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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    I first learned of Thomas Merton from two of my favorite authors, Brennan Manning and Henri Nouwen. After reading so a lot of works by these established authors, I began to be interested in learning more about those that influenced them. Merton is one of those writers who speaks to the mystical tradition and feels passionately about the Love of God. I can see why a lot of of the "Love" authors refer to him in their writings. The seven story mountain is less a teaching book and more a record of happenings leading up to his joining a Trappist monastery. This book has value for someone who likes to read various stories of people coming to know the Lord Jesus. Someone who is just beginning their spiritual journey to know Christ, may see something of themselves in the life of Merton. His questions are some of the same questions a lot of ask when beginning their spiritual quest. The book is painfully slow at times but can be read and then set aside for a while. I am not a fan of all the catholic theology but could look beyond the differing views to the heart of what is being said. If you are looking for some of the basic teachings of Merton, I wouldn't read this book. This book is more for those who want to learn about his private development. It is also more of a history book for the early half of the 20th century. There are interesting happenings taking put throughout the story that shed some light on the latest 100 years. If you are looking for an introductory book to his teachings, I would suggest reading "No Man Is An Island."

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    This is like a CLASSIC nearly so saying anything not perfection about it is...well...unusual. He had a very interesting life and his 'story' is also interesting to read. I heard this book was heavily censored by the church so...? Is this that ver or in our times is the REAL ver being sold here? at stated, I have a 'HOWEVER' to add: He converted to Catholicism etc etc we all know and when telling his life 'story', he does something that just throws me off EVERY time: He apologizes for his 'un-enlightened' actions and then 'adds' the updated Catholic ver of himself as a sandwich to his 'old self'. This makes the reading shatter whatever photo he was building up in his descriptive narrative...and was disappointing.I would have found his story much better if he had just told it--without ANY trimmings of 'Catholicism hindsight blathering'--just speak his TRUTH at that time, how he developed/changed over time, how he strayed/found peace, how he eventually became a monk....but in his words WITHOUT side-winding apology...it would have been more GENUINE a journey and much better to read.I found trying to read it TEDIOUS, yes, tedious. Trying to obtain around his 'word salad' and 'hindsight meanderings' to what he was dong at that time and how he saw the globe at that time (WHEN a certain thing was event in his life and not years after hindsight!) was...tedious.I did not have fun the story near as much as I would have if he had told it as it happened, without the years of ingrained belief-system-religionosity-apologies he ended up with! As I stated, it was tedious to dis-engage over and over past/present, past/present and stay interested in this book. I set it aside a lot of times and I am an avid reader! Would not bother reading this again and would instead read his other journals etc that are not heavily censored nor trying so hard to apologize for is own past he saw in hindsight as faults/errors/etc. instead of just LIFE.

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    This book appears on a lot of reading lists as one of the most influential and necessary faith-based works of the 20th century, and I finally decided to read it. Although I did read it in its entirety, I came to realize by the time I was about halfway through that it was not for me. There are some interesting philosophical reflections, and the book did have its moments, but I personally did not search it inspiring as a whole, and at times it was actually quite is book will most likely appeal to and/or inspire readers who are already living faith-trained and spiritual lives, especially those who are well-versed in the Catholic faith. There are a lot of locations where Merton moves into overly religious narration that will only be fully understood by those who have grown up with it. I'm not sure what I expected, but as an inspiration to someone who is not yet already at least a amazing method down that path, it will probably me of the things he finds religiously inspiring left me quite blank, for example, the Byzantine mosaics in Rome. Immediately upon discovering these, he launches into a faith-based monologue. This monologue cannot possibly reflect thoughts he had at that time, and is something it seems he only would have come up with much later. This may be one of the issues the uninitiated might search with his narrative; it does not reflect the thoughts he was having AT THE TIME HE WAS HAVING THEM, as a journal would have, so readers cannot progress in their thoughts like Merton must have done at the time. Similarly, when he tells of the medieval philosophy book where he read about Aseity he describes the concept as something he found personally profound. Again, those not already deeply into the faith will probably fail to understand its rton is particularly harsh concerning Protestantism, the Church of England in particular, and Communism (not a comment on my private opinions one method or the other).Some quotes and anecdotes that I found interesting enough to capture:- I found amusing a 70-year-old observation of Merton's that could have been uttered yesterday: "And Tag abhorred the smug assurance with which second-rate left-wing critics search adumbration of dialectical materialism in everyone who ever wrote from Homer and Shakespeare to whomever they happen to like in latest times. If the poet is to their fancy, then he is clearly seen to be preaching the class struggle. If they do not like him, then they are able to present that he was really a forefather of fascism. And all their literary heroes are revolutionary leaders, and all their favorite villains are capitalists and Nazis." (p157)- While at Columbia, he says: "One of the huge political happenings of that spring was a peace strike. I was never quite able to understand by virtue of what principle a student could manage to consider himself on strike by cutting a class. Theoretically, I suppose, it amounted to a kind of defiance of authority: but it was a defiance that did not cost anybody anything except perhaps the student himself." (p159) I remembered having this exact thought when there was a "peace strike" during my own college years.- "If there is a single truth people need to learn, it is that intellect is only theoretically independent of desire and appetite in ordinary, actual practice. It is constantly being blinded and perverted by the ends and aims of passion, and the evidence it presents to us with such a present of impartiality and objectivity is fraught with interest and propaganda. We have become marvelous at self-delusion; all the more so, because we have gone to such problem to convince ourselves of our own absolute infallibility." (p225)- "It is a kind of pride to insist that none of our prayers should ever be petitions for our own needs: for this is only another subtle method of trying to place ourselves on the same plane as God - - acting as if we had no needs, as if we were not creatures, not dependent on Him and dependent, by his will, on material things too." (p270)Near the very end, Merton has a very amazing discussion about the "active" vs. "contemplative" life, and in the process provides a very cogent explanation for what we observe as a need to proselytize. It is a perspective on that which I had never considered. "According to St Bernard of Clairvaux it is the comparatively weak soul that arrives at contemplation but does not overflow with a love that must communicate what it knows of God to other men." (p454)

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    I have read this book several times before, under the title of "Elected Silence" which was the first title given when it was published in Britain. I had an old copy and it created a deep impression on me. I have just gained a fresh copy of the book under the title of "The Seven Storey Mountain" I belong to the Thoms Merton International Chapter in Christchurch, Fresh Zealand, and we have a number of books to lend out at our meetings. People, I meet, wish to read this autobiography which still makes an impact. today, just as it did when it was first published.I recommend it to any one who is searching for belief in God because, for Merton, it was an intellectual conversion, and, for many, that makes more sense in today's complex society.

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    A lot of people recommend this book to me, and I finally got around to buying and reading it this year. I was fully expecting to have my dictionary or a notebook next to me while reading this-- I have always held a some what misguided sense of awe and trepidation toward Merton. I didn't think I would be able to grasp the lofty language or the deep spiritual I was pleasantly surprised to search the book so incredibly simple to obtain into! It reads like a story, and easily weaves you through his past show and future and how God guided is soul home. He has a amazing sense of humor and an even better sense for the true, amazing and beautiful.If you are looking for a companion on your journey of faith, or just simply looking to obtain to know a modern day St Agustin, Thomas Merton is perfect. I highly recommend this autobiography; it really is a masterpiece and a labor of love.

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    I first read Thomas Merton’s books as a young Christian over 60 years ago when I was wondering which denominations were closely aligned with Christ’s own teachings. I did not feel drawn to the Catholic tradition as I encountered it in his writings, but recognized its authentic spirituality. It is ironic that near the end of my mortal span I now search a home within the Catholic tradition I rejected then. Re-reading this classic has been very stimulating, Why only three stars? I think it is a small too self-indulgent. And there are questions raised in the preface that I search disturbing. But it is a landmark classic and well worth reading!

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    This Autobiography changed my life & changed SO a lot of lives before me! I'll admit - it took me a LONG time to read it.... it was beautiful massive & super intellectual at times, but then there are moments of total levity. This is such a attractive story of conversion. A story that SO a lot of of us can relate too, I think. This story is SO honest, so raw.... which makes it so accessible. How a lot of of us have not felt lost? Depressed? Prideful? Confused? Yet with all his questions & all his flaws - it is TOTALLY clear that he is such a Holy person - always seeking how to improve upon himself in the eyes of God. It makes you realize that anyone can convert, anyone can be Holy. Anyway - I cannot recommend this book enough. It is by far a total favorite that I will never forget!

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    I was captivated by the story of Thomas Merton's life and his conversion to Catholicism. I'd heard of this book for quite some time, but never really knew what it was about other than someone's spiritual journey, and that's what this is. How a man with an unusual childhood (his mother died when he was young, and his artist father took him to France to live for quite some time, then he attended university in England, eventually returning to the US, where he studied at Columbia, aspiring to be a writer) suddenly in his early 20s develops a hunger for the spiritual life. And though he chose to become a Catholic monk, a path filled with obstacles, if he'd been born in another country, I could just as easily imagine him having become a Buddhist monk. This for me was at the heart of his story. He had a spiritual conversion, not just a Catholic or Christian one. His description of and longing for communion with God brought me closer to the same. His words transported and inspired me. He was an unusual man, destined to write about his experience when in fact, at least initially, all he wanted was the silence needed by his of Trappists. He went on to write a lot of other books, some of which I have yet to read. Definitely recommend it, both for those who have fun a amazing autobiography and those interested in the spiritual life.

