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    The Local Politics of Global Sustainability []  2020-12-1 18:29

    This book is a fast read, essentially an app of Barber's Powerful Democracy treatise to the idea of sustainable development. It defines sustainable development as the reorientation of the economic system to accommodate inherent natural limits on energy use, waste sinks, etc. The authors point out there may be a lot of various paths humanity may choose into the future: increasing maldistribution of resources or increasing global equity; increasing loss of biodiversity or reduced destruction of the biosphere; a bleak and degrading future or a more promising one. They posit that a move towards a powerful democratic structure, with wider and deeper participation in the political system, would be a crucial step towards a more promising future.I found the book interesting, though a small light on examples: there's one chapter devoted to historical examples of strong(er) democracy. On the other hand, the book offers some ideas about how to obtain there from here, how to move incrementally towards stronger democracy. The author's proposal to make the democratic foundation for a sustainable future is the major focus of the book: it would be interesting to discover in greater detail those aspects of modern culture that mitigate versus famous participation, and those that might be brought into play to help it. How does the increasing homogenization of globe culture, and the concomitant consumerization of the world's people (and the corresponding influence of advertising), undermine democratic participation? What trends, like the coop movement or the expanding NGO movement, support develop political participation? How can we shift the direction of the increasingly international economy and it's political implications as illustrated by the WTO, for example? What are the implications of modern communication/computer technologies, both positive and negative, on the ideas outlined here?"Local Politics" doesn't attempt anything so grandiose. It's presents interesting ideas regarding powerful democracy. I think it will be more interesting to theorists than activists, but a lot of people might search something to chew on here.

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    The Local Politics of Global Sustainability []  2020-12-1 18:29

    This book could eventually be one of the most necessary ever published within the environmental community if it encourages environmental activists to shift their approach from confrontation to "principled" negotiation. Environmental activists for most of the past thirty years have tended to confront their adversaries using "hard" negotiation as described in Getting To Yes by Fisher and Ury. This was the style implied by Herman Daly's early writings.If "names" such as Robert Costanza and Herman Daly can shift their thinking away from confrontation and toward working with non-environmentalists as collective problem-solvers, there is no end to the possibilites. Interestingly, they endorse the process of public deliberation or what Benjamin Barber calls "strong" democracy. They are dsicovering, as a lot of of us already know, that citizens engaged in deliberation naturally tend to gravitate toward "sustainable" concepts. Hence, if we can make forums for powerful democracy in our communities, pro-environmental thinking will this manner, public deliberation can foster "principled" negotiation where all of us look for win/win solutions and treat each other with respect. Or, we can continue to confront and litigate each other and/or wait for huge brother to impose a resolution. Are we, as "ordinary" citizens, up to the challenge. Prugh et al imply we are. Those of us in the "front lines" of community development know we are. Satisfied reading!!

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Amazing resd

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Great!

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Book was in amazing conditions

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Was in amazing shape.

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Useful book though its rented

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    The book is used a lot of times, it looks too old that I don't wish to used it or I have to be very carefully turn page to page to avoid damaging it.

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Amazing value!

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    I got this book for my daughter's college class-- it is a amazing school book

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    The Challenge of Democracy: American Government in Global Politics []  2021-1-27 19:59

    Amazing book and quick shipping!

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    The book has a amazing layout and was an simple read. Full of useful info for the class I bought it for and others as well.

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    Bought this book for college, price was amazing and much cheaper than purchasing from school and or book store. Thank you.

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    Amazing book... just what I required to start to understand the industry.

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    Perfect book for any one interested to learn about airline industry. It is well-written by some of highly respected experts in the aviation field, and comprehensive that almost cover every aspect relate to this highly specialized field. I read the first edition of this book, but this edition contains chapters about aviation and the environment, and IT in aviation operations, which are amazing additions. The amount of info the authors are providing is huge, and as you read the book, you'll learn a lot of insights on the aviation and airline summary, it is a amazing book and valuable reference that I think any aviation scholar, professional, and enthusiast should have. It's worth every penny and I highly recommend it.

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    This is a highly ambitious and voluminous textbook introduction to the airline industry and to airline operations written by a total of 17 authors, mostly academics at the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics but also from other universities and a few industry practitioners. Much of the content was apparently originally developed for an MIT course, quite naturally, called the Airline e coverage of the book is impressive and at first looks at airlines from a top-down managerial point of view, then goes in to more practical and operational info when surrounding airlines and finally covers a number of similar subjects. Among the first types of subjects are the industry history, the regulation of both airlines and airports, the economics of the airline market, pricing options and revenue management plus costs and e second type of topics contains fleet and route planning, flight squad management during both regular operations and when things don’t work out as planned, labor relations and security handling. The latest type of topics contains airports, air traffic control, industry similar environmental problems and how IT effects the management of airlines. This is all obviously very comprehensive. The only subject I can think of that’s missing and that might have warranted a comment is the authors view on whether the traditional long haul hub-and-spoke network model could be rivaled by smaller fuel efficient, long range planes deployed in “long and skinny” point-to-point e sector has obviously changed a lot over the years for example with the emergence of low-cost airlines and the growth of fresh airlines originating in developing countries – both subjects covered extensively in the book. The biggest change is however the transition from a fully nationalized sector to a commercial industry. It is today almost chocking to read about how tightly regulated the industry has been both between the 1950’s up until the deregulation in the 1980’s, but in reality also up until now. Apparently, in some aspects the European Union has been a global forerunner in the deregulation of the sector which only goes to present how poor it has r me as an investor chapters three through six were obviously the most useful covering the economics of both the industry and if an airline corporation. Commendable enough these chapters begin off with a section on airline terminology, definitions and also acronyms such as RPK (Revenue Passenger Kilometer, i.e. one paying passenger transported one kilometer) or ASK (Available Seat Kilometer, i.e. one available seat flown on kilometer). In the end I think one must conclude that air transport is a commodity and in any commodity business the low cost providers will usually turn out to be itially my worry was that with the authors predominantly being academics the text would be too detached from practical life but this is not at all so. They clearly have a very deep domain knowledge. This doesn’t mean that it’s 500 pages to breeze through. Reading it is rather hard work as it is full of detail in anything from regulatory agencies to airline schedule development. Also, a book containing material from this a lot of authors never really addresses the reader in a fully coherent is book works well as a university textbook and it would be an perfect choice if you as an outsider have been recently recruited as an airline CEO and need a crash course on what you are getting into. However, it is probably too massive and full of operational aspects to really suit an investor looking to understand the industry economicsThis is a review by

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    Excellently written!!!

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    The MIT people are the best I know about the aviation industry. They are really knowledgeable about the aviation industry. This books is written by a squad of experts very various from loner writers in other books. If you wish to lean about airlines buy this book and throw all the other ones away.

