for a chapter or two to no purpose. Perhaps it is a issue of translation that the reading level is about that of an average 6th grader. The story is worth a more skillful telling.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Istanbul: A Novel []  2020-1-29 6:28

    Latest Train to Istanbul tells of the tribulations of Turkish Jews in Occupied France and efforts of the Turkish government to obtain their citizens and others safely to Turkey. This tale is not as captivating as others due to the writing style, particularly with the mix of happenings in Turkey and France being told together. It is written more as a novel than as a documentary of experiences. However, it does bring to light the political pressures brought upon Turkey by both the Allies and the Axis powers during WWII, as well as providing as various look at the plight of Jews other than those of central Europe. History tends to focus on those central European Jews and forgets that other nations also had citizens of the Jewish faith who faced deportation, concentration camps, and possible extermination at the hands of the Nazis. The book truly pays tribute to untold story of Turkish officials who risked their own lives to save not only Turkish citizens but other Jews who were seeking to escape the yoke of the Nazi occupation.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Rough Guide to Music of Cape Verde []  2020-7-15 19:53

    This is one of the best CDs in the entire Rough Tutorial collection. This is an incredible, melodic, haunting collection of Cape Verde tunes that fall somewhere between Portuguese Fado and the Afro-Brazilian sound of Bahia. If you are a fan of either genre (or even Delta blues), obtain this one.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Rough Guide to Music of Cape Verde []  2020-7-15 19:53

    if you're a blues fan, a soulful late night lounge fan, or lucky for you, a fan of amazing african music....don't miss this! i bought it because i really love the senegal/gambia collection by rough guide... this region of africa is incredibly distinct, and the cape verde sound is unlike anything else. melody so rich you can run your fingers through it. a definite must.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Rough Guide to Music of Cape Verde []  2020-7-15 19:53

    Just beautiful. One of my favorite RGs.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Rough Guide to Music of Cape Verde []  2020-7-15 19:53

    I've had this disk for 2 years, and it's loveliness never e honest talent of the artists, and the optimism and humanity of their melody continues to appeal, and create me happy, when so a lot of other disks are is it that one small windswept archipeligo, has produced so much melody that has impressed the world? (Both here in Israel, and in Europe Cape Verdean melody is often heard on mainstream radio!)I only want theat there were translations of the lyrics!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    After attending University of Miami in the 70's , I lived part time in Florida for most of the intervening years until I retired full-time in the Sunshine State in 's a state which I love for a lot of reasons (besides the obvious - the weather), but didn't know much about . I'd seen Flagler's name (as well as his assistant , Mr. Krome's ) on a lot of roads , buildings and monuments , but had no idea what a visionary industrialist he was, nor how he came about his is book tells a much required story of some of the history of Florida for the millions and millions of refugees moving here from the frigid, high-tax, over-regulated northeastern states. It is beautifully written , reads like a novel, but it is well researched and relates a captivating 's also a lesson in the amazing power of hurricanes for the neophyte who thinks he or she is going to "ride one out".As an aside, it is a gentle reminder that horrific climatological happenings have occur long before the term "man-made climate change" had even been dreamt up