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    A Review by Anthony T. Riggio of the book The Seven Story Mountain by Thomas Merton; 1/14/15I finally read this book after years of my wife Micheline telling me that this was such unbelievable book and well written by Thomas Merton, a Cistercian Monk, i.e., a cloistered monk who dedicates his life to silence and the devotion to God in all labors at the ter reading My Life with the Saints by James Martin, SJ, he listed Thomas Merton as one of those saints (though not canonized) and his review sparked my interests de novo.I purchased the Kindle edition and read it. One of the reviews was quite negative about typographical errors and I did take the time to report the typos to Kindle and I certainly hope they have corrected them as omas Merton led a most interesting life being born in France at the foot hills of the Pyrenees Mountains in 1915 to “Bohemian” parents, both artists but adhering to no religion. They had two sons Thomas and John Paul. The father, an impressionistic artist was a bit of a vagabond and they moved often. Merton’s mother dies soon after the birth of John Paul, the father moves to England and changes schools from the French ver to the English system. These moves had a very huge impact on both sons but Thomas, who is quite smart benefits from the hurdles of learning both a fresh culture and a fresh language. Soon the Father moves his boys to live with his parents in Douglaston Fresh York where both must begin over living with the ter a couple of years of the father travelling and painting in Europe, he returns to the United States and takes only Thomas back with him to France where Thomas continues his secondary education in both France and England. He then enters Oxford for his college education, and begins his find for his life goals and discernment as to his spiritual goals.Under the British system of education he takes courses in both Greek and Latin and a healthy regiment of philosophy and eventually obtains his BA and commences a course of study towards his MA. During this period, his father dies and he is on his own and travels a amazing in Europe during his studies. For a reason not specifically outlined in his auto biography of the Seven Story Mountain, Thomas Merton is caused to leave Oxford; it is suggested he return to Fresh York to complete his studies.Upon returning to Fresh York in the mid 30’s, he enrolls at Columbia University to complete his MA and his PhD. While at Columbia, Merton goes through a complex discernment process to determine his relationship with God and eventually becomes a Catholic. He is both smart and a pursuer of the deep problems of life and his readings, which he started as a very young man are both challenging and certainly not the usual fare, even then, for a young scholar. They are varied and full of searching themes, evolving from the philosophical the lives of the Saints, including Augustine and Thomas is necessary to note, that Merton, though living an unusual and self-filled and directional life, albeit not good finds himself almost frantically searching for his vocation which he believes is a complete devotion to God as a priest or as a contemplative monk. He eventually goes to the Gethsemane Cistercian Monastery where he lives out his life.He presents a warm and loving picture of his life as a cloistered and contemplative life and dies while on a mission in 1968 of an unexpected accident in Thailand.I loved this book and found it an simple read, even when Merton writes about his deep love of God, which reflect his lifelong study of philosophy and spirituality. While I personally would never consider the cloistered and silent life, I could easily understand Merton’s fulfillment there and how each experience in his own life led him to the monastery.I gave this book five stars out of five and highly recommend it to anyone searching for spirituality and God.

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    The Seven Storey Mountain []  2020-1-21 23:34

    I have known Thomas Merton's name for a lot of years and have heard of "The Seven Storey Mountain" more recently as I've become more familiar with modern classics. So, I was blindly enthusiastic when our Classic Christian Book Club decided to dive into this autobiography of a Catholic monk about whom we Protestants knew virtually nothing. What a fascinating journey it turned out to ere is no question that Merton was a gifted writer, and his prose is often quite evocative and elegant. His talents as a self-editor are less prominent, at least in the early scene of his writing career when Seven Storey was written. By that, I simply mean that he could have used a more discerning eye to extract nonessential info from his story. In short and to place it bluntly, I was bored during extended stretches of the book, especially in the first 200 pages. I fell asleep a lot of times while reading, not the sign of a gripping page-turner. As a whole, it felt like much more of a slow slog than I expected. It was enough of a struggle that I considered a three-star ever, having acknowledged some significant drudgery, there was still much that created the book noteworthy and worthwhile. There were aspects of the story that were utterly captivating, a combination of genuinely fascinating happenings and Merton's strong storytelling. His early foray into Christianity (before his conversion) based on the stained-glass artwork in Italian churches and the happenings surrounding his brother's baptism immediately come to mind.But my favorite part of the book wasn't the dates and people and locations he described. Instead, I was most captivated when Merton went into "spiritual reflection" mode. As he was telling us about his life and circumstances externally, he often shifted to analyze what was going on in his mind and heart and soul. And that's where Merton was at his best. His reflections on Scripture, prayer, obedience, pride, sacrifice, faith, vocation, and grace were rich and profound and convicting and deed, grace was a central thread running through the entire book in a method that I wouldn't have expected from a Catholic author. Evangelicals have a common picture (caricature?) of Catholics as driven by works-based theology, absent the grace so central to Protestant theology. Merton shatters that idea. And while he was none too kind to Protestants and espoused a few uniquely Catholic theological ideas that completely baffle me, the central spiritual themes of Seven Storey were broadly Christian, deeply challenging, and powerfully compelling.Overall, "The Seven Storey Mountain" was sufficiently agonizing that it doesn't qualify on my list of favorite biographies, nor is it one I expect to reread. But I'm certainly glad for having read it once, and there are passages in my well-marked book that I anticipate will be points of reference down the road. I am satisfied to recommend Merton as an inviting voice for any spiritual seeker, while also serving as a provocative pot-stirrer, grateful grace-recipient, and thoughtful theological-reflector of considerable value to Christians of all stripes who are willing to do the hard work of digging for the a lot of nuggets of gold sprinkled throughout some dross.

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    The 117-Storey Treehouse (The Treehouse Books) []  2020-2-12 21:35

    My son loved these books! They came overnight, which is always nice.

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    The 117-Storey Treehouse (The Treehouse Books) []  2020-2-12 21:35

    Amazing item thanks

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    The 117-Storey Treehouse (The Treehouse Books) []  2020-2-12 21:35

    hi everybody! i would like ro begin by saying this book was GREAT! but nothing much that happens.___________________SPOLER ALERT_____________________so baiscly Andy and Terry obtain into an argument about who should narrate and terry wins so he makes a somthing called: terrys dumb dot story and then the story police come to aresst them for making a poor story but first there is a chase when they are in a cell they create an an escape hatchwell thats it for now!

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    The 117-Storey Treehouse (The Treehouse Books) []  2020-2-12 21:35

    Grandson can’t wait until the next release

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    The 117-Storey Treehouse (The Treehouse Books) []  2020-2-12 21:35

    My children just love this series. Yes some of the content is a bit rowdy but they devour this series and obtain exposed to beautiful complex vocabulary and yes some naughty ones as well but it is tricky finding readers that engage small boys (and girls) in the same way.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    Though billed as a bluegrass album, The Mountain just as prominently showcases Southern string-band styles older than the melody Bill Monroe invented in the 1940s. "Harlan Man" sounds like an especially rousing agit-prop anthem from the labor battles that raged in the Kentucky coal mines in the 1930s (which produced the classic protest song "Which Side Are You on?"), and "Dixieland" could easily pass as an authentic Civil Battle ballad. "Carrie Brown" takes its inspiration from the Appalachian folk standards "Cindy," "Wild Bill Jones," and "Tom Dooley." The CD's most moving cut, the extraordinary "Pilgrim," weds a hand-me-down music to photos from a body of traditional songs and hymns, among them "I Am a Pilgrim," "Wayfaring Stranger," "This Globe Is Not My Home," and "Long Time Traveling." The bluegrass selections here mirror a sound more often heard in the 1950s than in the 1990s. This charmingly backward-looking collection underscores the genius of Earle's singing/composing and the McCoury Band's playing, of course, but it also reminds us that the well of American roots melody is well nigh inexhaustible.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    I listened once while I was working on something and it stopped me _ it was far more than background music. I listened again and loved it. And I've kept listening. Full of gems, not the least of which is a rare (only?) country ballad (OK, create it Irish), about a northern Civil Battle regiment, the 20th Maine, and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. And ... I was reluctant to it because it was advertised as bluegrass, a form I search monotonous. It's surpasses bluegrass, just as Alison Kraus does. Just amazing stuff.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    A truly amazing ere are four absolute classics here, songs and performances so amazing that it just gives you chills: "I'm Still In Love With You," "The Mountain," "Dixieland," and "Pilgrim," along with two very amazing instrumentals and a batch of other fine tunes.Earle has said this was a work of inspiration, and it is a sustained inspritation at that. Like the best of Springsteen or Tom Waits, THE MOUNTAIN speaks of put and time without being a hokey concept album. The characters come from hard times and, like those on Springsteen's NEBRASKA, they sometimes fall--into dispair, drunkenness, jail.But unlike NEBRASKA, where some characters seemed to search no method out, Earle's coal minors and irish immigrants see a light on the horizon. They search pride and honor in their hard work, in their civil battle soldiering, in their lost e Del McCoury Band is rock solid, swingin' and singin' with a confidence you only search in a band that has played together for a thousand years. Iris Dement is perfect; her duet with Earle on "I'm Still In Love With You" is achingly sweet. Emmylou Harris appears here and there--I think there is some law that says Emmylou Harris must sing backup on every bluegrass record now--and a whole host of country singers join in the chorus of "Pilgrim."But this is Steve Earle's record. I had a lot of problem stomaching some of his earlier records, but THE MOUNTAIN is so amazing that I'm willing to rethink it all. Nobody could create a record this amazing unless they have real heart, real soul, and a real love for bluegrass, country, blues--American melody in is is, without a doubt, one of my absolute favorite records of the latest 20 years.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    Had this album on CD. Wore it out. Nice to have a digital copy.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    I like this album so much...and have for years.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    Unless you have never heard of Del McCoury or Steve Earle would probably not am appreciation for this kind of bluegrass/thumper/folk music. I've worn out one CD working on #2, amazing stuff.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    I bought this album after seeing it ranked #2 on Amazon's list of the best of 1999. I'm a large bluegrass fan, and was amazed I hadn't heard of it before. I listened to 5 seconds of the online clip from "Texas Eagle" and was immediately sold. The songs are, without exception, amazing bluegrass compositions, about trains and heartbreak and battle and poverty and coal-minin' and all that amazing stuff. Steve's voice isn't beautiful at all, which is as it should be -- his raw vocals fit the emotional content of the songs. Del and the band provide outstanding instrumental and vocal accompaniment for that true, high lonesome sound. Standouts contain "Texas Eagle," "Carrie Brown," "Harlan Man," "Connemara Breakdown," and "Dixieland." If you like bluegrass music, you will absolutely LOVE this album.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    Genius. Even got to see the tour for this record. Amazing. Do yourself a favor.

