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    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-2-2 1:41

    I was sad that I did not learn anything from this book that I had not already deduced from Regency etc novels. I had hoped that this book would delve deeper into the "why's" of the social conventions, and why they varied during the century and from former and later impression was that this was a "Dummy's Guide" to 19th century etiquette among the medium to upper classes in e bibliography looks fascinating, though- lots of references to period etiquette books, for example- though I have no idea how available these are!I was disappointed that this was more a summary than an exploration. Society was changing a lot in these times, and the treatment of that here was superficial- when not entirely y recommended if you know almost nothing about 19th C manners, and wish to understand Regency novels (like Jane Austen's) a bit better.

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    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-2-2 1:41

    Thanks to Alex and the rest of the squad at Pen & Sword for providing me a paperback copy of this book that I freely chose to review.I am a huge fan of Pen & Sword books and I have learned a lot on a dozens of topics thanks to their amazing selection, but I must admit to having a soft spot for social history. Although I love history books and have recently become keen on historical fiction, I think that social history helps us obtain a better sense of what life was like in the past, not only for the kings, aristocrats, and strong people but also for the rest of the population. The daily life of going around one’s usual business, talking to people, working, rarely makes it into the huge books, but it is what life is truly about. And those are the info that bring the past to life. As I have mentioned in previous reviews, these books are also amazing to provide background to writers, filmmakers, and, in general, artists looking to make works set in a particular time in history, as it helps them gain a better understanding of what it would have been like to live is particular volume is a delight. I have read a number of novels set in the era and watched uncountable films and tv series that take put in the XIX century as well, and although I thought I was familiar with the customs, social rules and mores of the time, I was surprised by how truly complicated following proper etiquette was. As the author often explains, rules were not set in stone and they changed throughout the century. What was a must at the beginning of the XIX century would have been out of fashion by the end, and rules were begin to interpretation, as sometimes various sources offered completely various advice. Should you eat fish with a fork and bread, two forks, or a fork and a fish knife (the respond depends on at what point of the XIX century we were eating it)? Would it have been proper for you to introduce people you knew, or even greet people you met in the roads even if you had been introduced? What was the best time to go for a walk or to visit your acquaintances? What did it truly mean if somebody was ‘not at home’?Such subjects and a lot of more are discussed in this short volume, and it makes for fascinating reading. The author is skilled at summarising the rules from a huge dozens of sources (there is a detailed bibliography at the end and footnotes to check where each point can be expanded on), and also at providing practical examples that support clarify matters like how would you address somebody you are introduced to, or in which order would guest enter the dining room. Her turn of phrase is particularly apt, as her own explanations and the quotes and references to texts blend seamlessly, and she manages to write clearly and engagingly in attractive e tone of the book is light and there are funny moments, but there are also reminders of how various things were for those who had more serious concerns than following the rules of etiquette. The book contains 11 chapters that deal in a dozens of topics, from rank, precedence and title, to what was considered amazing company, paying calls, dining, ballroom behaviour, conversation, and correspondence, how to treat the service, courtship, and it also offers tips for ladies and gentlemen. The book (I had access to the paperback copy but I know the pictures are available in the digital ver as well) includes a number of plates that support illustrate the proper dress etiquette throughout the century for various occasions and there are also pictures of some of the fashion accessories of the period.I had to share a couple of examples from the book, so you can obtain a feeling for the writing style and the type of tip it contains:If a lady or gentleman was plagued by a person saluting them in the road who they did not like, who they did not wish to call upon, and who they thought was taking a gross impertinence continually bowing to them, it was still better for the afflicted lady or gentleman to return the recognition. (For some reason, this brought to my mind the nodding bulldogs that used to grace the back windows of cars).Talking about men’s fashion, the book has this to say:Similarly, a gentleman would have been restrained in his use of private ornamentation. After all, a gentleman was a gentleman, not a magpie hankering after shiny though some of the rules contained in this book might seem too fussy and silly nowadays, there are some about listening to people and being respectful towards others, no matter what their social cirtances (in fact, being more polite and generous the more difficult things are for them) that will create readers nostalgic for those more gentile and kinder times. There are always things we can learn from the past and it is necessary to learn and remember.Another amazing small volume from Pen & Sword and one that I particularly recommend to anybody interested in XIX century history, novels, films set in the period, and to writers and creators looking for inspiration or researching that era. It is also a fun read for people that study social history or are interested in the origins of some of our customs and on how these have changed. Unmissable.

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    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-2-2 1:41

    Ever wondered how ladies and gentlemen are supposed to behave? You will search all the answers in this book. The author breaks the topic down into categories such as dining, meeting on the street, and attending a ball. She walks the reader through a look at the nineteenth century as viewed through the etiquette books of the time. And the rules changed just about every decade. After reading this book, I feel like it would have been a full time job just to hold up with the rules and of course, the exceptions to the rules. Does it really matter who enters the dining room first? In the nineteenth century it mattered a lot and if not done right could leave with a reputation of being rude and undesirable at social gatherings. And please don’t present up at your neighbor’s house with mud on the hem of your skirt, even in London. This book is just full of small bits of formality that will create you glad you leave in the 21st century. I was also surprised though by how a lot of of the rules continue today but in a watered down way. This is a amazing book for those interested in social history.

