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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    Talented musicians, of course. But I have to say there was nothing in these tracks that really created me stand up and take notice.

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    Amazing tribute album of sorts. Features some of Dylan's best. Howe plays a nice supporting role to his fellow artists' memorable interpretations of Dylan. Sad Eyed Lady has a repeating rhythm that is surprisingly like a mantra you never tire of. I think it could rank with some of Yes' best material; it would be amazing to hear it on their current tour. All of the guest vocalists do a fine job and give the album a amazing blend of special styles. Some tribute albums don't work, this one does!

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    What a amazing album for anyone who is a fan of the melody of Bob Dylan and a fan of Steve Howe. I have been a fan of Steve ever since he joined Yes. It took me back a small when I first saw this release but once I listened to it I fell in love with it. There is a nice mix of Dylan songs from his career some hits and others just some amazing songs. Steve does a unbelievable job on the songs. One thing to hold in mind is that Steve like a lot of of us is a fan of melody therefore he does justice to the melody of Bob Dylan. One classy guy doing the melody of another classy guy. Pick this up and be ready to be surprised, I know I am.

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    not a huge yes fan.....however howe/Dylan captured my fancy......and I'm glad it did. there are a lot of amazing Dylan tribute lp`s out there and this up their with the best, lots of guest singers phoebe snow,jon Anderson,annie Haslam etc and steve handels any kind of stringed thing with ease and some amazing song choices.....no sure if mr Zimmerman has heard this,but I'm sure he would be pleased

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    The song selection is diverse, the singers are diverse, Steve Howe's guitar playing is diverse. What more could you ask for? The only disappointment are the songs where Howe sings lead vocals. I say much better to have used outside singers on all the songs. Each vocalist brings a various perspective to each song. From Jon Anderson to Phoebe Snow. Not some of your most well known vocalists, but immensely talented they are. Especially liked the loose, laid back vocal by Allan Clarke on "Don't think twice". If I didn't know better, I never would have guessed this was the lead singer of the Hollies.

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    The CD case was bad: there was a BB size hole in it. Luckily the CD was good. I gave this CD as a bonus for Christmas, and, besides the fact that the recipient already had it, it was not very presentable in its original state. If it was'nt for my amazing job with the wrapping paper and my known not good status, I would have been very embarrassed. Instead they just felt sorry for me.

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    It doesn't take much for me to like Howe albums. Just shut up and play yer guitar! It's not the singing that puts me off so much, the debut Steve Howe Beginnings albums singing didn't place me off, but this one lacks the dynamic and exciting playing. He doesn't take much risks. The singing is not very amazing even for other singers. It almost all seems passable. Sad Eyed Lady is the exception with Jon singing, and Baby Blue featuring Annie Haslam of Rennaisance. I'm not the largest fan of Bob Dylan but I feel that I could appreciate him enough to have fun Steve Howe doing Dylan. I think what would have worked more for me is acoustic guitar versions of his songs, and perhaps that's what I expected after hearing him do some Dylan on acoustic on a recording of his performance for the Montreal Jazz festival. I just yawn on this one, usually there is something that will hold me interested, or one or two tracks I might be tempted to skip, but this one I rarely play, and only played it a couple of times since I bought it, and I have listened to and enjoyed items of his from Maybelline in '63 to Remedy, and almost all of it is great, most of it is fantastic. This just pales in comparison. I think the selections of songs could have been more mainstream so I would hear more familiar tunes? I don't know, it's just not the kind of project I'm interested. I don't know how he could have done it better than he did in the method he did it. It's just the approach he took was too "authentic" sounding, too respectful, not risky, not progressive, yeah not progressive.

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    Howe is the best

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    It's amazing with the different guest vocalists and the arrangements are excellent. Steve is a unbelievable guitarist. But he is a LOUSY SINGER. He sings on too a lot of songs..............The one with Jon Anderson is best and the "Well, Well, Well" vocalist is amazing and so is the song. Mixed outcome on this one

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    Portraits of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-15 20:11

    Even if it is my first exposure to this CD, I must say that Steve Howe covered Dylan's tunes superbly with guest vocalists that did the songs justice. I just saw Dylan in Winston-Salem the other night and his voice is faltering with age so those who can belt out his songs coherently give us a possibility to embrace his poetic genius. We must never forget that genius and I always love to see him live!