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    The combination of Steve Earle's songwriting and singing with the instrumental and vocal talent of the Del McCoury Band has produced a truly remarkable CD. As a longtime bluegrass fan, I was a small leery of this "bluegrass" CD with Steve Earle as the focus, but there are so a lot of amazing cuts here that it's hard to praise it too much. The mandolin and banjo work is first rate and never sounds out of put or cliched, but it's ultimately the songs themselves that create this CD great. Steve Earle really shines as a songwriter and plays and sings with amazing energy and enthusiasm. Del and Ronnie McCoury's harmony singing sounds just right with this varied but cohesive group of songs. This ain't all traditional bluegrass, but whatever you call it, I like it!

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    The Mountain []  2020-1-11 20:24

    Most likely the best Bluegrass Album/CDEver made!! I have on e every this as a gift.

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    Africa (The Seven Continents) []  2020-2-7 20:2

    I have all of the older Evan-Moor continent unit books, and frankly, I like them more than these fresh ones. There are a lot of more "core focused" activities in this book, but the pages are filled with text. There are fewer creative projects as well. At $20, these books are much more expensive as well. The pro's for this book are: it is much larger than the older copies, with a lot of more activities to choose from. I am using selections to supplement a unit study we are doing, and I have plenty of activities available to drive home any number of geographical topics. That said, I do have a copy of the old Africa book, and most of the activities I am planning are coming from it.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    If, like myself, the magnificent seven is one of your all-time favorite movies, this may not be the right collection for you. I would recommend the two disc unique edition of it with lots of additional features and interviews behind the scenes. I was curious to see The three sequels. Of course none of them have the rising stars that shot to fame after the magnificent seven. Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson, Steve McQueen and James Coburn. Not to mention the superb Eli Wallach as The villain. The first sequel stars Yul Brynner reprising his role as Chris. Although only six years later he does not seem as robust and healthy. Perhaps the cancer was starting to show. He walks rather stiffly and looks rather gaunt in the face and neck. He does bring a screen presence to his role and helps to elevate a mediocre movie. Robert Fuller plays the part that Steve McQueen had in the first film. Apparently he and Brynner got on much better than when Steve McQueen was in the role. Unfortunately Fuller is not given much possibility to present what he can do, which fans of the series Laramie will know. Claude Akins has the only other interesting role. Note that all of the melody is lifted from the first movie and chop and pasted into the scenes for the sequel. As amazing as the melody was, this only makes it seem more of a copy, cashing in on the original. This is real for all of the sequels. Then George Kennedy took up the role of Chris in another sequel. He is a very likable actor and a amazing supporting star, but definitely not a leading man. Again a reworking of the original movie but at a much lower standard. The fourth movie stars Lee Van Cleef as Chris, and his hero is developed in some interesting ways. The formula is slightly changed and there is even a small original music. This is perhaps the best of the sequels. If you don’t expect much and view the sequels as separate films rather then more of what you would expect from the magnificent seven, you may have fun this. It really goes to present the quality of the first movie with its lean, punchy script, the brilliant skills of John Sturges the director, the wonderful casting and the music. Not to mention staying close to the Japanese movie on which it was based, the seven samurai. I will probably be dropping this off at the thrift store.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    If you like riding the begin trail and shooting outlaws these films are for you. I watched the first film and thought the sequels will suck, but they are actually beautiful amazing and have interesting plots.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    There were a lot of cast changes, including a replacement for Yul Brenner as the main character. Normally very amazing performances from each actor in each movie, and the scenery was very good.

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    The Magnificent Seven [App]  2019-11-5 21:35

    Best movie ever :-)

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    "Why do you people all have such long names?""I don't know. Perhaps it's because we have such short lives."Every time someone makes a Western that makes money, be it Real Grit, Dances with Wolves or Unforgiven, there's talk of the revival of the genre, but what it really needs is another Magnificent Seven to do the trick. It may not have the intellectual or philosophical weight of, or even as much action as Seven Samurai, but what the Hell, this is the Hollywood western at its most downright exciting and enjoyable, with a nice line in sly humour thrown in for amazing 's one of those movies that hides the scars of its difficult production exceptionally well. Brynner originally intended to direct with Anthony Quinn (who had directed Quinn in The Buccaneer) in the lead and the Seven originally created up of older Civil Battle veterans in a darker screenplay by Walter Bernstein, but after much rewriting and an acrimonious lawsuits surprisingly came out a much stronger picture. The rewriting went on through the shoot, partially to beat an actor's strike, partially to placate the Mexican censors, with Walter Newman taking his name off the picture and sole going to William Roberts (the finished script is mostly Newman's work). Then there were the constant issues with Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen and Horst Buccholz all vying for attention and feuding all the method only for the studio, disappointed with the finished film, to practically dump the movie in the US before giving it a second possibility (and three sequels and a TV series) after it proved a large hit in the foreign markets.With all that going versus it, it shouldn't have worked, but it does, and quite magnificently too thanks to its canny casting, powerful script and, of course, Elmer Bernstein's magnificent signature score (complete with John Williams on piano!) that combine to make a amazing audience picture. Almost a bridge between the old school American western and the sixties vogue for gritty south of the border violence, like Seven Samurai it leaves the impression of a movie that is full of movement, largely due to the kinetic action scenes as the camera races alongside men and or John Sturges' use of the Scope frame is characteristically outstanding, filling the frame with detail and occasionally making interesting contrast between foreground stillness and background movement, as in the Seven's arrival in the village or their first confrontation with Eli Wallach's bandit chief. Wallach, in the role that inspired John Belushi's Mexican Assassin Bee on Saturday Night Live among a hundred other parodies, is more than a tad over the top, brandishing lines like "If God did not wish them sheared he would not have created them sheep" with the kind of wild abandon that Alfonso Bedoya would envy, but it works a treat. The rest of the cast are on amazing form with Brunner, McQueen, Backhauls, Charles Bronson and James Coburn generally getting the best opportunities (sorry Bob, sorry Brad), and their introductory set pieces - not least the ride to Boot Hill - still keep amazing five decades ry belated sequel Return of the Seven sees Chris (before he turned into George Kennedy and Lee Van Cleef) returning to a certain Mexican village with another ragtag band of hired guns to save the locals from being kidnapped for slave labor in what is surprisingly the weakest of the sequels despite having the largest budget and best production values of any of the followups. If the village looks different, that's because it's moved to Spain to take advantage of the more amenable local censors and exchange rate, and it's not the only thing to have had a facelift since the original. Even though Steve McQueen and Horst Buccholz's characters return, sole returning cast member Yul Brynner ensured they didn't (Robert Fuller and Julian Mateos take their place) and seems to have done his damnedest to ensure none of the supporting players will outshine him: those looking for future stars will have to settle for Warren Oates and Claude Akins. You obtain the feeling that if Brynner had had his method the movie would have been called The Return of the Magnificent Chris: none of the rest of the Seven are allowed much hero or any memorable scenes. He even dismisses them as just being there for a war - "If not this one, they'd search another" - but in reality their sole purpose is to tell him how amazing he is. You almost expect Fernando Rey's priest to ask "Are you God?" Everyone is in his giant shadow and nobody is going to steal his spotlight this time.Burt Kennedy's direction has its moments but is mostly solid rather than dynamic and the plotting mostly mundane even though the villain actually has an interesting motive to drive the story. Even recruiting the Seven (actually six since one of them is held prisoner) fails to throw up any memorable set pieces in a movie that's light on action and incident until the two huge war scenes, rendering it at times one of those disappointing movies that is more interesting for what its cast and squad would go on to do than what they actually do here. Writer Larry Cohen would go on to make The Invaders and direct a string of out-of-leftfield genre films; producer Ted Richmond, one of the pioneers of filming Hollywood pictures in Spain (here shooting in the studios of the practice's most discredited proponent, Samuel Bronston) would go on to create the bonkers cowboys and samurai Western Red Sun and squad up again with Brynner on the Sam Peckinpah-Robert Towne scripted Villa Rides; while villain Emilio Fernandez and Warren Oates would face off again two years later in The Wild Bunch. All of which were more memorable than this drawn out and less than action-packed number that's best approached with low expectations and an undemanding ns of the Magnificent Seven is set shortly after a negotiating accident left Yul Brynner looking like George Kennedy, and it's not just the star who's changed: not only does he have hair but he's given up on the all-black outfits and the staccato moralising. It's lower-budgeted but considerably better directed than Return, moving into spaghetti western location as he gets involved in a Mexican revolution when Reni Santoni asks his support to spring Fernado Rey's politician from local sadist Michael Ansara's fortress. Naturally he goes looking for a few amazing men to support him out - "Not enough to obtain noticed, just enough to obtain the job done" - and thankfully they're a more interesting bunch this time round than in the previous sequel. Better still, without Yul Brynner's ego hogging the spotlight they're all given proper introductions and motivations to create it more of an ensemble piece, and there are more familiar faces in the cast this time, with Monte Markham's horse thief, Joe Don Baker's bitter one-armed Confederate sharpshooter `Buffalo Ben' ("I can't whip a six-year-old girl in a fair fight, but I can blow a man's eyeballs out at a hundred yards in a sandstorm."), Bernie Casey's explosives expert, James Whitmore's ageing knifeman and Scott Thomas' dying gunman making up his lucky is time round they can't quite manage the job on their own and have to rely on a distinctly unreliable bandit to swell their numbers, allowing for a bit of under-developed tension in the ranks, as does Joe Don Baker and Bernie Casey's racially-challenged adversarial friendship subplot that would later be very obviously reworked by Hardy Kruger and Winston Ntshona in The Wild Geese, itself very obviously inspired by the original Magnificent Seven. The script's sharper than you might expect, with amazing dialogue and some memorable small moments like Kennedy getting his info about the garrison's strength from a casual conversation about women with one of the guards, and it benefits greatly from a powerful villain who is given a memorable mass execution scene. Director Paul Wendkos has an perfect eye for the Scope format, and though it's not the most action packed of the series it makes its tag and keeps things interesting while you're waiting for it, setting it out as easily the best of the sequelsFinal big-screen outing The Magnificent Seven Ride sees Chris, who now looks like Lee Van Cleef, settled down as a small-town sheriff with his own would-be Ned Buntline dime novel biographer in tow until an act of mercy results in the death of his wife and sends him on a manhunt below the border where he finds another village in need of seven amazing men. The village is one that Ralph Waite, one of an earlier Seven (evidently Chris created more trips below the border than they filmed), tried to recruit our character to defend only to be turned down, but it's not so much guilt that drives him to go recruiting hardened convicts in the local prison to defend the raped womenfolk from the returning bandits after their men folk are all killed. Having ruthlessly disposed of his partners in crime ("Him for what he did. You for what you didn't do"), Chris is beautiful much just using them as bait for the remaining one of his wife's assassins who is riding with the bandits...The plot certainly takes the scenic route, the first half a revenge Western, the second a men on a mission picture, a sort of The Dirty Dozen Meets Guns of Fort Petticoat. The segue is handled neatly enough, but the movie never rises above the average. The largest issue is that despite, or perhaps because of being played by two actors (Rodolfo Acosta and stuntman Ron Stein) we never see the villain until the final battle, simply the dead bodies he leaves in his wake. No confrontations, no banter, no sense of who he is or why he's a threat, just a guy on a horse. (The best exchange is with a priest who only has one scene: "God works in strange ways." "Yeah, I know. He's got me confused most of the time too.") The fresh recruits to the side of the angels don't fare that much better despite their employer coming up with neat method of ensuring the loyalty of men who wish to slay him. Ed Lauter as usual does a lot with very little, but only James B. Sikking really makes an impression, leaving most of them fairly bland cannon fodder. Chris makes few bones about regarding them as such either: the film's best stage has them discussing tactic and predicting losses on both sides, and for once the tactic actually makes sense - this is planned out as a battle, not a gunfight. When it comes it's a decent enough showdown for a B-movie but nothing to stick in the memory for long.Which goes for the movie as a whole. George McCowan's direction is efficient but uninspired, the film's use of backlot sets and overused areas giving it the look of a 70s TV show, something not shooting in Scope but a more TV-friendly 1.85:1 only emphasises. Even Elmer Bernstein's score, at times more in the style of an episode of The High Chaparral rather than his iconic original, sounds like he could only round up seven less than magnificent musicians from some dead-end border city to play it. Still, if you're in an undemanding mood it's an okay outing even if it falls far short of being a grand finale to the leased twice in two unique editions on DVD, the DVD boxed set of all four movies contains an audio commentary by James Coburn, Eli Wallach, Walter Mirisch and Robert E. Relyea, 45-minute documentary Guns For Hire (slightly abridged from the longer ver that showed on Channel 4), stills galleries, two theatrical trailers and trailers for the three sequels on the first film. (A subsequent two-disc release added an audio commentary and featurette with movie historian Christopher Frayling and a featurette on Elmer Bernstein's score.) Unfortunately the UK DVD releases dropped the original mono soundtrack option on the first movie in favour of a remastered stereo score that didn't do Bernstein's score any favours, particularly in the main title sequence, though both stereo and mono options were on the US DVD and Blu-ray e US Blu-ray set of all four movies is thankfully region and well worth picking up despite losing some of the extras from the first movie - most notably Frayling's contributions - while the sequels are limited to remastered trailers in the correct ratio (these were crudely cropped in the UK boxed set) but sadly losing such gems of hyperbolic narration as "Seven men to a nation of peasants from an troops of madmen!" on the Guns of the Magnificent Seven trailer.Unlike the Dollars movies there's been no excessive use of Dolby Noise Reduction, avoiding the unnatural waxwork look that plagued that Blu-ray set. The transfer for Return of the Seven is for the most part decent, though has better detail on the studio-shot scenes than some of the huge outdoor stuff, and unlike the UK DVD and TV prints bears the original title, Return of the Seven rather than Return of the Magnificent Seven. Annoyingly every time you pause you obtain a menu picture over the picture while any time you use the subtitles another menu box also appears in the corner of the screen to inform you you've selected subtitles, both taking too long to disappear, but the discs do have perfect playback memory even if you remove the discs. Despite these niggles, it's often found going fairly at , making the US Blu-ray the best presentation around.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    I received quick delivery, the dvds were all in amazing shape, I got 4 movies, all the Magnificent 7 movies. But my favorites are the one with Yul Brynner in them. The first one with Steve McQueen, James Coburn and Charles Bronson is my all time favorite, the actors just seem to created for the parts and worked amazing together. It’s one of the best westerns ever made.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    Amazing Western movies. Not crazy about changing actors (wish they had cast ones closer to Yul Brenner's type) but neither was it as distracting as I expected. Watched all 4 in 2 consecutive nights.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    I honestly didn't even realize there were 4 of these movies. The first one, is of course, the best of the group, though Yul Brenner did reprise his role of Chris in the second movie. But two various actors played the role in the third and fourth movie.I honestly just bought it for the original film as I loved it as a child, as I liked all the 'old' westerns (including Clint's 'Man with No Name' Trilogy and beautiful much all of the 'Duke's' movies), so I wasn't expecting a lot of the follow-up films and I was satisfied I wasn't expecting a lot! Same story beautiful much with a few small changes, so don't expect anything great. The blu-ray transfer for the films was very good, though and that created me satisfied and seeing the original film again was a must for my collection.I right at $19 for this blu-ray and as far as I'm concerned, it was well spent. Don't know if I'd wish to more for it, however, so if you're looking to pick it up, hold an eye begin and test to obtain it on like I did!!!