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    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-2-2 1:41

    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century by Mallory James is a free advanced reader copy of a paperback book offered to me by Pen & Sword in exchange for an honest , witty, daintily and sassy-worded chapters about inherited/familial ranks and titles vs those earned from military service, offering and accepting social calls inside and out (like the most ideal time to be seen walking or riding, choosing and seating guests effectively during a dinner party), dancing (not accepting food, drink, or dances from strangers), speaking, writing letters (on stationary featuring a family crest, calling cards), hiring servants (on recommendation, never publicly berating them), marriage (wedding tours/honeymoons) and domestic life (fashion, jewelry, and hygiene).

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    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-2-2 1:41

    While I was already accustomed to much of the etiquette described here after reading Jane Austin, John Galsworthy, et al, it was fun to have it spelled out in frank language. A amazing resource for familiarizing yourself with the period.

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    Black Girlhood in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-25 21:7

    This book exhibits sophisticated archival work that intervenes in 19th century race and gender discourse by centering Black girlhood and, in doing so, it also proves to be an necessary resource for 20th and 21st century scholars of Black Women's Studies.

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    Black Girlhood in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-25 21:7

    Attractive book came protected. No bends or scratches.

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    Elegant Etiquette in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-2-2 1:41

    This is a very specific book. If you are not deeply into Victorian culture this is not your book.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    The print is a small too small.

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century [email protected]#$%!st class description of the beginning of female education in the US and an perfect discussion of the early History of cartography in the US and its political use.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    With a lot of 'on demand' publishers, classic books are being republished by a lot of entities with various catchy covers. This is one of them.If you zone scholar, you likely already have it on your shelf with a various cover... The basis for Fuller’s essay is the idea that man will rightfully inherit the earth when he becomes an elevated being, understanding of divine love. The conclusion of the essay is that before a real union can occur, each person must be an individual and self-dependent unit. For women to become such individuals, men need to remove their dominating influence, but women also need to claim themselves as self-dependent and remove themselves from man’s influence. Are you still awake?

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    Not enough people read Margaret Fuller anymore. She was the first amazing female American intellectual. She lived a fascinating life and died a tragic death. She also wrote a classic of early feminist thinking, Woman in the Nineteenth Century -- needed reading for anyone who cares about the history of women's rights. However, this is a book that you absolutely should NOT test to read in a Dover thrift edition. Fuller's references to her own reading and her historical moment are legion, and they are guaranteed to confuse the heck out of anyone who lacks deep background in the study of pre-Civil Battle American culture. The amazing virtue of Dover editions is that they are cheap. Their amazing disadvantage is that they offer no critical apparatus to support with comprehension. And Oh! does Fuller require critical apparatus. Without a hefty array of footnotes to tutorial you through, you are very likely to search this book opaque and frustrating. You may very well end up hating a book that greatly deserves to be loved. Go for the Norton Critical Edition instead -- it's well worth the additional investment!!

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    If you are interested inn cartography, this book is for you. She has a masterly grasp of her subject. I strongly recommend this book.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    In 1844, Margaret Fuller expanded her article, "The Amazing Lawsuit….," published in the Transcendentalist Dial magazine into this national and international 1845 bestseller, "Woman in the Nineteenth Century," as she created her transition from Boston and Fresh England to become the first woman social and literary critic for Horace Greeley's Fresh York Tribune in Manhattan. Margaret liberates men as well as women from their stereotypical roles in this first American feminist tract which inspired the 1848 Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton had attended several of Margaret's "Conversations for Women" in Boston which allowed women to reflect and speak about what was on their minds. Margaret lived the sacred marriage, her own struggle and integration of her feminine and masculine aspects as fluid, and emphasizes this pivotal understanding in this seminal writing about fulfilling one's life living the sacred marriage. Her passionate social justice and equality for women, Native Americans, immigrants, and African Americans is evident throughout as she uses her classical education as the first-born male initiated by her Harvard College-educated lawyer father. Captivating and riveting, Margaret breaks the chains of our bondage to limitation and opens the method to our human, creative, and spiritual freedom. A must-read for all those seeking justice and fulfillment in their lives and in the world. Rev. Michael Barnett, M. DIv., M. Ed.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    bought it didn't need it

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    Her essay was better than Emerson's, but it is only a slight improvement since hers lacks structure and organization as well. I read it for class.

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    Perfect book! Loved the subject and how it was explained. Ms Schulten drew me in, but with maps and history that is beautiful simple to do.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    Fuller was an outstanding human being. Her story should be created in to a film for a larger audience to appreciate. She demonstrates the capacity of the human brain. The book changed my impression of Emerson as well.

