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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    One of the best books I've read on homeschooling yet.

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    It wasn't as relevant as I had hoped.

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    Become & Stay Fit Forever: The Holistic - Psychological Aspect of the Problem (Holistic Women's Health Book 1) []  2020-12-6 20:44

    It was very refreshing to read a various type of book about weight loss. Allyson Hodge's tactic is simple to implement and leads to life long change. Perfect ideas. Simple to place into practice. This is a attractive book with constructive and even life-changing ideas-- I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to create a lasting change in their health and feel amazing while doing it!

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    I am career educator who left my teaching job to homeschool my own two children 2 years ago. This work by Holt and Faranga is incredibly encouraging and affirming it is almost read for every homeschool parent

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    Become & Stay Fit Forever: The Holistic - Psychological Aspect of the Problem (Holistic Women's Health Book 1) []  2020-12-6 20:44

    I really liked the thoughts presented in this book. I think it offers a new perspective on addressing the roots of eating issues instead of simply trying to treat the symptoms with crash diets. So a lot of of the things in the book seem like they would be common sense, but perhaps so much so that people never even stop to think about them, resulting in overlooking easy habits and solutions that can change people's lives. While I haven't yet successfully implemented all the tactics and suggestions in the book (it is a process that could take weeks or months to do), for the brief period when I was doing so, I did message an immediate difference in both the method I felt about myself, my level of physical comfort, and a lower number on the scale. It is definitely worth reading or listening to (as there is an audiobook version) and I think I will definitely be rereading it very soon.

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    I enjoyed this book and it gave me some amazing insights into the state of public education and they method kids learn. It also gave some amazing context for the friction between homeschoolers and the public school system. There was scant info about addressing schooling and children with unique needs. It would really be helpful if someone could be this comprehensive and also contain more info about state perspectives and expectations of parents who choose to homeschool their kids with unique needs.

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    Amazing writing but overall unconvincing and written from an exclusive point of view.

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    I am a large John Holt fan. I just required to start this review with that statement. I am also a fan of what I have read from Pat Farenga from other sources. So I thought the book Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book of Home Schooling would be a slam dunk. It wasn’t for wasn’t that I necessarily disagreed with any of the content but I just didn’t search it inspirational or ch of the content in the book consists of notes sent into the homeschooling magazine Growing Without School, which was run by both men, from parent readers. While I can appreciate what they were trying to do in providing a dozens of voices to illustrate their points, it kind of felt like I was just sifting through notes.If you are looking to be inspired and informed on your homeschooling journey, I would skip this book, but I remain a fan of both men and their work and I encourage you to perk up when their other writings cross your virtual desk.

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    You will learn a lot about homeschooling but also about the faults in our current system of education!

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    John holt inspired me to pull my son out of school and unschool. The book itself is very inspirational and well written. If you're considering taking the same path but need some encouragement to begin out...consider reading this book!

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    Amazing. If you are considering buying this, DO IT. Totally changes your perspective on life.

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    Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling []  2020-7-17 18:28

    I adore books by John Holt. They always support remind me how to respect the child's mind and the method that they learn. This is a amazing book for any Homeschooling parent.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    My wife is an avid gardener and a large Monty Don fan. If you've been lucky enough to watch the British gardening show, Gardener's World, then you know what a joy it is to watch Monty work his gardens at Long meadow. The Complete Gardener is a valuable resource which every gardener should have as a reference. Monty's info from the name of plants to how to plant them is meticulous, BUT, without being dry and boring. I highly recommend this book to any level of gardener. If you don't already have this book as a reference, please pick up a copy. Trust me, you'll learn something fresh on every page.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    Monty Don is an expert on everything Garden. I love watching his shows on Netflix and his book did not disappoint! Very thorough and gorgeous pictures.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    If you binged watched Monty Don and are now looking for something to support fill the void when you obtain to the end of the series this book is a most have. Amazing images and lots of helpful ideas to take your gardening to the next level

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    This is my favorite Monty Don book. It is filled with useful info and it inspires me to obtain outside and work!

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    As an avid, enthusiastic organic garden and landscape designer, I watched all the Monty Don Videos available on Amazon Prime and fell in love with how he gardens and helps people wanting to learn. How could I NOT have his written words to support maintain the memory of his attractive travels. I watch his videos again and again, never tiring of his simplicity and love of gardens and gardening...

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    Amazing book with dozens of info! My husband bought this as a bonus after we watched Monty Don’s present on Netflix. Amazing hints for gardeners of all skill levels. More information than I will ever be able to place into practice.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    After watching his TV shows I thought I'd test a book, and this is a comprehensive garden book from planning, climate considerations, and a lot of kind of plants including fruit, flowers, trees and shrubs. Gorgeous photos.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    This book has everything you need to learn about gardening. He goes into so much detail, it is quite amazing. A must buy for a gardener!

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    Homeschooling. Homeschooling Guide. Homeschooling Comprehensive Guide Includes: Curriculum, Online Homeschooling, Homeschooling Programs, Benefits & Advantages of Homeschooling, Statistics, Facts []  2020-1-14 18:48

    Loads of information! It takes a special perspective, amazing for people who don't categorize themselves as a teacher.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    I love Monty and his book is super helpful for me even in the US. I read a review that his hints only apply to the UK which is quite wrong. He gives info on what works where and under what conditions. It’s up to the reader then to apply that to their climate. I have found it very useful for my needs.

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    The Complete Gardener: A Practical, Imaginative Guide to Every Aspect of Gardening []  2020-1-4 21:20

    This book was received in excellent is a joy to read. Monty has a bonus for writing about gardening. I can’t wait to use all his exsperience in my garden.

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    This book was very funny and well worth it. It is written in short chapters, so husbands can easily read it a few mins at a time. I could do without the assumption that all homeschoolers are Christian, and without a few of the bible verses, though. However, we still enjoyed this book a lot as a good, realistic glimpse of what life for other homeschooling families is like.

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    This book is ok but it didn't provide any unusual insight, at least to me. It spends a lot of time discussing a home schoolers life and encouraging a dad to be part of it.

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    I like it a lot. My husband on the other hand, hasn't read a page!

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    I read this before I gave it to my hubby. It was a amazing read and gave a amazing insight for us homeschooling Mom's :)

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    Husbands of Homeschooling Moms unite! It's not simple but it's worth it because hard things are good. Todd continues his series of encouraging books with this one. Read it and be encouraged.

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    This is an ok book. Guess we knew a lot of the info. Very sarcastic, not overly politely written.

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    Both my husband and I read this book as we prayerfully consider homeschooling our children. We both enjoyed it and shared notes. It's a lovely read which maintains a realistic and hopeful tone. With God, all things are possible. Thanks for reminder Todd! Rachele from NY

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    I took comfort in this extremely funny, yet realistic book. We all need to take time to laugh at the reality of our struggles sometimes! This book is also filled with lots of encouraging words! Highly recommend!

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    I heard Todd Wilson speak at a latest Homeschooling convention (NICHE) and enjoyed the opportunity to have some down to earth insight from someone who is living through the same challenges that other homeschooling dads are going through.

