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    The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel [Book]  2018-3-21 18:0

    The Lynley novels have never been among my favorite mysteries, but somehow I hold coming back to them. It's the lure of any series, I guess -- once you start, it's hard to stop. Still, I've missed quite a few of these, and now it looks as if I'll have to search the one where Lynley and Havers go to Italy, since that promises to figure in the next novel. As for this one, it's long, very long. 700 pages in hardcover. But oddly enough, I really didn't mind and I enjoyed reading the whole thing, even if I wasn't tearing through it like a thriller. I liked reading it for an hour or so a day over the zone of a e mystery is a amazing one and I never twigged to which bloke was the culprit. You see what I did there -- Elizabeth George, who is an American, makes sure all the characters sound super British. No one ever "gets" something, they always "fetch" it, if someone addresses more than one person, it's always "you lot," and people are endlessly "twigging," "chuffed to bits," and so on. No one sounds as British as Elizabeth George, not Ruth Rendell or Agatha Christie or Tana French, no one.If there's a theme in The Punishment She Deserves, it's poor parenting, especially poor mothers. Evil Stepmothers are nothing compared to mothers who mean well but obtain it spectacularly wrong. Scary stuff.(Thanks to Penguin's First to Read Program for a digital preview copy.)

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    The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel [Book]  2018-3-21 18:0

    For the record, Elizabeth George is a various author than Elizabeth George Speare. In the Audible ad for "The Punishment She Deserves," other books by the same author are listed as The Witch of Blackbird Pond and others by Elizabeth George Speare. Both amazing authors but completely various subjects. Speare lived 1908-1994. Elizabeth George 1949- Present.

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    The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel [Book]  2018-3-21 18:0

    Ian Druitt was a respected deacon of the Church of England. When he turns up dead while in police custody due to an accusation of pedophilia, it’s up to Detective Chief Superintendent Isabelle Ardery to sort out whether it was suicide or murder. She reluctantly squads up with DS Barbara Havers and they set off to historic Ludlow to investigate. Ardery is battling more demons than a possible murderer. She’s fighting with her ex-husband who is determined to move out of the country with their two sons and Ardery’s been hitting the vodka bottle too often. She’s also determined to finally search enough reason to call for the transfer of Havers out of her district.I’ve have been a fan of this author since her first book a lot of years ago. Ms. George is a master at meticulously plotting out her complex mysteries, but where she truly excels is in her characters. If you decide to read something by this author, and I hope you do, you should begin with her first book, “A Amazing Deliverance”, so you have a amazing understanding of the background of each of the characters and can grow to love them as I have. Her newest book is a long one, over 700 pages on my Kindle, but you’ll obtain no complaints about that from me as the more time I spend with these characters, the happier I am. This is a complex tale and one of the best that this author has written. I became totally engrossed in the mystery and I so very much enjoyed Ms. George’s humorous telling of Havers’ attempts at tap dancing. Ms. George remains my favorite English mystery writer (though she’s American). I’m already longing for her next st highly recommendedThis book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

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    The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel [Book]  2018-3-21 18:0

    Always great!!!

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    The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel [Book]  2018-3-21 18:0

    Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley and Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers work well together, although they are vastly various in appearance and behavior. Havers is unkempt, impulsive, and laces her speech with off-color remarks. Lynley, on the other hand, is immaculately attired, urbane, and dignified. Despite their dissimilarities, Lynley and Havers have a amazing in common. Both are insightful, thorough, and more interested in attaining justice than in kowtowing to their nley is largely absent at the beginning of Elizabeth George's "The Punishment She Deserves." An unhappy Havers is forced to take a wretched street trip out of London with her nemesis, Detective Chief Superintendent Isabelle Ardery. DCS Ardery has contempt for Havers, whom she hopes to transfer to a remote outpost as a punishment for Barbara's impudence and disobedience. Ardery and Havers arrive in the city of Ludlow to determine whether members of local law enforcement mishandled the investigation into the alleged suicide of Deacon Ian Druitt, a much beloved clergyman and humanitarian. Clive Druitt, Gerald's well-connected and wealthy father, is putting pressure on Fresh Scotland Yard to reopen the case and search out what really happened to his is novel is a whopping six-hundred-and ninety pages, far longer than it needs to be. The characters contain a delusional alcoholic; a community help officer who keeps a close eye on Ludlow's citizenry; two mothers obsessed with micromanaging the lives of their grown children; and a group of self-destructive, hard-drinking, and promiscuous college-age kids. Although the writing is serviceable, the author, who is American, is too eager to present off her command of British slang and idioms. (One irritant is her use of the words "full stop" at least a dozen times.) There is a bit of gentle humor provided by Barbara Havers who, in spite of having two left feet, is pushed by a colleague into taking tap dancing lessons. Those who have admired Lynley and Havers for years will wish to read "The Punishment She Deserves," but not everyone will be mesmerized by this heavy-handed and awkwardly constructed tale of deceit, family dysfunction, corruption, and exploitation.

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    The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel [Book]  2018-3-21 18:0

    I found the parent/adult kids dynamics interesting, although sometimes a bit difficult to sort out who was parent to who. But all-in-all an enjoyable read and as always, having Lynley and Havers together was a treat!

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    wordington: a word story []  2020-7-6 6:35

    I have completed all tasks to be told more tasks to come soon. Its been days and still waiting. I have accrued over 250 dollars and nothing to spend it on. If i dont have any fresh tasks soon i am deleting the android game and certainly not recommending it for anyone.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    A lovely story about family, friends, and grief. You will not be disappointed whenyou visit with Jo and Col. Truly a must read to place a small love and heart into yourlife. A word of warning to the night reader, it is impossible to place this book downuntil you have turned the latest page. The characters are genuine and feeling andyou will wish to create them family.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    I could barely place this book down Maggie Christensen really knows how to bring life to her characters, this is the first book in a fresh series and Maggie is a marvel at older heroes and heroines and I loved it, what can I say, I do highly recommend that you pick this one up and obtain to know Jo and Col and to feel a part of Granite has been divorced from her husband for five years and she has three adult kids and four grandchildren and Jo is satisfied in the house called Yarran her home, she has recently lost her best mate Alice and although she has been mates with her husband Col she has become closer to him. Jo hadn’t thought that this could happen at her age and with pressure from her kids for various reasons they hold their relationship to themselves till the time is right to begin l and his wife Alice have been best mates with Jo and Gordon forever but now that Jo is divorced and Col is a widower, the time is right for them both to think about the future and to think about themselves there is a attractive sensual pull between them as well as the real friendship and this is what they need. But finding love again doesn’t always run smoothly especially with an ex-husband and a couple of kids interfering.I thoroughly enjoyed this story I thought Col was a real gentleman caring and loving and Jo what a amazing woman a loving mother and mate she goes out of her method to think of others before herself and there were times I wanted to tell her to place herself first because Col was what she required in her life, together they could search love and happiness. This is such a attractive story filled with emotion, I did love seeing the attractive Jo obtain the life she deserves this is one not to be missed and I am looking forward to Kay’s story.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    This story is a very realistic look at finding love later in life and getting your adult kids to accept it. There are a lot of emotional moments, both high and low. It is a somewhat haunting book that I'm sure will be in my mind for a while. I plan on reading the rest of the series.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    Absolutely adored this book by Maggie Christensen! I'm so satisfied it is the first in a series and hope we see Jo and Col appearing in future books. Unbelievable characters, brilliant setting descriptions - a joy to ready. One of my favourites from this author which I highly recommend.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    Author Maggie Christensen once again proves why she is the "queen of mature romance!". Jo and Gordon have been divorced for five years, and he remarried, but they have three grown kids and four young grandchildren. His law partner and best friend, Col, has been widowed from her best friend, Alice, for a year. As Col and Jo continue their friendship, feelings of comfort start to blossom into something more. But... everyone wants a piece of Gramma Jo. After all, she will be turning sixty so she doesn't need a life of her own any more. Ha!This book is just chock full of emotions and brought out a lot of emotion in me while reading it. For most of the book, her kids were really hard to like except for one. And don't even obtain me started on her ex! I agonized with Jo every time they tried to demean her or bulldoze right over her. They didn't deserve this unbelievable woman, but at the crux of this book is always love for family and will they accept her getting a second possibility at love and will she herself accept that she is deserving of a bright future?Brava, Maggie, on a unbelievable book. I look forward to the next story in this series.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    Normally I don't read books so focused on family interactions. However this author has a talent for making you fall for her endearing characters as she shares their story in such a method as you don't wish to place it down. Written in British style which is excellent for the setting and so much would be missing without this part.I won't go into extreme detail as others have covered this well or rather I won't go on about it too much. Jo and her husband (before he asked for a divorce 5 years ago) were close mates with Col and his wife (who he has now lost). Jo and Col's wife were best mates so both have felt this loss. Col and Jo's husband are partners as well. No kids for Col and three very interesting and somewhat selfish grown kids for is a very conscientious, giving and loyal woman who is sometimes taken advantage of since she always wants to do what is right. Sadly enough too a lot of people know this feeling. Col is a also conscientious and loyal man who doesn't wish Jo hurt. His strength is a huge part of this story and almost part of his is author navigates this complex story with grace and tips at another book to come. I'm looking forward to it!