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    Susan Schulton's first-rate Mapping the Nation tells the tale of the growth of both geographical education and mapping in America, especially the nineteenth century. In doing so she gives a history of the growth of educational and other bureaucracies that saw mapping as a critical medium for nation formation, politically and socially. One of the true virtues of the book is the attention paid to the different governmental agencies for which mapping was a critical medium for the ysis and presentation of data important to two critical locations of statehood: health and war. Time and again we see the map as a medium critical to the ysis of patterns of health and disease across the expanding geography of the United States. And, too, the relation between mapping and the problems surrounding the Civil Battle and the planning of the battle itself. Theoretical cartographers will blanche at her use of "thematic mapping" as an organizing concept (after all...all maps have "themes"). And, too, its geocentric history pays, I think, insufficient attention to the degree to which nineteenth century mapping was an outgrowth of European bureaucratic, cartographic, and scientific advances. but quibbles aside, this focused history of mapping as an instrument of nationhood in battle and peace is beautiful much unique. There is nothing else like it.

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    This should not have been placed in the e-book category. You really need to be looking at the maps as you read. It would have helped to have broken up the chapters. I usually search no reason that this could not be done and search that it helps in organization of the information.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    Good.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    I read Fuller's book together with American Bloomsbury by Susan Cheever. I must say it was one of the least enjoyable reading experiences I have ever had, reminding me of some of the obsolete literary styles I had to plow through in graduate school. The prose was mannered, self-conscious and pretentious, much I fear in the manner valued by her Transcendentalist contemporaries. When I read American Bloomsbury I found that Cheever appropriately described Fuller's writing as "turgid, quotation/ridden prose". I do not recommend it unless you are writing a thesis on mid-nineteenth century American thought or on the history of feminism.

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    Woman in the Nineteenth Century (Dover Thrift Editions) []  2020-7-22 18:45

    No, seriously... how audacious can you be? She was a attractive writer and a brilliant women who stole the hearts of every amazing mind in Concord in her day. She had a lovely and simplistic sense of logic and could reference amazing works from every corner of the globe with ease. You can not fail to learn from her and that is why she should be read, I think.

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    Mapping the Nation is a history of cartography in 19th century America that shows how maps were used as tools to deal with the economic, social, and politicalissues in America. Dr. Schulten special presentation of the development of mapsand cartography present how cartography was used to enlarge Americans social, political and scientific views of themselves. The book contains pictures of the maps written about in the book. I have a interest in cartography and geography andthis book is informative to me. I have added the book to my cartography collection. Charles

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    Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-7-25 18:0

    Fine copy, as advertised, and carefully wrapped and ship[ed. Being used as a secondary source in historical research and writing.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    Anyone interested in Women's Literature or the Victorian Novel in general needs to allow Gilbert and Gubar into their lives. Their other classic criticism source is "Rooms of our Own."

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    If you're looking to study literary criticism, specifically on 19th-century writings of any kind, Gilbert & Gubar's feminist critical collection "The Madwoman in the Attic" is completely indispensible. This particular copy of the book, too, is excellent, with clear text, a helpfully modern introduction, and a well-organized index. Even if you're not interested in its critical aspect, Gilbert & Gubar's pinpoint yses of 19th-century writings (Bronte, Eliot, inson, etc.) will begin your eyes to fresh meanings behind the female characters & writers, and their worlds.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    This book is so iconic, that I bought it so I could feel intelligent when I'm seen reading it. It is very interesting when I pick it up, and I always vow to read more, and then I obtain a fresh assignment and don't have time. Sooner or later I'll choose an essay subject where this will be a crucial source, and then I'll be glad I'll already have it.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    The most comprehensive study. Used it for my graduate exams, and rocked them!

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    I studied this book in graduate school, when I was getting my Master's in English Lit...My thesis was on the Brontes, so this was naturally assigned to my class. Great, if you are curious about 19th century women authors, how they worked, etc. My latest copy fell apart, so I got it again, this is one I need to have on my shelf.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    Love this version. Great!

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    Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century []  2020-7-1 20:6

    The roote/routes of transnational (as well as local) belonging are explored in all their full global/local complexity and poetics. Probing and interesting at a lot of points. I use one of the poems/essays/travelogues, "Honolulu: The Year of the Ram" in my course on the literatures of Hawai'i, as it gives a tourist view of Hawaii and moves method beyond that in its critique of US militarism and the arrogant masculinist gaze of "anthropology." Clifford is, for me, a kind of global and local poet of the postcolonial condition, an honest and caring soul in the muck.

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    Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century []  2020-7-1 20:6

    I really had a hard time conceptualizing my own ethnographic research in sociology concerning a non-federally recognized Native American community in South Carolina (now a book: Native Americans in the Carolina Borderlands: A Critical Ethnography, Carolinas Press, 2000). The lights came on after reading the Predicament of Cultures by Clifford. His theme of "Borderlands" is so central to the experience of a lot of cultures around the globe--including our own! To understand how people occupy and contend with borderzones between races, classes, cultures, and histories, turn to Clifford's work. His work is essential for the social yst because we, all of us, are increasingly living within borderlands and, thus, the need for fresh conceptualizations of the nature of the social/cultural. Clifford is one of the leading figures within the growing movement toward new, critical, and alternative forms of ethnography. Routes is about travel and how we might conceptualize culture when it is "put into motion." A must-read for all ethnographers, as well as those concerned with postmodernity and postcolonialism.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    "The Madwoman in the Attic:The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination" provides a full history of the plight of women writers and websites important/relevant research and problems that are still relevant in academia/ life today.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    For many, this book is essential reading since Gilbert and Gabar really employ a penetrating critical lens to their subject.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    This book was published in the late 1970's - which created me believe its notice would be dated and no longer relevant to my PhD studies. I could not have been more wrong. Interested in women issues? Do yourself a favour and read this book.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-century Literacy Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) []  2020-1-15 23:5