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    Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom: Showing Dads How to Meet the Needs of Their Homeschooling Wives []  2019-12-24 19:21

    Todd does a amazing and humerous job of teaching Dads, especially fresh to homeschooling, what wifes need from their husbands. It is also a amazing reminder for us veterans. This book can be read in 2 or 3 short sittings. I recommend it - especially to fresh homeschooling Dads.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    A common issue with understanding Greek verbs is we are often tempted to yze them within the framework of English language with its strictly temporal sense; past, present, excellent and future. One of the mistakes we are most prone to make, I think, is to assume just because a verb is aorist, the action must have happened in the past. While the concept of aspect and aktionsart are covered in a lot of intermediate Greek textbooks, it is amazing to have a small booklet that concentrates on the topic in greater depth like what Prof. Campbell does here. The highlights are as follows:1. He presents an interesting technique to arrive at the aktionsart of a verb, namely, by looking at the aspect (proximity, remoteness), lexeme (punctiliar, stative, transitive etc) and context, which I think is useful. Strangely however, in the latest chapter when he covers participles, he doesn't use the same methodology, but instead, he seems to jump into Aktionsart right after identifying the kind of participles (present, aorist, periphrastic) and its corresponding aspect without trying to identify the context. The Aktionsart categories he proposes are useful as well, namely, contemporaneous, stative, past-event, and attendant cirtance; the latter is a repetition of what Wallace teaches in Greek Grammar (p.640-645).2. He differs from Wallace in dividing aspects into 2 (perfective and imperfective) while Wallace adds a third element stative (Greek Grammar, 501). I tend to agree with Campbell more.3. Unlike the conventional view of the excellent tense having a perfective aspect, Campbell thinks it is imperfective with a heightened proximity view, more proximate than that of the show tense. I need to do more study on this to verify the validity of this claim.4. I disagree on some case studies; the two that I disagree most strongly are:- Rom 8:11 (zwopoihsei) where Campbell thinks it is ingressive (p.146) while I think it has a sense of future summary or future bodily transformation (cf. Moo, 493).- John 1:10 (ouk egnw) where Campbell thinks it is ingressive (p.145), but this doesn't create sense. How could the globe "begin" not to know Christ? I tend to go with gnomic or summary (cf. Carson, 124), leaning more toward the former. It is a universal truth the globe does not know God (cf. 1 John 3:1).

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    This book is very eye opening if you are not familiar witht he deeper understanding of Biblical Greek Verbal Aspect. It goes into a more deeper understanding of verbal aspect that most text books and supplies the resoning behind it.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    This review is a revision of the one I created in 2010. I've since studied otherviews such as Porter/Decker (C/D), and I've also looked at how the NT verbsare actually used. I think Campbell's (CC) view answers the most questions,for instance, what's the purpose of the tenses like the imperfect or the pluperfectif not for time. Also he deals the question regarding the purpose of the perfect.His view is that it's aspect is imperfective, and is a sort of "super-present", portrays a VERY close-up view of the action (that makes sense considering theway a lot of the perfects are used). He briefly mentions whether the augmentportrays past action, but doesn't go into it in any detail (P/D say it doesn't).The book fives amazing information. It has an index so one can search a particularverb form. He explains general and specific commands and how aspect affectsthem. He gives helpful "block" charts to determine the final action of the verb -ASPECT - LEXEME - CONTEXT = AKTIONSART. Unlike P/D, CC says thereare only 2 aspects - imperfective, and perfective. He agrees with Fanning that"stative" is an aktionsart, not an aspect. I tend to agree, since saying that theperfect/pluperfect are states, raises the same exceptions as the traditional viewof the excellent (completed with continuing results).I do disagree when CC says that the traditional excellent is never right ("it doesn'twork"). Actually, in a lot of cases it does, Whether it's THE meaning of the tense,or an aktionsart, I'll leave to the reader. In his block graphs, Campbell should havehad one like - IMPERFECTIVE - LEXEME IS A COMPLETED ACT - CONTEXTALLOWS A CONTINUING STATE/RESULT = AKTIONSART IS TRADITIONALPERFECT. He also should have had a block for the timeless perfect, althoughone can go to the other tenses and obtain the same information from their 's a amazing book on the subject. It's interesting to compare the verb uses in thiswork with Daniel Wallace's GGBTB, which deals with time and aspect in hisintroduction to verb tenses. For the student of the Greek, it's well worth lookingat.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    This book was a needed text book in my Greek Syntax/Exegesis class at Southern Seminary. Coming into this class, I knew nothing about verbal aspect in Biblical Greek. My intro grammer in Elementary Greek was Mounce's "Basics of Biblical Greek," which was very much based off of a time-aspect verbal system. This book definitely created me think about verb tenses (aorist, present, perfect, etc) not having inherent time in them, but rather communicated aspect. Other books introduce Greek students to the problem of verbal aspect, but they are often boring and very tedious. While the topic cannot be created extremely exciting, I think that Constantine Campbell does a very amazing job of keeping the info to a minimum while still giving the student a very amazing introduction to think through the issues.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    Campbell's book is quite insightful. It does give you basics of verbal aspect. There are a lot of helpful exercises and an respond key. My one critique is in the realm of interpretation. It would be helpful to have more info of how verbal aspect is used in interpreting a passage where the sequence of happenings carries much theological significance. Take for example, 1st John 5:1. "Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God." How do we interpret passages like these? How do we translate the show participle and the excellent indicative in 1st John 5:1, taking into acc the principles of verbal aspect?