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    Okay, first off 'The Magnificent Seven' is one of the best westerns (hell, one of the best adventure films) ever made--and you probably already have a copy in some sort of format. Why this set, then?Clearly, you this to obtain the sequels! Return of the Seven retains Yul Brynner as 'Chris', master gunfighter and leader. Robert Fuller takes over the Steve McQueen 'Vin' role and doesn't do as much with it. However, as this movie also has Claude Akins and Warren Oates, it works just fine.'Guns of the Magnificent Seven' is the least of the films. George Kennedy is a rather listless 'Chris' and even the amazing James Whitmore cannot save the film.'The Magnificent Seven Ride' surprised me. Lee Van Cleef as an older, tired Chris is just fine and the rest of the cast--looking like the members of a TV movie--help things move along. A fine turn by Stephanie Power e set as a whole is a must-have for any Western or Action fan--hours and hours of pleasure for a very agreeable price.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    Got these for my brother as a gift. He loves western movies, he really liked having the box sets of them all. The was very amazing deal.

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    The Magnificent Seven Collection []  2020-9-11 19:13

    BOTTOM LINE: Western fans should have fun this round up of all 4 Mag7 films. They all look & sound amazing and there are some decent features saddled with the first feature to sweeten the pot for film lovers. A solid 4-disc, 4-film collection in hi-def. 5 STARSTHOUGHTS: Simply stated, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN is one of the greatest, most entertaining Westerns ever made. Head & shoulders above the hundreds of other sagebrush & sixgun sagas which have galloped across film screens over the past 90 years. TM7 is far and away the superior of the four films, mainly due to its being the first and most closely copying its genetic inspiration: Akira Kurosawa's legendary 1956 masterpiece, THE SEVEN SAMURAI. (If you haven't seen that movie you owe it to yourself. It's one of the best motion pictures of all time, eastern or western... or Western.) And while the sequels to Mag7 are more or less transparent retreads they still manage to entertain, though your affection for & enjoyment of them will depend on how much of a Western aficionado you are. Steely-eyed Yul Brenner clearly sets the tone for the first two films, making a magnetic leader of men... and therefore the largest regret is that he doesn't reprise his role as Chris Adams in the final two flicks, which would've helped solidify the legacy of the four movies a small better. Even so, both George Kennedy & Lee Van Cleef are beautiful good, though not in the same class as Brenner. (They could've at least both shaved their heads to hold the aesthetic of Brenner's visual mojo going. ;-) Ya know?) The fourth film, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN RIDE (which I had never seen until getting this set) starts out feeling like a cheezy created for TV film but actually gets better as it goes along and features a rousing war & satisfying conclusion to wrap things E BLU-RAYS: Each movie is on its own disc here, so there's no worry about compression issues. The four movies look & sound amazing but I would've hoped they'd had somewhat sharper pictures than what we get. Still, they are much improved over the standard-def DVDs from years ago, so I can recommend double dipping to make batter if you're a fan of this series or Westerns in general. Unique features included with the first entry appear to simply be ported over from the original DVD release. The other movies only their theatrical trailers as the lone additional for each. Again, this bundled set is worth owning, especially for the video/audio improvements. The discs are securely stored, separately, within a compact snapcase, minimizing the footprint on your video library shelf.

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    The Mountain Midwife [Book]  2017-12-6 18:0

    The Mountain MidwifeBy Laurie Alice EakesAshley Tolliver is the local midwife, as have generations of Tolliver women. But she has dreams of taking her skills and training to the next level with medical school. But if she leaves who will care for those she leaves behind?Hunter McDermott thought he knew who he was, until he received a notice in his voicemail. An unknown caller claims to be his mother and she needs his help. Suddenly his life as he knew it is in chaos and he is determined to track down the truth. But to search out the truth he needs to search the midwife how delivered him over 30 years ago.But what he finds is Ashley Tolliver a young woman too young to be who he is searching for. Ashley is on her own find - a young woman, in desperate need of medical attention, has disappeared along with her newborn. Finding this young woman soon is imperative.But the Appalachians are a risky region to venture if you don't know what you are heading into. And neither Ashley nor Hunter fully know just what they are getting themselves into. And venturing into the unknown can be is interesting to compare this book with Laurie's previous books about midwives and how the occupation changed over the generations and yet didn't change. There are some a lot of today who are turning to midwives rather than doctors and yet it wasn't that long ago that midwives were the only is is an intriguing book that will be sure to hold you reading and be prepared for some twists that will hold you guessing as to the ultimate outcome. I really enjoyed this book and would highly recommend it to anyone in find of a well-written story.I was provided a copy of this book by the Fiction Clan in exchange for my honest review.

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    It's amazing still havent worked out how to obtain more crowns if you can tell me that would be amazing

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    This is the best Driving Andriod application I've come e best

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    Don't like the steering on this its not amazing enough turns to late n doesn't hold str8

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    Amazing concept, flawed controls I love it but the brakes are not balanced and there is no touch steering.

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    Shadow on the Mountain []  2020-2-1 4:23

    A very interesting story of Epson, 14- year old boy, and his mates caught up in the five year occupation of Norway during me school friends sided with the occupying forces while Epson and his mates joined the Resistance. Espen worked under difficult circumstances fearing for his life, lives of his family, and mates to bring peace back to Norway. The book is based on a real story.

