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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    I wanted to know the why's about why Hitler, and this was a amazing to-the-point book. Beginning with his birth, it spent just enough time telling enough about the various periods of his life so you obtain a full picture about what went on.A small over 200 pages, it's a amazing read so that if I required to give a report in a class, this would be my best resource.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    Report for school.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    I think this book should be read by every school age child. George Shaffner goes through the numbers. It shows us how precious we really are. It also is a motivator to stay in school.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    The Arithmetic of Life and Death by George Shaffner is a collection of essays. Each essay highlights how easy math can be used to evaluate one of life's necessary questions. This isn't a puzzle or riddle book. You don't have to know advanced calculus to examine the questions. They are straightforward - like, how much more income will I earn in a lifetime if I stay in high school?Many of these essays are amazing to use as "instructional notes" to people you care for who are making less than wise decisions. If you know someone who speeds a lot, one of the essays talks about how this increases your possibility of getting ticketed and fined. If you're in an environment where a group is trying to develop a consensus, you learn some tricks on getting that to work (and what to avoid). There are essays in here for a wide dozens of situations - family, professional, and personal.On one hand this chapter-based layout is great. If you know someone who smokes, you leap to "A Case for Smoking", read that, and share it. However, a lot of of the titles here are in the "cutesy" category. What is "Figures Don't Lie ..." about? It could be anything. How about "The Duke of Pork"? Or "MB(U)O"? Cutesy titles are amazing for magazine articles when you're turning the page anyway, but for a reference book like this it would have been far better if the titles each had clear ill, once you create yourself a cross-key, so you know what goes with what, you're all set. This is the type of book you lend out to family and mates - and then maybe don't obtain back because they are then busy foisting it on their children and parents. So be ready to yourself another copy. You'll wish to. This is the kind of the book you like to have around.Well recommended.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    This perfect book answers several questions that I have always wondered about - but never knew how to approach them. It also provideds help for problems I feel strongly about but did not understand why. It clarifies why some counter intuitive actions may be so effective. Finally it provides help to those of us working with young adults on how and why to take the proper long term actions. He tips at why rapidly finishing high school and college will provide much more income over the long th is really only a little building block in this book. No advanced math is required, just addition and averaging. The math is a tool - a easy effective one at that- and nothing more. The main focus is providing solutions to problems one feels strongly about but does not have a clue on how to attack is book has also reminded me of a few ways I better improve myself. I stick to the speed limit and no longer tailgate!!!!!I just want Mr. Shaffner would write another book!!!!!

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    There are so a lot of biographies about Hitler out there for young readers, but this is by far the best. Giblin is a master at using basic sources (photos, letters, etc) to document Hitler's youth, rise to power, and his goals. Overall, the notice is that Hitler wasn't this anomalous monster, but he was a man. A demagogue who gave the people what they wanted, and then pushed them all over the brink. He did monstrous things, he was terrible, he was the worst, but Giblin gives insight into why and how he achieved the things he did. Children are fascinated by Hitler, and I understand why. Giving them Giblin's book is the most responsible method to support them satisfy that thirst. He dispels the rumors and lies about Hitler's life, and leaves us with an understanding greater than you'd expect for a middle grades book.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    👍

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    I orginally bought this book to support me in explaining a few primary decisions to young people in need of a various approach to reasoning. It served its purpose well and I applaude the author for it. There are times when you have to sit down with people and "figure" things out before an smart decision can be made. This one helps you through the process.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    This is an awesome book and should be needed reading for anybody who lives in the modern world.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    Interesting. A various point of view. Worth the reader's time.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    The Arithmetic of Life and Death by George Shaffner is a collection of essays. Each essay highlights how easy math can be used to evaluate one of life's necessary questions. This isn't a puzzle or riddle book. You don't have to know advanced calculus to examine the questions. They are straightforward - like, how much more income will I earn in a lifetime if I stay in high school?Many of these essays are amazing to use as "instructional notes" to people you care for who are making less than wise decisions. If you know someone who speeds a lot, one of the essays talks about how this increases your possibility of getting ticketed and fined. If you're in an environment where a group is trying to develop a consensus, you learn some tricks on getting that to work (and what to avoid). There are essays in here for a wide dozens of situations - family, professional, and personal.On one hand this chapter-based layout is great. If you know someone who smokes, you leap to "A Case for Smoking", read that, and share it. However, a lot of of the titles here are in the "cutesy" category. What is "Figures Don't Lie ..." about? It could be anything. How about "The Duke of Pork"? Or "MB(U)O"? Cutesy titles are amazing for magazine articles when you're turning the page anyway, but for a reference book like this it would have been far better if the titles each had clear ill, once you create yourself a cross-key, so you know what goes with what, you're all set. This is the type of book you lend out to family and mates - and then maybe don't obtain back because they are then busy foisting it on their children and parents. So be ready to yourself another copy. You'll wish to. This is the kind of the book you like to have around.Well recommended.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    This is a flawless book, a masterpiece and exploration of history in written form. A real strong example of how to write a lasting book that will stand the try of time. A book that will stick with you and give you pure satisfaction in the learning process and historical makeup that takes put through this book. A unbelievable educational book to learn about one of the most vilest and most interesting characters in all of is is a unbelievable teaching tool and also a book that any Globe Battle 2 buff or history buff will enjoy. A amazing book to discover this man of history. A matter of fact biography style research that reads like a book. It holds your attention and educates you in the process. Highly recommended.A must read, must own.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    The Arithmetic of Life and Death by George Shaffner is a collection of essays. Each essay highlights how easy math can be used to evaluate one of life's necessary questions. This isn't a puzzle or riddle book. You don't have to know advanced calculus to examine the questions. They are straightforward - like, how much more income will I earn in a lifetime if I stay in high school?Many of these essays are amazing to use as "instructional notes" to people you care for who are making less than wise decisions. If you know someone who speeds a lot, one of the essays talks about how this increases your possibility of getting ticketed and fined. If you're in an environment where a group is trying to develop a consensus, you learn some tricks on getting that to work (and what to avoid). There are essays in here for a wide dozens of situations - family, professional, and personal.On one hand this chapter-based layout is great. If you know someone who smokes, you leap to "A Case for Smoking", read that, and share it. However, a lot of of the titles here are in the "cutesy" category. What is "Figures Don't Lie ..." about? It could be anything. How about "The Duke of Pork"? Or "MB(U)O"? Cutesy titles are amazing for magazine articles when you're turning the page anyway, but for a reference book like this it would have been far better if the titles each had clear ill, once you create yourself a cross-key, so you know what goes with what, you're all set. This is the type of book you lend out to family and mates - and then maybe don't obtain back because they are then busy foisting it on their children and parents. So be ready to yourself another copy. You'll wish to. This is the kind of the book you like to have around.Well recommended.

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    The Law of Life and Death []  2020-7-28 18:59