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    👍👍😍Author Maggie Christensen really creates true-to-life women protagonists, with all the complexity and worldly cares that come with maturity and a growing family. I love to read her romances, which are just as much about dealing with children, exes, and the challenges of growing old as finding love with a fresh partner.👥In this story, the fresh partner for Jo is Col, a widower she has known for decades and with whom she spent the latest few years sharing the care of his sick wife. But their second possibility romance is impeded by all the drama going on in Jo's family and her grown children's selfish expectations of what she can and should do for them. At 60, it's obvious that most of her family members think she's too old to undertake fresh ventures and have fun a life unburdened by their constant demands! And romance? At her age? At least half of her family expects her to fall in with their wishes and forget about what she desires and deserves after a lifetime of putting them and their feelings 's an added that, rather than telling the story from just the heroine's point of view, Christensen also alternates to Col's viewpoint on occasion. It's helpful and interesting to obtain his thoughts and feelings and learn what he, as an outside observer, learns about Jo's ex and his is is a amazing story, well-written, simple to read and based in true life. The romantic interludes are clean, implied rather than explicit, and that's refreshing when so much romance these days is centered on steam. It's another champion for me and, though the author shared an advance copy with me, I had to it to add to my collection. Definitely recommended.👍👍😊

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    Maggie Christensen writes books about true love and true people of a certain age, and I greatly appreciate her additions to the romance genre. *The Life She Deserves* is a touching story of a woman trying to create a life for herself, independent from her roles as mother, friend, ex-wife. I found her accommodating nature and unwillingness to rock the boat to be extremely frustrating but all-too familiar. I also was perplexed about his continued 'best mate and partner' status with her ex after he'd cheated on her. But like I said, the story portrays the messiness of true lives, confused priorities and feelings of obligation. Ms Christensen writes in a method that makes you care about and root for these characters. I read an ARC of this book and this is my honest review.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    Once again Maggie has written a unbelievable book. I found the story simple to obtain into and didn’t wish to stop reading. The characters were relatable and interesting. I highly recommend reading this book.

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    The Life She Deserves (Granite Springs Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:22

    When Alice died, her husband Col and best mate Jo were devastated. She had suffered a long time – she was now at peace. The three of them had been mates for a lifetime, now Col and Jo comforted each other with dinner out twice a week, always at ease in each other’s company. Gradually the respect and friendship they shared grew to more, and with it being a year since Alice had died and five years since Jo’s divorce, they were satisfied to discover their fresh relationship.But Eve, Jo’s daughter and Danny, her son, were determined Jo should live her life the method they saw fit. It was only Rob, her youngest son, who was on Jo’s side, completely understanding her need for companionship and love. And it was Gordon, Jo’s ex, who was the largest thorn in her side. What was she going to do? Would she go along with her children’s plans for her, letting them ride roughshod over her own needs and wants? Or would she rebel and have the life she deserved?The Life She Deserves is the 1st in the Granite Springs series for Aussie author Maggie Christensen and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The author depicts older characters extremely well and with both Jo and Col turning 60 in this story, Jo with adult kids and grandchildren, the complexities of family and relationships shines through. A unbelievable story, The Life She Deserves is one I highly recommend and I’m looking forward to book two already.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    I picked this book up to research cruel methods of torture for a novel I was writing. It was okay. Things are listed alphabetically. It was helpful although I found nothing "New".

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    This is a book for anyone interested in crime and punishments of the middle east particularly since the dawn of time but also of early Europe and America. A Encyclopedia of pain

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    The author, is as few sentences as possible seeks to provide definitions with annotations for torture. The writing, as well as the annotations employed leave one unsatisfied as they barely scratch the surface in both breadth nod depth.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    There is brief info in alphabetical of a lot of type's of punishment and torture not terribly gruesome or deeply referenced.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    I could have read more about the topic if I had googled it. Next time I will. I cannot recommend this book.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    While resembling a dictionary or encyclopedia it reads much better than that. the author manages to tell a small story or give background on most if the methods included. If you're interested in the topic this book is well worth the price

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    i liked it and it was certainly interesting....we are a cruel species....very scary, but it does seem that we have evolved.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    This book was interesting read. Had some amazing info that you would have never thought of Irene Thompson did her homework.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    The author should have expanded some of her examples with more detail. Not worth the when you feel that your reading a list to fill the pages.

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    The A-Z of Punishment and Torture []  2019-12-30 18:42

    The book was amazing and you cant beat the mark ... ha ha so I recommend it to readers of nonfiction