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    The Global Airline Industry (Aerospace Series) []  2020-8-13 18:29

    A comprehensive industry ysis

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    I feel the primary assumptions in the book are reasonable. For example, one key point that he makes is with the problem of peak energy cost and how solar fits in nicely with satisfying this need. This itself will be a key driver for alternative, and specifically solar growth. Peak energy is about 30% of the total power requirement in a lot of nations. Considering that solar currently only contributes around 0.01% of the world's total electricity needs, it is clear that it has a lot of room to grow.Less convincing his is argument that local production and consumption will reduce distribution costs. I dont think this is a given as there may be huge distances between production and consumption. This is after all how the feed in tarrif system is supposed to work. The only method distribution will be reduced significantly is if the bulk of the energy is consumed locally - and this will only take put if there is an efficient mechanism to shop the surplus energy locally. Currently, there is none.What I also found lacking was the derivation of costs (per watt hour or peak watts). He introduces these terms and presents different cost curves, but does not go into the info of how they are determined. In the end, it is all about costs and he should have spent more time on this topic.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    An perfect introduction into solar. Very informative, broad scoped, and simple to read. Most books on the topic are not worth reading, this one is excellent. The single best book on solar power, strongly recommended for anyone from novices to engineers.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    Amazing book that discusses the future of energy. This in not a save the planet type book, it gives an ysis for how we will obtain our energy in the future and the outcome of that ysis is solar. Bradford does a amazing job of using conservative estimates and giving both sides of the argument as much as possible within the scope of the book. I would recommend this book to anyone that wants to know the mechanics of why the shift to solar will happen from a dollars and cents and economics standpoint.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    I'm trying to do my part in promoting clean energy by investing in green stocks including companies like First Solar, Vestas, Suntech and General Electric so what I wanted to obtain from this book was some info on whether or not I'm making a wise investment. More specifically I wanted to know what is currently holding back solar energy and the possible timetable for a worldwide energy revolution. The author answered most of my questions but fresh ones arose. Create no mistake the author is a solar power proponent so there is small to no criticism of it as an emerging energy ter getting through a history of energy and comparison of fresh alternative solutions the author finally gets down to the nuts and bolts. The benefits of solar power contain its ability to be deployed quickly and in a piecemeal manner. Solar power can begin generating energy in months rather than the years that it takes to build a traditional power plant and extra panels can be brought online as needed. Countries like Japan and Germany that are leading the globe in solar power deployment are creating their solar infrastructure in a distributed manner. Individuals can generate there own electricity with panels installed on their homes and then send the excess into a 'smart' grid. Unlike wind power, which is considered by some to be an eyesore, solar panels can be made as "roofing materials, architectural glass, and potentially paint and plastic casing"The author writes, "The amount of sunlight that falls on the earth every day is equivalent to the total energy that is used by the earth's current population in twenty seven years" What is holding solar power back as a viable alternative to fossil fuel energy is simply cost per watt and the barrier is shrinking every day. The lowest cost for a PV system @#$%!5 per watt in 2005 but First Solar has set a goal of 65 cents by 2012. In one chart the author shows solar power costing between 15 and 27 cents per kWh while other forms of energy ranging from 3 to 15 cents per kWh so there is a gap to close. Mr. Bradford points out that the gap is even smaller than it appears because in addition to the apparent cost we pay for energy, taxpayers pay billions in hidden costs including military costs and the environmental price of using dirty fuels. Once solar power approaches parity with fossil fuels we will likely see a positive feedback loop as increased usage cause prices to drop creating increased usage. As the world's appetite for energy grows solar energy is the excellent solution in that the regions of the globe most in need of energy are the same regions that are flush with sunlight and in those locations solar energy doesn't need to compete with an already existing fossil fuel energy major issue with this book is that the breakneck speed of technology has left it woefully out of date having been published in 2006. The author writes that the "current" six percent efficiency ceiling of PV panels may reach 30 percent in three to five years. However, in late 2006 a solar cell broke the 40 percent efficiency barrier so the author's prediction was too conservative and the book is already outdated. The author's confidence in efficiency improvements was in response to fresh solar cells that could generate electricity from light rays outside the visible spectrum which leads to one of the questions I had that the author didn't answer. If electricity can be generated using rays outside the visible spectrum does this mean that electrical energy could be generated even on a cloudy day in winter? This is necessary for someone like myself who lives in northern Ohio.I'm 100% sold on solar power but I would like to know what the feasibility and environmental impact is of manufacturing millions of solar panels. I mean that is a lot of material. That's one topic never addressed in the book. My belief is that if solar energy is not adopted soon my portfolio value may well be irrelevant given climate change and other issues similar to having a fossil fuel based energy policy so I might as well put my bet. I found this book informative however even at a slender 200 pages it still seemed to have quite a bit of filler and as mentioned previously its numbers are out of date.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    Concise, prescient book. I read this about 6 years ago & it prepared me well to see the qualitative changes coming in the energy industry - & exploit the opportunity as a writer, businessperson, and grad student in History at UNLV (solar focus). I'm re-skimming it as I finish my first book, "The Case of the Cleantech Con Artist: A Real Vegas Tale."

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    Perfect overview on economic potential of Solar. This book is optimistic that Solar's inherent scalability...low maintenance and power will create it the choice to replace much, it not all fossil fuels in a few decades. The devil is in the assumptions, the reader must assess if they agree. The next several years will confirm or disprove the assertions. Note: Figure 5.6 on page 111 is actually 5.5.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    The book makes some beautiful compelling arguments for solar and I was surprised to hear how economically viable it has already become with small subsidy in locations like Japan with mediocre insulation. I think he may be underestimating some of the alternatives, as he seems to discard micro wind more casually that seems merited, and further investigation is certainly needed. All in all, this was a very informative book in getting me up the curve on Solar energy.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    Ever since I became involved in sustainable energy (wind and solar mostly) I have been reading stacks of books about the amazing and the bad. This book I have recommended to everyone I know who asks about solar energy and the future. It is short and concise, but covers both history and future of how solar is the most viable respond to our future energy points out that we really know almost everything we need to know to create this happen, but the cash people just have to explore that. What's really exciting is that Silicon Valley has discovered that there are other uses for silicon since he wrote the book, and things are really taking off now! I'm encouraged and delighted - and definitely recommend this book as amazing background material for your investment in solar!

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    This should have been a magazine article in the Economist, not a book. As other reviewers have explained, this is about photovoltaics and only photovoltaics (PV) and even at that it's limited. True, other energy sources are mentioned, such as hydrogen fuel cells, but they obtain about half a would be better titled "The Estimated Economics of Photovoltaics." But even at that it's weak. Photovoltaics come in a lot of forms from rigid structures to concentrators to flexible fabrics. Only round numbers are used, such as, "In the case of photovoltaic modules, the cost to produce them in the late 1970s was around $25 per watt but has since dropped to less than $3.50 per kW,..." (p, 109) But there's no mention of the applicable me things are footnoted, like "Various forms of solar energy have been used since prehistoric times." But others, like Figure 7.2 where today's PV costs are shown at $6 per watt are not. And the $6 per watt in Figure 7.2 hardly correlates with the $3.50 quoted above for production costs. Yes, I know one is production cost, the other presumably installed cost, but even that isn't clear and an installed cost that's 1700 times production cost deserves some explanation.I couldn't search one reference to actual PV conversion efficiency, yet there are statements such as "Even at today's efficiency of PV cells, the land needed would be 10 million acres, or 0.4 percent of the total land zone of the United States." Perhaps the efficiency assumption is buried in the basic doents but it should be shown here since it's pivotal. I didn't message any reference to the fact that today's PV's degrade over time. PV efficiency and life is fundamental to PV ere are few diagrams, all economics and order of is clear that a lot of work went into preparing and doenting the book, but in the end you can't do much with what's here. If you wanted, for example, to crudely estimate say the cost of a megawatt of photovoltaic power so you could compare it to say Nevada Solar One, the solar concentrator facility outside Boulder, NV, you only have the $6 per watt from the chart quoted earlier and that gets you to $6 million/megawatt. But you don't know what PV efficiency that's based on. (Solar One's cost is about $4 million/megawatt)From this book you'd think PV's were the future. But the Europeans are moving ahead with solar thermal at the bulk stage. Do PV's create sense for example on say roof tops and solar thermal makes more sense at the utility level? From this book, you can't even start to respond that question, or know if a breakthrough in PV efficiency would create a difference.I liked one of the reviews on the back cover..."deeply researched and hopeful." Says it all, and says nothing.Wish I could refer you to a better book, but haven't found one yet. There's material on the net. Scientific American's September 2006 and March 2009 problems cover the technologies briefly, but are weak on the economics. There's an absence of clear economic data on solar energy sources.