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    If you like Greek, this will support you with the grammar. If you don't like Greek, it will create no sense to you.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    If you are, like me, a relative newcomer to this topic and the debate surrounding it, endeavoring to sort out the wide array of viewpoints from proponents such as McKay, Porter, and Fanning while still learning the fundamental concepts, this book will be a the first part of the book, Dr. Campbell introduces some primary concepts and terminology of linguistics, and then provides a brief history of how the concept of aspect has developed over the previous two centuries. Accompanying this history is a very helpful overview of the key contributors that contains a summary of their positions on verbal aspect as applied to Biblical Greek.With this foundation in place, he then proceeds to describe his theory and perspective on the aspect of each tense-form in the verbal system of Biblical Greek. I found his diagrams illustrating the notion of proximity and its relationship to aspect particularly helpful for understanding and comparing distinctions among the different tense-forms. Not only were they useful for initially grasping the concepts, but I found myself referring back to them to recall and reinforce the theory when it was applied in the subsequent sections of the position of Dr. Campbell that might surprise a number of readers is his admittedly controversial view that the Excellent tense-form has an imperfective aspect. He argues convincingly that the Excellent tense-form closely mirrors that of the Show but with a heightened level of proximity; the Excellent tense-form is a zoomed-in ver of the Present, or "super-present" as the author calls ter introducing and describing the concepts of aspect and proximity and how they function in Biblical Greek, the author next proceeds to apply the theory to translation and exegesis in a highly consistent and systematic fashion. In fact, he is so consistent that some might consider his approach tedious or "cookbook." For me, however, this approach was tremendously beneficial to the process of apprehending such a complex topic that involves a profoundly various understanding of verb function and the app section of the book, the author uses the formula:Semantics + Lexeme + Context = Aktionsart,and applies it repeatedly to each of the tense-forms in the Greek verb system, including participles and infinitives, with a lot of examples from the Fresh Testament. This section crystallizes and synthesizes all of the ideas and concepts presented in the theory section, and illustrates their value to e chapters in this section are organized by tense-forms with complementary aspectual relationships: Present/Imperfect, Aorist/Future, and Perfect/Pluperfect. This organization also helps the reader see the ogous relationships between Show and Excellent tense-forms, and Imperfect and Pluperfect. For example, he describes the Show tense-form as "imperfective aspect with close proximity," and the Excellent as "imperfective aspect with spatial value of heightened proximity." The Imperfect and Pluperfect forms have a related relationship, but the proximities are described as "remote" and "doubly remote" respectively. Thus, Excellent and Pluperfect tense-forms are heightened versions of their Show and Imperfect cousins with respect to spatial value (proximity/remoteness), but all are imperfective in aspect according to Dr. e final section of the book is an expanded description of aspect in participles, including periphrasis. The book ends with a postscript that helps clarify spatial and temporal concepts in language and describes their diachronic development. Here Campbell argues that the verbal system of the Greek language began as a spatial one and transitioned to the Modern Greek system of today that is temporal. During the koine era, this transition was underway, but Campbell argues that all of the tense-forms except the Future were still more spatial in nature than temporal.I highly recommend this book to readers who are curious about the topic and wish an overview of the ideas and problems surrounding it, and to students of Biblical Greek seeking a foundation from which to begin further and deeper study into this necessary linguistic concept. Such a foundation will significantly reduce the time and effort needed to grasp, evaluate, and apply these ideas and to engage with those leading their ongoing development. It is well written and organized, straightforward to read, and provides useful info and insight.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    This book is an excellent, readable introduction to the mysteries and complexities of verbal aspect in Biblical [Koine] Greek.I am a mere amateur in this zone being at the beginner/intermediate level, and my review is primarily aimed at people in the same category. To create sense of this book, you need to be at least at that level -- having completed first-year greek (Mounce / Basics or an equivalent), and be conversant with the next scene (per Wallace Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics or equivalent). Campbell does provide translations of greek passages e book is divided into two parts: firstly, general aspect theory and its history and development (chapters one to five); secondly, the focus on the greek of the Fresh Testament (chapters six to 10.)Campbell is perfect in explaining his terms as he uses them, and also provides a glossary, scripture index, and general index at the end of the book. (I note from another reviewer that there was no scripture index. There is definitely in mine). He also provides some primary exercises in part 2 and there is an respond key for the exercises at the bell starts off by giving us the background to the problem, describing aspect theory vs aktionsart. He crucially answers the "so what?" question, illustrating the shortcomings of aktionsart and its doctrinal implications and showing how aspect theory alleviates those problems. He provides a clear definition of semantics and pragmatics and the characteristics and attributes of each of those disciplines. He goes on to give an historical outline to aspect theory, mentioning Porter, Fanning etc. and the different strands of thought within aspect theory (how a lot of aspects are there? etc.).In chapters 3 onwards, we dive into the nitty-gritty, discussing perceptive and imperfective aspect, proximity, the role of tense, the issue of the excellent tense (chapter 5). Part 2 relates aspect (semantics) to aktionsart (pragmatics) and describes how the different verbal lexemes are used to achieve different categories of aktionsart -- showing how it all fits together. The impression given is not that aktionsart is all wrong and is overturned by aspect theory, but that the manifest shortcomings with aktionsart, the issues of categorizing temporal properties of greek verbal lexemes as semantic rather than pragmatic, are overcome when aspect theory is applied. He builds a powerful NCLUSIONThis book does what it says in the title. If you wish to know the basics of verbal aspect in Fresh Testament greek, how it relates to Aktionsart, why it matters, how it works, then this book will respond all those questions in a clear, logical and concise (159 pages) way. I was surprised at the readability of the book. Normally technical books are a battle of attrition for me but with this one, I'd got through 37 pages and followed the argument with relative ease before realizing I'd created it almost a quarter of the method through! Doubtless the experts will disagree on Campbell's work, but as an introduction to the subject, I think Campbell has achieved a amazing deal in opening up the topic to the beginner with much clarity -- and at an accessible price too!Highly recommended.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    Campbell's brief but thorough treatment of aspectology is a worthy contribution because it makes a somewhat complicated linguistic debate more accessible to the non-expert. I looked at excerpts from Porter, Fanning, and others, but found their addressed-to-other-scholars writing more difficult to follow. Campbell's book may not be perfect, but it breaks the basics down to digestible components.Certainly if the writers of the NT had spatial verbal realities in mind more than temporal verbal realities when they wrote, meaning[s] can be affected. The book is worth it even if all one learns is that aorist verbs don't automatically connote one-time actions in the past, and present-tense verbs and participles do not necessarily indicate on-going action. Some of us have been exposed to old-fashioned over-simplifications such as these, and Campbell's book provides an escape hatch from these common errors.

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    Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek []  2020-6-14 18:39

    As a self-study NT Greek student, this has been a amazing resource for digging deeper into the languages use of verbs and helped immensely with getting a better understanding of aspect vs. tense. I think this would be a amazing read for a first year student as they are learning the verbal system, especially for English speakers, where the tenses are primarily designed to communicate "when did this happen?" vs "what is the writer's perspective here?" as aspect intends to communicate.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    This book helped me so much. Unschooling is brought more clearly into focus through these real-life stories. I pictured unschooling as "letting it all go" and that did not appeal to me. Unschooling is actually being more in tune with your kids and anticipating their needs and providing the important structure and materials for them to learn as their hearts desire. It is MORE work, not less. It helps them reach their full potential because they learn through passion.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    Encouraging, insightful, comforting, inspiring, reassuring, delightful. I cannot recommend it enough. I am going to buy the hard copy (as well as Homeschooling With Gentleness) so I can scour it with a highlighter and begin it with a cup of tea when I need to.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    If you've ever had any questions about whether unschooling is compatible with Catholicism, this is a must-read. The contributors cover the gamut, from radical unschooling, to a more relaxed or eclectic approach of learning. This is definitely one-of-a-kind, and will remain in my collection for a lot of a lot of years.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    Generally, when I obtain a amazing book in my paws, I inhale it like a greedy 2-year-old with a huge when I read a book slowly, it's to savour it. To digest it as I go. To pray it, ruminate on it as I take it into my mind. And if a book is amazing enough for me to read slowly, really tasting every bite, then it's a truly unique book, and they don't come often.I just finished a book which I read veeeeery slowly. It took me 7 days to read a volume I could have read in about 4 hours. Because I didn't wish it to end. Because it was like having a cup of tea after a rough day with just the person who had just the right things to say. The book left me at peace, deeply at peace with myself. My only regret is that I didn't read this book before placing my book orders this zie Andres has done it again. With humility, simplicity, and the sharpness of a fine sword, she cuts through every fear in my mother's heart, even the ones I didn't know were there. Her first book (Homeschooling with Gentleness) was revolutionary. Utterly revolutionary.But the critics were there, in the wings, ready: O sure, for a highly educated and well-read family that might work. O sure, if you only have 2 kids, spaced 10 years apart that's a nice idea. O sure, if....But here is a collection of writings from over a dozen women who allow natural learning happen in their homes. Homes with a kid or two; homes with a dozen or so! Homes where very various types of kids have grown up to become intelligent, peaceful individuals with happy, productive , in the spirit of Suzie and her husband's academic work, there is more info on the reassuring philosophical underpinnings of a relaxed home education (that her first book was so full of)- why it works, why it makes sense, why it is in keeping with the laws of nature and the laws of the human soul.If I were considering whether homeschooling was for me, I would read this book.If I were feeling overwhelmed and frustrated, and was fighting with my kids due in part (or in whole) to the method I was homeschooling, I would read this book.If I thought unschooling was a four-letter word, I would read this book.If I wanted to know more about what several very holy saints had to say about education, I'd read this book.If I had to rescue books from a fire and I could only take 3 homeschooling reference books (or what I call Mother-books) with me, this would be one of them, along with John Holt's Growing without Schooling and Mary Hood's The Relaxed ther Teresa said, "If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other." Why does that quotation capture the essence of this book for me? Because in this modern, fast-paced world, I look at families, with kids learning at home or in schools, and I see the lack of peace. For me, this book illuminates a method to bring peace into my home and hold it there, like a well-tended fire.God bless you, and may you search the cup of tea you really need today.(Excerpted from a review at[...] by the author of said review.)