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    Just weighing it so my one star gets averaged in to the rest. I agree with the low star reviews here. I love the Lynley series, and George's book, "What Happened Before He Shot Her" is a tour de force - a amazing novel. But this book is a disaster. The sidekick, Barbara Havers, is so endlessly annoying and stupid, I was rooting for her to be written out of the series. And oh my God... her small personality quirks have really lost their charm. Really? She doesn't know not to wear T-shirts with stupid sayings on them to work? I kept hoping she'd end up on a plane chasing after the love of her life, the boring and duplicitous neighbor, who is so dull I can't remember his name. (His hero undergoes a major and impossible sea change, but I am grateful for any plot device that removed him and his daughter for the time being from future books.) That said, Havers' behavior is so impossible, there is no method she'd have a job when this book is over. Really unforgivable plotting. The book seemed endless with silly turns and twists all for very small payoff. The conclusion was silly as well. Just awful. But I remain a fan of George's ... just skip this mess of a book.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    I had read all of George's novels to date except this one, as its reviews were so generally bad. I kept deferring reading it, but finally picked it up latest week. It has ended up being among my favorite books in the series. One of my favorite books, is very various than most of her work...much less an intricate mystery (although it is a mystery and it does have ample curious questions with intricately developed answers), but more about who Barbara Havers is. Havers, the sergeant to Thomas Lynley's DI, has always been a bit of a mystery herself, oblivious to the ordinary niceties but intelligent and aggressive in her find for justice. In this book, her hero is tremendously well and comprehensively written. Reading it is a joy, and the portrait has stuck with me. She is as true as any person I know. It is attractive writing and a fascinating of the things that some readers have complained of is George's use of Italian language when she writes those parts of the book set in Italy. There is never any issue with understanding the meaning of those phrases and it created me feel more immersed in the country. The Italian inspector is a treasure, and adds some common sense and sanity to the (at times) slightly bizarre ups and downs the story e book in some ways feels like opera..so much passion and so beautiful. I am very glad to have read it. It satisfies both as a mystery and a work of art, and remains in my thoughts.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    I can't figure out how to review this without some spoilers. I will warn you ahead of time when they are n't rush out to this. I pre-ordered it because I was desperate to know what happened to Hadiyyah, but the cost wasn't worth the is book is method too long and very repetitive. We obtain not only the "you told me that already" kind of repetition, but you also obtain one of the characters making the same mistake over and over again kind of repetition. The particular hero I have in mind must be getting to around 40 years old and should have learned something by this time. But no, the same teenager type mistake over and over. By the end (and the mistakes happen right to the end) I thought "whatever" every single time. I think I was supposed to be worried about the hero but instead I just wanted the book to end and thought the hero deserved whatever was in e main issue with this book is that it could provide true insight into Barbara Havers and fails to do so. At one point she says to herself "that he, [Lynley] should see her like this. Reduced in this method to the disintegrating substance of what comprised her: Loneliness that he had never known, misery that he had seldom felt, a future stretching out in front of her that contained her job and nothing else." That is the heart of the book, but that's that for it. Yeah, there's a lot of talk about whether or not Barbara is in love with Azhar, and I think she is a little. But I also think what she treasures from both Azhar and Hadiyyah is friendship.Honestly who has she got for a friend? Helen, could, I think have been her friend, but she died. Lynley will always be more interested in himself than anything else. All long time readers of the series should remember how he thought Barbara should let Hadiyyah to be thrown off that boat rather than take unauthorized action to stop it. The whole business about him not calling Barbara back, after all she had done for him in the latest book was just the final straw. No, Lynley will never be her real friend. Who does she have? She is totally alone in the globe and needs someone. Even a ten year old is someone when you're all alone. I think the book would have been worthwhile if it had concentrated on Barbara's loneliness and how she would with it in the future. But at the end it's just the same old thing.Spoiler: Would this have been charged as kidnapping in the US? I felt that the whole "Facing years in prison" thing was over blown. I kept thinking that it's just custodial interference and these things are usually handled in the Family Courts and usually with a formal kid custody agreement. But I don't know. Also that brings up the question so often raised in this book and never answered: Who is Hadiyyah's father? Until the question was raised over and over again, I had no doubt, but now I think it will pop up in the next book. And if it does, the respond has to be not Azhar because otherwise, what's the point of carrying on about it?

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    I really wanted to like this book. I tried to like this book, but I had a hard time liking it as well as all the others. It was tedious reading. Too a lot of times, I slapped the book shut with an audible, "Oh, amazing grief!" I've been a large fan of Elizabeth George for a amazing 20 years, and have LOVED all the previous Inspector Lynley books, along with the PBS dramas of the books. I don't know why the hero of Det. Havers took such a not good digression. It was almost as if the author had to take every one of Havers small foibles and hero flaws and magnified them so as to be ridiculous. Havers, always a bit odd for a Detective, became, in this book, an idiotic parody. Lynley, on the other hand, became a kind of a wimp. Because I have had family in law enforcement, I know there is no method any reputable law enforcement agency would place up with Havers outrageous, and frankly, downright stupid behavior in this story. She would have been place on medical leave and sent to the Dept. Psychiatrist, as she appeared to be bordering on a mental breakdown. Lynley, as her superior officer, would have been called on the carpet for not reining her in. Too much Havers, not enough Lynley. I slogged through to the end, and came to the conclusion the book was a couple hundred pages too long. The story could have been told much better without depicting Havers as a borderline mental case, and giving Lynley something other to do than hang out with a Roller Derby Queen. I mean, really! Here's hoping that Ms. George had only a momentary lapse of judgement, and the next Lynley / Havers adventure will be back on track.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    Other reviewers have detailed the issues with this poor book. All of her major characters were twisted in the service of a basically boring plot. I wish the characters back the method they were. The only solution I can think of is to search out that this was just a fevered nightmare of a seriously ill Havers. For the next book, have her wake up to tea with the professor and his daughter, flowers sent by a concerned Lynley, and a visit from her partner Winston. Then back to work being the cast of characters we are all hooked on. That way, this book would be just one evil act.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    My reason for reading this series can be summed up in two words: Barbara Havers. I love her, she's so funny. And I am trying, I really am trying, to slog my method through this book. But I'm on page 381 of 719 (!!) pages and it is tough going. This novel would be half this thick if Ms. George did not hold inserting words, sentences, or lord support us, entire conversations in italicized Italian. Then, because of course most of her readers don't speak Italian, she follows EVERY single one of these random Italian sections with an English rewording. Not verbatim, mind you, but a long, circuitous English discussion that is supposed to give us a clue as to what was just said. Here's a thought: how about if you just write it in English the first time?! This happens over and over and over, seriously making the book twice as long as it needs to e the image for an example. Why randomly call a stove a "fornello"? What is gained? Is she trying to impress us that she speaks Italian? Okay, that's wonderful, Elizabeth. Does she think it adds to the sense of the action taking put in Italy? It doesn' my opinion, this is the kind of indulgent poor editing that authors obtain away with when they've had a number of successful books. Suddenly their publishers let nonsense like this, which is why so a lot of series obtain worse over time.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    I have enjoyed the Lynley series for years--interesting stories and characters I felt I "knew" in a amazing way. I really disliked this book, though. I was genuinely bored early on and ended up skipping parts just because it felt so irrelevant. Even worse, I've come to be so done with Havers I can't even stand reading about her. Very disappointing read in every way. Tedious, trite, repetitive, whiny. I can't come up with a amazing description.

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    Lots of surprises. Well written.

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    This book haunted me. It had all the elements of a amazing story and kept me hooked from the beginning.

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    I couldn't place this down once I started. All the small plot twists and gradual release of Agatha's background kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time. Very amazing read!

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    I have read all his books. This is certainly not his best book which is extremely unfortunate. It is still very amazing read for your Xmas holidays

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    I loved this read. It gives you a various perspective and you search yourself conflicted over who to root for.

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    Slow start. Didnt like the style of writing but came through in the end. Good. Interesting storyline. Humans are damaged

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    Amazing book. Fun plot twists. This would create a amazing movie!!