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    Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry (The MIT Press) []  2020-1-22 21:3

    perfect book

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    I am an avid reader and have read a lot of books in my lifetime. I found this book thoroughly riveting and informative. Granted, I am not objective…..The book is written by my ry started writing this book to support explain to our kids and me why he volunteered to support our military in Iraq for more than six years. He did not have to go. He was a civilian. How could a husband/father leave his family for all those years to go to a battle zone? I never understood it. Now I ry is a 1973 graduate of West Point Military Academy. After serving in the army, he joined Mobil Oil Corporation and later ExxonMobil.He left ExxonMobil in early 2002 and found himself working at the Pentagon seven months later. When the opportunity for one latest adventure presented itself, he took it. He went into Iraq with the initial US military elements as a civilian oil advisor. We did not know if those initial Americans would see weapons of mass destruction from Saddam or not. Our farewell at the Pentagon parking lot on Sunday morning, March 17, 2003 was a very difficult good-bye. Unfortunately, that was only the first of more than twenty related good-byes over the following ten years. None of them were easy.I was the first person to read each chapter of his book as he finished it. I created some edits, but more than that – we talked about parts in each chapter that he had never shared with me, especially the risky parts. I slowly learned why he was so attracted to helping both Iraq and our country.He enjoyed working with our military and civilians in Iraq. Unbelievable friendships were developed with his Iraqi oil friends. All of this comes out in the a lot of short stories he shares. He has pride in what he helped the Iraqis accomplish in their oil ry did a lot of research for this book. He became obsessed with the oil agenda he discovered during his research. Much of it began to bother him. His health suffered. He had a difficult time accepting what he was reading, but he felt obligated to share what he learned. He was warned that some people from the former Administration would be irritated with his book, but he felt that America required to know the facts. I agreed.

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    Vogler has written an necessary first-person acc of the post-war effort to rebuild the Iraqi oil industry. This is original source material that will soon be turning up in the credits of a lot of term papers and theses. But it is more than simply a litany of facts. Vogler connects the dots to ferret out the underlying motivation for starting the battle in the first place. Stable-minded West Pointers like Vogler are not prone to conspiracy theories, but he names names and posits questions that will create him a marked man among the neocons and AIPAC lobbyists in Washington DC. Read this book. It will create you think and it will create you angry.

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    There are three reasons why I recommend that you purchase this book. First, the compelling accounts of author Gary Vogler’s 75 months in Iraq – working with Iraqi oil executives and government officials and Pentagon contacts – is one that you wish to hold reading, even though it is already an hour past your regular bedtime. His grasp of the oil industry and how it intersects with government oversight (and in-terference) is fascinating. Second, I always felt that the U.S. invasion of Iraq on March 20, 2003 was the work of a little group of men who had played with their toy soldiers well past puberty – to the point where they longed to transform their youthful fantasies into a real-life battle    any war! Since their toy soldiers had no need for planning for post-war governing after their fictional conquests, the group treat-ed their real-life invasion with related eloquence. The descriptions of the issues that this made for the author and his colleagues who were tasked with keeping the Iraqi oil industry functioning are grip-ping. Third, author’s detailing of the five months of pre-invasion Pentagon planning relative to the Iraqi oil industry – and his subsequent years of work in Iraq aimed at keeping the Iraqi oil industry function-ing amid the chaos of battle and the anarchy of sectarian conflict – lifted a veil on a motive that was, for me, truly eye-opening. His revelation of a once-operational Kirkuk-to-Haifa oil pipeline that had been used from the early 1930’s until 1948, and the promise of Ahmed Chalabi (the group’s chosen heir appar-ent to Saddam Hussein) to obtain oil flowing once again from Iraq to Israel, opens a door on a fresh perspec-tive on the ill-advised and ill-fated decision to invade Iraq. In summary, an perfect read! KAI, Ph.D., Electrical Engineer, Washington DC

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    Mirage: Power, Politics, And the Hidden History of Arabian Oil []  2020-2-2 1:47

    This book is a welcome addition to the early history of the oil business in the Middle East. It is is also a long-awaited biography of "Abu Naft", a Fresh Zealand concession hunter by the name of Major Frank Holmes who played such an necessary part in the development of the oil business in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. Holmes defied conventional wisdom and gained concessions in those countries that the oil majors had shunned - later happenings proved him right. As a comprehensive review of the story of Holmes, the oil companies and the British authorities on the Persian Gulf, the book is incomparable.

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    Gary Vogler has done us all a amazing service by ferreting out an oil agenda that got lost in all the shouting about WMD and the decision to invade Iraq. He has produced a book of prodigious research--filled with his own private experiences--and thoughtful ysis. Understanding happenings sometimes requires removal and thoughtful contemplation to come up with truths that seemed unthinkable at the time. That is the strength of this book. Highly recommended!

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    Iraq and the Politics of Oil, An Insider’s Perspective is a classic tale of experts being stifled from achieving their goals by the bureaucracy and political appointees. Gary Vogler spent 21 years working for Exxon-Mobile. In 2002 he was asked by the Pentagon to join a planning group for the Iraq invasion. That led to years working in that country. From 2003-04 he was with for the Pentagon, then the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA), and finally the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA). He would return from 2006-11 as a contractor for Wheeler Energy Ltd. During that time he found that there were committed Americans and Iraqis that wanted to develop Iraq’s oil industry and rebuild the country, but they ran into all kinds of issues due to Washington and ere are three broad sections of Vogler’s book starting with the ORHA-CPA period when the goal was to obtain Iraq’s oil industry up and running again after the invasion. One of the first things Vogler’s energy group did was to meet with Iraqis from the Oil Ministry, [email protected]#$%!s leadership, and obtain the country’s petroleum flowing again. Here Vogler ran into the first of a lot of roadblocks. The Oil Ministry wanted to re-establish its payroll and the CPA squad approved it. The CPA budget director however wanted to reform all the Iraqi ministries pay systems. The director then froze funding for the CPA oil group because he objected to its contract with Kellogg-Brown-Root(KBR) for service projects. The director was warned that these decisions could lead to unrest, strikes, and a reduction of exports, but he didn’t care because he had his own agenda. There were issues from the Iraqis as well. When the Iraqi Governing Council got to name ministers Ibrahim Bahr al-Uloom was appointed Oil Ministry with the backing of Ahmed Chalabi even though he knew nothing about the business. This was part of a political deal between the two where Chalabi was able to broker deals and pick ministry officials. That included having Iraq sell to the oil trading company Glencore versus the wishes of the ministry staff. Glencore had secretly sold Iranian oil to Israel, and Vogler believed this was part of Chalabi’s plan to test to obtain Iraq to export to that country as well, something he’d promised Jewish lobbyists and Israeli politicians to victory favor for his Iraqi National Congress. A Pentagon official also called Vogler and Iraq’s Oil Ministry to see if they could obtain oil going to Israel. These types of stories are repeated again and again in Iraq and the Politics of Oil. The Oil Ministry was one of the early successes in Iraq because the top officials quickly went back to work, while the other ministries had to begin almost from scratch. Then the CPA budget director and Chalabi tried to impose their own plans. There was no method the Iraqi government was going to authorize oil sales to Israel, but Chalabi and some in the Pentagon tried it anyway. That’s what makes this book so interesting because Vogler was involved in all these processes rather than hearing it second hand from someone else. The stories portray a constant struggle by experts to perform their tasks and follow through with their projects.Vogler returned to these themes again and again. During the Surge for example, the U.S. military working with the Baiji refinery director Dr. Obaidi took back the facility from the Islamic State. General Petraeus was able to obtain the Oil Ministry to okay the building of fresh export facilities in Basra. Finally, in 2009 Iraq held a series of auctions which opened up some of its biggest oil and gas fields to international oil companies (IOCs). For each one of those triumphs there were setbacks. Dr. Obaidi tried to tackle corruption at Baiji and got an arrest warrant issued for him as a result, and then left Iraq all together after the U.S. withdrawal because of the opponents he created in the insurgency and Iraqi government. Oil Minister Shahristani had no experience in the industry, and decided to break up the export facilities project into two parts that led to huge delays which cost Iraq billions of dollars in potential profits. After the IOCs were brought in the government bureaucracy couldn’t handle the number of visas important for the influx of foreign workers, and couldn’t consistently pay the companies. The Oil Ministry’s tactic also got out of whack and the petroleum production was growing much faster than its export capacity so it purposely slowed tracked deals on its oil fields. These are likely very common experiences in the interface between government and the personal sector. There are always politicians and bureaucrats that stand in the method of the best laid plans. Despite that, Vogler met a lot of dedicated Iraqis and Americans who wanted to improve the country. That’s what motivated him to spend so much time in Iraq and write this very interesting sings On Iraq Blog