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    Most of us who wish a amazing education and a amazing formation for our kids probably search ourselves often, if not constantly, re-evaluating what we are providing for them, whether we choose to educate at home or in a school setting. We might wonder whether we're really doing enough, whether we might search something better if we searched harder, whether we need to just be more disciplined, more organized. Some books test to give us that "perfect method", that if we follow it exactly as laid out, our kids will be smart, successful and good. Suzie Andres' book really stands apart in that she does not offer us her excellent method--instead she invites us to step back from that elusive hunt for "the" education, and simply to embrace learning with our kids in a more holistic way, one which allows learning to happen in a naturally integrated way, much like a baby learns to walk or learns its mother tongue. We can see that learning and self-perfection are the greatest adventure for little children, and we can continue that adventure with our kids as they grow. The childlike, receptive spirituality of St. Therese and other saints shines out throughout the pages of this book, in a lot of attractive quotes and principles pointing to gentleness and peace of though in some ways this is downright "spiritual reading", A Small Method is also very practical and meaty, as the mothers who write the chapters give us a glimpse of how they approach their homeschooling with the less duty/drudgery-driven, and more joyful, approach toward education that Andres is encouraging. It is very interesting that a lot of of the families differ greatly in their cirtances, their approach, or their emphasis--some are more 'child-led' than others, some more spontaneous, some more classically minded--but there are common threads of confidence in God's plan for each child, in the value of family relationships, and a zealous fidelity towards the Gospel.Anyone who is interested in education will benefit from the reading of this book, and whatever decisions are finally created with respect to methodology, whether in school or at home, the philosophy and spirituality presented here will lend an inclination to a greater confidence and clarity, joy and the spirit of adventure, and above all, love.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    Sometimes the excellent book comes along right when you need it. This was the case with me and "A Small Method of Homeschooling" by Suzie Andres. Andres, a graduate of Thomas Aquinas College with a Master's Degree in Philosophy from Notre Dame, became known as an expert in Catholic Unschooling after writing "Homeschooling with Gentleness." That book chronicled her own journey towards unschooling and explored whether a Catholic could unschool and still be in keeping with Church teaching. Her respond was a resounding "yes."In "A Small Method of Homeschooling," she asked other Catholic families to share their experience of unschooling. All of their stories are informative and informational. The first nine families profiled are real unschoolers. The remaining four "integrate elements of unschooling with more formal approaches to learning." I personally like Karen Edmisten's description of herself as "The Unschooler with a Plan."Andres is honest about the doubt that comes hand-in-hand with all homeschooling, but especially unschooling. "We may write long books and thoughtful internet posts proclaiming the goodness and freedom of unschooling; at the end of the day we still lie in bed exhausted and wonder if our kids are learning what they should." She advises us to "Trust God and be gentle with ourselves."In her epilogue, Andres relies on the wisdom of St. Therese and St. John Bosco, who a lot of consider the unofficial patron saint of unschooling. He stated "without confidence and love, there can be no real education." There are also four appendixes filled with useful info including recommended books, internet sites, and prayers.Andres and the contributors to this book offer much wisdom to all homeschoolers, not just unschoolers. I highly recommend this book, especially if the burden of homeschooling is becoming increasingly heavy. It is necessary to always remember that we are not the ones ultimately in charge. As Andres writes, "What is learned and achieved is extremely individual to the kid - and directed by God. Parents and teachers can assist, but they are not the ones primarily in charge."

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    Amazing book! If you are curious about what 'unschooling' can look like for various people, wonder if it can work for you or just need some encouragement, you will search it here! Highly recommend!

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    After years of bullying at school, we finally tried homeschooling my son's sophomore year. The first semester of strict curriculum was mind-numbingly boring for both of us. When his older sister tried to teach him, their relationship was almost destroyed. God used this book to save our family. Now almost 19, he's progressing well in his melody career, he talks to us about everything (sometimes consulting, sometimes just informing, as it should be at this age), he participates at Mass every Sunday, and he volunteers to support with the musical productions at the high school that had been so miserable his freshman year. I would never have been able to allow go of the strict curriculum, and we probably would have poisoned our son's relationship with us and Jesus if I hadn't stumbled upon this book.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    When I first heard the term "unschooling", I assumed it meant that the parents didn't teach their children anything. I thought the children just played all day long, and never had to do anything that involved structure. I dismissed the idea completely without doing any research. We began homeschooling our eldest with a few workbooks. They were fun for a few weeks, but they soon began to rule our days and cause stress. My son (and I) no longer enjoyed learning and the whole family was affected by the tension this way of teaching created.I knew I couldn't continue homeschooling if this is how it would be. I was disappointed. I began to leave the workbooks on the shelves and focus on my son. I found other ways to do math (counting legos/beans, cooking), science (reading books, being outside), and all the other subjects. I found my son was still learning and keeping up with his peers, and his small brother was learning right along with him.When a mate recommended this book, I knew I had to read it. I read it quickly and loved every word in it. I realized that all this time since we had place the workbooks away, we were unschooling! I was so satisfied to see that I wasn't the only "crazy" one out there, that this way actually works. It also created sense to me. This is how kids have always learned, long before there were schools.Even though this book focuses on Catholic families, this book is not only for Catholics. Anyone who reads it will obtain a amazing idea of what unschooling looks like in true life. This is a fast read, a book you won't be able to place down. It reads like a cup of coffee with friends. You will be invited into 15 various homes (and a few extras) and see how these families learn together and live together. You'll be refreshed and NUS: The back is filled with resources, making it a useful book to add to your home library.

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    A Little Way of Homeschooling []  2019-12-18 20:40

    This is a nice read. It has a lot of stories about homeschool moms. I got a lot from this book and would recommend it to other moms who are thinking about homeschooling or who are currently homeschooling their children.

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    Why I Love Homeschooling: 24 Parents Share the Joys & Challenges of Educating Their Children at Home []  2020-7-17 18:30

    I am a mother of seven. When Covid hit and we were thrown unexpectedly into homeschooling, to say I was taken off guard would have been an understatement.I’m a rebel by nature. I don’t wish to be told what to do. I wish to do things on my own terms. I was stressed beyond belief, with 2 home computers, 5 middle/high school students (each with 6 teachers), several various apps and software I was unfamiliar with, and two younger kids with teachers whose demands that felt ter reading this collection of essays, I realize that by sending my kids to public school without any choice, I was forcing my kids to do all of the things I tend to rebel against. Education can be anything we wish it to be, and the perspectives and helpful ideas in this book were both helpful and encouraging.Our school district just announced that we will be doing home-schooling at least through October. Instead of feeling shocked and disappointed, I now have a fresh perspective on educating my kids and I am giddy with excitement for this fresh adventure with my ank you for bringing so a lot of advocates together at such a crucial time. I NEEDED this book. My kids NEEDED me to search this book. And I recommend it to ANYONE who is even slightly interested in making their homeschooling experience more enjoyable, adventurous, unique and fun.

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    Why I Love Homeschooling: 24 Parents Share the Joys & Challenges of Educating Their Children at Home []  2020-7-17 18:30

    Each human being is special and different. Homeschooling embraces that individuality by recognizing that a child's cirtances, gifts, and struggles are all essential considerations in that person's education. Education that neglects to acc for all the multifaceted parts of a kid ignores the importance of learning that embraces people's intersectional identities. To be sure, homeschooling isn't right for everyone—several of my siblings thrived more in a public school setting during high school, while I loved being homeschooled. But that's the point: one size doesn't fit all, even if it works for many. You may read one of these stories and think, "I wouldn't do things that way." That's fine—but hold reading. Because none of these stories are identical. And that's the beauty of it, because no two kids are identical, either.