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    Shadow on the Mountain []  2020-2-1 4:23

    Having read and enjoyed Margi Preus' "Heart of a Samurai," I was excited when this book came out. As a child, I had read "Snow Treasure," so I had heard before of the Norwegian resistance during WWII. As an adult, I found this book more exciting than "Snow Treasure," although I really liked that book when I read it as a 6th grader. In "Shadow on the Mountain," I especially liked the historical photos, the timeline, and the suggestions for further reading included at the back of the book. I bought this book for my 12-year-old grandson, but I just had to read it first before I gave it to him. His mother doesn't like crudeness, but there is only one instance of bathroom humor. And a mate of the main hero is killed.

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    The Hospital (Mountain Man) []  2020-1-29 5:40

    Originally posted at Bunny's ReviewI am fast to state to authors I do not read anything dealing with zombies or vampires. With zombies it seems all stories are all the same zombies are all trying to eat the humans and there is not much else involved with the story. Well I have found an author that left the part out that irritates me and wrote a story worthy of Stephen King if the master of horror wrote about e Hospital was offered as on Audible. I have quickly gotten into audio books. As it allows me to work and listen to books. When starting this book I did not know it was about zombies. I quickly figured out it was but I was so engrossed in the story that did not matter. The story is not just about zombies it has action with a thriller and horror that will bring readers (or listeners) to the edge of their seat.I do not know who the narrator was but I really enjoyed the roughness I felt in his voice. The thrill that he projected in my mind throughout the whole story I did not just hear or read the book I lived it.I highly recommend this book to any who have fun a amazing e bunnies and I give this book 4 carrots.

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    The Hospital (Mountain Man) []  2020-1-29 5:40

    This short story was originally published in Blackmore's book of short stories Cauldron Gristle. I am rereading the story and will be rereading Mountain Man and Safari (Mountain Man Book 2) so I can go on to books three and four in the Mountain Man series - Hellifax (Mountain Man Book 3) and Well Fed (Mountain Man Book 4).I liked the books the first time I read them and this short story answers a couple of questions that pop up in MOUNTAIN MAN so I would suggest reading this story before you begin the rest of the series.If you have a weak stomach, you probably should search another genre of books to read. This small gem is full of blood and guts and profanity.

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    The Hospital (Mountain Man) []  2020-1-29 5:40

    Before I write this review of Keith Blackmore's longish short story, "The Hospital," I have a confession, actually two confessions. First, I don't usually like zombie stories. I like zombie movies, and I love "The Walking Dead," but I'm generally not too keen on zombie fiction. Confession two: I didn't know "The Hospital" was a zombie story when I got it as a download. It was on a recommended list; it had some amazing reviews, so I got it. Having said that, I'm glad I didn't know it was a zombie story because, if I had known, I would have passed on it and missed out on a gruesomely entertaining e general setting of "The Hospital" is typical for zombie fiction. The countryside is overrun by zombies with the handful of remaining humans very much on their own, having to gather meal and supplies where they can and hold an eye out for both undead flesh eaters and live assassins as well. Gus, the character of the story, is driving across country, scavenging where he can, when he finds what could be a gold mine... a huge town hospital. Gus rather expects to search zombies in the hospital, but he figures he can obtain in and out with food, medical supplies, and other necessities without running into the zombies.Of course, Gus's plans go awry and he soon finds himself in about as risky a situation as possible, but the source (or more precisely sources) of his peril are like nothing he has come across before. I don't intend to give away the exact nature of the menace that Gus faces, but I will say that author Blackmore evokes some imagery that's beyond anything I can recall seeing in a zombie movie, and that Gus finds himself in a situation that is likely to give readers at home the more has thought out his zombie mythos quite well here. He obeys the general "zombie rules" that George Romero first established in "Night of the Living Dead" and doesn't waste time going into unnecessary explanations of how the zombies came to be. Instead he concentrates on showing Gus's thought processes and reasoning, demonstrating that Gus is smart and very disciplined, a man who has developed his own internal survival manual that he follows religiously. But, even in the zone of this short a story, readers can see the mental toll the everyday horrors have taken on Gus."The Hospital" is a prequel to longer works featuring Gus and the zombies and, as such, it serves its purpose quite well. Gus has the right mix of hardness and inner angst to create a amazing survival epic hero. Obviously, a story this short only gives us glimpses of Gus's character, but those are enough to, at the least, create me interested in reading more about ever, "The Hospital" isn't just a teaser introduction to a series of longer books; it is an perfect standalone short horror story. Blackmore establishes Gus, the setting, and the central premise quite well, then provides a series of photos that will set most readers' nerves on edge. The story has some beautiful graphic gore, but the most terrifying photos don't really have that much blood and gore, only the threat of a fate that's about as horrific as anything I've ever read or seen in a zombie tale. Blackmore's "Hospital" isn't a put to set readers at ease; it's a put readers, even non-fans of zombie horror stories, can go to feel most enjoyably uneasy.

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    The Real Mountain Charley []  2020-1-29 5:55

    awesome story

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    Beyond the Mountain []  2020-1-19 20:42

    Beyond the Mountain, Steve HouseMy early exposure to mountaineering literature was through books like Maurice Hertzog's Annapurna and John Hunt's The Ascent of Everest. These accounts described heroic struggles of man versus nature and provided much detail regarding the organization and logistics of siege style Himalayan climbing. However, these efforts gave small insight into the psychology or motivation of the climber, nor did they let the reader to glimpse the tensions and personality clashes that frequently characterize climbing re recently, however, a fresh genre of mountaineering book has emerged characterized by deeply introspective "tell all" accounts of rivalry and discord. Examples contain anything by Kurt Diemberger, Ed Webster's My Storm Years on Everest, and to some extent Royal Robbins's "serialized" eve House's Beyond the Mountain clearly falls into the latter category. It is soul searching, highly personal, and unabashedly confessional in describing House's private failings and embarrassments. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It has a quirky style, often jumping forwards and backwards in time when describing a single climb, almost like a screenplay, but the overall result was compelling, at least to me. The central section of color photographs is superb and I frequently found myself wondering how did they even managed to take some of the shots given the wonderful difficulty and exposure of the climbing situations. Also, given House's extreme light weight philosophy with respect to gear, I can't imagine that the cameras were any more than the tiniest digital models, although this couldn't apply prior to about 2000. (I actually think there is a book waiting to be written about the technical aspects of climbing photography under different demanding conditions).By the end I was almost jaded (this isn't a complaint) by descriptions such as House's solo ascent of K7 in thirty hours.

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    Beyond the Mountain []  2020-1-19 20:42

    Interesting, but confusing until you understand the style of writing. He jumps back and forth in the timeline of climbs, and sometimes i had to go back and re-read parts to create sure I understood what was going on. Overall I really liked this book though, and would look to search other House publications.

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    The Mountain Will Fall []  2020-1-23 3:13

    Love this album!

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    The Mountain Between Us []  2019-12-11 18:0

    At first, this seemed like a bleak and improbable read. Snow, mountains, no one for miles, two injured people with only each other and a dog for company, struggliing to survive an unsurvivable situation. The book requires suspension of disbelief. For instance, even if Grover the very experienced pilot was flying VFR, why didn't he file a flight plan? Why didn't Ashley allow her fiancee know what she was doing? Why didn't somebody on that plane tell somebody else where they were and where they were going? All these characters except the dog start this journey doing something less than intelligent. Only the fact that our character is a mountain-climbing, orienteering doctor saves them all, including the dog, from certain death. That aside, I loved this book. Accept the premise, and you'll love the book, too. Just be prepared for a major plot twist somewhere along the method that may send you back to re-read the book in light of fresh information. And I suspect that if you've seen the movie, you'll see major Hollywood differences, so be prepared to accept the book as it is.

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    The Shining Mountain []  2019-12-11 18:33

    It was an interesting acc of his and Joe Tasker's assault of Changabang. I love Boardman's writing style and humor. I liked the viewpoints of each man of the other--it showed that even under the most stressful conditions, trust is of utmost importance in this kind of relationship. He described in detail the techniques involved and the challenges faced, but he created the acc readable and interesting to a lay-person like me. I especially enjoyed his acc of their walk-in to the base camp, and his description of the villagers along the way. He really has a method of putting you there.

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    The Shining Mountain []  2019-12-11 18:33

    This is the story of two men who climb Changabang in India, the vertical north sherpa or squads setting up the route. No lines of 150 climbers waiting to ascend with their tents setup and meal perpared for er Boardman and Joe Tasker solve the amazing issue together, just the two of them. It is a riveting story of friendship, guts and trust. They became climbing partners and unbelievable writers. Their bodies are still frozen of Mt Everest's Nothwest Ridge.

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    The Shining Mountain []  2019-12-11 18:33

    On time delivery. The book is a classic - what defined and inspired a lot of climbers like myself method back then to shed the baggage of huge scale expeditions and embrace 'alpine style' in the Himalaya.

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    Colors of the Mountain []  2020-1-17 20:49

    This is an extraordinary book. The struggles that Da Chen went through are so foreign to the average American, we know in the abstract that we are lucky to be born here, but Colors of the Mountain hammers it home. And we are lucky that this is still a put that people wish to flee to rather than from. China is going to be a huge part of our future; this book gave me a piece of the puzzle of China. I can't wait for the next book.

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    Colors of the Mountain []  2020-1-17 20:49

    This should be needed reading for mature young people, especially in our privileged society. My eyes were opened regarding life in rural China and the extreme hardships this memoir portrays.

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    Lessons from the Mountain []  2020-1-16 6:50

    I loved this book, read it in just two a huge fan of the Waltons (I still watch re-runs) I bought the book originally expecting a behind the scenes look at the Waltons, and did. But so much rst of all I have to say how Very, very, Very nice Mary Beth came across throughout the entire book. When she told stories that were unpleasant, she took care to only describe the incident, but not out, accuse, or belittle the offender. There were a lot of times she was wronged as a woman and a human and she has handled those wrongs in the book with the utmost class.Hearing about all the cast of the Waltons was so wonderful, to see that the people I loved on screen were the same amazing people off screen. I admit to knowing and loving these actors, including Mary Beth and even when I see them somewhere else they will always be Erin, John Boy or Olivia. When Ralph Wait was on Days of Our Lives, even as Father Matt, he was still John e more touching was when Mary told of her struggles, I felt for her, and vowed that I would not allow my daughter, who is currently 10, be in the dark. She has a right to her voice, and a right to say no. She has a right to her own body, and a right to create informed decisions about it.I bless Mary Beth for this book, for her work, and for her continued role as a caregiver to everyone.