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    Such a amazing book! I was really sad when it was over.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    I have read and beautiful much loved all the Lynley/Havers books. I pre-ordered this book, and was very anxious to read it. To call it a allow down is an understatement. The zone switches back and forth between England and Italy, which is fine. Ms. George clearly labels where each stage is taking place, so there shouldn't be any confusion about that. She, however, has decided to impress us all with her knowledge of Italian, and it's annoying...and I grew up in an Italian speaking home. I can only imagine how annoying it was for non-Italian speakers. I think one could obtain the gist of it in the context of the scenes, but why should the reader have to do that, when the book is written in English, ostensibly for English speaking readers? Even in scenes where the characters are obviously speaking in Italian, and she's "translating" it to English, she'll throw in the odd word or phrase in Italian. Does that mean they've actually thrown an English phrase into their Italian? Enough already! OK, perhaps that contrivance just annoyed me, but the other thing that I felt really damage the story was that Barbara Havers behavior was so incredibly stupid in this book. She's acts like an idiotic, besotted, love sick teenager who's been sheltered all her life and never seen anyone act badly in a custody situation, or any other situation for that matter, and not like a seasoned homicide investigator. Her complete and total belief in Azhar's innocence is somewhat unfathomable, and a tad pathetic, as it seems to have no true basis. Her confused and manic tumbles of words to those who don't speak English and have no clue what she's going on about gets very old, very quickly. (Come to think of it, the same goes for her quick talking to those who DO understand what she's saying!) I suppose it was done to fill in the gaping holes in the plot, but it seemed very out of hero for Havers, and didn't do much to support the book. As a loyal fan, I kept plodding through the tedium to the bitter end, hoping it wold obtain better, but it never did. The solution to the mystery is about as wonderful as it gets, even taking into consideration that the book is a work of fiction. One would at least hope that Haver's total faith in Azhar's goodness is shattered for any future forays. I want I could obtain both my and my time back on this book. I will have to think seriously about whether or not to ever obtain another of Ms. George's books in the future. This is a shame because I have truly enjoyed this series up to this point, and would recommend the preceding books to other mystery fans.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    This was by far the worst book by Elizabeth George that I have read to date. It was tedious going and the dialogue tortured. Particularly after Hadiyyah was found and returned to her parents. I couldn't believe that there was still about a third of the book left! To say this was anti-climatic would be putting it nicely. I found myself disliking and being unsympathetic towards both Inspector Lynley and Havers - something that has never happened before. Truth be told, I didn't even read the whole book after Haddiyah was returned. I jumped to the end to see what happened and then backed up only enough to obtain the jist and left it at that.

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    Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel (Inspector Lynley Book 18) []  2020-2-6 21:35

    Everyone has said it in so a lot of ways here: overlong, trite plot, irritation over the Italian language inserted into every page, and on and on. I just want we could all figure out a method to support Elizabeth George out! I had the amazing fortune to meet her at a book signing after she had written her fifth or sixth mystery. I was a fan, and I remember her happy reaction when I told her that I enjoyed her books as novels as much as I liked them as mysteries. Plotting and characterization were spot on, and I was hooked on the continuing saga of Lynley, Havers and company. George was gracious and kind, and I was excited to be a (relatively) young reader hooked on a (relatively) young author at the beginning of her career. I have hung on, but each succeeding book has become such a slog that I don't know how much longer I can continue.What's going on here? A lot of readers have complained that the issues stem from George killing off Helen several books ago. I see no reason to fault the author for the stories she wants to tell; the fact that losing a beloved hero was so painful to a lot of of her readers is a to how successfully she got us all to into the relationship between Helen and Lynly. Some people have complained that George loves to describe things - especially settings - in detail. If setting is her bag, that's okay; P.D. James also thrives on creating a rich setting for her mysteries, and while it's never my favorite part of a book, it can add so much to the overall success in atmosphere and tone of a ill, as the years have gone by, George's novels obtain bigger and bigger and seem to be about less and less. It began long before Helen's death, but the mournful tone of her characters since that happening has only exacerbated my impatience with George's writing. Each succeeding volume has become, literally, heavier and heavier (to the point that I now read her only on a Kindle), and even when there are some amazing points to a story (I think most of us like Inspector Lo Bianco here, and I'm fond of Dairdre, Lynley's fresh love), they are buried under the sheer weight of verbiage that surrounds the thin plot. In her latest book, Believing the Lie, George presented a victim and a lot of suspects, and after 700 pages were over, NONE OF IT MATTERED. In this current novel - which I REALLY wanted to like because, like so a lot of fans, I'm into Havers - the plot is thin and repetitive in the extreme. Every stage between Havers and the personal eye in Britain seems to be the same; ditto her conversations with the tabloid journalist. Ultimately, there are very few suspects to meet. The kidnapping is resolved with hundreds and hundreds of pages left to read, making the murder almost an afterthought. George's prose seems completely convoluted, as if she's trying to emulate an author from an earlier century, even as Havers speaks in a funky modern way. I felt for Havers, I really did, as she tried to support her neighbor. But I spent more time flipping page after page and muttering, "Come on, Come ON!!!!!" with small to no certainly does not behoove an artist to much attention to critics and fans; one must keep real to one's own artistic vision. Still, I can't support but wonder what happened to create George believe that size matters, that bigger is better, when the quality of her work has so obviously suffered as a 's simple to play the critic and slam an author. What I'm writing here certainly didn't take as much time, care and effort as George expended writing this book. But when READING a novel becomes so effortful, and provides so small pleasure in return, I have to ask myself if it's worth continuing with an author. What makes this decision so difficult is the sheer joy I experienced in reading George's earlier work. It was really, really great.I wish that author back.

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    I am not a mother but this book will shake my mother friends. It reminded me of a amazing Lifetime movie.

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    The Secrets She Keeps: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-16 18:0