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    Queen of the At-Home Lifestyle: A gal’s guide to working-from-home, homemaking and homeschooling []  2020-7-22 18:28

    Full of practical tips to create the most of your time at home. Little habits can create a large difference, from homeschooling to setting up a work from home biz - I loved the tips.

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    Why I Love Homeschooling: 24 Parents Share the Joys & Challenges of Educating Their Children at Home []  2020-7-17 18:30

    I've read a LOT of homeschooling books. But this one gave such a special perspective, directly from parents in the thick of it. It's the excellent introduction for someone on the fence about homeschooling. I especially love the true life challenges these parents openly share. I don't often see that in the books or blog posts, because usually their purpose is to shine a positive light and persuade someone to a certain method, product, or just the lifestyle in general.

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    Why I Love Homeschooling: 24 Parents Share the Joys & Challenges of Educating Their Children at Home []  2020-7-17 18:30

    I really enjoyed learning about ALL of the various ways people homeschool. I enjoyed reading about all the various private stories.What I didn't like, is that one particular chapter was very preachy and if you chose not to do homeschooling than you are a not good parent and don't love your kids. It just left a poor impression on me. I did like seeing so a lot of various variations of family life.

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    I assign the most latest edition each year to my survey research class. I've reviewed lots of other books on the topic and never found one I like better for its completeness, practicality, and tone.

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    This book helped me in my studies as I attended college

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    It's beautiful well written, I had the digital version. It wasn't bad; however, sometimes my talkback option would read the book back to me backwards

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    This is a textbook I am using to teach a college upper-level class in beginning research.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    It is with some regret that I write a (mostly) negative review of this work by E.O. Wilson, because his earlier writings such as the tour de force "Sociobiology" were among the books that inspired me to pursue a career in rst, allow me state the powerful points of "The Social Conquest of Earth" - like most of Wilson's books, it is very well written and includes a amazing deal of carefully researched information, ranging from the author's own expertise in the biology of ants and other social insects to different findings in biological and cultural anthropology. However, much of this consists of ground that was previously covered (albeit in now outdated form) in "On Human Nature" and "Conscilience."Unfortunately, the main weak points of "The Social Conquest of Earth" are also the book's central theses. One of these points, the claim that human beings are "eusocial," is perhaps a matter of semantics rather than a fatal flaw. Wilson asserts that humans have come to dominate the Earth's macrofauna for the same reason that ants and other social insects have come to dominate the world's microfauna: both are the effect of social hierarchy and efficient communication systems/divisions of labor. This general point is indisputable, there is no denying that both humans and ants have achieved unparalleled forms of social integration that let us (and them) to extract and process resources more efficiently than any other living organisms of related size and metabolism. However, the definition of eusociality (promoted by Wilson himself in earlier key works like "The Insect Societies" and "Sociobiology") requires a reproductive division of labor, with sterile or nearly sterile worker castes and reproductive castes. This clearly isn't the norm in human societies, since even the most stringent social hierarchies (e.g. caste system in India, social classes in Medieval Europe) do not involve a strict reproductive division of labor. In humans, even the lowest castes and social classes generally have the opportunity to reproduce. The only vaguely ogous examples of reproductive division of labor in human societies may be the role of homo berdasche in certain American Indian tribes, but this is far too culture-specific an example to permit generalization as an example of "eusociality" in humans. Perhaps a somewhat closer ogy for strongly hierarchical human societies would be reproductive skew models for nearly eusocial insects such as paper wasps, or closer still, the reproductive skew in package mammals such as timber wolves, where alpha males and females are the principal, but not sole or permanent, reproductive individuals in the social group. The key to human and ant ecological dominance is not eusociality or (reproductive) division of labor per se, but rather high levels of social integration. Referring to humans as eusocial simply leads to confusion, because it isn't reproductive division of labor per se that leads to social dominance but ergonimic division of labor, which in insects is coupled to reproductive division of labor while in humans is (largely) ever, the point about human eusociality is a semantic one that can be excused, in spite of the possible confusion it may cause. The most necessary problem raised in "The Social Conquest of Earth" is Wilson's critique of kin selection and inclusive fitness models as the theoretical foundation for understanding human (and insect) sociality. It is this problem that distinguishes this book from the author's earlier works, and it is on this problem that the book's merits should stand or fall. In my opinion, the book fails as an effort to refute kin selection and inclusive fitness as explanatory models, for the following reasons:Wilson contends that kin selection is inadequate as an explanation for the origin of the high degree of sociality seen in humans. Strictly speaking, this it is real that human cooperation extends far beyond kin groups, since human socities exhibit a high level of altruism among non-kin. However, this problem has been addressed extensively by a lot of authors in the past, e.g. theories of reciprocal altruism, psychological theories which posit non-kin groups (religions, nationalities, even sports squad loyalties) as emotional surrogates for tribal kin groups, whereby altruism to non-kin is ogous to keeping of pets or adopting kids as emotional surrogates for one's own (i.e. as a surrogate emotional outlet for instincts that create Darwinian sense) Wilson discusses altruism among non-kin as unambiguous evidence for group selection and versus kin selection without seriously considering, much less refuting, alternative hypotheses.Furthermore, there exists several decades' worth of literature that extends kin selection/inclusive fitness model to exceptional cases in where the easy additive model presented by Hamilton fail to apply - including powerful selection. Specifically, Wilson correctly notes that Hamilton's rule assumes linearity and weak selection, but fails to note that alternative models for powerful selection and non-additive effects have been considered in the latest basic literature. Similarly, while it is real that for completely eusocial insects with sterile worker castes it is not meaningful to model inclusive fitness in terms of altruism or parent-offspring conflict (because the worker castes have no potential for reproduction to sacrifice), this point confounds the end effect with the evolutionary history that lead to that endpoint. To continue with Wilson's ogy of cells in a multicellular organism, once the germline/soma is in place, it isn't meaningful to speak of standard cost/benefit models among cells in terms of Hamilton's rule, and the same is real for advanced eusocial insects where workers are constutively incapable of reproduction. However, the ancestors of multicellular organisms and the primitively eusocial (and subsocial) ancestors of advanced eusocial insects surely experienced evolutionary scenarios where Hamiltonian cost/benefit yses and evolutionary android game models were quite applicable. This had to occur in order to establish the soma/germline division or the worker/queen castes from precursors where such a reproductive division of labor was only weakly defined. To contend otherwise would be to assert that eusociality arose de novo.I also search Wilson's contention that group selection is an alternative to kin selection quite puzzling, and I say so as one who is quite sympathetic to hierarchical selection models across all levels (having done some work in this field). Indeed, in "Sociobiology", Wilson, in my opinion correctly, treats kin selection as a unique and necessary case of trait-group selection. This point was perhaps best articulated by his sometime coauthor David Sloan Wilson (no relation, as far as I'm aware). D.S. Wilson has long argued that for kin selection to favor altruistic behaviors, organisms must be partitioned into kin groups, just as other forms of group selection require a mechanism for trait group partitioning in order to establish a covariance between group level fitness (e.g. inclusive fitness for kin) and phenotype. Why E.O. Wilson now treats kin selection as an (allegedly) refuted and discarded alternative to broader models of group selection isn't clear. These broader group selection models may indeed explain such phenomena as co-founding of colonies by unrelated queen wasps and facets of human altruism among non-kin, but these are begin questions that require a careful evaluation and refutation of alternative models (including more restrictive kin selection scenarios). Unfortunately, Wilson's book fails to create this case, and the technical paper that Wilson references (Nowak, Tarnita, Wilson 2010 Nature) merely articulates a point created by D.S. Wilson decades earlier: that kin selection can be modeled as a unique instance of group selection by using an alternative form of genetic book-keeping (i.e. trait groups rather than Hamilton's inclusive fitness). Nowak et al simply show a more bersome, albeit more general, alternative to Hamilton's ere may very well be much to be gained by applying generalized, rigorous models of group selection to our understanding of human and insect sociobilogy, but unfortunately "The Social Conquest of Earth" fails to create a case for doing so. Readers are encouraged to read Wilson's earlier works such as "Sociobiology" in its place, as well as E. Sober and D.S. Wilson's "Unto Others."