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    "The Latest Train to Paradise" is a really amazing history book about Henry Flagler, who played a large role in the development of modern day Florida. The book combines a very amazing biography of Mister Flagler and his building of a railroad, primarily down the east coast of Florida, and then through the Florida Keys. The book goes on to document the hurricane of 1935, that destroyed the Florida Keys part of that railroad. I was really glad that I was able to read this book and felt it was very well done. As an amateur historian, I feel I know a fair amount of Florida's history, but I learned a amazing and really enjoyed this a resident of Pennsylvania, I now travel to Florida for a brief visit, once a year in the winter. Mister Flagler is an obviously notable personage in Florida to this day. I always wanted to read his biography and of course, of his activities in Florida. This book proved completely satisfactory in both is common for me, I purchased the Kindle and accompanying audiobook, and read and listened simultaneously. The audiobook is faithful to the Kindle and is about as amazing as it can be under the circumstances. However, in that this is non fiction, the Kindle has photographs, and a bibliography that can not be reproduced on the audiobook. I enjoyed both, but if I was only to one or the other, I would have chosen the Kindle.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    A fun read, if history in the Florida Keys interests you.Ever since I moved to Key West in 1972 I have been fascinated by Henry Flagler's Overseas Railroad. For a lot of seasons I frequently traveled the roadways and bridges of the old rail that much of that infrastructure is disused and parts are deteriorating, it was a joy to search this book. It has enormous amounts of detail and I found myself inspecting topographical maps of the keys to follow some of it.Well written, interesting, thorough.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    Fascinating, historic retelling of Henry Flagler's work building the "overseas railroad" from Miami to Key West, and of the devastating hurricane that wiped it out. It's even more exciting if the reader has been on the modern streets and bridges leading through the Keys and has seen the awesome remnants of the railroad alongside the highway. The story is almost unbelievable, in that Flagler built this wonder of the globe without gasoline or oil, but used steam power and awkward massive equipment. He and his men overcame numerous obstacles such as swamps, swiftly moving tidal currents, yellow-fever, storms, engineering challenges, and more. Of course, today, this would be an environmentally impossible task. But in Flagler's day, it was considered a "miracle", or a folly, depending upon whom one asked. It is an simple and quick read, well written, even for a non-engineering type like me.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    I read Latest Train to Paradise because I was interested in learning more about the author and his writing. I not only discovered a very readable book by a talented writer, I learned a tremendous amount about Henry Flagler and his railroad to Key West. Most entertaining and educational. Les Standiford won me over in his first chapter where he does a remarkable job of conveying the intensity, the panic, and the devastation of a hurricane. He returns to this stage in his conclusion. In between there is the story of a man who persisted versus amazing odds and I am left wondering what propels men like Flagler, who had it all and spent his final years pursuing a passion to build something as unimaginable as the Florida East Coast Railway? I'm sorry I got only the Kindle and missed out on the pictures. I plan to another copy as a gift.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    Just came back from 6 weeks in Florida and while in Key West saw the Henry Flagler exhibit at the museum there and wanted to learn more about him. This book is an interesting history of Florida and especially the Keys. We have been to the memorial for the Hurricane Victims of 1935 so this told me the complete story. Read this is you wish to search out more about the beginnings of Florida and the snowbirds!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    Although I've lived in Florida a lot of years and visited most of the historical websites associated with Flagler that are discussed in the book, the book gave me a trove of info that I haven't known and place it cohesively all together. I especially liked the method the narrative flowed: from starting of with a discussion of the 1935 Labor Day hurricane through the eyes of those who were there, then going back in time to revealing Flagler's beginnings—through his rise in Standard Oil and his projects in Florida which ultimately culminated in the Key West Extension of the FEC—and from the discussion of the planning and building of the extension back to the hurricane that destroyed it, and the aftermath which led to it becoming the Overseas 's worth noting that this book was published in 2001, so there are only comparisons of the 1935 storm to other huge storms prior to this date (notably Hurricane Andrew). We all know that there have been more devastating storms to hit the US since that date. I wonder if the author has ever had to urge to return to this book and modernize the comparisons to any of theses more latest storms.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    A fun read, if history in the Florida Keys interests you.Ever since I moved to Key West in 1972 I have been fascinated by Henry Flagler's Overseas Railroad. For a lot of seasons I frequently traveled the roadways and bridges of the old rail that much of that infrastructure is disused and parts are deteriorating, it was a joy to search this book. It has enormous amounts of detail and I found myself inspecting topographical maps of the keys to follow some of it.Well written, interesting, thorough.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    I read Latest Train to Paradise because I was interested in learning more about the author and his writing. I not only discovered a very readable book by a talented writer, I learned a tremendous amount about Henry Flagler and his railroad to Key West. Most entertaining and educational. Les Standiford won me over in his first chapter where he does a remarkable job of conveying the intensity, the panic, and the devastation of a hurricane. He returns to this stage in his conclusion. In between there is the story of a man who persisted versus amazing odds and I am left wondering what propels men like Flagler, who had it all and spent his final years pursuing a passion to build something as unimaginable as the Florida East Coast Railway? I'm sorry I got only the Kindle and missed out on the pictures. I plan to another copy as a gift.