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    The book is a first hand acc of efforts to restore the Iraqi oil industry after the war. It also info the a lot of sacrifices created by uniformed Americans and civilians as well as the Iraqi people in those is book was written by a West Point grad, retired Troops Lieutenant Colonel and former Mobil Oil executive who helped lead the efforts to restore the Iraq’s oil industry after the second Gulf War. It captures the info of the restoration activities over the a lot of years of his involvement on the ground in Iraq. It also shows how the processes evolved (and sometimes devolved) as powers behind the scenes placed their preferred players into key positions. It also lays out numerous facts, that over time led the author to a conclusion about the true agenda which has never been voiced by our government leaders and had nothing to do with a threat posed by Saddam or the interests of the United States.Why did we go to battle ? It’s been obvious for a long time that there were no WMD’s. That was all a smokescreen. It wasn’t to enrich major oil companies and fortunately, the author and others in key roles on the ground would have walked away if they sensed anything along those lines.Did we sacrifice thousands (4000+) of lives and even more casualties (30000+) for some ulterior motives (secret agenda) ? That would seem to be the case. If the reader truly understands the forces that drive our foreign policy with regard to the Middle East then you’ll be seeing confirmatory evidence step by step along the way. For those who haven’t researched the topic (similar to the author early on), then you will come to realize over time what the real objective was as the pieces come e book will provide insight into the following and a lot of other questions:Why did key civilian Pentagon leaders cheer about going to battle when Colin Powell stated the (erroneous) case to the UN? What were their real allegiances?Why was there so much interest by these same leaders about a secret crude oil pipeline to Israel ?Why did the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) policy of only selling Iraqi crude oil directly to consumers (refiners) later change to involve Glencore - a middle man (founded by Marc Rich who had been previously indicted by the US on tons of counts only to keep a controversial pardon by Bill Clinton as he left office) ? Marc Rich had been a key supplier of oil to Israel over a lot of years including oil from Iran even though sanctions were in place.I have spent over 40 years working in the US oil industry and this activity and relationship to necessary players in the Bush Administration were eye you connect the dots while reading the book, you’ll realize that the battle was waged to benefit another country (not the US) at a large cost in both US lives and dollars and most of those in the know don’t have the courage to stand up and tell the epare to learn the truth

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    The equivalent of the Pentagon Papers on the Iraq battle in regards to American and Israeli interest in Iraqi oil. Very enlightening, especially about our defense senior civilian leadership....sad to say, very self serving.

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    A week ago, at my West Point Reunion, my Classmate, Gary Vogler and I sold each other our books (with signatures, of course.) I must say I got the better end of the deal, in two ways: first my book, a hiking guide, costs more, and secondly, Gary’s book is far better reading!Gary, it is on me to buy our beverages the next time we meet!This book focuses as a memoir on Gary’s time as an US Government advisor to the Iraqi oil industry to restore the flow of oil after the conclusion of the 2nd Iraqi battle and then later as an industry consultant. Gary was well qualified to do this since after completing the service time needed for the West Point education, he went to work for Exxon Oil Company and rose in their ranks to executive levels. Thus he brings first hand and very knowledgeable info in his very readable itially until he could fill the position with an Iraqi, Gary was the effective Oil Minister for Iraq. The book highlights the problems, structural, technical and political, that had to be solved in order to restore Iraqi oil was not the US’s position to take the Iraqi oilfields and hold these as possession of battle reparations. Instead, it appears our senior politicians recognized that to restore stability in Iraq, you must also restore the stability of its oil production since that alone makes up 95% of its economic income. And yet, there were people in the US Government service working actively to corrupt this goal, either intentionally or ry was there! He was there when certain people broke out with cheers and laughter when Secretary of State, General Powell, said that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction (WMD.) He was there when certain individuals wanted to interrupt oil flow to Syria from Iraq. Gary was asked about providing status on a decision for a Kirkuk – Haifa oil line, a non existent plan, to provide oil to Israel. And he also witnessed an attempt to direct oil to Glencore International, Marc Rich’s company (the same tax outlaw and fugitive that President Clinton pardoned the latest day he was in office,) with powerful links to was the 2nd Iraqi Battle about grabbing Iraqi oil for US companies? It certainly doesn’t appear so from the happenings that occurred.But it does appear that certain people were under the influence of Israel to provide oil to Israel. It certainly was in Israel’s best interests to have the US in Iraq. And it appears that at least one person in the US oil planning and advising squad was an active, but probably unprovable, Israeli agent. Did Israel generate and provide the intelligence that influence our top administration to go to war?We, as US citizens, don’t and will never know. But battle cost the US greatly: we should know and act!As military men, we loath war. It is important to war to victory them when they happen but battles should always be a measure of absolute latest resort. When administration people who don’t actively work in the battle location cheer and laugh because we are going to war, it is stomach turning. Gary, like I, is abhorred by this and this comes out in his book. Furthermore, when we let foreign agents to determine our national policies and implementations, we ultimately are the ank you, Gary for this very thought provoking book from an eye witness viewpoint. Job well done!

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    Very well written! Must read for those who wish facts and not supposition.

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    Mirage: Power, Politics, And the Hidden History of Arabian Oil []  2020-2-2 1:47

    This book is written by an Australian international journalist now associated with the Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies at the Australian National University, Canberra. Thus Dr. Keating can be free of the political arguments currently going on in the US between the pro and anti Bush e title comes from the deliberate obscuring of the fact that the Arab locations of the Persion Gulf were virtual outposts of the British rule in India. This was not a satisfied situation for the people in the gulf and set the scene for the dramatic changes that were to come as the Americans came to the gulf and eventually superceeded the British the end of Globe Battle I, when this books story begins, it was generally believed by the experts that there was no oil in Arabia. The book basically ends with President Roosevelt's statement in 1943 that 'I hereby search that the defense of Saudi Arabia is vital to the defence of the United States.'In the twenty years between these two dates, there is a story of ambition, intrigue, folly, drama, conflict and even some comic interludes. None the less, this was the time that set the scene for the remainder of the century and for the future years. Here is the foundation for what is going on in that part of the gulf e book is extensively researched, and written so well that the otherwise dull history is created very readable and interesting.