    Amazing story hooks you in immediately.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    This book is *gripping.* It alternates between Bauer’s undercover work as a guard at a personal prison and a fascinating deep-dive into the history of the prison labor system growing out of the slave system. It’s just so well-reported and well-written and so disturbing.I know Shane Bauer through his other book, his reporting for Mother Jones, and his necessary social media presence. One thing I respect about him is that he’s not afraid to spit out truth even when it’s unpopular or would offend the sensibilities of our is book is no different. It takes a deep undercover look at Winn Correctional Center and at the history of prisons for profits in general, but Bauer is just as critical of himself as well, and pulls no punches in describing how his experience participating in the prison system negatively affected him, and the catch-22 he found himself in while trying to navigate an oppressive system he didn’t really into but increasingly felt the need to participate in. His honesty is refreshing, and is something (I assume) that anybody who’s socially conscious but has been in a position of authority can relate e history of for-profit prisons was raw and intense without being preachy. I think if Bauer was teaching history classes, more students would attention.I didn’t read a lot of books this year, but am really glad I read this one. Highly recommended.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    I'm a few chapters into the book, and I'm a bit dismayed that PB didn't have some kind of editor -- or at least it seems as though he didn't. He makes a point, then makes it again, then repeats the facts that comprised the story that led to the point, then makes the point again. It's a good-hearted book, full of valuable lessons that unfortunately I felt beaten over the head with. I would like to see PB appointed to the US Supreme Court, but at the same time my services as a reader/editor should he decide to write another book.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    This is not a Trump bashing book. Instead it is an inspiring ramble through the legal process. It looks at the process and mindset of how justice should work. I am a scientist, and I was especially impressed by how much legal investigation and prosecution has in common with lab research. Patience, continual questioning of data and bias, and the necessity to admit when you are wrong; and of course, pursuit of truth.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    This book was not an simple read. I had to reset it a few times. It became very complex when the author examined the nation's shift from not favoring the death penalty overwhelmingly with abolishment a very true chance under the Warren court. When president appointed Warren Burger as Chief Justice of the Court, the death penalty was all but insured a fresh life and was reinstated with fresh laws passed in thirty-five states. The crusade versus the death penalty was "killed" by the Burger an then the Rehnquist courts. The book was still very enjoyable and covered a subject that most people are aware of, but would rather not be bothered about. The state "legally" killing a human being.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    From any perspective, the Wilbert Rideau story is a remarkable one. Sentenced to prison for murder (which he readily acknowledges committing), he emerged as a celebrity. "In the Put of Justice" is his autobiography as well as a survey of the US judicial system from the "inside", a put nobody wants to brief, the author was raised in the Jim Crow -era South during the most tumultuous segment of the civil rights struggle. Naturally, he was from an economically deprived background and had a poor home life too with an abusive and then absent father. Rideau, displaying an obtuse but understandable concern for his private safety, working as he did in a white-owned located in a white neighborhood, purchased a handgun and a knife for "personal protection". This decision had dramatic and unexpected consequences for his a thoughtless adolescent move, Rideau decided to reverse his fortune by robbing a local bank and starting a "new life" somewhere on the West Coast. As expected, the robbery went wrong quick and, further compounding his bungled crime, Rideau took 3 bank personnel hostage. Driving through rural Louisiana, the naive criminal became lost and panicked. His hostages escaped and, in a frenzy of fear, Rideau shot and killed a woman and wounded another. He was quickly captured and transported to the local jail where, of course, a hostile mob awaited him. He expected vigilante "justice" (lynching) but instead was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was transferred to Angola, the "crown jewel" of the Louisiana State Criminal Justice System gulag ("Life is in Angola, as the Fresh Orleans singer Dr John wrote). Through a complex course redolent with witness manipulation, suppression of evidence, jury-rigging and other judicial transgressions unfortunately typical of the time and put (but hauntingly evocative of our current judicial system), his death penalty was deferred (due to the 1972 US Supreme Court "Furman vs. Georgia" decision) and was eventually "reduced" to a life sentence.Unlike a lot of or most prisoners, Rideau used his incarceration to brilliantly enhance himself: he learned to write (journalism), became editor of the prison newspaper and achieved national recognition for his accomplishments. After over 4 decades in jail, Rideau, through the efforts of a dedicated squad of super-lawyers and supporters, he achieved freedom.Rideau makes two major points in "Place of Justice", the first regarding the nature of the criminal justice system and the second on the circumstances of his "redemption". Approximately equal portions of the book are devoted to these intertwined themes. On the first issue, the author convincingly demonstrates the incompetence, racial prejudice, political machinations, entrenched interests (financial and political) varying combinations of which are the motive forces behind the "prison-industrial complex". Frankly, the degree of abuse suffered by a lot of prisoners is horrifying (as duly and unemotionally noted) although paradoxically, Rideau seems to have lead a charmed existence during his long incarceration. This blends almost seamlessly into his private story, which is the second major theme. An element of egoism and self-glorification seems to permeate the book: the Angola prison administration, by Rideau's telling, viewed him as a lynchpin interlocutor between staff and prisoners; the prisoners conferred on him near demi-god status; the public relied on his "Angolite" magazine for insightful, probing, scrupulously honest reporting; the field of journalism was in his debt for his seminal contributions to the discipline and his example would be a light for the potential criminal guiding him away from a poor end. While this recounting conveys the impression that Rideau was insufferably full of himself, the facts seem to help all of his claims. After all, who else has emerged from the penal system with quite so a lot of accolades and why would they be conferred on Rideau unless he genuinely merited them? While the retelling might be somewhat embellished (and what autobiography isn't guilty of that), the facts speak for themselves.I would be remiss in failing to note that Rideau consistently expresses regret (he's actually quite contrite) about the crime he admits to committing. His crux argument in favor of a pardon from his life sentence is the nature of the crime: not premeditated, sentencing discrepancies between his high-profile case and the "industry standard", all coupled with the twisted prosecutorial efforts to manipulate evidence and witness testimony and pure judicial revenge exercised versus him for his celebrity. Valid points all and, in the author's opinion, sufficient to reduce his sentence to "time served".Rideau, of course, received the death penalty for his crime. Since 1973, 130 denizens of death row have been exonerated by DNA evidence. Still, Rideau is not a crusader versus capital punishment. Its a bit hard to tell what his perspective on the death penalty in the abstract might be but, in common with a lot of others, he is able to pillory the system for its inconsistencies (racism, classism, etc) and its incompetence. By this point in history, its generally recognized that the death penalty in the US is an aberration. Our country, alone among "advanced" democratic societies, wields capitol punishment as a "resource for political exchange and cultural consumption" in the words of David Garland. In other words,to paraphrase Justice John Paul Stevens, we use the state's monopoly on violence to slay people not for the deterrent result of capital punishment (it doesn't exist); not because it serves the victim (he's dead), the family (is the loss of a life worse from murder than from a drunken driver, on whom capital punishment is never inflicted?); the state (it costs too much money, consumes too a lot of resources and takes too much time); the prisoner (they spend about 30 years in jail anyway awaiting death); or even the general public. In America, this cultural artifact appears to be immutable, although significant shifts in public opinion on the death penalty, when lead by progressive legislators, has been documented in the UK when capital punishment was banned in the 1960s. . In the December 8, 2010 Fresh York Times, columnist Nicolas Kristoff recounts the case of Kevin Cooper a black man in California,a who faces lethal injection next year for supposedly murdering a white family. A starkly dissenting group of judges argue compellingly that he was framed by police, concluding, "California may be about to execute an innocent man." The situation has become so egregious that former Supreme Court Justice Stevens has publicly and in a high-profile venue ("New York Review of Books"), recanted his pro-capital punishment opinion.Judging from the liner blurbs, "In the Put of Justice" is a sort of glorified self-help book, an impression reinforced by the sub-title ("A Story of Punishment and Deliverance"). However, I found it a compelling autobiography which makes several necessary points (which I hope have been satisfactorily stated in this review) and does so with considerable literary merit. Its not a polemic but it is a tale of exceptionalism. I think, if Rideau was to place the entire notice into a single "sound bite", it might be this one: "Give a prisoner a chance; with the right resources, encouragement and support, its possible to successfully re-enter society." Consider the alternative America is creating for itself...then consider other options. If that's his point, I think Rideau accomplished it.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    The author supports rape, while bashing the mentally ill and victims. He exaggerates anyone white and professional as ape-ish and cruel, while playing up himself as a bigger victim than anyone else. He is guilty of his crimes too.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    What an perfect book. After taking a course on the death penalty in law school, spending two years as a research assistant for a capital defense attorney and interning for a capital defense organization, I assumed I knew about as much as there was to know about the Furman/Gregg line of cases. But this book challenged that assumption and then some. From interesting tidbits about the justices to the LDF's strategy, Mr. Mandery takes us on an simple to read, but deeply informative overview of just how we went from total abolition to a reinvigorated capital system in just a few years. I can't recommend this book enough.On a side note, I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Mandery a few months ago. Very thoughtful and nice.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    Shane Bauer, author of “American Prison,” is a senior reporter at “Mother Jones” which might lead one to believe that liberalism will abound in his reporting. It does, to a certain extent, but I think critics of the book, based on that alone, are off base in their negative commentary. I search the accounting to be more tedious than leftist with undue emphasis on historical data that seems to be repetitive rather than interesting. Much of his info is merely reflective of what we all know about slavery and the exploitation of its subjects. There isn’t much fresh in his info about today’s prison environment, either.His accounts of his four months of undercover work as a correctional officer are interesting and reflect the abominable mindset and behavioral patterns of underpaid custodians of the incarcerated. Faced with harassment and insults, most of them have no idea of how to handle the abuse. Even the supervisors, the instructors supposedly “trained” in how to handle the trying circumstances, don’t have a clue how to professionally handle themselves or their harassers. The employer, Corrections Corporation of America, obviously locations economic interests above meaningful policies that are truly of service to the inmates or supportive of the employees. Personnel training is uer reports on what he sees and it isn’t beautiful or inspirational. The inmates are out of control. They intimidate, insult, and are, generally obnoxious. Attempting to control their behavior seems to consist of screaming insults and threats back at them. Discipline is inconsistent with minimal training and no conceptional background information. Economics seems to be the driving force that prompts action, or inaction, as the case may be. That’s not Bauer’s fault. He has to operate in the atmosphere that exists.His topic matter has been around as long as prisoners have existed. Meaningful reform never seems to be productive. Obviously, locking up huge numbers of people with no bright horizons will foment unrest and misbehavior. Corporal punishment, although the most frequently used strategy to control abhorrent behavior, is more destructive than effective. Other methods seem to be ineffective. The respond isn’t found in Bauer’s well-written book, nor did I expect it to be. At present, there seems to be no the epilogue Bauer tells about attending a stockholders’ meeting at CCA where he stands up and asks a lot of of the questions raised in his book. He is largely shut down by standard answers and platitudes about the company. The bottom line, publicly stated, is that the company is in the business of punishment because it makes the globe better, not that it makes them huyler T WallaceAuthor of TIN LIZARD TALES