    Although erudite as most academic dissertations are, this book provided a springboard and context for my further pursuit of feminism in British literature.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    Anyone interested in Women's Literature or the Victorian Novel in general needs to allow Gilbert and Gubar into their lives. Their other classic criticism source is "Rooms of our Own."

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    Love this version. Great!

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    This book is so iconic, that I bought it so I could feel intelligent when I'm seen reading it. It is very interesting when I pick it up, and I always vow to read more, and then I obtain a fresh assignment and don't have time. Sooner or later I'll choose an essay subject where this will be a crucial source, and then I'll be glad I'll already have it.

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    I studied this book in graduate school, when I was getting my Master's in English Lit...My thesis was on the Brontes, so this was naturally assigned to my class. Great, if you are curious about 19th century women authors, how they worked, etc. My latest copy fell apart, so I got it again, this is one I need to have on my shelf.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    Although erudite as most academic dissertations are, this book provided a springboard and context for my further pursuit of feminism in British literature.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    "The Madwoman in the Attic:The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination" provides a full history of the plight of women writers and websites important/relevant research and problems that are still relevant in academia/ life today.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    If you're looking to study literary criticism, specifically on 19th-century writings of any kind, Gilbert & Gubar's feminist critical collection "The Madwoman in the Attic" is completely indispensible. This particular copy of the book, too, is excellent, with clear text, a helpfully modern introduction, and a well-organized index. Even if you're not interested in its critical aspect, Gilbert & Gubar's pinpoint yses of 19th-century writings (Bronte, Eliot, inson, etc.) will begin your eyes to fresh meanings behind the female characters & writers, and their worlds.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    The most comprehensive study. Used it for my graduate exams, and rocked them!

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    This book was published in the late 1970's - which created me believe its notice would be dated and no longer relevant to my PhD studies. I could not have been more wrong. Interested in women issues? Do yourself a favour and read this book.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Veritas Paperbacks) []  2020-9-24 19:1

    For many, this book is essential reading since Gilbert and Gabar really employ a penetrating critical lens to their subject.

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    The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the Nineteenth Century []  2019-12-24 20:13

    Fascinating cultural study.

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    The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the Nineteenth Century []  2019-12-24 20:13

    Schivelbusch connects psychology and history beautifully, though the beginning is a small slow for me.

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    The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the Nineteenth Century []  2019-12-24 20:13

    Simple read, super fascinating--even for weekend locomotive lovers.

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    The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the Nineteenth Century []  2019-12-24 20:13