    This book adds nothing fresh to coverage of debates about life and death. The cases of Karen Quinlan, Terri Shiavo, and others have already been extremely well-covered by perfect journalists writing for the Fresh Yorker and Harpers. See "Harvesting the Dead," for example. Biopolitics has already been theorized by Giorgio Agamben in Homo Sacer (1995)Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) and earlier by Michel Focuault The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1: An Introduction. (The author is entirely ignorant of this work, btw). I returned my copy this book to Amazon.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    "There are no memorials to Adolf Hitler in Germany, the country he ruled with an iron hand from 1933 to 1945."So begins THE LIFE AND DEATH OF ADOLF HITLER by James Cross Giblin, a book that provides essential info for young adults who wish to understand the twentieth century. In writing a detailed biography of the most infamous human being of the latest hundred years, the author has place together a fascinating story that never lets up. In doing so, Mr. Giblin also provides a clear overview of the happenings leading up to and through the second globe war. Beginning with the haunting cover, the book is illustrated with large, clear photographs of the significant people and locations we encounter, as well as several well-drawn caps to which I'd periodically refer as I read the book."To celebrate his triumph, Hitler planned a sightseeing tour of Paris, a town he had long admired but never visited. His favorite architect, Albert Speer, accompanied the Führer as he visited the ornate Paris Opera, drove down the broad Champs Élysées, stopped at the Eiffel Tower, and lingered for a long time at the tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte. The three-hour tour through almost completely deserted streets--the French deliberately stayed away--ended on the heights of Montmartre, long known as a district for artists. Perhaps its narrow roads and outdoor cafés reminded Hitler of his youthful days in Vienna, when he himself had dreamed of being an artist."THE LIFE AND DEATH OF ADOLF HITLER does an exceptional job answering the questions of how Hitler was able to gain control of the German government, and how his forces and henchmen were able to succeed so horrifically and effectively before they were finally halted. We see how the long-term effects of the Versailles Treaty on Germany lead almost inevitably to the opportunity for Hitler's rise to power. We are reminded of the significant anti-Semitism in the US, Britain, and other countries that figured into their less-than-stellar response to Hitler's aggression and genocide. (I can remember how my friends' families still weren't welcome at some personal clubs in the 60's!) And, of course, we see Hitler from birth to death: as a son, a student, an artist, a failure, and a homeless person who eventually finds a group in which to belong. Joining that organization, making it his, and changing the globe forever--the lesson here is not lost on the author, who ends the book with a profile of some Neo-Nazi groups in existence today.We also obtain a amazing look at a lot of of the trustworthy men who turned Hitler's maniacal goals into reality:"Neat and methodical, Himmler was a born bureaucrat. He worshiped Hitler and would carry out any the Führer gave him, immediately and without question."I thought that I knew all about Adolf Hitler. But from the vivid photograph of one of his watercolor paintings to the info of his final hours with Eva Braun and Joseph Goebbels, James Cross Giblin has illuminated the life of a madman and given me a true ie Partington

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    When you hear the name Adolf Hitler, what comes to your mind? Murderer, crazy, psycho or how about "how could he pull off killing that a lot of people with out anybody knowing?". That I assure you comes to my mind. When I had to do a report on him, I chose, "The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler", by James Giblin. When I first picked out this book I thought, "Who in the globe would write about this insane person we call Hitler?!?!" James Giblin is like any other ordinary man born in Cleveland. He grew up in Ohio, spent his summers with his nose in a book, and had a supporting loving family. He has also written books about Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. So why would someone in his right mind choose to write about a man who is hated by virtually every soul in the entire world. I don't believe that James Giblin admired Adolf Hitler, but that he wanted people to know the entire history of the happenings that led up to and formed the person that we know as Adolf Hitler. James has written a very clear and concise story about Adolf Hitler's life. He started with when Adolf was a child. He described how Adolf was closer to his mother than his father. He tells about one time that Adolf and his childhood mate decided that they would never present fear again and that the next time Adolf's father used a belt on him that he would not cry like he used to. James Giblin covered virtually every aspect of Hitler's life and without any bias. This book helped me to have a better understanding of how Hitler's mind really worked. It showed that he actually had a heart under all of his hatred and insanity. I learned a lot from this book. I learned much more than I would learn from a sophomore Globe History book that only contained the section of his life describing him killing off a lot of Jews and other religious and ethnic groups to form the superior human race. This book was indeed very helpful in that the opinions were presented in such a manner so as to not sway you to either hate him or like him, just straight facts. I know what you're thinking., "How in the globe would this ordinary man obtain all this info on this monster?" It was simple, he got quotes, read interviews, looked at pictures, and got other such info from the book Adolf Hitler wrote himself titled Mein Kampf. The info in Hitler's book helped me to further understand why he thought the method he did. For example, he hated the fact that when he returned home from Globe Battle I, the Jews were holding all of the high political offices and he blamed them for the loss of Globe Battle I. His book also contained a lot of pictures that helped me to understand what Giblin was writing about. The book by Hitler helped me to have a better understanding of both Hitler and the method he was and to also understand what the author James Giblin wrote. I found it to be both informative and helpful. Giblin's sentences were not so intense and were easy and easier to read and understand. This book wasn't as poor as I thought it would be. I tried to push away all my thoughts of what he did and all the people he damage and tried to think of him as a man I knew nothing about. After doing so, I found it was simple to obtain through the book. But at times when I did read it, I would obtain angry and say. "why would you do that?!?!?!" I would stop reading for a while but then I would pick it up and begin reading where I left off. I don't think that this book was a waste of time but it definitely wasn't my style of reading to choose. If you like reading about historical figures then this is a amazing book for you to read. If you can push aside your feelings about Adolf Hitler and what you feel about him, then I think this book would be a unbelievable book for you to read. It was well written and very interesting and informative.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    Ser Goot!!!!

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    Fundamental insights to tutorial life decisions. Short, sharp and simple to read. Excellent.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    I just received the book. I am not a morbid person. But that man was so evil and I just wanted to read all about him. I have read a lot of books on the Holocaust and it is hard to believe that happened in our lifetime. There are people who do not believe this happened. But I do.

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    The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler []  2020-1-28 0:20

    This book is very informative. It gives the background of one of the world's most infamous men. It is not biased in any way. Instead, it gives a clear history of Hitler's life. Readers might be surprised to search out about the a lot of accomplishments of this much-hated man. It created me think about how Adolf Hitler could have contributed to society, instead of hurting so a lot of people. Things could have been VERY different...It is so sad to realize he wasted his talents and destroyed a lot of lives because of hate.

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    The Law of Life and Death []  2020-7-28 18:59

    The author is a law professor. She tackles a very difficult and emotional subject in our society. The science and the law have been and still are changing in defining how to define when a person is alive and when they are dead. Problems like brain death, and cardiopulmonary death are addressed, as well as statutory and common law on life are addressed. This is a well done book about a difficult subject that we talk about very small in our society.

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    The Arithmetic of Life and Death []  2020-6-22 18:50

    The Arithmetic of Life and Death by George Shaffner is a collection of essays. Each essay highlights how easy math can be used to evaluate one of life's necessary questions. This isn't a puzzle or riddle book. You don't have to know advanced calculus to examine the questions. They are straightforward - like, how much more income will I earn in a lifetime if I stay in high school?Many of these essays are amazing to use as "instructional notes" to people you care for who are making less than wise decisions. If you know someone who speeds a lot, one of the essays talks about how this increases your possibility of getting ticketed and fined. If you're in an environment where a group is trying to develop a consensus, you learn some tricks on getting that to work (and what to avoid). There are essays in here for a wide dozens of situations - family, professional, and personal.On one hand this chapter-based layout is great. If you know someone who smokes, you leap to "A Case for Smoking", read that, and share it. However, a lot of of the titles here are in the "cutesy" category. What is "Figures Don't Lie ..." about? It could be anything. How about "The Duke of Pork"? Or "MB(U)O"? Cutesy titles are amazing for magazine articles when you're turning the page anyway, but for a reference book like this it would have been far better if the titles each had clear ill, once you create yourself a cross-key, so you know what goes with what, you're all set. This is the type of book you lend out to family and mates - and then maybe don't obtain back because they are then busy foisting it on their children and parents. So be ready to yourself another copy. You'll wish to. This is the kind of the book you like to have around.Well recommended.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    People seem lately to rewrite history in their own image, useful to their purposes, as though their agendas were always the norm and to keep differently than they do is aberrant and has been since the beginning of our country's history. That this is not real should be more easily grasped by a commonwealth that has grown around the notions of equality and tolerance, but media is used to turn that fiction into fresh "realities", fresh "truths," fresh "histories." It is for the historical scholar to take a look based upon evidence in writings and records of those times. Jill Lepore does this with humor and insight into the realities of the days long ago forgotten and so tattered and worn by their adoption by ideagogues pandering their own self-serving interpretations. The realities of life were much more colourful by the closeness of death in previous ages not equipped with a health industry to deny death at all costs. This book looks into those realities and cultural differences, at times humorous, or profound, or a bit of both.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    Jill Lepore is an historian who recently wrote about Ben Franklin's sister and I noticed that some of her other books looked good. This was very interesting and very different.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    the book is a disappointment The content was culled from articles in the Fresh Yorker. JILL Lepore simply lets down readers who anticipated more.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    Very interesting and thoughtful analysis of historical precedents to current policies and thinking about birth, death, child-raising, life. I like the author's "take" on things that we accept as part of the zeitgeist.I'd recommend it if you have fun historical analysis.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    Written in a nice, breezy style; yet very well researched. Nearly half the Kindle edition is composed of the endnotes and index. Life's different stages considered by a very interesting writer.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    This is the history of American culture told in the engaging style of a literary newswoman. By using the evolution of a nationally famous android game throughout the decades the author defines our changing social values. Her research of happenings from the wide range of venues including newspapers, books, movies, etc is rendered with an immediacy as if this reader felt as if she were witness to discoveries, ideas, fads in as they effected public opinion then and result us now. I search it difficult to place this kind of history down. It is Fresh Yorker style at its best.;a dramatic immediacy that leaves one feeling that he or she were there.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    This book is NOT a history of anything, really, but it is a fascinating read if one enjoys well-written essays on American culture. The author is erudite, without being dry or overly academic. I learned some things and got some chuckles reading The Mansion of Happiness.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    this is a quirky book, but filled with so much insight and things to think about. arrived quickly and as specified