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    Don't take my word for it, Wilson's masterpiece is but another contribution to placing humanity in isp writing, original thoughts, and a scientists careful exposition create this the ultimate classic. Wilson is to ourtimes what Darwin was to the 19th Century in terms of understanding our biological put on the uce Altshuler , Los Angeles

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    This book is a must read for those who wish to educate themselves on the current debates that are raging within the realms of evolutionary biology. While I have been persuaded by Wilson's arguments for group selection over inclusive fitness I recognize that as an amateur I do not have a long history with competing theories beyond familiarity with the works of Richard Dawkins. Nonetheless I think this book is exactly what the conversation needs right now regardless of whether you agree completely with Wilson's conclusions. This book is going to @#$% some people off, that is for sure. The reviewers who feel that this is simply Social Darwinism 2.0 are missing the point completely in my opinion and they lack an understanding of Wilson's argument and as well as the mechanics of natural selection. Wilson's writing is accessible and enjoyable and I believe he will eventually prove to be correct largely because what he's saying is not a large deviation from Darwin's original ideas. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in understanding how natural selection works in the true world. Even if you end up disagreeing with the conclusion, you'll have fun reading this book.I do agree that it is unfair to compare human societies to ant societies but that's because I search ants to be much more interesting than humans.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    I don't normally write poor reviews on a text book, but this has to be the worse text book written. Babbie babbles on about nonsense and is showing how intelligent he thinks he is instead of being making this an instructional text book to actually teach students social research. This is an necessary course for me and I have had to purchase another comprehensive text book so that I know what the heck I'm suppose to be learning. Waste of money, but had no choice it was the chosen text book at my University. I will give you an example .. chapter 6 he keeps throwing out the term composite measures but does not state what it is, you have to google it and it is complex does he even tell us how to measure using this method, no he just runs off to the next nugget of nonsense. Every chapter, he is all over the place, no structure, no foundational stuff to build on with each chapter. When I'm finished with this course I could write a better text book.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    I don't like the price. In the long run, it was the best deal I could find.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    The book itself was obviously fresh and the delivery person did a amazing job of not damaging it because when I pulled the book out of the packaging it was immaculate. It came a day later than it was supposed to but that's fine.

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    Searle is captivating, and interesting. You can't obtain enough! He makes philosophy understandable, he ideals are refreshing and his delivery is unique.

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    This book has created my career in human services come together!

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    This book was recommended to me by my research mentor and I couldn't be more pleased. I have read through some chapters that are essential to what I am working on and feel comforted as a brand fresh researcher to have it nearby to reference whenever I am unsure of what is next or how to accomplish something.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    This book is a logical prelude to, and continuation of thoughts in "The Meaning of Human Existence". In this one, written in 2007, can be seen much of the detail leading to Wilson's concern about human eusociality and our tech threatened future. The two together constitute one very lucid argument about concern humans should have about earth's future. This book is much more detailed and therefore more difficult to simply summarize. Chapter titles are one means of understanding a close relationship between the two as an argument from science about life now and in future. Coincidentally I read the second first and vice versa but from page one the commonality of an underlying argument is very clear. Our 'first conquest of earth' was a special 'event' in the past 4+ billion years of earth's existence. That small summary alone makes this book worth the read even if not followed by 'meaning of human existence'. The issue with books of this sort is that they do not have a much, much broader reader appeal. To ultimately stimulate broad human concern, allow alone action, the messages must be almost universally understood by the billions of human now on earth and the millions more to come perhaps sooner than for which humanity can usefully plan. Change portrayed in both books fits an exponential curve covering billions of years with an asymptote not far away from the present. Kurzweil and others suggest that to be in or around 2050 CE, about three decades from 2016.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    I had read Professor Wilson's On Human Nature, but didn't have fun it as much as I did this book here. This book is an expression of the wisdom he gained from a life-long love of e only flaw I found is that the book is a small dry in some places, as for example in the discussion of kin selection and inclusive fitness and the discussion of color perception in so, there are two or three typos (such as writing "artificial conception" instead of "artificial contraception") and in a few locations the pronouns used were not clear as to which noun they refer to. But I consider these editing problems, rather than the author's ly, close to the end of the book, Professor Wilson writes, "Why, during the 3.5-billion-year history of the biosphere, our planet has never been visited by extraterrestrials?" Well, we don't know for sure that it hasn't. Maybe it has; we ourselves (Homo Sapiens) have been here for only a very little fraction of those 3.5 billion years. Maybe extraterrestrials came and didn't like it here, or simply changed their minds.On the whole, a amazing read. Recommended for any one with an begin mind and a love of learning.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    I finished reading Edward O. Wilson's The Social Conquest of Earth, and decided that it belongs as one of the bookends for four of the other amazing books in my library. (The other books being Steven Pinker's Blank Slate, Richard Dawkins' two books, The Greatest Present on Earth and The Ancestor's Tale and a much older book by Norbert Weiner, The Human Use of Human Beings). The other bookend, of course, is Wilson's Consilience.Wilson makes some perfect points about both physical and social evolution, basing much of his evaluation of human societies on his life-long work with ant colonies. He sometimes takes exception to the work of Dawkins and other biologists, but generally he presents a very special, often private look at human though I absorbed much of what he proposed, there were sections of the book (the reader was warned) that I found difficult to understand by a layman in the field. His most telling opinion is at the end of the book, wherein he proposes a lot of changes to peoples' use of Earth's resources; changes which would go much beyond avoidance of global e book is written much like a series of essays; perhaps a gleaning of his years of experience in the societal makeup of ant, termite and related e shortcoming of the book is Wilson's illustrations and photos. I don't think any of them clarify or truly illustrate any point in his book.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    Required for class

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    An interesting and heartfelt book, but it ignores the previous work with nearly the same title by Berger & Luckmann; The Social Construction of Reality!

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    It's helping me escape the matrix

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    Best textbook I have ever read.I think I learned more in this class than all my higher Ed classes combined because Babbie offers hilarious small tidbits throughout what would be a normally dry subject.And if you wish a amazing laugh read through the glossary ie. "deduction- (1) The logical model in which specific expectations of hypotheses are developed on the basis of general principles. (2) What the IRS said your good-for-nothing moocher of a brother in law technically isn't. (3) of a duck."Maybe I am a total nerd, but that is amazing humor.

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    Perfect book. This is one of the best I've read if you wish to gain a solid understanding of the foundations and breadth of social research.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    There's nothing wrong with the book. It's just missing the front cover. I just don't wish to be charged for the book missing the front cover.Edit 9.17.19At first, the book looked as though it was just missing the front cover and had a few ends torn. Now I'm reading a chapter for my assignment and it literally looks like someone's dog chewed holes in it. There's holes in the middle of pages, cutting gapes in sentences. I should've returned it and requested a better book.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    Very well written and entertaining, particularly for a text book on psychology. Dr. Babbie is very human and very realistic. He speaks directly to the reader, explains the point, always gives interesting examples, and is human and maintains his sense of humor where appropriate. The book is a five star plus book and a genuine pleasure to read. It is the probably the best textbook I have ever read.