    Very interesting perspective going beyond the rails into a lot of contributing factors of change.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    In 1841, Fresh York Town is bound in a special social construct, the town teeming with Americans of every walk of life, the very wealthy, the amazing working class and a rich pool of literary talent, all juxtaposed with newspapers that war for readership, corrupt backroom politics and gangs of leatherheads who compete as fire brigades, the town a microcosm of a rapidly changing world. One impressive figure, Jacob Hays, High Commissioner of Fresh York Town for forty-two years, is notably the city's first detective, at the time sixty-nine years old, with no plans for retirement in spite of his advancing years. His office located in the newly built prison, the euphemistically named "Tombs", "Old Hays" has his finger on the pulse of the town as a series of murders give the newspapers no end of e most notorious murder is that of Mary Rogers, a woman with a lot of admirers who has graced a local tobacconist's that serves as a gathering put for such luminaries as James Fennimore Cooper, Washington Irving, Charles ens and Edgar Allen Poe, all of whom reflect the bizarre balance of dramatic Victorian fiction, poetry and a journalism defined by sensationalism. The city's appetite whetted by the brutal murder of the striking young woman, another outrageous crime focuses attention on the unexpected slaying of writer/publisher Charles Adams by John C Colt, brother of the inventor of the Colt revolver, an influential family. After his trial Colt is sentenced to die, his quarters in the Tombs markedly various from the other prisoners, attended to by a manservant, his cell obscured by draperies, meals delivered by the finest ross from Colt on death row is yet another condemned man, Tommy Coleman, leader of the Forty Small Thieves, one of the infamous gangs that make havoc in the poorest part of the city, Five Points. Tommy is charged with killing his wife, a hot corn girl, and her small daughter, although he insists they were murdered by the woman's former lover, Ruby Pearl. Tommy's insists his only crime, is killing Pearl after finding him by the slaughtered bodies. From the lowest echelon of society, Tommy's prospects are bleak. It is Old Hays task to ferret out the truth of these crimes and he applies himself with his usual mental vigor; unfortunately a fire in the prison complicates the pursuit of of the most pivotal characters in the novel is the aggrieved Edgar Allen Poe, who interviews both Colt and Coleman while they are incarcerated and brings suspicion upon himself. Fascinated by the study of physiognomy, Hays believes a man's face is reflective of his character. To Hays, Poe is both an interesting and suspicious person; their lives become a series of contretemps, especially once Poe writes a chilling narrative of Mary Roger's murder as a thinly-veiled fiction in a local magazine. Blending the criminal element with the literary ambitions and expanding globe of publishing, Rose has made a special blend of crime and literature, unchecked passions and one author's steady decline while grappling with the self-destructive nature his particular talent. From thugs and murderers to the luxurious boardrooms of the powerful, Hays remains undeterred, shadowed by the sad and desperate life of the shattered genius of the author of "The Raven". Luan Gaines/ 2007.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    This is one of those irritating "historical" novels that have virtually nothing to do with actual history. To recap some of the more notable oddities: 1.Poe never had an affair with Mary Rogers--in fact, there is no reason to believe he ever so much as laid eyes on the woman. ere is also no evidence that Poe was ever unfaithful to his wife at all--with Fanny Osgood or anyone else. This fictional portrayal of Poe actually has practically no resemblance to the true man in any sense. the author himself rather shamelessly admits in his afterword, there is no evidence that the novel's murderer had, in reality, anything to do with his victim. Rose was certainly free to concoct any completely fictional scenarios he chose, but why did he have to tack the names of true people onto them? Is there no compunction anymore about libeling the dead? Has Rufus W. Griswold been transformed into a role model for some of these novelists? Ironically, the book would have been much more convincing if Rose had eschewed trying to use true people and had instead stuck to pure invention. The scenes where he simply describes the milieu of 1840s Fresh York are the most successful in the entire top it off, this novel is method too long, and extremely dull and pointless in spots. It was a true effort to obtain to the conclusion, and when I realized that it had nothing to do with the actual facts surrounding the Mary Rogers murder, I felt rather cheated. In short, I found the book to be a waste of time.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    Don't read this.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    In this novel, the reader follows a multitude of characters and their individual stories set versus the backdrop of Fresh York Town in the mid-1800's. At the end of the novel the main mystery is solved and each story is intertwined with those of the other characters.I freely admit that I started reading this book with rather high expectations, which may have set me up for failure from the beginning. I generally have fun mysteries and always search myself entranced when the storylines of multiple characters are intertwined in clever ways. However, this book failed to live up to my e aspect of the book which I probably enjoyed the most was the author's writing. Joel Rose was very descriptive when it came to settings and characters movements. He was also faithful in using the type of language that people in the mid-1800's would have at being said, Rose's story dragged on. The exposition understandably took a long time as there were a lot of characters being introduced. However, there was no reason for the rising action to be as long and tedious as it was. Out of a 475-page long story it probably took up 300 pages. Much of this time was wasted on causing Hays (the constable of the novel) to continuously seek fresh answers from the same people and outlets. It was frustrating and honestly felt as though the author was just trying to add more pages to his novel. During this time fresh info only came to light sporadically. Once Old Hays (as he is often referred to in the book) finally pieces together all of the clues the mystery quickly unravels.Overall, this novel lacked the mystery aspect that should have had me enthralled with the story. Instead, I was often bored and not inclined to pick up this book and read. I only recommend this book to people interested in the time period and not mystery lovers.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    I love stories set in the Victorian era and was thrilled when I came across this book. It looked like just the type of story I'd like.I was wrong.I am halfway through the book and bored so I came to Amazon to read other reviews to test to determine if it's worth finishing. I don't think I'll rmally I'd give something like this two stars but I'm giving a third star because the author really evokes the era nicely.

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (Studies in Legal History) []  2020-1-24 21:50

    i got this book for a legal history research paper on the free exercise clause. it was simple to read, interesting, and well cited. i highly reccomend it.

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    Stolen Childhood, Second Edition: Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America (Blacks in the Diaspora) []  2020-6-29 18:31

    I was apprehensive about purchasing Stolen Childhood. I had it on my Want List for awhile and finally got up the nerve to read it. All I can say it is very informative. I never wanted to read info of childhood slavery. It was and still is abuse versus children. A lot of may not be aware but childhood slavery is still prevalent worldwide. If there is wealth to be made, you can believe someone or some corporation is using oppression and slavery versus these smallest victims as well. My only suggestion is if you purchase the 2nd edition, you will not need to purchase the 1st edition also.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Thanks! We have it on our Fresh Book shelf.