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    Bob Dylan is more complex and dynamic than most people credit him. No, I have not met the man, but his life story resonates with the beat of humanity... his tune can be used a back-drop drizzle, but once your ear comes closer to his message, then the pulse and amplitude of life becomes like a giant hammer onto an anvil. My opinion is that some people wish melody to distract them from reality, while Bob Dylan's perspectives enmesh us toward acknowledging our own challenges and challenges us to grab our "what ails you" by the horns and carries us thru our wrestlings!

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    This 180g mono pressing sounds fantastic. I had been eying the MoFi release, but I can't see that sounding any better than this. No background noise, no warping (as is common in a lot of pressings nowadays), just a great, clean sound. Sounds amazing with my Small Dot MKII. Highly recommended.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    This album was the first full Dylan album I ever heard. I found a cassette of it at a Thrift Shop for $0.30, and from the first second I heard it, I fell in love with it. After a while, the cassette wore out, and I had no other copy of it. Until I saw it on here, and bought it the second I could. But when I place my headphones on and listened to it, I was slightly horrified. The stereo is so not good on this album. They place all guitar in the right speaker, and tried to place all harmonica in the left. But they place vocals in the middle, so when it goes from vocals to harmonica, you can hear the terrible, choppy chop that tries to move the sound. Don't obtain me wrong, it's still a amazing album! My all-time favorite Dylan album. But I just want the editing had a small more effort place into it.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    One it Dylan's best albums, always a favorite of mine. Just because of that I'd normally give a five star rating lol but I'm giving this a 4 because I received this brand new, unopened vinyl(said used), and was bent at the corner(picture) without hurt to the prime box and only to the album cover before it was shipped.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    Didn't expect this to sound amazing out vinyl, but wow. Almost like you're in the room with that guitar. So clear and warm sounding. Really worth it, despite thinking the recording was too easy to present fresh life on wax, but very happily surprised. Corrina Corrina was a highlight, and girl from the north country never sounded so heartbreaking

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    A lot of of Dylan's most popular songs. Amazing for a casual Dylan fan or someone who really loves him and wants a bit of his whole career in one album. Quality is amazing and song selection is beautiful solid.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    BOB DYLAN HAS MADE VERY GOOD FOLK AND @#$% MUSIC SINCE THE EARLY 60,S..AND ALL OF IT IS GOOD..AND HE STILL PLAYS TODAY.AND I THINK HE,S ABOUT 75..BECAUSE I REMENBER THE GOOD OLD DAYS..

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    Anyone who buys a fresh ver of this vinyl will need no comments on the melody itself. This vinyl is created by a company called "We are Vinyl". The sleeve offers no mention of the source of the material as to whether it was from the master ogue tapes or from a digitized source. Regardless, the record sounds so clear and crystal - if they did indeed use a digital source, it must have been a high resolution source. If you are looking to make batter to a newer ver of your old vinyl, this would be a amazing purchase for the price.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    I was able to snag an original copy of this baby for about $10, it came in awesome condition and was even in a protective plastic sleeve cover. The method it was shipped was amazing, super safe and it got here in one piece (which is always my concern with getting vinyls in the mail!) Very very satisfied with this purchase, added to my collection and it’s one of my favorite albums ever!