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    This is a beautifully written and thoughtful book about aspects of the criminal justice system that should be of interest to everyone. As a lawyer myself--but not one who is involved in criminal law--I found the book fascinating because it not only explains the nuts and bolts of the system, but uses stories of true people involved in it to bring it ere is also something comforting, in this fraught time, about Preet's calm, measured, even humorous tone, both in writing and speech. I have both the Kindle and Audible editions and recommend them both.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    Well written, readable and SHOULD be read by anyone who wants to understand how the Justice department denizens think and go about their work.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    I had a hard time putting down a lot of sections of the book. To me, the most interesting and intellectually enlightening section was about soliciting info from different poor guys including terrorists and was glad to read that the patient and humane treatment worked best. Amazing read. Mr. Bharara would create a amazing US attorney general.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    For the latest 30 years, I read 40 to 60 books a year. I place In Put of Justice as one of the top ten impact books I have ever read! This story belongs in the same category as To Slay a Mockingbird, A Lesson Before Dying, and The Color Purple, books that forever change the reader. I am a better person having lived Rideau's experience painfully written on the pages of this dark history.I admire Rideau when he was in solitary confinement for 12 years. That chapter became very real, as he brings the reader into that bare existence but makes it entertaining as well as compelling. It was so graphic, so illustrative that it created me experience his absolute frustration of being alone without human touch, and I witnessed his indomitable spirit by just not going crazy. In his narrative, I felt his lack to hope. I was in Lake Charles at that same time and was completely oblivious to what was event in that jail, and quite frankly not caring; it is an awaking to hear his story. I regret my a co-author of two books and my first solo published in March, I was struck by not only the compelling story but absolutely loved Rideau's word craft. In Put of Justice will inspire a lot of and in a huge method change the world, I know your victim did not die in vain for Rideau proved the ability to change and by this book, his suffering has meaning; Victor Frankel would be proud.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    His story of working in the prison is a page turner. But every other chapter is on the history of slaves, freemen both white and black. Descriptions of the working and living conditions were unbelievable. Surely the people of the South can't be proud of that history. I had my doubts about for profit prisons and this book confirms them.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    Preet Bharara powerfully narrates his own story. Hearing it in his voice makes it all the more powerful. It is a human story, a story that can be listened to and enjoyed without taking notes. He speaks in every day [email protected]#$%!&? is an elegant speech. I search it thrilling that it is like listening to a soliloquy. I hold wanting to speak up and often do. Yes, I have interrupted Preet is is not just the story of his year in and out of office. This is his story, not the story of Barack Obama and Donald Trump. It is a story about who we are and who we should be. It is also about the true globe -- it is about integrity and leadership. The meaning of truth is under fire: "The creeping contempt for truth" is e Southern District of Fresh York makes me think of Tim Russert saying: 'Florida, Florida, Florida.' At some point the entire drama will end up playing out in the center of the world, not Florida this time, but the Southern District of Fresh York.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    A must read for everyone vested in the rule of law and the future of America. Ordering one for my 19 y/o granddaughter now.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    The early reviews are spot-on: Evan Mandery's study of the Supreme Court's history with the death penalty in the 1960's and 1970's is engrossing, breathtakingly informative, and scholarly (but at the same time accessible to non-laywers). The insight he into the inner workings of the Court's deliberative process is first-rate and is based on interviews with several then Supreme Court Clerks who actually witnessed history (and helped write the opinions). Mandery has taken us into the Justices' chambers (and the lunchrooms they frequent) with the goal of delivering an objective acc of the Court's stance on the death penalty in the United States---to say he succeeds is an understatement.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    An accessible and engaging look inside the Supreme Court regarding the evolving status of the death penalty issue. The book is well-written and provides realisitic assessments of the mechanics of Supreme Court decision-making. The author also addresses, within the context of the death penalty issue, the disturbing partisanship of the justices

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    Amazing read.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    A riveting introspection into the death penalty. I highly recommend it.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    i found several passages pendantic and often thought Kindle had created unexpected jumps to sections i had read. Over all this book has intensified my distaste for the ignorant oligarchs trump has unleashed on America. i feel more confident karma will grace ex-president trump with a Fresh York orange jumpsuit.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    Doing Justice is the best non fiction book I've read in a long time. Preet has a storytelling expertise that keeps your interest. It is so refreshing to hear someone speak with such integrity, honesty and work ethic values. His words can certainly apply to all facets of life. Amazing book. Janet Shiers, retired elementary teacher

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    I got my copy of American Prison latest night and literally could not stop reading it until I was finished. Shane Bauer did a heroic job infiltrating a for-profit prison and giving us an inside perspective on one of the most violent and exploitative industries in helps that American Prison is a complete page turner. Obtain your copy now, before it inevitably gets turned into an award-winning HBO series!

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    An perfect indictment of the personal prison industry and why it needs to be done away with. Also fascinating history of our nations penal system.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    While the first half or so of the book was interesting, it became repetitious and, frankly, tedious. I felt like I was reading the same chapter over and over again. Certainly the experience he had was appalling and not to be tolerated, but the book felt like an overblown article. I’d read that this was inspired by an article in a magazine. That’s where it belongs. I can’t imagine this as a page turner, except when I was turning a dozen pages at a time hoping it would obtain better. Ok, it’s horrible, ok you were scared, ok you were disrespected by the people who were being abused. A short article!I want I’d not read an except which enticed me to wish I reflect on it, what was I really looking for?Oh well, life is too short to spend on boring books, even if you gave amazing for them.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    This book includes the story of the experience of one black man, convicted of murder he admittedly committed, who lived through the Jim Crow system of discrimination and mistreatment in prison in Louisiana beginning in the early 60's. Unfortunately, there are a lot of stories like his from other Southern States. Our character achieves redemption over 40+ years of confinement. I suspect he is one of the few that came out of that prison environment better than when he went in. I was particularly interested in his vivid description of the inmates in a Louisiana county jail. If the author were not a black man, his description would be less acceptable. However, I spent 24 years as a judge in Florida and his description matches my experience exactly. Conditions in Southern prisons have improved over the years, as the author explains in detail. However, there is still a long method to go. The ration of black inmates to white is still method out of proportion to the population and the failed drug policy in the United States has made a law enforcement industry that is going to be very difficult to dismantle if we are to address the drug issue for what it is instead of treating it as a battle to warehouse addicts as prisoners.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    In The Put of Justice by Wilbert Rideau, a Pulitzer Prize Winning Author, he does a masterful job of showing you the life he lived in an alien "storehouse of hell" because he was black, uneducated and a juvenile living in the South. A riveting story of a young man's strength of hero and wonderful endurance. Wilbert's hope for freedom blossomed after spending years on death row reading books where he gained insight into people and the nature of power and politics.I ordered the book for research and found a gold mine. A wealth of info about how the politics behind the American correctional system bleeds of corruption. The system is driven by and power that results in a subculture of "human wreckage - tortured souls and destroyed lives."