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    Lessons from the Mountain []  2020-1-16 6:50

    When I first saw this book offered, I knew I'd be instantly ordering it. For years I've been calling "The Waltons" the greatest TV series of all time. The love and warmth one would feel watching an episode found its method into our hearts. They were my "other" family. Will Geer's "Grandpa Zeb" was a wise old man who taught us something with every line he was ever given. Ellen Corby's "Grandma" was stern but very loving. What Mary has given us with her book is an inside look at the relationships they developed over the years. Her stories about specific characters and actors is quite revealing. Mary assures us that, despite what one might expect, their life as young actors wasn't as glamorous as one might have thought. She also reveals the occasional trauma that certainly was to come about as a kid grew into a lovely woman. Back lot stories of her fellow actors was refreshing and entertaining. I thank Mary for caring enough to share all this with us. I have each season on DVD and never tire from watching them. Memories abound. Mates would come over and we'd watch The Waltons, followed by Kung Fu... which is a close "second" in my favorites category. What a night of TV!! Thanks, Mary, for a unbelievable book of your own memories, being on set. I'll finish by relating how she and the other young actors would wander over to the Kung Fu set and hang out - becoming mates with the young actor who was portraying Kwai Chang Cain as a youngster. Mary never lost sight of how fortunate she was to have that role. She said Will Geer assured them that this would be the "best gig" they'd ever have as an actor. She soon realized how real that was. If you're a fan, obtain Mary's book - you won't be able to place it down. Goodnight, Erin.

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    Lessons from the Mountain []  2020-1-16 6:50

    I've read and enjoyed this book. I am from Virginia and am familiar with the Schuyler and surrounding areas. When I was a young child, our homes were related to the Walton`s home. We didn't have modern fixtures nor indoor plumbing. My grandparents had 17 grandchildren running in and out of the house daily. They had a large family garden, which we all worked in if we wanted to eat. I'm sorry but I could go on forever. What I'm trying to say is that when I read the book or when I watch The Walton`s, it brings back a lot of unbelievable memories of my own childhood. These are memories that I will always cherish. And yes, Times have changed, but I will always appreciate the method I was brought up. Times were tough but they were more easy and that brought families closer. That doesn't happen today. I do miss the simpler times. Reading this book took me back to that unique place. Thank you Mary and Beverly.

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    Livin on the Mountain []  2020-1-18 22:37

    Del McCoury's "Livin' On The Mountain" was mostly recorded at Glaser Sound Studio in Nashville, TN on August 9, 1971. A pair of tracks featuring twin fiddle were simultaneously recorded at Bradley's Barn in Mt. Juliet, TN ("Don't Allow Your Sweet Love Die" and "I Still Write Your Name In The Sand"). The album was first issued in 1976 on John Palmer's Grassound label as "Collector's Special" (as by Del McCoury & The Dixie Pals).The album was produced by Carlton Haney and was co-produced by Fred Bartenstein and Doug Green. Haney shopped the tapes around and was unable to get a label deal. Had the album been issued immediately, it would have been McCoury's second release (his first being "Del McCoury Sings Bluegrass," Arhoolie, 1968). McCoury subsequently issued albums on Rounder ("High On A Mountain," 1973), Rebel ("Del McCoury," 1975) and Revonah ("Del McCoury & The Dixie Pals," 1975)."Collector's Special" was McCoury's 5th album. It was reissued on this CD in 1992 with an extra track from the August 9, 1971 session, "Rain And Snow (which had been withheld from the Grassound album because a more latest recording of the song had been issued as the opening track for Rebel's "Del McCoury" LP).The song "Rain And Snow" is also known as "Cold Rain And Snow." It dates back to at least the 1910s. It was recorded by folksinger Obray Ramsey in the early 1960s. It was also recorded by folksinger Dillard Chandler and the Grateful Dead in the mid August of 1971 the Dixie Pals were mandolinst @#$% Staber, banjoist John Farmer and bassist Dewey Renfro. Buddy Spicher was hired to play fiddle for both sessions; Jimmy Buchanan is featured on twin fiddle. In addition, Bartenstein contributes lead vocals to one track ("I Hope You Have Learned"). Bartenstein is uncredited on both releases."Collector's Special" features a few songs McCoury rerecorded years later. The most notable is "The Bluest Man In Town," a song credited to Bill Monroe. Staber recalled that Monroe was visiting the band's bus and brought along a music and chorus, saying McCoury and the band might be able to use it. Staber finished the song by writing the two verses. McCoury rerecorded this song in 1985 with Monroe for the latter's album "Bluegrass '87." He again recorded "The Bluest Man In Town" for the albums "A Deeper Shade Of Blue" (Rounder, 1993) and "Celebrating 50 Years Of Del McCoury" (McCoury Music, 2009).Other songs from "Collector's Special" which McCoury recorded multiple times are Leroy Carr's "How Long Blues" and George Jones' "Don't Stop The Music."The opening track, "Lonesome Hobo" was composed by McCoury's brother Grover Cleveland "G.C." McCoury e closing track, "Mother's Prayer," was composed by Wally Fowler (who recorded it with his Georgia Clodhoppers for Capitol Records in the mid 1940s).McCoury has issued a lot of amazing albums over the years. "Collector's Special"/"Livin' On The Mountain" remains one of my private favorites.

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    Music on the Mountain []  2020-1-18 23:39

    Beautiful, soothing music!

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    The Magic Mountain []  2020-2-5 1:54

    Yes, there are amazing books, brilliant books, and then there are the few that are called masterpieces. Thomas Mann's "The Magic Mountain" is a masterpiece. It is a humorist, satirical piece of delightful writing with a cast of characters that create the characters in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" look relatively normal. Set in a Sanatorium in the Swiss Alps, at the turn of the 20th century, the patients in this luxurious abode of healing are from all over Europe (Germany, Britian, France, Italy, Russia) and they represent a microcosm of the irrational and insane behavior that each of these countries were exhibiting just before the outbreak of the First Globe War. From the doctors, to the patients, to the nurses, and down to the waiters and kitchen staff it is impossible to precisely say who exhibits the most paranoid and illogical behavior. The one thing that is certain is the absolute brilliance of the novel. Simply amazing!

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    The Magic Mountain []  2020-2-5 1:54

    (Not Posted on Amazon) “Early 20th Century Masterpiece” This is Mann's amazing masterpiece, capping a literary career that won him the Nobel Prize in 1929. (And that was in a time when the Nobel Prize really meant something and had not yet descended into being a bauble of political correctness and uninspired multiculturalism.) It tells the story of Hans Castorp, described as a "perfectly ordinary" young man, who travels to Switzerland before Globe Battle I to visit his cousin in a tuberculosis sanitarium in Davos, now popular for its annual winter symposium of the wealthy, powerful, and brilliant. Castorp is highly intelligent, rather lazy, and cosseted; certainly he is set in his ways and highly opinionated, even arrogant when we first meet him. But in Switzerland, he will be forced to change the method he thinks and lives. He will be diagnosed with tuberculosis himself, and his planned three-week social visit will become a seven-year rest cure among a fascinating menagerie of rich and eccentric invalids from all over the world. They live on the magic mountain, chop off form the globe below and ambivalent about it, all of them very ill and a lot of of them dying. The sanitarium sails above the globe down below, like a very comfortable cruise ship endlessly sailing the Pacific but never touching land; every day is full of elegance, comfort, amazing food, deferential service and varied leisure, some melody and lively gossip. But all is not well; this is a ship of fools, a voyage of the damned. Mann means this collection of eccentric characters to be a metaphor for the nations of Europe before the Amazing Battle that changed all of them, devastated most of them, and eliminated several of them altogether. It is not just the Ottoman Empire that is collapsing and is "the Sick Man of Europe;" all of the nations of Europe are sick in this metaphor, they are all corrupt and ill in their own way, some of them fatally, and they are all in breezy, elitist, and arrogant denial. They are all ripe for caricature and Mann has amazing fun sending them up in a novel that is very long, nuanced and brilliantly observed with tremendous detail and fascinating hero insights. The Magic Mountain is also metaphorical in another strong and obvious way. Each of us is dying over the span of our lifetimes, our deaths are implied by our very existence, and we go bravely on from day to day refusing to acknowledge that painful fact. This novel stirs interesting feelings in each reader about the privilege of life, its finiteness and purpose, the value of time and of each day and hour. But this is not a lugubrious or morbid book. Far from it; it is deeply droll, and often laugh-out-loud funny. Mann mines every hero and every situation for its essential chance of human humor and preposterousness, its pathos and sympathy. Just listen to this brief passage when the character is X-rayed for the first time: "With the eyes of his Tienappel forebear–penetrating, clairvoyant eyes–he beheld a familiar part of his body, and for the first time in his life he understood that he would die. And he created the same face he usually created when listening to music–a rather dull, sleepy, and devout face, his head tilted toward one shoulder, his mouth half-open." It is a characteristic passage, sympathetic and hilarious at the same time. Amazing ideas are rolled through this mammoth text: What is the meaning and nature of time? How are the mental, physical and emotional selves integrated in the unity of personality? How shall we live though we know we are to die? How are love and eroticism related and dissimilar? A director of the sanatorium lectures controversially and often, in what were the early days of the practice of psychoanalysis, about love as a force conducive to illness. There are very long debates between two highly disputatious and pretentious pedagogues, the humanist Settembrini and the man of God Naphta; these are the opportunity to discover deep themes like the conflict between nature and religion, wellness and illness, the spirit and the body, time and eternity, and so on. It is an intellectual feast that can be rather head-spinning. The very middle of the book includes a chapter titled “Walpurgis Night”, what the Germans call Mardi Gras, and this chapter feels like a kind of fulcrum that the book balances upon. The chapter is perfectly written: extremely thought-provoking, very tender sentimentally, but also extremely funny. After that chapter, the book rushes downhill like the speedy, thrilling and efficient Swiss toboggans that take the deceased patients from their attractive globe on the magic mountain back to the banal reality of the globe “down below.” One can’t support having the powerful feeling that this is very much what purgatory is going to be like: not a not good place, but a put you would like to eventually leave, and one that is repetitive, curative, well-managed but on the whole rather dull and tiresome. The writing includes hypnotically descriptive passages that rise to pure lyricism. The chapter called “Snow” in the second half of the book, for example, is sublimely lyrical and at the same time intensely dramatic. It ends with high drama and a very poignant and moving latest few pages about the beginning of the cataclysm that was the First Globe War. This very long book is powerfully conceived and masterfully executed, with a excellent balance achieved between seriousness and farce, hero and plot. It is Mann’s amazing masterwork and here it is brilliantly rendered in English by the prize-winning translator John E. Woods in this very lively and eminently readable edition.