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    Iraq and the Politics of Oil: An Insider's Perspective []  2020-2-6 19:30

    Wonderful detail. Mr Vogler crystallizes those vague notions a lot of have about the reasons for battle in Iraq.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    Marion Nestle is an awesome researcher that worked diligently to unravel the truth about Lobbyists for the meal industry, and their result on the Meal Pyramid. Americans are eating today based on the misnomers of a politized Congressional debate. It is the most fascinating read I have ever had. It will not only inform you, but change the method we eat and the method we feed our families. This book has had a tremendous impact on my life and I'm sure it will have the same result on yours. Since the "Super Size Me" experiment of Morgan Spurlock, who called Marion Nestle his mentor, Americans are more concerned about our meal source. Marion Nestles research will not oly support you to understand the issues of meal labeling, but teach you what questions we should be asking our selves before we choose what we eat. I have attached a copy of the link to her book. It is a must read. So, be sure to treat yourself and your loved ones to a whole fresh understanding of how "Political" meal truly can be.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    If you really wish to know what goes on with food, read this instead of the goofy fad diet stuff. Marion Nestle, PhD, knows her items and writes in a very readable and engaging style without fudging the facts.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    This book was assigned to read for class in my graduate nutrition program. Definitely an amazing, eye-opening book. I'm so glad I've read it and feel like it should be needed for everyone to read! I found myself shaking my head at almost every page and reading parts out loud to those around me. I found it to be a beautiful simple read, although some parts were repetitive. However, this would create it simple to just choose specific chapters if you didn't wish to read the whole book.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    Arrived on time for my class!

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    The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Guide to the Debate []  2020-1-29 2:7

    Dr Goebbels once said that if you repeat lie enough enough, people will come to believe you. His words could stand as the motif of this book, which pretends to provide a fair and even discussion of the amazing global warming debate. They appear to accept everything the IPCC utters as gospel truth, but we now know that the authors of their different reports (the most latest from 2007) are not correctly peer reviewed but rather reviewed by a handful of carefully selected believers. Thus we encounter errors and mistakes such as the well-known prediction of the disappearance of the Himalayan glaciers in 2036, a precise date which clashes with the known uncertainty of any climate predictions. It was apparently taken from an article (not from a scientific journal) published by an environmental activist. Although the IPCC has since admitted the howler, the reputational hurt remains. But to return to the book, Chapter 2 looks at how science works and the authors argue that peer review is completely effective in screening research results. My own experience as a peer reviewer for scientific journal is that the process can work well provided the reviewer is independent and does not know the author of the paper. However, if the reviewer is selected as a mate or colleague of the author, then one can only expect a whitewash. As the Climategate emails showed, prominent climatologists have been abusing the system to promote their own viewpoint using close colleagues for review purposes. In another break with scientific protocol, those climatologists then refused to divulge the data sets they had used to outside and independent ysis. Scrutiny and scepticism are at the very heart of scientific advances, and if you twist the rules, the reduce the credibility of your theories or ideas. There are no references at all to Climategate in this book, for example, a surprising flaw given what the messages revealed. It is also surprising that they do give quotations from some of the sceptics like Lindzen and Singer, but then ignore their arguments completely. They seem to rely only on their selected "experts" such as the IPCC, which gives the entire book an air of systematic bias. In fact the globe climate has been cooling for the latest decade, an happening not foreseen by the IPCC, and neither could their misleading climate models acc for the severe cooling phase in the 1940's to 1970's (we were lucky then, because the cold Russian winters of the 40's helped conquer Adolf Hitler). None of the dire outcomes of the IPCC report have occurred, such as sea level rises drowning countries, species extinction, Biblical floods and etc. Not good floods have happened, but as a effect of tsunamis. It is such counter-evidence that these authors have ignored, and so this book cannot rank as an unbiased and fair acc of the alleged issues of climate change.

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    The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Guide to the Debate []  2020-1-29 2:7

    Very amazing introduction to the subject. A bit dry and colorless. Could do with a bit more punch in the method it is written. But uni professors tend to write that way. Amazing intro to the topic but in 2017 a lot of people would search it a small dated and in need of a bit more zip and zap.

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    The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Guide to the Debate []  2020-1-29 2:7

    Recently used this book for an online course, and I really enjoyed reading though it. This book provides you with a nice overall look into the globe of Climate Change Politics. What I really appreciated about this book is that you do not need to have a degree in Climatology or Political Science to understand the material.

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    The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Guide to the Debate []  2020-1-29 2:7

    Amazing information for my research paper.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    The book, however lengthy, does cover the topic in most primary historical time and is a amazing read of the subject. Altho,it is a sholarly work it has benefit for a health care worker interested in the e Kindle edition does not present the graphs and charts in a readable method and is a major drawback from a paper credit to the author for the a lot of years of labor over this lbert Kleiff

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    Very amazing very necessary topic. This book highlights the clash of values between the public interest and the profit motive. Some commodities such as meal have a social impact and this should override the profit motive. The book highlights the lack of integrity in the multinational globe and the issues associated with lobbying by unique interest groups. Things have become worse since this book was written. It should be compulsory read from any health professional and dare I say it politician. Is it to late to bring integrity back into agriculture and nutritional tip and training. The FDA have a lot to respond for.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    Very insightful. Worth the reading just to obtain some contextualization of how things really work.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    Marion Nestle wrote how the meal industry influences nutrition and health. Politics, government and the Meal Industry are influencing the method consumers eat.We are totally being controlled as to the method we eat. It is not a free country. We need to break free of the meal industry and select the food, which is more beneficial for the human body.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    First, I have to commend Nestle, the author, for doing the near-impossible feat of providing highly controversial facts and info in a clear manner, which is so damning that you cannot support but feel yourself transform your thoughts about meal - and she does it without lecturing the reader. Bravo!Some passages that particularly sat with me included, "Surveys indicate that people are interested in nutritional and health but are confused by conflicting information, suffer from "nutritional schizophrenia," and cannot figure out how to achieve "nutritional utopia." (p.91) [Indeed... and there's a billion-dollar industry counting on that!] "The hundreds of millions of dollars available to the meat and dairy lobbies through check-off programs, and the billions of dollars that meal companies spend on advertising and lawsuits, so far exceed both the amounts spent by the federal government on nutrition tip for the public and the annual budget of any consumer advocacy group that they cannot be considered in the same stratosphere." (p.171) "Researches counted not a single commercial for fruits, vegetables, bread, or fish." (p.182) "It seems reasonable to expect that everyone would be concerned about whether supplements are safe, whether they do what they claim to do, and whether the benefit of taking them outweighs any financial or health risks they might induce." (p.220) "Because all foods and drinks contain ingredients (calories, nutrients, or water) that are essential for life, any one of them has the potential to be marketed for its health benefits." (p.315) "Food pack labels are the effect of politics, not science, and [have] become so opaque or confusing that only consumers with the hermeneutic abilities of a Talmudic scholar can peel back the encoded layers of meaning. That is because labels spring not from disinterested scientific reasoning but from lobbying, negotiation, and compromise." (p.249)This is a GREAT book, though towards the end my brain lost the ability to yze the info (fact overload), but overall it was an necessary read and I'm glad I created my method through it. I want there was a Reader's Digest condensed version. This is not for everyone, and definitely not a "light" read. But if you commit to reading it, digesting it, really thinking about it... your life will benefit from doing so. In the end, Nestle has left me frustrated and mad and sad and, in general, just simply emotional. Through her matter-of-fact writing tone and reserved bias throughout the book, I am left to think whatever I wish of the info she has spread before me. And it @#$%es me off.