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    Those looking for simple, weighty, biblical answers to life's essential questions will be disappointed. Instead, Professor Lepore portrays detailed snapshots of our nation at various ages. We are left to pull together the confusing and at times contradictory currents of American e a carefully documented, readable, and in locations humorous look at how our nation and its thinking has changed, since our founding fathers walked the earth. She gives evenhanded treatment of her topics that counters history's fundamentalists. She writes of the history that was rather than what ought to have freshing.

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    The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death []  2020-2-6 21:12

    A collection of well-written essays intertwining past with present. The parallels the author draws are quite interesting, she has a talent for synthesizing info and a amazing sense of humor! A fun book to pick up and read a chapter here or there, it doesn't have to be read sequentially or all at once. The subjects covered are diverse, I really enjoyed it!

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    None.

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    It is one of the best book I have read regarding the Middle East. What happened during that period is what is still now affecting this region. Amazing insights and very detailed info about the Middle East and the american policies during that time. One comment in the book if it was at that time taken into consideration, a lot of lives would have been saved.Looking forward to read more.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    Maybe not of interest to everyone, but if you have history with, and love for the Amazing Lakes this is a amazing read. I turned the pages like it was a murder mystery and I could hardly wait to search out the next clue about what would live and what would die beneath the waves. Full of fascinating science and interesting trivia and history. I am going to read it again to support me remember what I learned.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    This is an perfect telling of the ecology of the Amazing Lakes. It emphasizes the role that invasive species have played in the decline of the Amazing Lakes during the 20th Century. The book can be trying to read if you love the Amazing Lakes and grew up near them as I did; almost everything humans have done in and to the Amazing Lakes watershed have caused problems. But it helps to have a concise discussion and history of those issues and Egan's book does this admirably. The book is very well written. The narrative flows quickly and Egan does a amazing job of keeping your interest piqued. Egan makes clear that in a natural system as complex as the Amazing Lakes, humans really have small clue what we are doing. Nor do we have the insight to understand what our actions will cause decades hence. I've feared for some time that as a planet and species, we're screwed. Sadly Egan's book did small to allay that fear. Highly recommended.

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    Amazing

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    I still don't understand fully the complexities of the region but this book brought me more clarity than any other book I've read.

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    This is an perfect and honest read of amazing men working for their cause, and a clearer story on the Palestinian struggle for justice than I have ever seen. It gives an inside view of the ways the CIA works, and the heart-warming story of the life and death of Robert Ames, his work, and his friendships in the Middle East that helped shape history. I couldn't place it down.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    I consider myself relatively well-informed, but every page was a revelation. Could have something to do with the fact that I am an Easterner, not familiar with Amazing Lakes history, which is fascinating. But the environment and climate change are universals, and this story of human abuse of Nature and resulting imbalances, and attempts to fix them, and the unforeseen consequences of the fixes.....on and on, as well as the kind of shortsighted resistances place up by often well-meaning (although sometimes not so well-meaning) groups and individuals rings so real in these times.Dan Egan's writing is clear, concise and, with his inclusion at every turn of the people involved, a page-turner, not often said about non-fiction, at least for though the topic of the stupidity of environmental degradation is often depressing, the inclusion of some very interesting positive stuff, adaptation of some threatened species, and especially people's recognition of how to head off future crashes without creating fresh catastrophes, left me much more hopeful.We all have to live in this world, the book gave me a view of a put I think I'm going to visit soon.

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    Interesting insight into a CIA officer's life, and especially into behind-the scenes going ons in international ually well written and readable. However, to my mind the author was more than a small smitten and uncritical of the subject, and occasionally his political views distorted the narrative, even if fairly subtle.

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    This book gives a large amount of detail of our past dealings in the Middle East. If you've ever wondered why things are the method they are now, this book will respond a lot of questions. Robert Ames was one of those quiet specialists that are all to rare in the globe today. This was a difficult book to place down.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    The first 2/3s of this book focuses on invasive species and the people who are contesting those biological incursions. There is a bit of history tying it all together, and a lot of unbelievable research illuminating the issues, but a fair chunk of the story focuses on the impact and consequences as felt by the fishing industry, vacationers, the shipping industry, and municipal water managers. I greatly appreciated the occasional geological, ecological, and hydrological perspectives of the different scientists interviewed by the author, as well as the motivations and decisions of policy makers and how their endeavors affected the e latest third of the book looks to the future and addresses the concern of resource extraction, exploitation, and degradation. I would have loved to seen more of this topic, but the author finished on a positive note with restoration and rehabilitation being the rallying cry of anyone hoping to pass this regional treasure onto future generations (for better or for worse).This should be purchased and passed around the Amazing Lakes communities so that the 40-50 million locals can appreciate what they have before it is lost. Politicians only care about their reputation while in office, and profiteering capitalists only see this land as an opportunity for private gain. Authors like Dan Egan provide us with the knowledge important to protect and defend these fragile and finite resources. This is an necessary work of journalism and deserves the respect and appreciation of anyone and everyone living in the Amazing Lakes anks Dan.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    Dan Egan's "The Death and Life of the Amazing Lakes" is a sweeping chronicle of North America's biggest fresh-water lakes and the environmental threats they face. Tracing their geological history, from the end of the latest ice-age some 10,000 years ago, to today's troubling headlines, Egan explores man's impact on one of the World's most precious resources: fresh-water. Well written and meticulously researched the book is endlessly fascinating with the author's hand-on approach of traveling to a lot of areas and interviewing the people who live and/or work in these affected areas. The issues started with the building of some bypass-canals in an attempt to link the Amazing Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean and the globe of international shipping. Done with the best, of intentions in the mid 19th Century, these canals would let goods from all over the Globe direct access to our "inland seas" and the communities who crowd their shores. Sounds like a amazing plan, right? Issue is; these canals not only served as a pathway for globe commerce they were also a excellent avenue for any invasive organisms that happened that way. Whether these organisms swam, drifted or hitched a ride in the ballast of a cargo ship, they came in vast numbers from all over the Atlantic Seaboard and beyond. And they were unstoppable! I really enjoyed reading Dan Egan's marvelous book on the history and ecology of the Amazing Lakes. Written for the layman reader in clear, non technical prose, Egan starts out with their origins at the end of the latest Ice Age. But it's man's impact on The Lakes, both intentional and non-intentional, that makes up the bulk of the book. The only connection between The Amazing Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean is the St. Lawrence River so any unwanted organisms would have a hard time getting past the a lot of rapids and of course Niagara Falls. The early 19th Century governments of the United States and Canada wanted to begin the zone to worldwide shipping as a boost to the local economies and improve both commercial and recreational fishing. To that end it was decided to construct a series of canals that would let the passage of deep-sea ships through a series of locks. There were a few dissenting voices heard but but those voices were largely ignored by the two governments and the canals were created available to overseas shipping concerns and the doorway to The Amazing Lakes was opened wide. At first everything worked fine but it wasn't long before environmental issues began to crop up. Foreign organisms, fish, algae, ect, found passage to The Lakes on the hulls, and in the ballast tanks, of deep sea ships and, it turns out, the locks were largely ineffectual in stopping the invasion. Biologists and fishermen began noticing some strange fish in their catches. unfamiliar shell-fish and algae blooms added to the warning signs, but to no avail. Adding to the issue was the sewage discharge from coastal communities and and over app of fertilizer by farming concerns. It's a war that continues to this very day. I was amazed at some of the suggestions created by professional biologists and by politicians, in both countries, to "fix" the problems. Also awesome was the connection between The Amazing Lakes and the Mississippi River and bodies of water even further west, it truly is a little world. I wholly recommend this book to anyone interested in the ecology and and social impact that can occur when Man tries to "improve" on Nature and how short sighted some scientists and governments can be. I received this Kindle edition through the Amazing Reads Giveaway program. There were no technical or downloading problems with this st Ranger