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    Just came back from 6 weeks in Florida and while in Key West saw the Henry Flagler exhibit at the museum there and wanted to learn more about him. This book is an interesting history of Florida and especially the Keys. We have been to the memorial for the Hurricane Victims of 1935 so this told me the complete story. Read this is you wish to search out more about the beginnings of Florida and the snowbirds!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    "The Latest Train to Paradise" is a really amazing history book about Henry Flagler, who played a large role in the development of modern day Florida. The book combines a very amazing biography of Mister Flagler and his building of a railroad, primarily down the east coast of Florida, and then through the Florida Keys. The book goes on to document the hurricane of 1935, that destroyed the Florida Keys part of that railroad. I was really glad that I was able to read this book and felt it was very well done. As an amateur historian, I feel I know a fair amount of Florida's history, but I learned a amazing and really enjoyed this a resident of Pennsylvania, I now travel to Florida for a brief visit, once a year in the winter. Mister Flagler is an obviously notable personage in Florida to this day. I always wanted to read his biography and of course, of his activities in Florida. This book proved completely satisfactory in both is common for me, I purchased the Kindle and accompanying audiobook, and read and listened simultaneously. The audiobook is faithful to the Kindle and is about as amazing as it can be under the circumstances. However, in that this is non fiction, the Kindle has photographs, and a bibliography that can not be reproduced on the audiobook. I enjoyed both, but if I was only to one or the other, I would have chosen the Kindle.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    Although I've lived in Florida a lot of years and visited most of the historical websites associated with Flagler that are discussed in the book, the book gave me a trove of info that I haven't known and place it cohesively all together. I especially liked the method the narrative flowed: from starting of with a discussion of the 1935 Labor Day hurricane through the eyes of those who were there, then going back in time to revealing Flagler's beginnings—through his rise in Standard Oil and his projects in Florida which ultimately culminated in the Key West Extension of the FEC—and from the discussion of the planning and building of the extension back to the hurricane that destroyed it, and the aftermath which led to it becoming the Overseas 's worth noting that this book was published in 2001, so there are only comparisons of the 1935 storm to other huge storms prior to this date (notably Hurricane Andrew). We all know that there have been more devastating storms to hit the US since that date. I wonder if the author has ever had to urge to return to this book and modernize the comparisons to any of theses more latest storms.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    This book is a well written read of the story of the development of the East Coast of Florida. For someone ,as myself, who is a Florida transplant, it is an interesting coverage of the man known simply as Flagler. I would caution those who are easily bored by technical descriptions that there is plenty of that within, but Mr. Standiford does an interesting job of counterbalancing that with the very human stories of the men who built the dream that Flagler had to defeat the Florida coastline and link the Keys to the rest of the peninsula. In the end, Mother Nature prevails and dashes Flagler's Folly, but the story is nonetheless a gripping tale worth reading for those who are interested in Florida history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    Fascinating, historic retelling of Henry Flagler's work building the "overseas railroad" from Miami to Key West, and of the devastating hurricane that wiped it out. It's even more exciting if the reader has been on the modern streets and bridges leading through the Keys and has seen the awesome remnants of the railroad alongside the highway. The story is almost unbelievable, in that Flagler built this wonder of the globe without gasoline or oil, but used steam power and awkward massive equipment. He and his men overcame numerous obstacles such as swamps, swiftly moving tidal currents, yellow-fever, storms, engineering challenges, and more. Of course, today, this would be an environmentally impossible task. But in Flagler's day, it was considered a "miracle", or a folly, depending upon whom one asked. It is an simple and quick read, well written, even for a non-engineering type like me.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    Railroad history is always of interest to this rail fan. Though historical, it reads like a fiction thriller. The character overcomes the villain. Except, in this case the villain is not a person. Weather and the tropics become Flagler's foe. In his era, anyone who built a railroad was considered a "robber baron". Flagler Wes certainly not. He was a humanitarian and a visionary and Standiford's writing clearly spells that out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    Review by J Matthews - April 30, 2018What a true treat to search out what Flagler's role in history had to do with Standard Oil Co. and the railroad in Florida from Jacksonville to Key West. Once having lived in West Palm Beach, I had the opportunity to visit the Flagler Museum and I found the Flagler Museum to have been one of the best I have ever toured in my lifetime. This book gives a bird's eye view on this topic matter. NOW I WILL READ MORE ABOUT THIS MAN AND THE PEOPLE AND EVENTS SURROUNDING THE MAN FLAGLER.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    After attending University of Miami in the 70's , I lived part time in Florida for most of the intervening years until I retired full-time in the Sunshine State in 's a state which I love for a lot of reasons (besides the obvious - the weather), but didn't know much about . I'd seen Flagler's name (as well as his assistant , Mr. Krome's ) on a lot of roads , buildings and monuments , but had no idea what a visionary industrialist he was, nor how he came about his is book tells a much required story of some of the history of Florida for the millions and millions of refugees moving here from the frigid, high-tax, over-regulated northeastern states. It is beautifully written , reads like a novel, but it is well researched and relates a captivating 's also a lesson in the amazing power of hurricanes for the neophyte who thinks he or she is going to "ride one out".As an aside, it is a gentle reminder that horrific climatological happenings have occur long before the term "man-made climate change" had even been dreamt up