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (Studies in Legal History) []  2020-1-24 21:50

    I have just finished the book. It is well done, and very enlighteningI have not yet finished the book, and it is very enlightening. It is interesting that in that period The U.S. Government held strongly that marriage was a contract between one man and one woman. Today in the war the U.S. Government is very much on the other side, as tho any thing goes. There is a lot of history in this book that i have not known. Howard H. Johnson

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    Stolen Childhood, Second Edition: Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America (Blacks in the Diaspora) []  2020-6-29 18:31

    Very informative with amazing personalized stories.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Hunter has given us a nuanced, authoritative acc of 19th-century African-American marriage, with an emphasis on the antebellum period. She draws on a large range of sources and paints a vivid picture of both the institution and numerous individual men and women. Her historical descriptions inspire confidence and helped me understand the horrible impact of slavery on African-Americans in this most personal aspect of their lives.I have two reservations about the book. First, Hunter is not a gifted stylist. Her writing is prolix and often fuzzy, requiring a second take to unravel. The book is unfortunately not a smooth read. Second, her final chapter on “legacies” seems superficial compared to the rest of her ysis, and has a tacked on quality; one wishes she had omitted it.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    Amazing Book

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    Full of actual historical figures from Old Fresh York, this novel focuses mainly on two actual murders that took put in 1841 Fresh York Town -- a town full of gangs, political corruption, social discontent, and an inflammatory news press. How these murders touched the lives of the rich and popular and raised hue and cry all over the town is explored in the novel.Halfway through, however, the novel suddenly shifts focus from the murders and murderers to Edgar Allan Poe, now a suspect for the murder of Mary Rogers. As a known acquaintance to murderer, John Colt, brother of Samuel Colt (of firearms fame) and to the murdered cigar shop girl Mary Rogers, and as author of The Mystery of Marie Roget (based on the murder of the cigar girl), Poe gets the attention of veteran High Constable John Hays. Readers are now able to examine the life of Poe and his consumptive, child-wife, Sissy, always on the edge of poverty, eking out a meager subsistence on his writing - but is he a murderer? Hays, with his interest in 'physiognomy', seems to think he might e Blackest Bird has an authentic flavor and is powerful historical fiction. If you are fascinated by real-life murder cases, 19th century Fresh York, or Poe, I would recommend it. It is interesting, entertaining, and obviously well-researched.

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (Studies in Legal History) []  2020-1-24 21:50

    Presents plenty of not-so-widely-known info and historical background. Not a poor read, but definitely not particularly compelling.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Fabulous missing piece history.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Thought it would be better.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    On the surface, The Blackest Bird is about a murder, introducing readers to rich characters and a gritty, budding Fresh York, but the drama unfolds to reveal at its heart, the literary figure of Edgar Allan Poe. A lot of a novel has attempted to fictionalize Poe with varying results, but Joel Rose has probably been the most successful in painting the proper patchwork of ego, madness and genius without having the poet come off as a pure fop. Rose is able to cast the reader back to a simpler and darker time filled with corruption and politics, scandal and decorum with the careful turn of a phrase and execution of dialogue. The story is an intriguing mystery filled with shadows and ultimately vague yet plausible answers that hang in the air of the fiction, to beckon consideration to the aspects borrowed from reality. Its only vice is that it may have held the suspense just a shade too long.

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (Studies in Legal History) []  2020-1-24 21:50

    Gordon's book is an perfect review and commentary on the relationship between polygamy and the constitution. If you are interested in this items be sure to buy it.

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    Stolen Childhood: Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America (Blacks in the Diaspora) []  2020-10-22 18:13

    Very informative with amazing personalized stories.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    I bought this book for a college class and it was incredibly helpful when completing assignments and writing papers

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Perfect historical doentation of African American culture and behaviors. Puts a much maligned group into more correct perspective.

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    The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth Century New York []  2020-7-12 18:29

    According to his acknowledgments, Joel Rose spent eighteen years writing THE BLACKEST BIRD, simple to believe since most of it is written in nineteenth century newspaper jargon. The following is a description of Jacob Hays, "Old Hays," High Constable of Fresh York City: "Equipped solely with his long ash constable's staff, he would proceed from one to another, knocking the hat off the most vituperative, then, when said individual went to retrieve his aggrieved topper, sending him flying with a swift kick to the rump, effectively rendering his participation harmless." Rose was able to keep real to this recondite argot for 475 pages, a Herculean accomplishment in my mind. THE BLACKEST BIRD refers to Edgar Allen Poe's nickname, The Raven. Poe is a major player in the narrative. At the beginning of the novel, Old Hays, now almost seventy, must deal with three murders, those of Mary Rogers, a "segar" shop clerk, Samual Adams, publisher to John Colt brother of Samuel Colt of six-shooter fame, and the daughter and wife of gangster Tommy Coleman. The latter two are open-and-shut cases and both men wind up in the Tombs, notorious Fresh York Town prison. Edgar Allen Poe is a suspect in the Mary Rogers case, primarily because of a thinly-disguised short story he wrote about Mary, a former lover. Joel Rose's portrayal of Edgar Allen Poe might strike some readers as suspect. He is depicted as a megalomaniac, not above plagiarism and blackmail. Towards the end of his life we see him pingponging back and forth between three various women, all of whom he asked to marry him. Somewhere in the cobwebs of my mind I remember a reference to a Poe biographer who hated him with a passion. Rose mentions two of Poe's must hated rivals, literary critic Rufus Griswald and newspaper publisher James Gordon Bennett. Rose insists, once more in his acknowledgments, that neither worked in concert versus Poe, but apparently he believed every rumor he read about Poe, because he goes so far as to infer that Jacob Hays' daughter helped him write "The Bells" when Poe was suffering from brain fever. THE BLACKEST BIRD lags in spots and the ending seems a bit rushed, but overall I enjoyed it. It's certainly more original than the serial assassin rubbish we're constantly subjected to these days.