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    This is an interesting, if rather slow, read. Add it to the pile of 'what ifs' … what if Robert Ames, a man knowledgable about the Middle East who appeared to be much more sympathetic to the Palestinian cause, had lived and risen to become the CIA director? Add it to your list if you are interested in researching alll sides of the history of our involvement in this zone of the globe since after WW2.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    How much can the Amazing Lakes take? Dan Egan chronicles the successive invasions by lampreys, alewives, and zebra and quagga mussels. (Interesting fact: under some conditions, these mussels can filter "all of Lake Michigan in less than two weeks, sucking up the life that is the base of the meal web and making its waters some of the clearest freshwater in the world.") He explains why salmon were introduced in lieu of an emphasis on restoring native lake trout. He documents the spread of invasive species (into and out of Lake Michigan) through the flow-reversed Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. He follows the northward approach of bighead, silver, and black carp. He persuasively argues for ballast-loaded overseas ships transferring their cargo to local ships or railroad lines instead of squeezing though the St. Lawrence Seaway. Egan demonstrates the urgent need for the United States and Canadian governments to actively protect an eco-system holding 20% of the world's non-frozen surface new water. Most importantly, after all the poor news, Egan concludes with proposals and discoveries that provide hope for our Amazing Lakes. Fascinating reading; highly recommended.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    This is a superb and comprehensive history of the efforts men have created to control the Amazing Lakes, and the often hugely harmful results, usually not e Seaway was obsolete when it opened because its locks were too small, and shipping containers launched about the same time changed the whole nature of commercial navigation. But ships using the Seaway did bring in devastating foreign invaders, from aquatic plants to sea lampreys, alewives, and mussels. Egan is amazing on the financial interests, the appalling inaction by the EPA on ballast and pollution from farms, and the Troops Corp's resistance to consider shutting down the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal which threatens Lake Michigan with an invasion of carp. I've read pieces of a lot of of the subjects he covers, but he goes into amazing depth and links the pieces together in a very readable book. His conclusion seems to be to proceed with caution, but thee is hope. Native species such as lake trout and whitefish are rebounding and there's hope for perch.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    I could happily tell tales about adventures on or on the edges of the Amazing Lakes that would create this note less a review and more a private travelogue. As much as I think I know, Dan Egan’s book gave me a fresh perspective about what has happened in and under the water. In short, I learned more about canals, locks, dams, sewers, trout, lampreys, alewives, salmon, mussels, carp, and toxic an artfully connects all the subjects in a historical overview. His descriptions and explanations of lake degradation provide enough detail to understand the connections between human actions and consequences, but not so much that the reader feels intimidated by specialized knowledge or discouraged to complete the book. Then Egan describes some options for the future, including public policy decisions that might be created in to improve the health of Amazing the wake of reading this book, there are a number of questions that hold my mind working late at night: Exactly what is the chemical compound used to kill/control sea lamprey, and what is its long-term effects on humans and wildlife? Will the “front door” to invasions (St. Lawrence Seaway) die its own slow death due to the relatively high cost and decreasing profitability of maintaining canals and locks? What are the most necessary practical and political hurdles to cross in to close the “back door” to invasions (Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal) and to restore the natural divide between the Amazing Lakes and the Mississippi River basin?If you live near and/or love the Amazing Lakes, then this is a book I highly recommend!

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    This book is a detailed experience of one of America's amazing Secret Soldiers and gives a amazing insite to the man Robert Ames.

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    The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames [Book]  2018-1-23 18:0

    I feared up even though I knew Robert Ames died before I read the book. He was human with all the flaws but was a genuinely amazing man who worked very hard for what he believed in. Unfortunately that cost him his life. Amazing book, really brings you in and keeps you engaged.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    Dan Egan's book is fascinating from begin to finish. I learned a myriad of fresh facts about the Amazing Lakes' geological and inherent histories, as well as about accounts of invasive species introduced through the miscalculations of people and governments. Egan's compelling talent for telling stories with engaging info and intriguing characters makes this book an enjoyable educational experience.

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    The Death and Life of the Great Lakes []  2020-1-22 20:50

    I've had the advantage of hearing Dan Egan from a front row table promote his book, and he was very good. But, his writing is 10X better than his speaking skills. He takes complicated problems and breaks them down for the average Joe. I recommended this book to my book club, which is currently reading it. All of the feedback is unbelievable positive. He locations these problems in both a national and international context. It's not just another regional issue. About the only significant threat which he misses is the 65-year-old oil pipeline which runs under the Mackinaw Straits. But, that may have come to the forefront after his book went to print. He makes a cogent argument that the Amazing Lakes are left begin to the import of more invasive species in little ship ballast tanks, which are the only ones which can still obtain through the St. Lawrence Seaway, and these ships bring less than 2% of foreign cargo into the United States. Bottom Line: That cargo could just as easily be off-loaded to trains and trucks at our seaports at very small additional cost. I would like to see a more quantitative economic analysis of this argument. But, Egan is a newspaper reporter, not an economist.

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    Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America's First Spy [Book]  2017-11-16 18:0

    Nathan Hale is an ancestor of mine, and I own numerous old biographies of him, dated from 1855 to 1915. This fresh biography by Mr. Phelps is by far the best biography of Nathan Hale I have ever read. Mr. Phelps extensively documents everything he says, and he uses material (a Tory diary) discovered just a couple of decades ago to finally settle who it was that betrayed/uncovered Nathan's spy mission, and how he was captured. He has really filled out the story of Nathan Hale in a method none of the earlier biographies I have read do. Mr. Phelps writes in a positive method about Nathan's faith and upbringing and his Christian character, without trying to glorify him as a lot of early biographies do. This allowed me to learn much more about his hero than I have learned in all the other biographies place together. On the other hand, he does not overlook or sugar coat the mistakes Nathan created that led to his capture, which early biographies tend to do. I also learned a amazing about his family, his upbringing, his Yale days, and his mates that I did not know. This has brought him to life as a true person instead of just the character of American ree awesome (to me) things I learned from Mr. Phelps: 1) Nathan is probably the first teacher in colonial America to begin a school for girls, at a time when it was not legal under British law for girls to go to school to learn to read and write (they could go to school for sewing, cooking and keeping house); 2) Five of Nathan's brothers also served in militias or the American troops during the war; and 3) From his research Mr. Phelps believes Nathan is the first American to publicly declare that Americans should war for their independence from Britain, in a speech he gave at a city meeting the night he resigned as city schoolmaster. Independence was a fresh word in the English language (who knew?) and not commonly used at that e only criticism of the book at all is that there are no maps in it to present us where the action was taking place. I found myself reading the book with my phone next to me with Google Maps up, so I could trace the routes the characters in the book were taking. I suspect that most people who do not live in Fresh England do not know the relationships between Coventry, Moodus(!) (East Haddam), Fresh London, Fresh Haven, Bridgeport, Stamford, Hartford, Boston, Fresh York City, Harlem Heights, the Battery, Staten Island, Long Island, and on and on. Google maps really helped me understand what was happening. (In my opinion, the gold standard for American histories that use maps is Barnet Schecter, "The War for Fresh York: The Town at the Heart of the American Revolution, 2003, which happens to be one of Mr. Phelps sources.) There are no images or drawings in the book either, but I really missed not having maps to is book is very well written, and is enjoyable just as a amazing biography. But for those who wish to dig deeper the end notes and bibliography will point you to the original source documents in the US and in England. I highly recommend this book for all who are interested in the American Revolution.