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    The Essential Uncle Bobby, updated. Perhaps Sony should do an Essential Dylan two-disc set for each decade; I mean, really, his voice, his writing, his whole approach to studio recording, his live-in-concert performances, have all gone through so a lot of phases and changes that it's damn near impossible to compile a satisfying two-disc career overview. Still, you can't really argue with what's here, only scratch your head at what's missing. A goldmine for the casual fan, and a fine introduction for the uninitiated. Five Stars.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    I love the album and it came in very amazing condition BUT, what’s with not being available for download into Amazon melody like all my previous purchases.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    Bob Dylan's second album was his first on which eleven of the thirteen individual songs were written exclusively by him. Two others, "Corrina, Corrinna," and "Honey, Just Let Me One More Chance," are older Blues songs that Dylan adapted and Columbia Records, after notations, credits exclusively to him. Considering the rich body of work found here, it is simple to see why a lot of Dylan aficionados regard this CD/Album as his best. Some of his greatest music, without a doubt, is heard here. The Civil Rights Movement- inspired theme song, "Blowin' In The Wind;" "Girl From The North Country," perhaps Dylan's greatest long song; "Masters Of War," an expose of what former President Eisenhower called the Industrial-Military Complex; an evocative response to the then latest Cuban Missile, "A Hard Day's Rain's A-Gonna Fall;" and the best of his a lot of fare-thee-well gal salutations, "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right." The fact that Dylan was only twenty-two when this album was recorded is created obvious by the front and back cover images of Dylan's famed early love Suze Rotolo and him strolling through the snow-swept roads of Fresh York's Greenwich Village. These youthful portraits are reason enough to classify this album as a collector's item whose melody still seems new today.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    This was the first amazing Dylan album. His own music, with those witty lyrics, those photos of absurdity (listen to "Talkin' Globe Battle III Blues"), along with the spare guitar/harmonica format. And that voice!One of the striking things about this classic Dylan CD is that some of the least known songs are still great. I still have fun listening to "Talkin' Globe Battle III Blues" to this day. The story of his expropriating a Cadillac; his listening to Rock-a-Day Johnnie singing "Where's your ma, where's your pa; Our love's a gonna grow, ooh-ahh, ooh, ahh"; his conversation with a telephone operator; etc. "Oxford Town" is a amazing couple mins that lays out the key underlying aspects of the racism of the South that called for a Civil Rights movement.And, of course, there are some of his early "political" classics represented here: "Blowin' in the Wind," "Masters of War," "A Hard Rain's a Gonna Fall."This album also features some of his gentler songs, such as "Girl from the North Country" and "Don't Think Twice, It's all right."This CD holds up awfully well over time! Those who wish to know about the early Dylan would be well advised to listen to this CD.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    32 songs and 2 amazing CD's of Bob Dylan. I originally had the 2000 release which only had 28 songs on two discs but it got scratched and replaced it with this fresh gift track collection. I like it better. I like the newer songs such as "Mississippi" and "Make You Feel Like Love" instead of "Silvio" and some others. My only complaint is that I still wished it had "Shelter From The Storm" which was taken off this collection for some other songs. However, I also recommend getting the album Blood on the Tracks which has "Shelter From The Storm" among other greats. I also recommend The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan for such Dylan greats as "Masters of War", "Girl From North Country", and "A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall". I also recommend Bringing It All Back Home album for the Dylan classic, "It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" and "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue". But if you're looking for just a amazing Dylan compilation this is excellent without buying every Dylan album this is perfect.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    Amazing comparation CD for any Dylan fan, or any young people just discovering his music.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    This collection uis chock full of most every Bob Dylan song you could likely wish to hear unless you're into "deep cuts." they're all very well recorded, too. Obtain this one.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    I grew up in Dylan's era, but have always listened to classical melody and opera - until the past couple of years. This guy's gotten a lot of fame and following, but I search his work to be among the weakest I have heard from the classic rock era. There's barely a tune to be found, as most of the time he's singing pretentious lyrics in repeated strophic phrases to a rather droll and often mechanical background accompaniment - something much more common to today's pop artists. I'm sure he's a great, but there's absolutely nothing in there for me.

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    The Essential Bob Dylan []  2020-2-2 22:9

    I like this one more than the original because it has some newer songs.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    This album pressing and sound is far superior to any older ver you're going to e printed cover is very nicely done and of superior quality.I own this and and the boxed mono set. And after listening to both I would argue that the mono ver yields no existentially improved listening experience. But it is far less expensive to buy the boxed set of 8 albums rather than these (excellent) stereo pressings.If you're just after a couple of Dylan recordings then these stereo pressings are great. But if you wish the first 8 for [email protected] go with the boxed set.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan []  2020-1-18 23:51

    on amazon for $6.99? what a steal! i grew up with the man and his music, and so i'm partial. but this album is forever timely. masters of war? a hard rain's a-gonna fall? corrina, corrina? talkin' WWIII blues? don't think twice it's alright? man! rap, blues, country, rock, the whole post 60-music explosion finds its seeds here. minus techno, disco . . . look at that guy on the cover. who would have thought?

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    Amazing collection of truly gifted gospel singers, groups, and choirs doing Dylan's best Christian period songs. As noted by others, tho all are good, the Chicago Mass Choir ver of "pressing On" is almost other-worldly -- and one of the finest gospel pieces I've ever heard. (I'm a large Rosetta Tharpe and Dorothy Love Coats fan, for reference purposes; the Shirley Caesar ver of "Gotta Serve Somebody" has a nice DL Coates vibe to it.)Tho I'm a lifelong Dylan fan, I'd always skipped his Christian Period albums, owning just about everything pre-Late 70s and Post-early 90s. But, since getting this, I've gone back and gotten "Saved" -- which has six of the songs featured here, including the original "Pressing On."That's a terrific album, too!