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    Stolen Childhood: Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America (Blacks in the Diaspora) []  2020-10-22 18:13

    I was apprehensive about purchasing Stolen Childhood. I had it on my Want List for awhile and finally got up the nerve to read it. All I can say it is very informative. I never wanted to read info of childhood slavery. It was and still is abuse versus children. A lot of may not be aware but childhood slavery is still prevalent worldwide. If there is wealth to be made, you can believe someone or some corporation is using oppression and slavery versus these smallest victims as well. My only suggestion is if you purchase the 2nd edition, you will not need to purchase the 1st edition also.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    I liked the vintage images the best. The dialogue of true ex slaves was very interesting as well, it's like you could hear their voices.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Unbelievable Black history to know.

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    Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century []  2020-11-16 18:23

    Too much detail. It became boring.

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (Studies in Legal History) []  2020-1-24 21:50

    This book covered the subject of polygamy and constitutional laws. I used this book for Political Science paper. The book had amazing info useful for my research paper.

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    In Search of Equality: The Chinese Struggle against Discrimination in Nineteenth-Century America []  2021-4-6 21:53

    This is a strong book, which shatters the illusion that pioneer Chinese didn't understand the American justice or court system. The book also does a amazing job of doenting the tax inequities that faced the Chinese until repeal of the Magnuson Act in the 60's. Taxation inequities are still with us- immigrants holding work or student visas pay disparate taxation rates, scheduled according to their country of origin. Immigrant exploitation is still prevalent. This book's themes still resonate today.

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    The Lives of Chang and Eng: Siam’s Twins in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-1-31 21:21

    Terrible

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    The Work of Art: Plein Air Painting and Artistic Identity in Nineteenth-Century France []  2020-2-1 0:23

    Perfect all and dark reproductions.

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    The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon []  2020-1-28 20:36

    Amazing book, thank you so much!

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    Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home []  2020-7-19 19:28

    A fascinating and colourful look at the use of arsenic in daily products in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. Scrupulously researched, and a delight to read. The color plates of wallpaper samples? What a amazing idea to contain them?

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    Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home []  2020-7-19 19:28

    Love the history and images. Even my non-design motivated husband enjoyed it. Clever title and fascinating context.

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    Larding the Lean Earth: Soil and Society in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-3-31 19:3

    arrived in fine shapearrived in fine shape

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    Larding the Lean Earth: Soil and Society in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-3-31 19:3

    When we think of the conservation movement in America, our minds are drawn to people such as John James Audubon, John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, and Aldo Leopold. Although these men wrote with passion about conservation, the political movement had deeper roots. In his original and thought provoking book, Steven Stoll proposes that conservation thought emerged as a political force in the 19th century exploitation of the land. Two forces emerged - the improvers of the land who believed that farming practices must be used to sustain the soil, - and the emigrants who kept moving to new untouched wilderness as their land gave out. Today, most of the arable land is cultivated and much of it in North America is maintained by technology. Larding the Lean Earth explores how technology has come to dominate the agricultural landscape. It is a must read for anyone interested in the history of conservation, and anyone close to the land.

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    Afoot in Japan: A Nineteenth Century Guide to Walking The Back Roads []  2020-7-13 19:39

    I'm prejudiced because I translated the book, but I think that it is a charming work that in a lot of parts is still pertinent today for walking the back streets of Japan.

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    Home Fires: How Americans Kept Warm in the Nineteenth Century (How Things Worked) []  2021-2-16 20:16

    A surprisingly interesting book on the energy industry of the 19th century. As I read it, the globe of the 19th century opened up through the window of the universal need to heat one's home and cook. As a person who tracks the oil industry today, certain parallels, such as unpredictable price fluctuation became immediately obvious. Small details, such as the difficulty of working with anthracite coal for heating were fresh and informative discoveries. Would recommend.

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    The Lives of Chang and Eng: Siam’s Twins in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-1-31 21:21