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    I was initially assigned this book for my Psych and Law course, but I quickly became so engrossed that I couldn't place it down!This book is more than just a criticism of the legal system. It's a story about redemption. He not only challenges the stigma we keep versus prison inmates, but he also manages to present how easy compassion for others can create a globe of difference.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    Just too a lot of excuses for his/others murders. Like the human life that was taken means nothing yet being kept in prison is the true crime! Really?!?

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law []  2019-12-22 18:35

    I enjoyed Preet's take on our justice system. He explains the method things are supposed to work (as opposed to the method Hollywood shows it), and how hard the decisions can actually be for the prosecutors, defenders, and judges. He uses actual cases to illustrate his points, and finds a method to explain the intricacies of our legal system in a method even non-lawyers can understand.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    If you are not a consistent reader of "Mother Jones," you may have missed their original expose of conditions inside contemporary for-profit prisons in America. A lot of us should read "American Prison" to learn more about what is being done in (some of) our uer went undercover, in his own name, as a guard in a for-profit prison operated by CCA (Now CoreCivic). He ties his experience in CCA's Winn Correctional Center into America's century-plus history, primarily but not exclusively in Southern states, of using convict labor to bridge the gap made by the end of slavery. Factor in for-profit prison operators, and you make an environment excellent for the dehumanizing of convicts and correction personnel does CCA create a profit on contracts that as [email protected]#$%!24 per inmate per day? CCA pays guards at its Winn LA facility $9 an hour, less than local burger flippers earn. Guards work for years with no raises but plenty of mandatory overtime because hiring (Even with virtually no minimum competency standards) can't hold up with attrition. Troops are consistently understaffed with two guards assigned for upwards of 500 inmates. Social services and mental health programs are virtually non-existent. Medical care? One CCA facility has a 20-hour-per week physician for 1,400 inmates. Education? Rehabilitation?CCA's stock took a hit when the Obama administration announced it would discontinue using for-profit prisons for federal detention. But investors needn't worry--that recovered and more the day after Trump was sworn e ghastly conditions of plantation prisons--where 1 in 5 convicts died each year--are worse than you thought. And so are the outcomes of for-profit prisons. More violence, more suicides, higher recidivism, more civil rights violations.A sobering look in the prison and corporate hallways most of us will never have directly.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    Just more Liberal “Gotcha.” Attempts, but fails, to connect profit-driven corrections institution to profiteering associated with the inception of the penitentiary system at large. His insinuation is that, like in days of old, the black man is subjected to unequal and unjust punishment for the sake of profit but, at the penitentiary level and via his reporting, he proves the “business” of profiteering by method of black incarceration to be dangerous and void of the huge berals hate to see anyone but themselves create money. They are elitists disguised as humanitarians and flower chuldrun, be theym not good or rich. The author makes an attempt to profit from personal penitentiaries, too; am I wrong? Did he donate the proceeds from his documentary to an effort to have wayward black men placed where he implies that they rightly belong (federal lock-up)?It takes a twisted courage and warped fortitude to decide you’ll evade a thousand little lies for the sake of the huge one you’re going to tell at efforts like these. This is a deceitful dude in find of self-aggrandizement while shielded by “his own truth.” What he did here doesn’t matter, in the long run. It was a sad effort, a sissy’s method in and out. It saved nobody. And it lined his pockets while proving that he’s equal to, or less than, the honest people he came alongside to deceive and exploit. The Redneck he describes in the early pages comes out looking really, really amazing here by comparison; the tobacco spitters and squirrel hunters are honest and he is ther Jones—-says it all right there! Another George Soros disciple, bathing in his own paradox, his own irony, his own hypocrisy.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    A well-written book based on undercover, investigative journalism by Shane Bauer. With all transparency, I am adamantly versus the notion of personal (aka as for profit) prison. "American Prison" explores a lot of of the problems found with personal prisons, informed by his time as a Corrections Office in a LA state prison (having gone undercover to report on the conditions found at such facilities). Bauer does a amazing job of tracing the roots of for profit prisons in the US, how they arose primarily from the practice of convict leasing for labor, predominantly (not exclusively) in the post Civil Battle South. The most power part of Bauer's book is seeing his transformation as the mental and emotional toll of this work impact him. It becomes apparent how this line of work, especially in poorly managed personal prisons with their inadequate and lean staffs make PTSD (and suicidal) conditions with so a lot of that have worked in these conditions.While I was hoping that "American Prison" would provide a more fully fleshed out set of arguments versus personal prisons, I did think it was mostly effective of doing this through Bauer's experiences working at Winn. In my mind, there is no method to reconcile personal prisons with providing humane treatment for individuals incarcerated, whether for short term sentences or life sentences. The profit incentive leaves these facilities with poorly COs, virtually non-existent medical care, not good oversight, horrendous nutrition to name a few issues.

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    American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment []  2019-12-16 18:0

    It's actually very disturbing to realize what goes on behind the scenes in our prison system. The book explores the history of prisons in amazing detail. The life of a correctional officer is not simple and the training seems inadequate. Very informative.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    Capote-esque in its narrative, "In the Put of Justice" chronicles Wilbert Rideau's 44 year incarceration in the Louisiana penal system. Convicted at age 19 of capital murder in the Jim Crow South, Rideau's is a tale of overcoming both institutional racism and private demons. He never shies away from the truth, including his role in his victim's death, which is a testament to his real journalistic integrity. As the NY Times Book Review stated, "Rideau is the rarest of American commodities - a man who exited a penitentiary in better shape than when he arrived."I recommend this book to anyone interested in the pitfalls of the criminal justice system, as Rideau lays out the issues facing the incarcerated - ranging from violence, substandard resources, and rape - without sensationalizing the facts or falling victim to outrageous hyperbole. This book is also interesting, as it follows the evolution of capital punishment from the Jim Crow era, to the Supreme Court's 1972 Furman ruling, to show day. "In the Put of Justice" is a must read for anyone taking civil litigation because it puts a very human face to statutes governing capital punishment and the appeals process.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    Incredibly well written. As a psychology professor interested in effective management techniques, I found a lot of interesting insights into organizational functioning and crisis resolution in a most unusual setting. The book is also an inspirational story of ultimate rehabilitation and redemption. I could see using this book as a supplementary reading in an advanced seminar.

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    In the Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Redemption []  2020-1-29 17:24

    Very well written. I have followed Mr. Rideau's story now for over 20+ years and glad that he finally get his freedom. I am from central Louisiana but now live in Baton Rouge. As children growing up in Louisiana we were constantly warned to straighten up or " You'll be Angola bound ". That always got my attention from whatever it was I was doing. I'm sort of a Louisiana buff and love reading almost anything pertaining to my state. Mr. Rideau writes so familiar he place you right in the story. He is a very detailed writer. Perfect story about the strength, will, and redemption of the human sprit. Five Stars sir!