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    Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America's First Spy [Book]  2017-11-16 18:0

    M. William Phelps does an updated biography on the life of Nathan Hale America's first spy to be executed. Washington was well known for his desire to gather intelligence on the opponent and set up several spy rings throughout the revolution (See Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring for that history). Nathan Hale was the first attempt at spying on the British in the days leading up to the invasion of Fresh York. Nathan was not a successful spy and was caught and hung by one of the amazing thugs of the American Revolution. From young farm boy in Connecticut to Yale Education to educator of colonial youth the reader gets to see a unbelievable picture of life in colonial America leading up to the revolution. Nathan Hale is painted as a patriot who would give anything for the cause and comes off as a very idealistic character here. The basic sources presented and his actions at Yale lend credence to this story and do create for a likely case that he uttered his popular phrase before being hung. Overall while there were one or two factual misprints that have already been noted by other reviewers there is still value in this book for those who really wish to see more into the life of colonial America and how your average educated person became involved in the revolution instead of following the life of one of the major figures.

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    Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America's First Spy [Book]  2017-11-16 18:0

    "I regret that I have but one life to give to my country."Nathan Hale speaks this popular line and is then hung at the gallows by the British General Howe as a spy for the American rebellion.I thought the legend was interesting enough that I took a review copy from publisher to learn more about America's first spy. What I learned is that the legend is much more interesting than the truth.Hale was used a martyr for the American rebellion, becoming synonymous with patriotism, freedom, and the war for liberty. He was a well-learned man, handsome, and amazing with the much as Mr. Phelps tries to bring Hale to life and fill in his background, there just is not much there. The book is thin and spends as much time filling in stories about the Revolutionary Battle and other people in Hale's life as it does telling Hale's turns out that Hale was not a very amazing spy. He was caught on first mission. It also turns out that he probably did not speak that popular ybe I'll stick with the legend.

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    Life Will Be the Death of Me: ...And You Too! []  2020-1-18 20:13

    I rarely read a book in one day. Chelsea had me from the first page. I laughed, I cried (for her and for myself) while reading about her quest to have a deeper understanding of herself. Her honesty and vulnerability were refreshing and her insights created me realize I am also ready to dig deeper. A reminder that it's never too late.

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    The Death and Life of Great American Cities []  2020-1-23 19:12

    Every person living in a town should read this book. Most of us who have studied Jane Jacobs are either architects, urbanists or simply interested in how cities work. However Jane Jacobs as an ordinary citizen that was worried about how modern urbanism has been destroying humanity's natural tendency to produce living locations according to our social norms, and not because of our addiction to automobiles. The more people read this book, the closer we will be to fixing what modernism in urban design has done to enslave us to the use of autos, and how our lives have changed in a negative method by such design.

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    Ghosts of the Tsunami: Death and Life in Japan []  2020-1-25 3:4

    Powerful, poignant, well-researched and beautifully written. It sheds light on the impact the tsunami had on several of the families in its path, and opens western eyes to the story of Okawa Elementary School and the kids lost there. I couldn’t place it down.

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    Life Will Be the Death of Me: . . . and you too! []  2020-1-19 23:23

    I'm giving this book a 5 star review even though I haven't read it. Do you know why? To off set The reviewers below who gave it one star even though they didn't read the book. Just because you don't like Chelsea doesn't mean you should give something a badd review that's not right people. Chelsea hold fighting the amazing fight. And you're appearance onthe Howard Stern present today was fantastic

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    Life Will Be the Death of Me: . . . and you too! []  2020-1-19 23:23

    The best

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    Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig []  2020-1-19 23:24

    A superbly told tale of the life and death of one of baseball's all-time greats. If you thought you'd heard everything there is to know about this strong yet gentle man, grab a copy of this book and begin reading. From Lou's early family life, through high school and then into baseball at Columbia and finally the Yankees, Gehrig's story is compelling, star-studded and wonderfully presented. His tragic war with ALS, still at an age where he could easily have rewritten baseball's record book, unfolds in heartbreaking detail. Through it all, we see what an awesome soul Gehrig was, and how his understated lifestyle compared with most of the ballplayers of yesterday and today set him apart. Jonathan Eig's treatment of this awesome story makes this a biography for the ages. Again, no matter how much you thought you knew about Lou Gehrig, even after seeing the Gary Cooper movie about his life, you'll have fun and learn from this fine book.

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    Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig []  2020-1-19 23:24

    I just finished reading this outstanding book, Luckiest Man, and I wish to share with others how much I enjoyed it. I'm a SABR member and a baseball historian of some note and I've read a lot of baseball biographies. This is certainly right up there among the very best. By the time I finished it, I really felt that the author had captured the essence of the man, Lou Gehrig, greatly surpassing the superficial baseball persona that we're all familiar with. I felt like I came to know Lou, and could even anticipate accurately how he would react to the various happenings that occurred in his life. This created the final tragic chapters dealing with his demise and death very addition, I enjoyed the hero development of his parents, his wife, and the a lot of others personalities in Lou's world. Eig's engaging writing style created the book enjoyable to read, and I found the pages were just flying by. As a baseball historian, I read the text with a critical eye, but found absolutely no factual nathan Eig has written a unbelievable book - the definitive biography of the amazing Lou Gehrig, and has created an extraordinary contribution to baseball history. Available for exactly one cent, used, from Amazon, this has to be the baseball bargain of the decade! If you love baseball history, do yourself a favor and this book.

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    Boy on Ice: The Life and Death of Derek Boogaard []  2020-1-19 23:27

    Avid hockey fan here and I am into reading biographies, hockey or non hockey related... I thought the beginning of the book covered too much on Derek's childhood, but it created the ending that much more tragic once you read about his struggles with painkillers/alcohol. The eulogies cemented that see who Derek was, who he became and accomplished as an athlete, only to see it fall apart was the main reason I bought the book - I wanted to know why. The author does a amazing job of detailing this.What I want for is more info post-Derek's death. With all the prescriptions from NHL doctors and random drug dealers that Derek crossed paths with, what was their final judgment from a legal standpoint? Were any fired, caught or sent to jail (besides Aaron getting some legal troubles)? The truth lies somewhere in Derek having an addiction and his former doctors/friends enabling him. Not sure if Derek's dad is still pursuing this the end of the day, the book was worth it. Hope the Boogard family heals over time.

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    The Death and Life of Aida Hernandez: A Border Story []  2020-1-21 20:59

    This book succeeds in broadening public conversation about immigration policy that concerns undocumented men and women surviving along the border. In particular, this mix of journalistic fiction and ethnic-biography locations a spotlight on asylum policy for survivors of abuse. Aida’s story is rooted in a lot of not good decisions and a lot of inescapable circumstances. The trauma that she experiences should encourage the reader to re-evaluate our country’s treatment of less than model immigrants who are complicit by choice or by circumstance with narco-criminal exploitation of the vulnerable and marginalized. Neither conservatives nor liberals will be fully happy with the resolution/ solution to the core conflict in the book. For this reason, I consider the book a compelling conversation starter for a national dialogue on immigration. Compassion and pragmatism must prevail.

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    The Death and Life of Aida Hernandez: A Border Story []  2020-1-21 20:59

    This is a amazing story, although heartbreaking. It follows Aida Hernandez, and her war for a decent life after leaving Mexico for e writing in the book is great, and the story flows well. I couldn't place it down!

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    Titanic: The Death and Life of a Legend []  2020-1-13 18:59

    This books gives amazing insight to the construction of the amazing Titanic without overly romanticizing the history of this amazing ship. You really obtain to know the "players" and feel light you have visited the ship itself. Also gives amazing insight to some of the passengers as well as the class structure and culture of the day. Perfect read. would create all of my middle school students read this!