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    This book is another one of Searle's rigorous and complex effort at philosophizing, and yet one of his most readable. I think we are indebted to his research assistant for the clarity of locution and punctuation -- two locations where Searle can be vulnerable. This book also uses a lot of concepts discussed at length in two of his other books: "Speech Acts" and "Intentionality." Having read these two other books, while definitely helpful, is not necessary, as Searle is kind enough to describe his meanings and references as he goes along. And he goes along at quite a rapid clip. This is, moreover, one of those books one cannot afford to skip a sentence without serious impairment of further understanding.With these caveats in mind, I highly recommend this tour of Searle's defense of naive realism in modern ytic terms. He is highly ytic, and builds quite a fortress that he is pained to defend versus criticisms of circularity. Nowhere is this charge more appropriate than in his defense of language as simultaneously being an "institutional" and "brute" fact. Each reader will have to decide whether or not he succeeds, but, if he has failed, it is not for a lack of effort.Of all Searle's books, this is the one I enjoyed the most. Searle is an perfect ytic philosopher, but a grammarian he's not. His lack of grammatical discipline usually interferes with his philosophizing and frequently plagues his other works, but is completely remedied in this book. It's not an "elegant" work, by any means, but it is clear, concise, and comprehensible. His arguments are thoroughly explained, developed, and explored, so that even a novice could follow his impeccable logic. And, there are an abundance of arguments, fresh linguistic devices, and formulations and reformulation of his ideas to sustain his central motif: Objective reality is objectively is is a amazing display of ytic thoroughness, coupled with a generous amplification of his ideas. A truly "fun" read.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    Was it not the will of God that chastened Crusaders under the sign of the cross to march virtuously under papal influences? But equally in the service of God, Ottoman forces were chastened to sell into slavery, or even butcher, Christians whose fates were not favored by God.Under the evolvement of species battles and genocide were universal, eternal, and favoring no particular ligious and social values exemplify a lot of traditions and dictums, one of which is noted as a divine law under Paul VI whose ecclesiastical forbids artificial e Bible states that Man was made in the photo of God; Secularists say no, that God was made in the photo of Man. But does God exist? Depends on who you ask. Perhaps a similar question is just as pertinent: Does it really matter? Maybe not in physics but a lot of individuals feel an necessary emotional comfort location in their belief e conflicts among religious, and biblical beliefs, can be emotional influences among differing followers, at times precedent to battles of words, or worse. Some dogmas preached from the pulpit can precipitate idolatry, hateful intolerances, even physical attacks versus churches and their congregations. Some may be targeted as heretics.God is an invisible divinity in all three Abrahamic this book's final chapter we search the Huge Question. Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? Humanity lives in a mythic, spirit haunted existence. Enter religious dogma and creation elegies that now comprise heavy financial empires independently prosperous and prescient. To openly question some sacred idioms is to risk imprisonment or death among some e author posits that global climate changes must be confronted through problems of overpopulation, pollution, species overharvesting and destruction, or the consequences of humanity's own existence will be the final arbiter of a right to dominate and ruminate future eventualities.Umbriago

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    Did not search this text very helpfil

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    I enjoyed the first third of this book where Wilson discusses human evolution. I did not have fun the second third where he went into amazing depth about eusociality in insects, although I realise this was included to provide a basis for the group versus kin selection argument in the third part. Without inclusion of the mathmatical modelling from the quoted nature paper I had no method of assessing the validity of Wilson's argument, which is a major change to evolutionary theory. But something did not ring true, I had found myself questioning his definitions and examples of sociality in the second section and when he started to write about cave painting his eurocentic views lead him astray from my ing some research I found that far from being widely accepted as the casual mention of the nature paper implies, this part of Wilsons work is very much still in question by evolutionary theorists. It is an necessary book to read but be aware that there is another side to the argument.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    This is one of the most necessary books I've read in a long time. It lays out the fundamentals of humanity's biological and social evolution on this planet. Wilson states that humans are "by any conceivable standard...life's greatest achievement...are the mind of the biosphere, the solar system, and--who can say?--perhaps the galaxy." But we are monsters who have at once "...created a Star Battles civilization, with Stone Age emotions, medieval institutions, and god-like technology. We thrash about. We are terribly confused by the mere fact of our existence, and a danger to ourselves and to the rest of life."In the beginning of the book, Wilson discusses eusociality, a scene of social evolution in which "group members are created up of multiple generations and are prone to perform altruistic acts as part of their division of labor." Humans are among the relatively few species on the planet ever to have evolved to a level of eusociality. (So are ants and bees, which are not given short shrift in the book.)The main argument Wilson proposes is that eusociality has evolved by "group selection" and NOT by "inclusive fitness" (kin selection). Inclusive fitness was the accepted wisdom from around the 60s to the 90s. It says that, "kinship plays a central role in the origin of social behavior. In essence, it says that the more closely similar individuals in a group are, the more likely they are to be altruistic and cooperative, hence the more likely are the species that formed such groups to evolve into eusociality." Inclusive fitness has "powerful intuitive appeal" but does not keep up to scientific scrutiny and mathematical evaluation, he selection, on the other hand, proposes that it is hereditary altruists forming "groups so cooperative and well-organized as to outcompete nonaltruist groups."In the end, Wilson argues that human eusociality is a product of multilevel natural selection. "At the higher level of the two relevant levels of biological organization, groups compete with groups, favoring cooperative social traits among members of the same group. A the lower level, members of the same group compete with one another in a manner that leads to self-serving behavior. The opposition between the two levels of natural selection has resulted in a chimeric genotype in each person. It renders each of us part saint and part sinner." (p. 289)The other necessary concept that is covered is that of "gene-culture coevolution," which deals with the causal relation between the evolution of genes and the evolution of culture--briefly, that "many properties of human social behavior are affected by heredity... and that the innate properties of human nature must have evolved as adaptations."I've used mostly quotes from the book in writing this review because I didn't wish to obtain it wrong. A couple of the chapters were difficult reading for me, so I read and re-read and looked items up on the Web to obtain a better understanding. It was definitely worth the is book should be one of the primary starting points for everyone who is interested in how humanity might understand itself better in order to leave aside some of the beliefs that are causing us to do so much damage.

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    The Social Conquest of Earth []  2020-5-12 18:11

    What better person to discover the biological origins of the human condition than preeminent biologist Edward O. Wilson!This book is a fascinating read. I especially like Wilson's positive slant on what a lot of see more negatively. Take, for example, the observation that human beings are both innately amazing and innately wicked. Wilson observes, "In a constantly changing world, we need the flexibility that only imperfection provides." (p. 241)He clearly reiterates his conceptualization of evolution, which distinguishes between the evolution of genes (that has to do with individual selection and is responsible for what we call sin) and the evolution of culture (that has to do with group selection and is responsible for altruism). He summarizes: "...selfish individuals beat altruistic individuals, while groups of altruists beat groups of selfish individuals." (p. 243) This conceptualization of evolution, while controversial, is an necessary contribution to understanding our human biological origins.Wilson underscores how interconnected human beings are and how much larger and discordant our modern social networks are becoming. He concludes that our increasing interconnectedness worldwide will inevitably "weaken confidence in creation myths ..." (p. 293) I disagree. Because the human mind needs stories to explain its meaning, I believe that our increasing interconnectedness will force a fresh interpretation of creation myths taking into acc our intersubjectivity.Furthermore, I believe Wilson arrives as such an interpretation by the end of his book. I quote, "So, now I will confess my own blind faith. Earth, by the twenty-second century, can be turned, if we so wish, into a permanent paradise [read: Garden of Eden] for human beings, or at least the powerful beginnings of one. We will do a lot more hurt to ourselves and the rest of life along the way, but out of an ethic of easy decency to one another, the unrelenting app of reason, and acceptance of what we truly are, our dreams will finally come home to stay." (p. 297)I highly recommend this book for all concerned with human existence and the future of our earth.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    It’s a textbook. What’s there to obtain excited about. Amazing to be able to rent though instead of paying exorbitant prices.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    As a ph.D. student I require books that are legible. Perfect condition and delivered for a character and future leader. The book was all in one piece and neat.