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    Meticulously researched and annotated, A Wild Justice is a compelling and thoroughly convincing acc of the struggles surrounding capital punishment in America, both in society and within the Supreme Court itself. The book illuminates the specific problems involved in a number of fascinating cases, provides the historical context for the decisions, and explores how personalities and deal-making impact the decision-making of our highest court. It is this latest point which is particularly ing a brilliant tactic of interviewing the clerks of the Justices, Mandery uncovers previously unknown details, including a real bombshell which will be of amazing interest to both general readers and scholars in the field.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    Mandery is preaching to the choir, insofar as I have always been extremely interested in this subject, even though as an attorney I have only watched it from afar. I studied under Tony Amsterdam, so it was all the more illuminating for me, and I think the author does an perfect job portraying this unique, if not widely known, person who is part of American History. Aside from a few historical mistakes - the year of the Freedom Summer was misdated, and there were a couple of there things that the editors missed, this is a amazing book that looks at the unusual instituion of capital punishment from all sides. Don't expect that the author is anything but an abolishonist - but he presents the opposing viewpoints with clarity and fairness. Most exciting are the inside stories from what went on behind the opaque walls of the Supreme Court, which the public doesn't obtain to see in any decent measure, except from books like this.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    The books looks at the philosphical anthopolgy of capitial e social, legal and polical problems before the US Supreme, due to capital punishment litigation, are brought to life. The author nails the legal drama surrounding the resolution of a series of capital cases by the Justices. My only criticism is that, at times, the Justices were portrayed as small more than water carriers for the clerks.A legal background is not important to have fun this book.

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    A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America []  2020-1-17 21:48

    I ordered after hearing Mandery interviewed. Fascinating look at the Supreme Court and the players of the wars to eliminate the death penalty in 1960's and 70's. Inspiring to learn of how hard people worked to eliminate capital punishment.

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    A Duke She Can't Refuse (The Impossible Balfours Book 1) []  2020-1-21 21:17

    She could be awkward But her best mate was worse. She also took the fall for her friend. But that was ok. After all, they insisted they would be sisters forever

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    The Day She Tried To Leave: A Domestic Violence Novel []  2020-1-24 23:19

    Ladies, this book is fire. I can not wait for book two. As usual your books are entertaining and I just love your books.

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    The Day She Tried To Leave: A Domestic Violence Novel []  2020-1-24 23:19

    Omg both books were soooooo good. I love both authors. Whew chile :)

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    The Day She Tried To Leave: A Domestic Violence Novel []  2020-1-24 23:19

    Let's obtain right to it....Kalisha is an idiot because she thinks a baby will create Sameer's abusive a$$ magically convert to being a wholesome, loving family man. Yeah right. She's engaging in social media beefs with Gina, for what?? A amazing piece? Girl bye!Nina is a bossy, judgmental hypocrite. I obtain that she hates in her what she sees in Sameer, but her approach was all wrong. Who is she to block contacts, demand Gina not to see him then take it upon herself to block him. Right or not, Gina has to not wish that relationship to leave him alone, not Nina. As for Gina, smh, how a lot of times does Sameer have to present his temper for her to obtain a clue and leave him?I'm reading the next installment in the hopes of finding out why Brock cheated and where Nina has been hiding. Gina and Kalisha, getting what they think they deserve, so 🤷🏾‍♀️🤷🏾‍♀️

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    A Pirate's Life for She: Swashbuckling Women Through the Ages []  2020-8-3 18:52

    I write fictional stories about female pirates. A mate gifted this book to me and I’m so grateful he did. I’m loving these accounts of these women’s tales, not only as research but inspiration. Thank you to the author for compiling all of this info into one book. This is now my number one guidebook for all things female pirate.

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    The Day She Tried To Leave: A Domestic Violence Novel []  2020-1-24 23:19

    These authors really brought the fire with this book. Domestic violence can have men and women as the perpetrators, and it was shown with Sameer and Nina. The only difference is that Nina realized that she had a problem, whereas Sameer was a complete dog. I feel so sorry for Gina and can’t wait to read book two.

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    The Day She Tried To Leave: A Domestic Violence Novel []  2020-1-24 23:19

    Domestic violence committed by both male and female is portrayed in this book. Nina, who is abusing her husband, recognizes that she has a problem. She is also fearful for her twin, Gina, who is being abused in her own relationship. Gina is in denial, though and makes excuses for Sameer's behavior. The thing that upsets me most about Gina's situation is that she's not in a relationship; they're just bed buddies. They only actually went out once, and the rest was booty calls with one of them leaving afterwards. So what is she taking all this abuse for? She's been warned by her sister and by Sameer's ex. And the ex is now stupid for Sameer again. Each of these characters need support and Gina definitely needs to chop her losses and move on.I rated a 3 because I didn't like how weak Gina and Kalisha were depicted. Domestic violence is a serious issue and they act like they've never heard of it.

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    A Duke She Can't Refuse (The Impossible Balfours Book 1) []  2020-1-21 21:17

    Lovely story with love, threats of danger making for amazing reading. This is the 5th book I have read by this author, and all have been great!

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    A Duke She Can't Refuse (The Impossible Balfours Book 1) []  2020-1-21 21:17

    Five starsGerman Blackwood storyline hold me deep into the story. Alexander and Daisy love and adventure had me guessing what will happen next.I cannot wait to read Edith' s story. Alexander's sister's on finding love seem to be a adventure ready to read.

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    A Duke She Can't Refuse (The Impossible Balfours Book 1) []  2020-1-21 21:18

    I enjoyed this clean regency romance. I liked Daisy’s strength and independence. I would have liked to see a small more hero growth-especially with The Duke, but I enjoyed it. I’m looking forward to reading more about The Duke’s sisters in upcoming books.

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    A Duke She Can't Refuse (The Impossible Balfours Book 1) []  2020-1-21 21:17

    Due to her best mate Edith’s carelessness in breaking an antique vase as she searched for secret panels in her brother’s fresh house, Daisy Morton stays behind to clean up and remove the broken pieces and is discovered in a very compromising position – hiding in the bedroom of Alexander Balfour, Duke of Loxwell. To save her reputation, Alexander immediately proposes a pretend engagement until things settle enough that they can go their separate ways without ese two are such opposites! Daisy was lively, daring, unconventional, and loyal to her mates to the point of getting herself in trouble. Alexander instead appeared aloof and disinterested, was stern and preferred following rules. He is Daisy’s best friend’s older brother. He feels undeserving of happiness, despite how he cares for Daisy who has been attracted to him for the past year. There is also a mystery that Daisy has found herself involved in when she hears something she shouldn’t while she was half-way under Alexander’s bed reaching for a key she had spotted. Will this place her in danger from the two men who had searched his room? And will Alexander and Daisy be unable to resist their growing feelings for each other?This was a sweet romance and really well-written. The characters will draw the reader in, and the mystery will entice the reader to read on and search out what is happening. Grab your copy and have fun a unbelievable story.

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    A Duke She Can't Refuse (The Impossible Balfours Book 1) []  2020-1-21 21:17

    I so much enjoyed the advancing romance with just the right measure of mystery on the side that I read it in one sitting. No, it isn't a excellent Regency, but those can be a bit stuffy. It has shenanigans, humor, and HEA, my favorite type of read. No sex, maybe one curse word, well-edited. Author Felicia Mires

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    The Day She Tried To Leave: A Domestic Violence Novel []  2020-1-24 23:19

    this was amazing books. couldn't stopping reading them.

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