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    Junior Seau: The Life and Death of a Football Icon []  2020-1-20 19:9

    Junior was a amazing man and the globe is less without him. He is a player who transcended the android game he played, a man who transcended his life.Every mother and grandmother of a football player who has played with a concussion or a sprained ankle,and heaven only knows what else, knows that football is about more and less than life. Junior tells us, again and again.His daughter has a speech that he asked her to give if he was inducted into the Football Hall of Fame, as he could no longer speak for himself. She speaks without bitterness. She speaks beautifully. I saw it on the NYT website.We cannot ignore these problems any more. We must protect our Juniors of the future.

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    Junior Seau: The Life and Death of a Football Icon []  2020-1-20 19:9

    If you are a Chargers fan, this is a must read. So a lot of of us had no understanding of why Junior would or could have killed himself. Jim Trotter explains so much in his book. A large thank you to Junior's family for helping to create this book insightful into the man who really is the face, even now, of Chargers football.

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    Field Marshal: The Life and Death of Erwin Rommel []  2020-5-14 18:0

    Overall its a amazing read. The detailed war descriptions are the best. The author does sometimes go on repetitive rants/history lessons that don't much substance to the subject at hand. The author also uses a lot of French/German sayings, but no English translation or explanation.

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    The Bone Box: Confines of Life and Death []  2020-1-22 20:19

    In my opinion, the most fascinating and by far, the most significantly necessary biblical archeological discovery ever realized, created its sadly unacknowledged debut in an obscure burial cave in East Talpiot, Israel during 1980. Although this wonderful happening occurred more than 25 years ago, it is virtually unknown to almost the entire general public. Why it still remains almost totally unknown today is a amazing mystery, but part of the respond likely relates to the unprepared mentality of the academics who first analyzed the findings, and their seemingly lack of awareness of primary statistical analysis regarding the grouping of names.I am aware of only three books which address the importance of this wonderful discovery. The first is a very latest academic book about the Jesus Dynasty by the famous American scholar, Dr. James Tabor. The second is a novel by Kathy Reichs, and the third is this fast-paced, and well-researched novel by Itamar Bernstein about documented archeological research, as well as ancient Judaic and early Christian symbolism.But the book is also about love, spiritual healing and renewal - an alchemical marriage of sorts, between the living show and the living past, out of which grows the everlasting quintessential essence, as revealed through the deepest, most hidden, symbolic, almost gnostic teachings of the original Christian eat yourself to the enjoyment of a most entertaining and moving book about archeology, symbolism and love, and at the same time be prepared for several incredibly shocking truths concerning some of the actual info and mysteries surrounding the most underrated but greatest biblical archeological discovery in all of history.

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    The Bone Box: Confines of Life and Death []  2020-1-22 20:19

    Writing in a refreshing private style, tight and flowing, the author concentrates on what the reader expects from an perfect thriller. Credible though very imaginative an original narrative. Intensely engaging conflict between the main hero (supported by an IAA official and impaired by his own government) and opponent. Dramatic action as hard choices between patriotism and truth-seeking are forced upon the main character. Sensational archeology - all set upon a forceful description of the agony and deliverance of a father grieving the loss of his first borne son.Looking forward to the next book.

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    The Bone Box: Confines of Life and Death []  2020-1-22 20:19

    This was a beautiful amazing read - exciting and suspenseful - even for someone who isn't a religious historian. Other than some formatting problems likely stemming from the publisher, this was a very refreshing read in an exciting style. The story had some unexpected branches at times but tied it together with an intriguing, mysterious storyline which, according to the author, is based on real happenings which adds to the intrigue. Fun to read albeit a bit massive on the historical religious info - sometimes hard to follow for someone who isn't religious but, doesn't detract from the overall excitement.

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    Munson: The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain []  2020-7-4 18:55

    I'm a long time MLB Yankee fan and have a lot of Yankee heroes. I wanted to learn about the late amazing NY Yankee catcher Thurman rty Appel has wrote a better than amazing book on the late amazing NY Yankee catcher Thurman Munson. The book is a 376 page burner. I read it in three days. Some nice B/W pictures too. The book reads smooth with no boring parts. The reader wants to read on. Marty was the Yankees PR director and got to know Thurman well and got a lot of research for this book.We see Thurman and his two sisters and brother growing up in Canton, Ohio and having issues with their father who was a long distance truck driver. Plus some issues with their mother but nowhere as much as with their father. All leave the family as soon as they can either going to school, job or on their own. We see his father as verbally abusive and not a very loving father. Their mother allow the father do the discipline when he came home a lot of times with the belt. The father is shown as a true jerk.We see Thurman as a very amazing HS athlete in a lot of sports especially baseball. He gets a scholarship to Kent State. He excels in baseball and gets in the minors and eventually to the NY Yankees. We see him originally as a shortstop in High school/college and eventually developing into a amazing catcher for the NY Yankees with power and a amazing average. We see him winning Rookie of the year and later MVP. He was given the title and responsibility for being the Captain of the Yankees by manager Billy Martin with owner George Steinbrenner suggesting Martin decide if he wanted a Captain.We see the epic wars the Yankees had versus other ball clubs. We see the amazing rivalry between Thurman and Carton Fisk the catcher for the Red Sox. Both amazing competitive urman is shown as a gruff but loving man who sometimes got grumpy with some players and the media especially when he was in pain. We see him wanting to be for what he was worth and wanted to be the highest Yankee. We see owner Steinbrenner implying that until Reggie Jackson becomes a Yankee. We see some INMO jealousy in regards to urman did amazing in AL championship play... .339 average and led the Yankees to 3 Globe Series with a .373 average. He had MLB 113 HRs with a .292 average. He played with the Yankees less than 11 years and in the end his knees and legs were giving out and he played in amazing pain due to a lot of injuries and the hard joint stress due to catching. A very amazing player on the borderline of HOF. He did not create HOF.We see him marring his loving wife and having kids. Thurman is shown as family man who loved his wife and kids. We see Thurman becoming a personal pilot and quickly passing his tests (INMO too quickly) and eventually is legally able to fly his $1.5 million dollar jet. He wanted this quick plane so he could obtain home quickly to be with his family. Many, a lot of people plead to Thurman not to be flying airplanes especially this quick jet. He was only a pilot for 1 1/2 years and had only less than 40 hours experience flying the jet after being certified by his instructor and the FAA. Too quickly passing his tests and not much experience especially in jets. We see the crash landing with two passengers( fellow business true estate partner and a plane instructor..not jets ) Thurman crashes as the plane sinks and does not go up quick enough on full throttle. The two passengers survive with severe injuries while Thurman had a broken neck, trapped in his busted seat and died of smoke inhalation and toxic vapors. Just too much plane and not enough experience.We see the viewing and funereal with a lot of Yankee players, manager and management and Thurman's a lot of friends. A sad sad e reader really develops empathy with the death of Thurman, and his young wife and young kids left with no dad. The Yankees do give the family $1.3 million dollars left of his contract.A amazing book and added to our baseball book collection. 4 1/3 stars.

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    Munson: The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain []  2020-7-4 18:55

    I expected better writing from Marty Appel. The story bounced around a lot and seemed disjointed to me. It seemed like he would follow a topical line on Munson, then switch off randomly to something unrelated about a teammate. Although ultimately he told the story of Munson, it was a tough read. I've read much better biographies by other authors.

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    Broken Harts: The Life and Death of Owen Hart []  2020-7-13 18:53

    An perfect book about the life of the late, amazing Owen Hart. It's attractive because it describes the love Martha and Owen shared for each other, how much of a unbelievable human being Owen was, and the life those two shared in the show and had envisioned on sharing in the future once Owen finished wrestling. It's massive because it describes in amazing detail how Owen died on May 23, 1999 (Very, very sad). It's also sad because of the toxic environment Owen's family had in put which carried over to him and Martha's wedding and to the wrongful death lawsuit versus the then-WWF. It's attractive because Martha went toe to toe with Vince McMahon and the WWF in court, was victorious in quest for justice for Owen. An perfect book!