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    Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health []  2020-6-29 19:44

    Dr. Nestle is the best. An exceptional book with awesome info that's so simple to read you'll wonder why America is so obese. Oh yeah, it's because reading isn't cool anymore or something ridiculous.

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    GREAT CD!

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    If you have a lot of miles to go before you sleep. I recommend this Double CD as listening expresso if your system's-on-hit!

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    I loved PVD before, but after getting this CD set, I feel I'm honestly obsessed with him. This is his BEST album, in my opinion. It IS very various from his usual stuff... I actually want he'd place out more albums like this one. Definitely worth the money!

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    The Politics of Medicaid []  2020-5-1 18:28

    This is an perfect book for one wanting a clear, relatively short history of the Medicaid program and how it impacts the individual states as well as the federal government. My only complaint is that the author unnecessarily taints her narrative with an obvious bias versus huge business which she supports, in each section or chapter, largely with one or a few anecdotal examples or a governmental study of questionable utility. As a former healthcare executive with over twenty years experience, I know that a lot of of her generalizations about the nursing home, hospital, managed care and physician segments of the healthcare shop are either incorrect or don't tell the complete story, which would change her conclusions. This could have been rectified by learning more about the industries or, best of all, leaving the bias out altogether. In fact, the book would have rated a five star if the author would have left out the bashing, general statements altogether. For instance, she could have said that the nursing home industry spent "x" amount for lobbyists or that the hospital industry appears to earn profits even on Medicaid patients without saying, in effect, that our healthcare crisis is caused by a bunch of greedy huge businessmen which is, obviously, an over simplification. Just give us the facts and the readers can draw their own conclusions. This would create the book a pleasure to read in twenty-five years, rather than date it by its polemics.Once again, a book worth reading! I don't usually write reviews. However, it bothers me when a book this amazing is unnecessarily blemished by high-level rhetoric that distracts any reader with a high level of knowledge of the industry she discusses. I hope the author continues to discover the health care industry's history, but can write with a more objective viewpoint.

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    one of the best albums of all time

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    Perfect!!!

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    Everything ok.

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    one of the best dj in the world.. love it

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    This Cd is out of print and getting harder to find. I have purchased this product 3 times already because they hold dissapearing , i assume its because how amazing it is or they just know its rare and worth something to have a hard is is one of PVD's best series to date including POD2 which is also a nice search to add to your collection if you haven't heard them by now then you shouldn't be a fan.Just saying.

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    EPIC!!!!!

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    The Politics of Dancing []  2020-7-18 19:43

    Cool music

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    Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul (Gender and American Culture) []  2020-1-16 5:24

    This book proves to be an necessary addition to the doentation of the cultural transformations that influenced generations of black women around the world to dress and organize in a "soulful" manner.

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    Paul Edwards has done a amazing public service by writing A Vast Machine. By reading this book you will come to understand and appreciate the enormous effort that has been place into gathering weather and climate data and processing it to give us insight into what to expect. You'll learn about making "data global" and then making "global data." You'll be able to respond critics who say "It's just modeling. It's not real." They don't know what they're talking about. You will. What we need to do about climate change including global warming is far too necessary to be decided on the basis on mindless 30-second sound bites or well-paid talk present hosts telling their listeners not to pay any heed to the thousands of scientists who actually know something about the problem. Reading A Vast Machine will require some effort, but you can skip some of the more technical parts without losing the main message. I strongly recommend it.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    This book informed me of so a lot of various perspectives, and challenges what we’re trained to see as the “norm.” Everyone should read this

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Interesting and insightful

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Very thoughtful, It explores the cultural meaning behind symbols and knowledge of silence through visual communication.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Method too political.

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    "Probably the best overview book about the workings of meteorology and climatology, this book also serves as a refresher course for people in the business. As a "seasoned" climatologist, reading this book was like visiting an old friend, and meeting all the kids and descendants.His book, as he puts it, presents "an historical acc of climate science as a global knowledge infrastructure". As such, it's a must read for anyone fresh to climatology as it give not only a useful history of the development of the systems we rely upon (WMO, WWW, GCOS, WCRP, IPCC, etc) but also puts to to rest some past controversies (myth of cooling, the MSU errors, bias removal in GHCN). I was impressed by Edwards' use of latest papers by Peterson, Karl, Easterling, well blended with older works references by Smagarenski, Sagen, Manabe. And of course his amazing friend, the late Schneider is there throughout.Edwards makes the point that it is through models that we revamp our knowledge about climate, whether these are simulation models based on physical theory, reysis models that blend observations with forecast simulations into uniform global data, or data ysis models that produce coherent data from heterogeneous, time-varying information. Climate knowledge works like historians work; there is always more to learn about the e book suffered a bit, I think, from not using Zillman's perfect (and short!) history of climate progress (though I might have missed it in the 67 pages of references! A time line of the decades of progress in understanding climate change, from GARP, Villach, Espoo, Rio, etc. would have helped.I especially enjoyed the description of reysis (chapter 12), the summary of pre-19th century observations, and best of all, the Greek derivation of climate - klima - from "inclination" - the slant of the suns rays with latitude with the tilt of the earth. Best of all, I see that Edwards has a degree in "Science, Technology, and Society" - exactly the course of study my son is following - along with an engineering degree. If Edwards' book is any guide, this is certainly what we need more of.I'd be remiss if I didn't add that Edwards contains useful, dispassionate, historical references to S. Fred Singer's questionable work in fighting the science of climate change, acid raid, and the ozone hole! Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose".A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    An perfect and clear explanation of the history of weather data collection and its interpretation and use in climate modelling, including much of relevance for anyone considering problems around huge data.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    I loved this book and I've been interested in the subject since it was first mentioned by another author I really like. It's not very dense, I could have easily read the whole thing in one sitting. It has a lot of pictures and talks about controversial design from a dozens of case studies. I like how he took something that could have easily been boring and academic, and created it into a fun read.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Yay Love it

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    This book had a lot of amazing information. Unfortunately there was a lot of repetitive wording where you had to skim through because you already knew what he was talking about. The technical info was not too difficult for someone with a couple of semesters of College algebra. But I would still recommend this book because overall there was a lot of amazing information.

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    A VAST MACHINE is an perfect historical review of meteorology/ever, mathematical treatment of fluid dynamics is very complex. The advent of computers has greatly enhanced weather prediction and ysis, but even today in meteorology five to six days forecasts are at best are only eighty to eighty five percent accurate. Forecasting years ahead, as in climatology are, in my estimation, only educated guesses. We simply don't have a comprehensive enough data base, in climatology, for dependable forecast ysis even with computer models. Although Mr.Edwards presents his case admirably, I am not convinced we are ready to forecast climate with any degree of accuracy now or in the foreseeable future.