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    Meeting On the Mountain []  2020-4-1 20:38

    Meet Me On the Mountain is one of the greatest songs written and performed int he latest 10 years. Both bands do it their sets and it's a present stopper each time. And rest of the EP is very good. Spliff makes me giggle.

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    Hymns On The Mountain []  2020-5-8 18:35

    Perfect! Liked so much I had to be one for my mother-in-law.

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    Songs From The Mountain []  2020-6-29 19:54

    Old time country melody has been kept pure and pristine hidden in the mountains of North Carolina ... and wherever else the immigrants from Ireland, Scotland and England settled in the 1700s. The melody is played on the fiddle, the guitar, the mandolin, occasionally the banjo and in some instances accompanied on the hammered dulcimer (but not on this CD). Before "Cold Mountain" the book was written by Charles Frazier and before the film was conceived -- this melody endured for several centuries. Musicians, Dirk Powell, Tim O'Brien, and John Hermann will guarantee it will be preserved for centuries to come in the future on such fine CDs as e alluring fiddle notes remind one of the haunting beauty of the Appalachian mountains in track #1, "Mountain Air/ Washington's March/ Bonaparte's Retreat". It uses the 8 beats to a measure ... so well known to "contra dancers" who dance the steps as did the ancestors of the immigrants from the shores of the English-speaking Old World. Other memorable songs are, "Wayfarin' Stranger" which is mentioned in the book "Cold Mountain". Sung with poignant emotion, the listener is transfixed by the mournful tune and words. Two gospel-type songs ... "When I Die I'll Live Again" and "Bow Down" have refrains that hold repeating themselves like a mantra the rest of the day after being heard. They are reminiscent of a time when powerful physical endurance were accompanied by powerful faith and a powerful spirit ... to build a fresh life. Melody lifted the spirit and maintained faith in G-d ... and the future. Two other songs mentioned in "Cold Mountain" (the book) are "Backstep Cindy" and "Fair Margaret and Sweet William". The liner notes contain passages and references to scenes and happenings in the book, "Cold Mountain" next to the title of each track. This enhances the meaning and enjoyment of the music. The book was written in 1997. This CD was produced in 1998. The musicians were ahead of their time in recognizing and predicting the popularity of this musical genre ...This melody is eery, haunting, poignant, heart-stopping and soul-searching ... it will appeal to anyone who wants to remember the best in both the book and film, "Cold Mountain". While it takes one back to a time when there was no TV, radio, computers or tv ... by closing one's eyes, you feel caught up in the era when melody stood for more than entertainment. It represented man's indominatable spirit versus the elements and hope for the future ... even in the midst of the Civil War. This is a most highly recommended piece of musical history. Erika Borsos (erikab93)

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    Songs From The Mountain []  2020-6-29 19:54

    I am from the Appalachian foothills in eastern Kentucky, and love the mountains. The melody on this CD reminds of melody I heard while growing up in a little mining camp in the 1950s. The melody is simple, raw, and emotional. It is the kind that you might have heard performed by a family or mates gathered on the porch at the end of a hard week's work. My favorite tunes are The Blackest Crow, Angel Band, When I Die I'll Live Again, Wayfarin' Stranger, and Bow Down. (My least favorite is Fair Margaret.) Several amazing instrumentals on here, as well.

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    Songs From The Mountain []  2020-6-29 19:54

    This is fine fiddlin' with accompanying folk lyrics. These are traditional tunes handed down over the generations. It gives me a feel for what must have been back then - and Tim O'Brien is a fine hand with that fiddle. Very enjoyable.

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    The Mountain Midwife [Book]  2017-12-6 18:0

    4.5 stars! I really, really enjoyed this book! ^_^ I should probably stop saying that I don't like contemporary fiction, because I hold finding gems in this genre! I've read some of Laurie Alice Eakes's historicals, and was expecting The Mountain Midwife to be one also. As it turns out, it's a sort of contemporary companion novel to one of her historical series about midwives. At first I was disappointed. But that soon changed!The story centers on Ashley Tolliver, a midwife in the Appalachian mountains. Her family has lived there for nearly 200 years ... The women in her family, and their mothers before them, had been practicing midwifery just as long. Ashley wants to go to medical school, to be able to support more, to obtain more respect. But for the time being, the women in her little community need her. Especially the one who was kidnapped soon after giving birth in Ashley's care ...This is not your average boring contemporary! *grins* Kidnappings. Mountain life. Handsome heroes searching out a birth mother. It was exciting, charming, sobering, and attractive all at once. And besides that, I really have fun reading about midwives. A baby's birth is miraculous. And midwifery intrigues me. I love watching Ashley, as a young woman, helping out other women as they enter into the exciting, but sometimes frightening, time of of bearing children. Some women, she's delivered all their babies. Some women, her mother or grandmother were the ones to "catch the baby". All in all, there's something private and comforting about a community midwife.And the mountain life is just quite interesting as a whole. They have this mountain accent. They've lived there all their lives. And their ancestors for almost 200 years! It's beautiful crazy to think about. And just really neat. Imagine that kind of history! Very enchanting feel at times. Though there is the downside too. Instead of moonshine like the old days, illegal drugs are ruining the lives of a lot of a person around Ashley's home. There are also the more poverty-stricken people, whose rather messy and "behind-times" lifestyle cause the general prejudices of the town folk versus the mountain folk. There are some pregnant, single women who live in smoke-saturated locations and work far harder than they should at little diners with very small pay.And Ashley, with her loving heart and family ties, strives to support them yes, The Mountain Midwife kept my attention! I thoroughly enjoyed so, the romance was very, very sweet! ^_^ I quite enjoyed it, and how everything tied together and worked out. So cute. So gentle. Such endearing moments. Poignant moments. Ashley and her man are the sweetest couple; and I loved every bit of their journey! Eep!

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    The Mountain Midwife [Book]  2017-12-6 18:0

    The Mountain Midwife opens with an engaging stage that pulled me immediately into Ashley Toliver’s globe – that of a midwife for the women of a little Appalachian community. Awakened in the night, the latest thing that Ashley expects is an abduction of her patient right after the birth. This light mystery takes off from there, pulling in another mystery of Hunter McDermott’s birth mother. Both of these threads intertwine nicely as the story progresses, as well as the growing friendship between Ashley and ere is a nice atmosphere found in this story – the feel of the little community is fully realized, and I loved the powerful sense of heritage that Ashley has for her home. I have fun when an author gives a hero an authentic history that feels true to me, as this one did. The plot also flows nicely. The mystery thread is light and more my speed, since I don’t like super scary, crime-based stories.I felt like some of the ending scenes came across as a small bit anticlimactic. There are also some loose ends that I felt like weren’t tied up – perhaps to leave room for a sequel? I definitely felt like there are secondary characters in this story that could have their own and would be interested in reading those. I was also bummed at how easily things wrapped up for Ashley – I thought there would be more of a compromise regarding one huge problem in her life. It seemed a bit glossed over, but that’s just my opinion. Other readers may not feel that method at e info about midwifery really grabbed my attention; Ashely had such deep roots, and the info about her job held my interest – and for anyone worried about there being too much detail, don’t be – I thought it was enough info to understand the situation and even learn from it, but not more info than was needed. I also thought it was neat how the author created Ashley and her mate Heather a descendant of characters in her historical series about midwives – I’ve read this first book, and this story actually makes me wish to read the other two.Overall, this is an engaging story, with a lot of compelling elements, and a light mystery at its core - and I hope it's the beginning of a series. These characters have more stories to tell, I'm sure of it.I received a complimentary copy of this book. I was not needed to do a review, and the views expressed here are my own.

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    The Yellow Mountain [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    Battle of the Mines! The Yellow Mountain is directed by Jesse Hibbs and collectively written by George Zuckerman, Russell Hughes, Robert Blees and Harold Channing Wire. It stars Lex Barker, Mala Powers, Howard Duff, William Demarest, John McIntire and Leo Gordon. Melody is by Joseph Gershenson and cinematography by George Robinson. The yellow mountain of the title is in Goldfield, Nevada, and there is gold up there in that thar mountain. There are two local factions in opposition for mining superiority, something is clearly going to have to give... She thinks I'm a philanthropist. Lovely tidy Oater this one, it's for the discerning Western fan who has a love for the 1950s boon of the genre. It begins with a fun punch - up as Barker's Andy Martin arrives in city and renews his fremeny relationship with Duff's Pete Menlo, and of course the presence of the gorgeous Nevada Wray (Powers) muddies the testosterone waters still further. Uneasy alliances will be formed and director Hibbs slots in some Western staples (chase/fights/stare-downs etc) as the story progresses, with some very nifty stunt work into the bargain. Technical credits are method above average. Barker has left Tarzan behind and is playing cowboy, and he's OK, but more of a presence than a fleshy character. Main issue for Barker is the strength of the supporting cast who outshine him. McIntire and Gordon are the weasels, which is always a for Western fans, while Duff and Demarest, the latter of which owns the film, give amazing hero driven turns. With nice outdoor scenery photographed around the Mojave Desert and appealing costuming on show, production is as safe as a brick out-house. Stoic fans of Westerns will know exactly where it's all going to end up, but formula is fine if the journey is fun and engaging, such is the case here. It isn't going to create anyone's top 100 Westerns list, but genre fans should catch it if they can. 7/10

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    Best vehicle race of the greatest track on earth. Very detailed graphics and game play. Would live to see some AI or multiplayer.