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    Broken Harts: The Life and Death of Owen Hart []  2020-7-13 18:53

    Martha Hart writes a compelling book about her life with Owen. From reading it, I could tell that she held him in high regard and loved him very much. It should be considered that sometimes Martha seemed to speak in put of Owen and place her desires and ideals as the same as Owen's. Her describing how he died and the effect of the lawsuit were eye opening to how the wrestling industry operated (and still operates). If you are looking for a book centered around Owen's wrestling career you might be disappointed but if you wish to read about how Owen lived and died I would recommend it. The material on the infamous stunt alone was shocking.

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    Broken Harts: The Life and Death of Owen Hart []  2020-7-13 18:53

    Not really up to a lot of other wrestling books. This is my first and only book that is written by a wrestler's wife. The best parts involved Owen Hart, his private life, his wrestling life and wrestling in general.Unfortunately, Martha place me off a small by being anti-wrestling. I mean I completely understand and agree with her anti-WWE/Vince in light of what happened to Owen and the resulting loss of her husband and her kids' father. What I don't agree with is her looking down on wrestlers as "freaks" as she called them several times and uneducated. If she had done her research more she would have found that there are lots of educated wrestlers who wrestle because that's what they love to do. Also there are some glaring mistakes. One mistake was her statement that Andre The Giant died in the 1980's. He died of a heart attack in so, I disagree that wrestling was just a job to Owen and that he didn't like it. I agree he might have felt differently about wrestling as it changed into Jerry Springer-like tv, but actual wrestling and in-ring work it was obvious Owen was passionate about it. He might not have loved wrestling as much as his wife or kids, which is normal. The wrestlers that love wrestling more than their wives or families are abnormal to me. Wrestling was in Owen's blood, but I think Martha & her mother both looked down on wrestling & wrestlers. I obtain the feeling Martha was ashamed of her husband's profession from the moment she met him.I do feel really sorry for her and Owen's kids. I can't imagine the shock of the tragic loss she must have felt when she was told Owen died. If I had a choice I would have borrowed this book (if anyone I knew had it) or gotten it at a library, but the only method I could read it was to it. Still I am glad if the goes to her and Owen's kids, or the Owen Hart foundation.I'm not anti-Marth Hart by any means. I just have various opinions than she does. I totally agree that Vince, WWE and others were negligent, stupid, and responsible for the horrible accident which cause Owen Hart his life. It is yet another case of wrestling going too far. I'm a huge wrestling fan, but wrestling sometimes goes too far.I also liked the interaction between Bret Hart and Martha. Unlike some who criticize Bret, I am glad Martha appreciated his help. You could tell that Bret really loved his brother and was real to his word that he would look after Martha and Owen's children if something ever happened to spite my various opinions on wrestling and wrestlers, I feel amazing I purchased this book. If the goes to Owen's family I feel amazing at the end of the day. I was absorbed by the book and don't regret buying it. At least now I know Martha's view on things and got to know Owen Hart a lot better than I did before I read this book.I recommend this book for the more die-hard wrestling fan, but warning that it might anger some with the anti-wrestling and putting down of wrestlers through-out the book. Other than the snobbish-ness I think Martha is a decent human being and feel sorry for her loss.

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    Broken Harts: The Life and Death of Owen Hart []  2020-7-13 18:53

    How poor and such a tragic happening that didn't need to be. Martha is an awesome human being to push rious to see how the WWE treats their employees now a days.

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    J.D.: : The Life and Death of a Forgotten NASCAR Legend []  2020-8-1 18:42

    Read this cover to cover in one shot! I found it to be well written by someone who has extensive first knowledge of J. D. His life, his family, and his before I obtain into the details, I think it wise to share a bit of my own history. I was there at the track the day J. D. Died (I was only 5, but still to this day I believe that was the day my love hate relationship with motorsports began) I also feel it is necessary to share that I am an active member of the safety squad at Watkins Glen International, and have been for over a decade. So I already have a basis of knowledge from a various perspective than some race fans.I was so very happy with the quality of content in this book, so much more than what I ever imagined about this tragically lost legend. From day one in J.D.'s career to that final green flag in 1991. The longevity of his career as a "independent" is something we will never ever seen again in Nascar. The inevitable evolution of the sport has created it impossible to be a real "independent". My favorite tale in the book was the glory of J. D. 's final checker flag, it was a heart warming tidbit before the ultimate tragedy would befall ong with the history of J. D., we also got a well painted picture of Jimmy Means. (the other driver involved in the incident). Then on top of that there was a amazing bit of info about the track itself and a lot of of the other horrific incidents that took put in at turn 5, including the a very latest crash (just weeks prior) when Tommy Kendall was so gravely injured. We got to hear his thoughts about it afterwards, something sadly we did not obtain from J. in Peace J. r legacy will never be lost because of this book, and thank you Brock for sharing!

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    J.D.: : The Life and Death of a Forgotten NASCAR Legend []  2020-8-1 18:42

    First off, allow me state that Brock Beard is a man truly dedicated to his craft. His www service has recapped races from the perspective of latest position in NASCAR races since 2008. As I started becoming more familiar with his online persona, I then saw he had written a painstakingly researched book about the king of the underdogs J.D. McDuffie.I'll admit that as a fan for 20+ years, I knew where and how J.D. met his end. Saw the footage on YouTube with Ned Jarrett screaming about the problem in turn 5 at Watkins Glen. That being said, I wasn't expecting the captivating back story that intermingles with just about every major facet of the garage zone in the time he was racing. While his story may not be as glamorous as, let's say, a Richard Petty, J.D. often found little successes running parts purchased second/third hand operating out of a that is a microcosm compared to the huge vast of today. His budget was as little as they come yet his driving talents often landed him up in the running more than you would e one stat that amazed me, and this was definitely talked about in the book, was that J.D. never finished on the lead lap in a Grand National/Winston Cup race. This was also in an era where it was common for men like Petty lap the whole field multiple times over in top-flight equipment. It's still awesome regardless because had J.D. been able to run a race or two in amazing equipment, like his mate Jimmy Means did with Rick Hendrick in 1987, there could have been untapped potential in the wrap it up, I just have to say this book is absolutely phenomenal and its a must read for all NASCAR fans. It reads familiar, but its a history lesson of that what happens in the back of the field is just as necessary as whom takes the checkered flag.

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    J.D.: : The Life and Death of a Forgotten NASCAR Legend []  2020-8-1 18:42

    I bought the book for a flight to Hawaii and read the entire flight there and back! I thought it was thoroughly detailed and I enjoyed reading about events/instances that weren’t known to me. I also like how it went back in time and just really enjoyed the perspective. The book arrived in excellent condition.

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    Unsettled Matters: the Life and Death of Bruce Lee []  2020-8-8 18:57

    I thought I was amazing a lot of things questions as the butler who vanished became wealthy. How on July 20 they all seem to be doing things that create guilt fall on certain people waiting to treat Bruce lee till it was basically useless.I think he was murdered and negligence too some who is Ill u don't wait to treat till its fatally useless.I think the lees need to uncover what really happened and give there lil dragon justice because there are unsettled matters to his coffin just opens up and bleeds blue through the silk lining that's him doing that wasn't his time yet a plan created sure it the book says what his art should of did it failed him in the invisible opponent but numerous people whom some are alive fame lots of motives were and still are there Lee family obtain Bruce justice before its too turn of the dragon .......

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    Unsettled Matters: the Life and Death of Bruce Lee []  2020-8-8 18:57

    I bought this Kindle bio hoping to search out more about my character Bruce Lee. What I got was an acc of his life with snide comments about the size of his testicles and other negative insinuations about his personality ... and I'm not making this up, the author actually talks about his testicles. For instance in different parts of the book he is described as a womanizing male chauvinist and lout. He is also depicted as rude vain boorish and self absorbed. Truly hero assassination at its finest. Bruce is not around to defend himself versus the coward who wrote this defamation of hero and Bruce's widow and kids certainly do not have to have this insult piled on her husband and their father. Pls do not help this author by buying this piece of crap.