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    Understanding how we know about climate, and even what it means to know about climate and climate change, is essential if we are to have an informed debate. This is far and away the best book I have read on the infrastructure behind our knowledge of climate change, how that infrastructure developed, and how the infrastructure shapes our e story begins in the 1600s as systematic collection of weather data began (at least in the modern period, other cultures such as the Chinese have older records and it would be interesting to unearth these, although the data normalization problems would be extreme). It picks up speed in the 19th C with global trade and then the telegraph. The more data collected, and the more data is exchanged, the more necessary it becomes to normalize data for comparison. Normalization requires some form of data model, a theory that makes the data meaningful. Indeed, this is Edwards point, all data about weather and climate only becomes meaningful in the context of a model (this is of course generally true).Work accelerated during WW2 and then exploded in the 50s and 60s as computers became more available. The role played by John Von Neumann in this is fascinating, as is the nugget that his second wife Klara Von Neumann taught early weather scientists how to program (there is a whole hidden history of the role of woman in developing computer programming that needs to be written - or if you know of one please add it to the comments of this review or tweet it to me @StevenForth).Edwards also introduces some useful concepts such as Data Friction and Computational Friction. I think my company can apply these in its own work, so for me this has been a very practical dern models of climate are complex and are growing more so. They have to be to integrate data from multiple sources. One of the main lines of evidence for climate change is that data from a lot of various sources are converging to suggest that climate change is a true and accelerating phenomena. One can meaningfully ask if this convergence is an artifact of the models, although this appears unlikely given the diversity of the data and models. But Edwards shows that it is idiotic to claim that the data and the models can be meaningfully separated. This is real in all science and not just climate science. A theory is a model to normalize and integrate data and to uncover and create meaningful relations between disparate data. That these models are now expressed numerically in computations, rather than as differential equations or sentences in a human language or drawings is one of the major shifts of the info age. It will be interesting to dig deeper into the formal relations between these diffferent modeling languages.

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    Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul (Gender and American Culture) []  2020-1-16 5:24

    Amazing read. Very entertaining and enlightening.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Unbelievable book which illuminates so much of what we are conditioned to view as acceptable design standards. Indeed, our private biases and cultural upbringing influence the work we do in such a significant way. A few typos here and there, but otherwise a highly enjoyable and educational read, with lovely examples throughout. I have fun the size of the book, as it is simple to slip into a purse and read on the everyday commute.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Intelligent and simple

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    Author gives an perfect acc of the history of weather and climate modeling and the general circulation models. There is very small technical content of any detail. I bought Kindle ver and do not recommend it. In the Kindle version, the footnotes are not linked and the index is unreadable and also not linked

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    "For every complex problem, there is an respond that is clear, simple--and wrong." Edwards explains complexity well.A couple of unbelievable coinages characterize this book. The "Apocalypse Gap" is the void which must be filled by somebody scaring us to death. An "issue entrepreneur" is somebody who successfully exploits that gap and sells newspapers by scaring us. Global warming as a concept has to war versus our inherent skepticism. We have been smacked with the population bomb, numbed by global winter, piqued by peak oil, and generally jerked around by every manner of scaremonger with a book to sell. Edwards convinces me it's true this time.Edwards' field, he tells us in his final chapter, is "science and technology studies." The sociology of science and scientists. It is a amazing background, because in the field as complex as climate studies, before you can even decide what you know, you have to decide how you know what you know. Gone are the days when a single scientist in the lab could have a "Eureka" moment and prove something profoundly fresh about the climate. No, everything we know about weather and climate is the effect of an immense and collaborative cause we can never create a meaningful number of observations on our own, the question of how we know things is of paramount importance. Individually, we can anecdotally note that it was a hot summer in Russia and that there were an exceptional number of forest fires perhaps in Wyoming. We might guess that the globe is getting warmer. But no individual would ever have the resources to monitor thermometers in 1000 stations throughout the world, much less do so over any meaningful period of time, such as everyday for forty or fifty years. Even making the impossibly easy assumption that you measure global warming by thermometers alone, one can immediately see that whatever you know depends on other pending on other people, it depends on systems and standards on which all those people agree. Where to place thermometers; how to shield them from the wind; what time of day to read them; what manufacturers to use... And 1000 other questions. Then: how to send the thermometer readings to some central site, correct errors, and translate into universally agreed geographic coordinates and is is my not good introduction to a vastly more complex problem. The things that are measured, the devices that measure them, and the data translations are vastly more complex. A key observation that Edwards makes early on is that "it is models all the method down." For data to be useful, they have applied to standardized three-dimensional grid points. Of course weather stations are not conveniently placed at the intersections of longitude and latitude lines, and they certainly cannot be stacked twenty kilometers up in space. Useful readings have to be interpolated from actual readings into estimated readings for the points in a regular grid. They have to be corrected for any systematic errors known to be associated with the instruments, and interpolated for time. It is all modeling.A key distinction is that weather forecasting and climate measurement are various enterprises. The first must be done on very short process cycles, is eminently pragmatic in its orientation, and is uninterested in data after the forecast is done. Climatologists have all the time in the world, love nothing more than long sequences of commensurable data, and are interested in a lot of more types of data than weather forecasters. What they have in common is that they both depend on models are based on physical principles from a huge number of disciplines: fluid dynamics for wind and ocean movements; thermodynamics for the exchange of radiant energy among all components of the atmosphere, ocean and earth; biology, for the physiology of living things; chemistry, for the interaction of chemicals in the atmosphere. Add to these physical principles a number of given parameters, such digitized topographic maps of the Earth, observed ice and snow cover, areas of rivers, and so me physical interactions are well understood and can be quite accurately modeled, such as the absorption of sunlight by carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Some are vastly more difficult and problematic, such as the method in which soot in the air precipitates the formation of clouds, or clouds reflect sunlight back out into model can possibly describe every characteristic of the earth; fine info have to be rolled into gross parameters. Edwards' example is rain; you cannot model individual raindrops, you have to talk about average precipitation over one of your grid squares, typically several hundred kilometers on a side. In the end, you are left with the following realizations: it is impossible to model everything - whatever model you create will be shot through with simplifying assumptions. However, a model is absolutely the only method to visualize either weather or climate on a global scale. Any claim that we don't understand global warming because it is "just a model" misses the point. A model is absolutely the only method we can understand global climate or global weather. Edwards does a amazing job of leading us through the history of both data collection and modeling. His argument is that today's models are fairly amazing because (1) they do a beautiful amazing job of explaining past climate and (2) a vast number of models, more or less independent of one another, converge on more or less the same predictions. His word, a nice usage, is shimmering models. The photos of the past and the future that they make are not fixed - each one is slightly various from the others, which you can visualize as shimmering - but they converge fairly well.He introduces the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Control late in the book, and he published before latest year's major controversies over the Himalayan glaciers and the East Anglia e-mails which tarnished the IPCC. Nevertheless, he does an exceptionally amazing job of describing the political environment in which the IPCC operates.He might have mentioned, but does not, that the IPCC has three working groups: the science of global warming, the projected effects of global warming, and proposed policy to combat global warming. This book addresses the work of only the first of them, perhaps the least controversial. While there is a consensus that the globe will warm by perhaps three degrees Celsius when carbon dioxide doubles to 560ppm, it is much harder to project, or obtain a consensus, on whether that will be harmful or beneficial to any given country, and harder yet to conclude, as the Kyoto protocol attempted, that the globe must bite the bullet to the tune of 100 trillion dollars to combat CO2 immediately. In summary, Edwards' sticks with the science, and does an extremely amazing job of presenting the case for believing the model, and also that there nothing else in which one could believe but the model. Having established that global warming is almost certainly real, he leaves what to do about it to the politicians. But he dedicates the book to his kids and the globe they will inherit.I add that Edwards has an perfect web site, [...] in help of the TNOTE: The integrity of the models has been called into serious question by several scandals involving the IPCC. Read my review of "Die Kalte Sonne" for an insight into the abuses of models. I agree with Edwards that models are essential, and the only available tool. However, they have to be used with integrity.