    Orser's book looks at the twins both as special people and as people embedded in a very complex era. The book covers the times when the twins were a traveling exhibition, but focuses more on the decades after they retired in 1839. As freaks, or monstrosities, or educational shows (they've been seen as all three) they earned enough cash to buy land in, of all places, rural North Carolina. They were "Siamese" in the sense of being from Siam, but seem to have been mostly of Chinese descent. Born in 1811, they were spotted and either bought by an American or were entrusted to his care, when they were 17. They came to the USA and spent the rest of their life here, save only travels. In a sense they are an early foretaste of multicultural e twins managed to gain what is often called "agency," that is some ability to act freely. This gets wildly ironic. In an agrarian community in which racial divisions were deep, Chang and Eng became citizens (apparently reserved for "whites," so they became white somehow). They could vote. They married sisters, in a time when inter-racial marriage was illegal. They owned slaves (about 30). Two sons fought in the Confederate side, one being wounded and one a POW. They produced 21 kids and have a sizable number of descendants. The descendants seem to have faced more overt racial antagonism, but some continued to live in the North Carolina community. While it is only speculation, Orser mentions the chance of the twins fathering a kid with one of the slave women they owned, a common ey now and then exhibited themselves after retirement, traveling to California (in the 1850s when anti-Chinese sentiment was rising) and to Britain in the 1860s. They remained in varying degrees in the public eye for decades, becoming so well known as to be almost a trope. In the Civil Battle and the happenings leading up to it, the Siamese Twins were used by some journalists and writers as symbols of two halves being tied together. There were stories about them all along, and it's remarkable the twins and their families got through it (there appear to have been a few minor incidents). There's also a lot of misinformation about them still around; Orser is particularly critical of one 20th century ey died in 1874, and there was a brouhaha over the bodies. The families were offered quite huge sums of cash for the bodies and family feared they would be dug up and stolen. They were embalmed and an autopsy performed. This makes for some macabre reading.

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    The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon []  2020-1-28 20:36

    There is much that is thought provoking in this scholarly but never boring book; for example, the notion of simplistic, self referential perceptions on the part of western missionaries and diplomats of the different communities in Mount Lebanon coloring subsequent views - and consequently, policies -in that part of the world, and creating artificial stereotypes which were then conveniently exploited. Makdissi's ysis is cogent and stimulating. He presents a challenging and refreshing perspective on happenings in Mount Lebanon in the middle of the nineteenth century and their far-reaching implications to the state of affairs in modern Lebanon. One cannot support drawing a parallel with perceptions of the globe today informed by CNN- quick food-style information: Everything one hears is simplistically and uniformly packaged to render it more easily palatable with small regard for the complexities of any situation. What is particularly disconcerting is that even our own perceptions are colourful by that type of reporting and ysis! Makdissi's book reminds us of the necessity for questioning our perspectives and assumptions thus conducting 'reality checks' that may lead to some fresh solutions to misdiagnosed problems.

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    The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon []  2020-1-28 20:36

    The thesis of this book is simple: Sectarianism is not an age-old feature of Lebanese society but rather developed in a dialectical process involving locals, Ottoman reformists, and European interests. The argument is convincing, but it is still incomplete. There is virutally no treatment whatsoever of the changing economic realities the region experienced in the 19th century. As a social history, the work distances itself from the Marxist model, but unfortunately, this distancing resulted in neglect in terms of economic structures of Mt. Lebanon, esepcially with regard to the Christian peasant rebellions and the subsequent massacres which take up a huge portion of the book.

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    Afoot in Japan: A Nineteenth Century Guide to Walking The Back Roads []  2020-7-13 19:39

    its ok...

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    Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home []  2020-7-19 19:28

    I got this book for my wife. Best trade I ever tually this book is a amazing read and worth every cent.

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    Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home []  2020-7-19 19:28

    This is method more interesting than I thought it would be. I bought it for all the wall paper samples inside, but it has little informative chapters about arsenic during the Victorian era. All about murders, deaths, health issues, and wall paper.

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-8-19 20:0

    Presents plenty of not-so-widely-known info and historical background. Not a poor read, but definitely not particularly compelling.

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    The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon []  2020-1-28 20:36

    I read this book for a college class. It was quite informative as well as extremely s:The author does a amazing job trying to articulate his point that the rise in sectarianism is not a product of the 20th century, but instead a product of more latest times. He tries to argue that the blame should be somewhat given to the Western powers for inciting the rise in major clashes between the Christians and the Muslims. The author understands that the Western perspective of Muslims being poor and all. He uses Lebanon to specifically showcase that our truths are in a method ns:This book is definitely not for the faint of heart. While good, it can sometimes be convoluted in understanding what is truly going on. Definitely not for someone who has no interest in learning more about Lebanon.

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    Afoot in Japan: A Nineteenth Century Guide to Walking The Back Roads []  2020-7-13 19:39

    Unbelievable book!

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    Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home []  2020-7-19 19:28

    Mixed feelings on this book. It’s attractive to see the papers but turning through the pages are awkward and difficult because they are too small. They should have created all pages same size. Also would have been nice if the papers were place in order of date!

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    The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-8-19 20:0

    This book covered the subject of polygamy and constitutional laws. I used this book for Political Science paper. The book had amazing info useful for my research paper.

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    Larding the Lean Earth: Soil and Society in Nineteenth-Century America []  2020-3-31 19:3

    Larding the Lean Earth: Soil and Society in Nineteenth-Century America My husband purchased the 2003 paperback edition of this book for a class. The content of the book is fine. The issue is that every odd numbered page from 145 to the latest page grows increasingly blurred until finally becoming illegible. I have never owned a book suffering from such not good quality printing and intend to ask the publisher for another copy. Hill & Wang should be ashamed.

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