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    Need more vehicles even some old brocky and @#$% johnsons legendry bathurst winnig vehicles

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    okay it is Bathurst , it is okay . But the steering is far to sensitive, hard to drive in a straight line, Definitely needs sensitivity adjustments!. Sort the steering and it would be fine , but at the moment it is just to sensitive to drive properly. / modernize : still no sensitivity adjustments , amazing luck trying to place in a lap without crashing ! Not worth the as it is . Come on guys , obtain it sorted !.

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    King of the Mountain [App]  2019-4-27 13:47

    Its all right more tracks would be nice though

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    The Mountain Between Us []  2019-12-11 18:0

    I like adventure stories and survival stories and stories that involve cold and snowy climes and this story fits all these categories.Dr. Ben Payne, an orthopedic surgeon, is heading home to Florida after a conference when he's stranded at Salt Lake Town airport. He has surgeries scheduled for the next day so he hires a little fishing and hunting charter plane to fly him to Denver where he thinks he'll have a possibility of catching a flight home. At the latest minute, he asks a young woman he met at the airport if she wants to share the ride. Ashley Knox is a magazine columnist on her method home to Atlanta where she is getting married very soon. So she takes him up on his eir little plane, with no flight plan filed, ends up going down in the High Uintas Wilderness mountain range in Utah. Oh, and it's winter.I enjoyed the heck out of this story. It hit all the right spots for me and I read it beautiful much straight through in one sitting.But...you have to be willing to suspend your disbelief at all the "coincidences" that factor into this tale. Yes, it COULD happen this method but it would be very unlikely.But I loved it. I also saw the ending coming but it didn't matter a whit to me. Exciting story that I highly recommend.

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    The Mountain Between Us []  2019-12-11 18:0

    After seeing the movie, I was terribly disappointed by the book. The adage that the book is always better than the film did not prove real to me in this case. There is no romance in the book; I don't mean sex, I mean an emotional connection that the author forgot to write. The ending was creepy. At the very end, Ashley just became a replacement of his late wife. The writing style was very good, though I don't usually like the first person, which doesn't let the reader insight into the feelings of other characters, but it worked OK in this novel. Just kind of empty on the human scale of two people trying to survive versus all odds.

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    The Shining Mountain []  2019-12-11 18:33

    Very amazing acc of the climb. It helps if the reader knows something about the techniques of rock eresting description of the culture and living conditions of the native people around the mountains.

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    Livin on the Mountain []  2020-1-18 22:37

    I own most albums by Del and the boys including this one. I have also seen them several times over the years including just recently at the Town Winery in Atlanta, r some reason this is the album I play the most. I can't place my finger on it but this is my favorite of all his albums. I think it must be his special high and lonesome sound which is found on all albums, however, it is especially high and lonesome on this album. This is a must for any Del McCoury band. Actually, it is a must for any fan of bluegrass.

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    Music on the Mountain []  2020-1-18 23:39

    Unbelievable music. Highly recommend

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    The Magic Mountain []  2020-2-5 1:54

    My headline is my entire message. The promo for the Kindle ver does not specify the translator, and oddly, the itself doesn't include any reference to the translator. But I compared a few selections with what I know to be the Lowe-Porter translation, and they are clearly the 5-star rating is just because it was hard to figure out a rational rating for an informational note like this.

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    The Hospital (Mountain Man) []  2020-1-29 5:40

    Keith Blackmore has certainly captured the end of the globe apocalyptic feeling in The Hospital. I was shocked and Eager at the same time to learn of Alice and what she does, what happens to her. To make a hero with such a twisted mind and write it so enticingly, makes me yearn to know a small more about her, how she ended up in her frame of mind. Although it is a hospital.... of Insane? Perhaps there should be another book in the sequel....In a day where I am hearing and seeing, reading more and more of the age of zombies, and a rebirth in death so to speak, this book captured my attention and wasn't released until i finished every single page. For my mates that are into this story line I will definitely recommend The Hospital.

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    The Hospital (Mountain Man) []  2020-1-29 5:40

    Imagine being a "survivor" in the zombie apocalypse. You're in need of certain medical supplies and all the drug stores have been picked clean. You know of a huge hospital within driving distance, but you don't know what, or who, lies therein. You decide to take a chance, place on your gear and head out to the hospital. As you stand outside the hospital doors you listen closely, stare instensely and generally summon any 6th sense available in the hopes of hearing, seeing or detecting something within. The coast looks clear. You push begin the doors and head is is the premise of "The Hospital," and it's incredibly thrilling. I love zombie apocalypse fiction because I have fun thinking about what I'd do in these situations and whether I'd have the guts to brave the unknown to potentially search supplies. After all, how a lot of of us could navigate a huge hospital, with a lot of sections completely in the dark mind you, to search a specific item? It's also enjoyable to learn of different daily stuff that could become invaluable in globe where zombies feed upon the living. For instance, the protagonist in this wears a motorcycle helmet which seems incredibly intelligent and is something I might not have thought of using were I in that world.But back to the review, I won't say whether the protagonist finds anything (or anyone) as I don't wish to spoil the story. I will say that upon completing "The Hospital" I immediately purchased the first book of the Mountain Man series. I strongly recommend this prolouge to any even remotely interested in the genre or in zombie fiction. I can't wait to see what occurs over the course of a full length novel as there was plenty within this entry.

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    The Real Mountain Charley []  2020-1-29 5:55

    This essay on Charlie Parkhurst is loaded with details, including citations and first-person accounts. It tells of an impressive lady who voted long before women were allowed and bravely drove through the frontier as the best coachman on the eastern seaboard. She drove through the roughest towns of the gold rush, and ascended to folk-hero status. A delightfully obscure tale for those curious about the women who tamed the West. The author really knows his stuff, comparing Charlie's arc with the classic folk hero, and citing a strikingly long list of sources. Definitely worth a read.

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    The Mountain Will Fall []  2020-1-23 3:13

    I usually don't review melody I don't like. Melody is subjective and I usually test and abide by the , if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all credo BUT here it is...... I liked track 2, and kinda liked 4 and 5, and the rest, man, I just couldn't obtain with it. How can I place it, it was like somebody learning how DJ and mix and record after being inspired by ETBTG-Walking Wounded and Aphex Twin-...I Care Because You Do. I can't say I wasted my since I could have Youtubed the entire album prior to purchase, which I didn't. I want I had, I'd still have that $9.00. None the less, I'm still a DJ Shadow fan, no doubt.

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    The Mountain Will Fall []  2020-1-23 3:13

    SOLID, BRILLIANT..

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    The Mountain Will Fall []  2020-1-23 3:13

    Amazing album, glad dj shadow is still creating!!

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    Lessons from the Mountain []  2020-1-16 6:50

    McDonough has a unbelievable ability to draw you into her story of playing a android game of hide and seek with the multiple dimensions of herself. From her life at home to her adventures as a kid star growing up on TV's Walton's; as an adult struggling to search her unscripted method through love and marriage, motherhood and parenting, as she carefully learns to balance between trusting herself and others who have always been portrayed as the ones who should never be doubted or questioned. McDonough takes you on a path that will lead you up the steep and sometimes rocky side of Walton's Mountain back down to the valleys of unknowns only to finally reach a plateau of acceptance and a better understanding of living a life of peace requires the occasional dips, twists, and turns to remind you who you truly are.

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    Lessons from the Mountain []  2020-1-16 6:50

    Interesting read and I especially enjoyed the behind the scenes stories. I have to admire Mary's strength as she fought to search her voice while fighting her illness. Suffering from related problems, though nothing as poor as Lupus, I found myself nodding along with some of her experiences, especially with doctors. Such things can be infuriating, frustrating and leave you wondering if you really are some sort of hypochondriac and I thank Mary for sharing her story. When those who are well known share their stories it often has more of an impact in gaining recognition for these very true conditions than a 1000 stories from ordinary people will. All of that being said and as much as I did have fun the book, I could only give it 4 stars due to the method it at times jumped around making it difficult to follow. Mostly it was well written but it could have been that small bit better had the focus been kept to a small more.

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    Shadow on the Mountain []  2020-2-1 4:23

    I remember reading The Snow Treasure (McSwiggle) when I was a kid about how Norwegian kids snuck the King’s gold out of Norway under the eyes of the Nazis. Here’s another memorable book, based on an historical event. Fourteen year old Espen joins the Resistance. How does he know who to trust. How can he not place his family in danger? Lots of adventure in this book as he helps the Norwegians resist the Nazi regime.

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    Shadow on the Mountain []  2020-2-1 4:23

    My grandson shares books with me that he reads in school and then we discuss them. This is really a bonding thing with us. This book is filled with suspense. I really admired the young people who risked their lives for liberty

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    Songs From The Mountain []  2020-6-29 19:54

    I think I've just about ran my family out of the house with this one! It came the other day and has beautiful much been played non-stop since then. I love every song. I didn't realize it was a soundtrack of sorts for the novel, Cold Mountain, until I read the liner notes included with the CD. So if you read the book(and I must be honest, after hearing this I went back and read the book again, and saw some things that happened in the book in a fresh and various light.), and enjoyed it, then I recommend this especially if you are wondering about some of the things referred to in the novel. I also recommend reading the liner notes, in regards to that as well. I also wouldn't hesitate to recommend this to those who haven't read the book, but are looking for some amazing old-time music, it serves as a amazing introduction for newcomers, I think. I highly recommend!! Enjoy.

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    Songs From The Mountain []  2020-6-29 19:54

    This is a collection of old-time Appalachian/Mountain ballads. You will not search a bluegrass chop on this project. Tim O'Brien is an amazing performer of traditional music. I have seen him several times in concert. All songs are out-standing, and the two gospel numbers will bring shivers down your spine. (Especially Wayfaring Stranger-As close to real Appalachian singing that you will get-that high lonesome sound.)

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    Colors of the Mountain []  2020-1-17 20:49

    Not a light read.

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    Hymns On The Mountain []  2020-5-8 18:35

    I bought two CDs by this artist, and my mother loves the old time instruments.

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    Hymns On The Mountain []  2020-5-8 18:35

    Pleasant Appalachian mountain sound to a lot of familiar hymns. Melody styling is traditional, but upbeat.

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