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    The Author revisits the definitions of infrastructure and data at depths that I personally have not encountered before and his articulations have considerably enriched my understanding of both these concepts and helped me better perceive their roles in several fields: infrastructure in the zone of networking and data in the field of climate science. Having read this book I now perceive infrastructure as including perceptual structures that influence and constrain our perceptions and I understand data as being generated through perceptual e authors portrayal of the meteorological weather forecasting networks enables the perception of their growing across the face of earth and linking up to form a global network that generated the Globe Meteorological Organization in 1950 and the Inter governmental Panel on Climate Change in 1988 gives a clear portrayal of the rising of a Global Network of scientists capable of perceiving planetary processes and providing the human species with strategic ese perceptions and their articulation are nested in a bed of very deep and detailed info regarding data, data generating methodologies and processes as well as significant happenings that every serious student of climate sciences will benefit from familiarizing themselves with.

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    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (Infrastructures) []  2020-1-31 3:10

    Disclosure: Prof. Edwards and I are both faculty at the University of Michigan. He is not in my unit and I do not know him e "Vast Machine" of the title refers primarily to the construction of the vast network for data aculation and ysis needed to understand weather and climate. The term also refers implicitly to the global climate system itself and its considerably simplified mirrors in the form of global climate and weather models. Edwards is a historian of technology and this book is primarily the story of the construction of the modern system of weather and climate interpretation. This is partly the history of institutional development and partly the history of the development of meteorology and climatology as sciences over the course of the 20th century. Edwards is a fine writer with a knack for explaining complicated topics. Starting with the emergence of some national weather bureaus in the 19th century, Edwards shows how the desire to develop accurate weather prediction and the corresponding necessity to understand a global system drove meteorology into increasingly ambitious and difficult forms of data gathering and interpretation. In parallel, a smaller scientific community pursued related data in an effort to understand climate. Edwards discusses very well the interactions between practical needs and emerging science, particularly the amazing difficulties with collecting, characterizing, and yzing the enormous quantities of date required. Edwards' narrative provides a vivid sense of the scientific and organizational obstacles that had to be overcome to develop the type of relatively successful weather and climate prediction systems we now possess. More than anything else I've seen, this acc demonstrates the remarkable achievements of the climatologic and meteorologic scientific communities.Edwards goes beyond an perfect narrative of scientific progress and institutional development. He argues quite well that the demands of meteorology and climate science resulted in a distinctively novel form of scientific inquiry. The combination of data that was simultaneously heavy in quantity while often highly variable and incomplete in both temporal and geographic dimensions needed whole fresh methods for organizing and yzing data. These large data demands were somewhat paralleled by irreducible fact that primary physical processes involved could be described by equations that needed heavy computational resources. The result, ultimately, is a complex network of data collection, ysis, and interpretation built around heavy computing power and complex organization and resulting in the use of increasingly elaborate models as a proxy for both necessary features of observation and experimentation.Edwards also addresses some of the policy dimensions of meteorology and climatology and how they interacted with scientific and institutional developments. Meteorology has long been of interest to governments for a dozens of reasons, including military planning. The pioneering atmospheric physicist Wilhelm Bjerknes, for example, worked for the German Troops in WWI. A amazing deal of the impetus and help for post-WWII meteorology and climatology, including the pioneering use of physically based models and huge scale computers, came from the US military. Edwards is very amazing on how the political demands of the Cold War, the progress of science, and the internationalism of science interacted to promote the development of global weather data collection and ysis. He also has some astute ysis of latest controversies involving climatology, particularly the somewhat disingenuous attack use of modeling as a basic tool in climatology.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    Perfect book, I would recommend to anyone looking for a brief introduction to a lot of interesting subjects of conversation. Well place together and included accessible language.

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    The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Design Manual for Visual Communication []  2020-2-1 0:46

    An incredibly eye opening book and must read for anyone who makes things. Makes you deeply consider the implications of every design choice on the population interpreting or being exposed to your design. Very practical and useful book for anyone designing or making something for anyone other than themselves. Each section had footnotes and references for further reading.

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    The Specter of Global China: Politics, Labor, and Foreign Investment in Africa []  2020-1-27 19:47

    This author is a amazing writer, but I feel quite disappointed after reading the rst, I don't search the major findings surprising. Of course, the Chinese state capital differs from personal multinational capital because the Chinese government has multi-dimensional interests (more than economic interests). I don't understand why this easy fact and logic can be the major argument or cond, the author doesn't consider China's military presence in Africa and how the Chinese state has attempted to export is methods of political control to African countries. This book tells small about China's influence in Africa in general.

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    Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul (Gender and American Culture) []  2020-1-16 5:24

    Dr. Ford is one of my former elementary students. So happy with the depth of her research and the manner in which she tells the story.

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    Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul (Gender and American Culture) []  2020-1-16 5:24

    Need for a unique project in black women in fashion and beyond. A unbelievable work!

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    I'm still taking the class that requires this textbook, so I'm only 10 chapters deep into this 15 chapter text. So far, every chapter has at least one grammar, spelling, or punctuation error, if not much more. While that does obtain annoying, Hilyard's book provides a clear and thorough introduction to the Oil & Gas industry without being overly technical. By the 2nd chapter, I was able to carry on conversations about the industry with my dad, who retired from the field close to 20 years ago.If the editing and proofreading were carried out more professionally, I would have rated this textbook 5 stars without hesitation.

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    Amazing introduction to Oil and Gas business but not enough depth.

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    Just recently, I finished reading Joseph Hilyard's book, "The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide". And I am satisfied to report that the book was both edifying and enjoyable. Mr. Hilyard sets about in this book to accomplish a noble, though challenging, objective: to provide an introduction to this tremendously complex, and important, industry in a manner that doesn't require a significant and deep technical background. And I think that he has accomplished this objective in fine fashion.Having read carefully through the entire book, from cover to cover, I would say that I am now in possession of an understanding of the industry far greater than the average layman. To place this in context, I am an MBA graduate, whose career thus far has focused primarily on Data Management in the Financial Services area. As we live now in greater Houston, a town whose economy is dominated by the Oil and Gas industry, I found Mr. Hilyard's book to be extremely e book manages to cover a very wide dozens of topics with respect to the industry, ranging from the fundamentals of Oil and Gas discovery, exploration, and development, to product development, distribution, marketing, industry structure, and finally to emerging challenges that the industry must come to address. Mr. Hilyard succeeds admirably in covering these necessary matters in a manner that is both readable and informative. We applaud the author for his fine efforts in this regard and encourage others to avail themselves of the perfect learning opportunity provided by this necessary and well written book. God bless.

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    This book gave me wide vision about oil and gas industry

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    amazing discount and amazing condition

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    This book provides an simple to read first introduction to the business of oil and gas. A must for anyone who wants to be acquainted with this.

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    Amazing book. Delivered at time

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    Beautiful disappointed. The copy I purchased fresh through Amazon was missing an entire chapter on section on pipeline transportation (pages 161-176). Parts of this book were amazing for an simple intro into the industry but with the missing section and typographic errors, I'd suggest looking elsewhere, there are lots of quality books at this price level.

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    The Oil & Gas Industry: A Nontechnical Guide []  2020-8-2 18:30

    Generally excellent. I would like to see more extensive coverage of Peak Oil, Shale Oil, Kerogen Oil, and the Olduvai Theory, and the implications of all these.

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