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad That Crossed an Ocean []  2020-4-16 18:40

    Railroad history is always of interest to this rail fan. Though historical, it reads like a fiction thriller. The character overcomes the villain. Except, in this case the villain is not a person. Weather and the tropics become Flagler's foe. In his era, anyone who built a railroad was considered a "robber baron". Flagler Wes certainly not. He was a humanitarian and a visionary and Standiford's writing clearly spells that out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    Review by J Matthews - April 30, 2018What a true treat to search out what Flagler's role in history had to do with Standard Oil Co. and the railroad in Florida from Jacksonville to Key West. Once having lived in West Palm Beach, I had the opportunity to visit the Flagler Museum and I found the Flagler Museum to have been one of the best I have ever toured in my lifetime. This book gives a bird's eye view on this topic matter. NOW I WILL READ MORE ABOUT THIS MAN AND THE PEOPLE AND EVENTS SURROUNDING THE MAN FLAGLER.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean []  2020-1-16 12:10

    This book is a well written read of the story of the development of the East Coast of Florida. For someone ,as myself, who is a Florida transplant, it is an interesting coverage of the man known simply as Flagler. I would caution those who are easily bored by technical descriptions that there is plenty of that within, but Mr. Standiford does an interesting job of counterbalancing that with the very human stories of the men who built the dream that Flagler had to defeat the Florida coastline and link the Keys to the rest of the peninsula. In the end, Mother Nature prevails and dashes Flagler's Folly, but the story is nonetheless a gripping tale worth reading for those who are interested in Florida history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    This book combined with Garrigues' book The Birds of Costa Rica, were indispensible to me on my trip. They are not up to the quality of a Sibley or a Peterson, but these are the best available for Costa Rica.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    Perfect companion to Garrigues's The Birds Of Costa Rica. Amazing stand-alone guide. Superior photography. Comprehensive.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    The photographs are high quality. Awesome diversity of Birds. Interesting facts to read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    No tabs or color coding on pages to support you flip quickly to the bird type you are looking for. Other than that, the images were attractive and was a amazing was to obtain to know about the birds of Costa Rica before going on a trip, as well as useful foe indentification.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    We took the book with us on a trip to Costa Rica. It was helpful to have it with us when we wanted to ID certain birds.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    This was a bonus and greatly appreciated for their upcoming Costa Rica trip!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    This is a amazing book and was very helpful in identifying birds during our trip. One drawback is that the book doesn't have color tabs or a table of contents by category to enable you to quickly ID birds. I had to thumb through the whole book to look up birds. The author has a more comprehensive book, but this one is a amazing size to throw in the backpack.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    On our latest trip to Costa Rica we would not have been able to add 26 birds to our life time list. We identified around 50 birds total. The book was a amazing purchased.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    In preparing for my first trip to Costa Rica solely for birdwatching, I bought this book along with the 2nd edition of the Garrigues & Dean field guide. The two books pair extremely well. This one concentrates on the birds one is most likely to see, making it the basic tutorial I'm studying in the lead up to my trip. But I'll have the Garrigues & Dean with me as well, as it's coverage is exhaustive. Both field tutorials are simple to use, well designed, attractive, and informative.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Photo Guide to Birds of Costa Rica (Zona Tropical Publications) []  2020-6-10 20:8

    Really attractive book, the photographs are great.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Complete Guide to the Grand Circle National Parks: Covering Zion, Bryce, Capitol Reef, Arches, Canyonlands, Mesa Verde, and Grand Canyon National Parks []  2020-1-23 0:26

    Excellent book. Did all 5 national parks and followed this book for the trails. Helps significantly when describing the trails so you know which ones to take

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386