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    In an earlier review of a later book ("Seeing Things as they Are" 2015) I said Searle's argument for "direct realism" was a bit circular. In this earlier book, he addresses that very is book is about the physical and conceptual structure of social reality, such things as money, marriage, government, corporations, and tail parties. Searle points out that a lot of animals live and cooperate in packs and so exhibit a "social reality". All it takes to be social is for two people, or animals, to do something together. If you and I decide to go for a walk together, that, our walk, is a social fact. If we agree that a screwdriver is useful for driving screws, our agreement takes put in a social and linguistic framework in that we both know what screwdrivers and screws are for. But neither the walk, nor the screwdriver are institutional. Walking is something that humans are able to do by their physical constitution and the same goes for the screwdriver's ability to drive screws. But other objects (coins) can also drive screws and if they can do that it is also thanks to their physical stitutions are different. Cash is not valuable intrinsically because of the properties of colourful paper. It is valuable because it is embedded in an institution that applies symbols to physical things (like printed money) granting them powers they do not have merely as a product of their physics. These symbolic applications can be compounded endlessly yielding more and more complex institutions into which subsequent generations are born and raised versus a background of these already symbolized and so constructed social realities. Language, that which we use to assign these symbols, is itself a socially constructed phenomenon and unique because it is the institution that originates in a pre-linguistic but already social (in the animal way) context. Apart from the bodies that utter them, words work because they are symbols from the beginning. Paper colourful and printed in a certain method by a certain institution (a mint) is, after all, physical. The government itself rests, ultimately, on something physical, a constitution, which is recorded in one form or another. Records (whether in language on paper, pictures, bits encoded in a computer, or uniforms conveying certain assigned powers to their wearer) are often the "at bottom" physical manifestations of our symbolic institutions. Every dollar bill is a record. Here (as I suspected) Searle and M. Ferraris ("Doentality") come together. All of these are physical RECORDS that constitute the foundations of "from that point on" persisting social institutions. We connect the raw physical thing to the constructed institution by language.If all of this seems too fast and over simplified, it is here in this review, but not in the book. Searle takes us through the argument that social institutions are, step by step, constructed by such symbolic assignments. "X has power to Y in context C" being the fundamental form of all institutional facts. This structure can be infinitely recursed. "Y's" can become "X's" and "C's" can become "Y's" generating symbolic constructs (social facts) recursively and Searle takes us through numerous examples demonstrating how it is that our complex social reality can be generated from the same structure which, when fully unpacked, and except for language, always finds its bottom in some physical X. Thus society grows out of the physical foundations of the globe and is continuous with the book's latest three chapters, Searle connects all of this to the ontological reality of the physical globe and our shared experience. Physical reality must exist in order that any statements about it are intelligible, and specific forms of physical reality (like Mt. Everest or the screwdriver) must exist and be shareable, part of our "public reality", or we could not be sure, when we communicate (a social phenomenon) that our meanings are ever understood. If I say "the cat is on the mat" we take for granted that we know what we mean by 'cat', 'mat', and 'on', not to mention an enormous background of experience in physical and social reality such that we understand and agree on a reasonable range of contexts for cats, mats, and so on. Searle essentially argues that it is our capacity to communicate and construct social realities out of physical realities, that demonstrate the independent correspondence between our epistemic categories and the external world. None of this would work if not for mind-independent things structured much as (if not always exactly) we take them to be. Our capacity to communicate rests on the correspondence between language-reflected concept and mind-independent fact.I would give this book six stars if I could. Searle is exceptionally amazing at getting at what he means in plain English. Anglo-ytic philosophy at its best, and about a meaningful subject!

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    Place simply, this book yzes how human society functions and it does a really amazing job. It is philosophy place to work in normal life. If you wish to know how complex this society we live in can be read this book.

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    I remember several times going "I never thought about that". And Searle has a very approachable language that is suitable even for people without a powerful philosophy background.

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    A very amazing book on the theory of reality.

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    This book overkills each subject to the point of bored. It reads like garbage. Several of the subjects should be placed together and not introduced several chapters apart. The author needs to rethink the book and write a better edition. This book place me asleep.

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    The Practice of Social Research []  2020-1-21 21:3

    Awesome

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    Read this book cover to cover and have to say it did a amazing job breaking down the concepts of social research and how to conduct research. Of course, this subject isn't the most exciting so I did search a lot of the discussion personally boring but Babbie did a unbelievable job of applying the concepts to daily studies and situations.

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    The Basics of Social Research []  2020-8-18 18:41

    Amazing condition

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    The Construction of Social Reality []  2020-10-31 18:16

    Evidence that Searle is wrong - we think transcendentally, not- as he presumes- empirically,I am discussing here a Copernican revolution (far greater that Marx's) in anglo-american philosophy that should have taken put but has only taken put in european (continental, transcendental) philosophy. Should it take place, there would be a amazing leap in the development of cognitive science, which at show is held captive to british empirical, rather than transcendental, ere-- I've said it. But the difference is innate in our culture and is not so simple to understand. But in order to persuade you of its importance, here I give some evidence of this mistaken nce the 18th century there has been a crucial error in anglo-american philosophical culture, because we have adopted Hume's empirical model of the mind rather than Kant's transcendental model. The transcendental model allows our mind does our thinking for us, rather than being a mere slave of our our brain. In other words, we aren't robots or computers. Here I give some evidence of e Swiss linguist Saussure developed a theory of language as a system of signs (words) as signifiers of meaning (signifieds), the meanings coming from the (learned) differences between signs (signifier/signified), whose signifiers were not absolute, but hematically as we can see in Greimas' semiotic square how the establishment of meaning comes from such differences. The differences areintegrated together transcendentally at a much higher level, a chance that the empirical english and american cognitive scientists have rejected. There the differences are in fact transcended and we have a personally singular meaning of the square as the transcendental us although our ears hear an orchestral binaurally (in stereo) our mind transforms this into a singular experience. That is the evidence I e my www service [...]

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    The Heart of Homeschooling: The Memoirs of a Homeschool Mom, Cultivating Creativity, Planting Faith, Harvesting Lifelong Learners []  2019-12-23 19:34

    I appreciate the asthetic pleasure of homeschooling life presented in this book. It's more experience than information, meant to inspire us to fashion and have fun our own learning environment and appreciate the various delicate moments of educating and growing with our children.

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    The Heart of Homeschooling: The Memoirs of a Homeschool Mom, Cultivating Creativity, Planting Faith, Harvesting Lifelong Learners []  2020-10-5 18:59

    I appreciate the asthetic pleasure of homeschooling life presented in this book. It's more experience than information, meant to inspire us to fashion and have fun our own learning environment and appreciate the various delicate moments of educating and growing with our children.

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