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    Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America's First Spy [Book]  2017-11-16 18:0

    This book was helpful because I knew so small about Nathan Hale except for his dying words, "I regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." In fact, those words are disputed. Nathan was the son of a prosperous Connecticut farmer who insisted that his sons and daughters be well educated. After finishing local schools, Nathan and his younger brother attended and graduated from Yale University. Nathan was a school teacher for a few years until rumors reached Connecticut about the revolution brewing in Fresh England other states. He volunteered for the Troops under General Washington then in Boston where he served for some months until he was chosen to be a spy among British units in Fresh York. He wasn't a very clever spy because he was caught reasonably early and executed. However, he did uncover some intelligence for General Washington and is considered a hero. The book is well researched and contains info about business activites in Colonial Connecticut. For instance, Nathan's father owned a huge and successful farm and exported products to foreign countries.

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    Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America's First Spy [Book]  2017-11-16 18:0

    I not singularly appreciate Mr. Phelps' work as an Investigative Journalist and the enormous time spent with his nose to the grindstone of real darkness into the "why" of humanity's sickness, I believe he is a man of rare and empathetic amazing character. He is a amazing writer, gifted with abilities to bring life to true people involved...some smack of his use of zone & socioeconomic prose. I believe this is one of the a lot of ways his re-creation of horrible crimes may "jar" someone's memory to help in cold cases. Additionally, he "tells it like it is". As a Sheriff Deputy, I can certainly identify. Thank you as equally well for a really amazing look into the life of one of America's first heroes. Hold up the amazing work you give us who follow you with wonder at your wonderful energy...and for basically just giving a damn... Heather

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    Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America's First Spy [Book]  2017-11-16 18:0

    This book gives substance to a name I remember reading about in history class. It humanizes the name we are all familiar with and does an perfect job of describing the problems that he dealt with and provides a special perspective on the revolution.

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    The Bone Box: Confines of Life and Death []  2020-1-22 20:19

    After reading the previous reviews here, it seems like a contradiction of purpose to say you are seeking real info on a historical quest for the true Jesus through a fictional piece of work. Yet fiction accounts are purported to have more real info than actual research? Since when? Please let's not confuse the two.'The Bone Box' is OK as novels go, but none the less it IS fiction and should be kept in correct perspective. I recommend reading it for its intended purpose as a amazing entertaining piece of fiction. I give it 4 stars. I would have given it 5 stars but I had some issues with the author's sometimes amaturish use of phrases and writing, plus the author himself balked near the end and did not take a definitive stand regarding the Talpiot tomb authenticity.

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    Life Will Be the Death of Me: ...And You Too! []  2020-1-18 20:13

    I think the other reviews on here are reviewing Chelsea Handler as a personality from the past, rather than her current book. This book is a small less funny but a small more true and in touch as she discusses working through the repressed pain from her brother's death and father's subsequent absence. In this book Chelsea acknowledges her bouts of out-of-touch reality in the latest past and struggles with finding herself and real meaning in life. All with that satirical slight self deprecating humor I've come to love from her books! This book has already inspired me and motivated me to take another hard look at my own self and the globe we live in. Props Chelsea, I really fell in love with your book and appreciate your honesty and vulnerability. And of course your humor. You really present that humor can be a subtle and effective art.

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    Life Will Be the Death of Me: ...And You Too! []  2020-1-18 20:13

    Although I thoroughly enjoyed "Uganda Be Kidding Me", Chelsea Handler's fresh memoir, "Life Will Be the Death of Me: ... and you too!", is by far my favorite literary work from the comedienne. A transparent look into her memory, Handler leads readers on a hilarious, smart and candid tour of her life pre and post-election. From the death of her brother to her infatuation with Robert Mueller, Handler's memoir is unique, entertaining and thought-provoking. If you have fun comedy and candor, "Life Will Be the Death of Me: ... and you too!" must be on your summer reading list.

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    Life Will Be the Death of Me: ...And You Too! []  2020-1-18 20:13

    I have enjoyed all of her books thus far and was looking forward to reading this one. I honestly didn't even create it past page 24 before giving up and realizing that she would be ranting about politics the whole time. What a waste of $17 for the hardcover that I was hoping I would be able to pass along to a mate afterwards.

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    The Death and Life of Aida Hernandez: A Border Story []  2020-1-21 20:59

    Aida Hernandez is a pseudonym for a woman who was born in Mexico whose mother brought her and her siblings across the border from Agua Prieta into Douglas, Ariz., when Aida was too young to have any say in the matter. In her youth, workers, shoppers, mates and family ricocheted back and forth between the two towns and countries. The towns’ mutual dependence and interactions were such that people called them collectively DouglaPrieta, but by the time Aida was a teenager, a fresh policy of immigrant “deterrence” complicated and criminalized movement across the border. What had been considered a normal ebb and flow became risky—even dangerous, and the economy on both sides of the border da, her mother, and her sisters face joblessness, economic insecurity, and abuse by men on both sides of the border. Trapped into accepting a risky job in Agua Prieta by single motherhood and poverty, Aida is stabbed repeatedly in a late-night attack by a stranger, leading to her brief “death” and her latest trip across the border into the U.S. for emergency medical attention.Over the twenty-five first years of her life, the period covered in this narrative, Aida makes mistakes—many mistakes, some minor, some major—all piling up to form a mountain of physical, emotional, and legal challenges that threaten her quest for legal residency and portend a life-long war with chronic PTSD. The book is in part a narrative about Aida, her family, and her friends—people stuck on one side or the other of the border by virtue of their put of birth. It’s in part a narrative about the exponential growth in this nation’s border-control industry and the counter-intuitive decisions that have exasperated rather than resolved the problem of immigration over our southern a back-of-the-book essay, “About This Book,” the author, a professor of politics at Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA, which he credits with providing help for the research and completion of his book, makes the point of his book explicit: border policy isn’t “broken,” as is so-often stated. Instead, it is working well for many: politicians, personal corrections firms that run detention centers like prisons, smugglers, law-enforcement job-seekers, and government contractors—even Western Union—all of whom profit from a system that stigmatizes, punishes, and destroys people based on their birthplace, their geographic and career ambitions, their huge and small (but human) is is a huge book—a book that pulls more weight than its relatively modest 340 pages of narrative (not counting back-of-the book material) might suggest. First, Aida’s story is complicated—the kind of story that would lead a lot of authors or journalists to abandon the project and look for a simpler, more completely sympathetic protagonist. A lot of of Aida’s troubles are self-inflicted, but others are the effect of circumstances out of her control. Once they start to add up, it’s hard to tell one kind from the e book is chock-full of detail and history about our complicated, expensive, ever-expanding, and often counterintuitive and irrational border-control agencies, laws, and systems. It records the decline of Douglas, a once-vibrant, multi-cultural border city where Mexican men and women created decent wages and felt safe raising their families. The town’s major industry today is border “security” and most of its residents are transient law-enforcement employees with no connection to the community. Finally, it’s a story about battered women and families—a topic which the author didn’t know he would have to address in such detail until Aida’s story created it clear how integral abuse is to much of what happens to women at the e topic matter is so big, in fact, that at times I found myself checking how much of the book I’d read, compared with how much I had left to read, as if I were back in school and the book was a class assignment, wondering how much more I could items into my head without losing the string of the at is not criticism. The author’s ambition is admirable, and his book illustrates how much the media over-simplifies and dumbs-down both the stories of migrants’ journeys and our border policy in covering the “crisis at the border.” Even multi-page articles in the Fresh York Times—for example, a latest one that followed a migrant family from the border through several states—can’t do these stories justice. Don’t obtain me wrong: I also understand how the limits of media resources and the average readers’ patience create the kind of examination this book undertakes , bravo for Bobrow-Strain for taking up the slack, and for his publishers for accepting this hefty manuscript for publication. I heartily recommend his book for anyone who wants more than a superficial understanding of what has really happened at our border, and how we have ended up with a bloated anti-immigration industry that, by 2012, was costing us more than “the FBI, the DEA, Secret Service, ATF, and the U.S. Marshals Service combined, with enough left over to run all of the country’s national parks for a year.” One can only imagine how much more it is costing today in both budget and ruined lives.

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    The Death and Life of Aida Hernandez: A Border Story []  2020-1-21 20:59

    A fictional acc of life on the Arizona-Mexico border, but based on experiences of a true person.

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