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    I listen straight through, then to two specific songs each and I cried for the first three hours of owning this cd.

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    This is a must have for Dylan fans and serious blues, Gospel, folk and rock listeners. I bought this after reading "The spiritual life of Bob Dylan" and this record blew me away. It brought fresh meaning to every one of these songs in a very amazing way, most of which I never realized were so close to God, which came as shocking to me, but in a attractive way. It may be Bob's best contribution to the human condition as his words are sung and backed up in such a soul-filled meaningful method by some very cool and unique Gospel singers and simply amazing hard driving guitar bands. It culminates with a Bob and Mavis Staples reunion singing "Gotta change my method of thinking", which did just that to this listener.

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    I purchased the deluxe "Trouble No More" which is awesome. Well worth the price! I saw this, listened to the samples and purchased it. Wow! Awesome performances. LOVE IT!

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    This period of song writing, crafting, recording, and performances of Dylan's "gospel" melody was extremely fertile, valid, and rewarding for composer, performers, and audience members who had not already decided to hate whatever they could not understand. Bob's own recordings and live performances illustrate ALL of his previous work was "gospel" in nature and all of his "Christian" was more of the same "song and dance" fare from Hibbings most popular Jewish vaudeville e performers on this recording take Dylan songs and create them near classic spiritual music. Buy, listen, learn, inwardly digest, enjoy, or stay home and wallow through Another Self Portrait. Now that is rough sledding.

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    Amazing covers of some of the lesser known Dylan songs. This has been hard to search in the past, and I was very happy to search it at a reasonable price, and now to also have it available on my Prime melody application when I am on the go.

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    Bob Dylan has to be the "energizer genius" of American music. His forty years of writing and recording have touched every genre if not directly then indirectly. He hasn't written Classical Music, but his songs have been reinterpreted by classical musicians; he's barely touched on jazz - though he has written a few jazz flavored numbers - but his work has been interpreted by jazz musicians; and he hasn't written for the stage, though his work has been staged. There's just no end to Mr. Dylan's talent or influence. When Mr. Dylan released "Slow Train Coming," he broke another private and artistic barrier that had a lot of of his fans howling in rage. But he didn't relent, and followed up the next year with "Saved," and then "Shot of Love." Bob Dylan was writing Gospel steeped in an R&B tradition, and absolutely redolent of the back woods. With all its ragged edges, it was amazing e compilation and labor of love, "Gotta Serve Somebody," is also amazing stuff. Mr. Dylan's raw gospel has been spruced up in some cases, and roughed up, at least emotionally, in others, with different results. I've never thought "Saved" was a particularly amazing song, consider it a small too "busy," and this rendition hasn't convinced me otherwise. I feel much the same about, "Solid Rock," amazing for a begin but kinda boring by its finish. "When You Gonna Wake Up?," I search much better in the more vitriolic original. That's not to say these recordings aren't worth the effort, they're just not to my a fan, I think one of the unbelievable things about this album is the recognition by black, gospel artists of Mr. Dylan's contribution. I think it must be something of a vindication (as if he required one) of the steps he took as an artist to create his spiritual journey public. But hey, that's what an artist is supposed to do.

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    I have always said that Dylan has written perfect songs even after mainstream culture gave up on him. This collection of cover songs from his newly-found Christianity in 1979-1980 present a poet utterly changed and at the top of his wordsmithing skills. The performances here are powerful and evocative of the original passion of when the songs were new. I am not entirely a fan of this type of gospel melody but I appreciated the talents of the varied performers who contributed to this tribute the coming years, a lot of more artists will suddenly realize that Dylan is far more than his trademark 1960's catalog of hits. His real depth will be mined for years after he leaves the melody scene.

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    Dylan's "religious" or "Christian" period wasn't a hit at the time with a lot of of his fans who expected more of the same kind of songs that had created him famous. He was booed at a lot of of his concerts when he attempted to play this "different"material-shades of 1966 when he started performing with The Band! In hindsight, it is now clear that a lot of of the songs he wrote during this time stand amongst the very best in his entire canon. "Gotta Serve Somebody", "Pressing On" and "I Believe in You" are simply brilliant, moving works as amazing in their method as anything he's ever done. The only glaring omission from this perfect collection is the majestic "Every Grain of Sand" which in my opinion is not just his greatest gospel song-it is his greatest ever song!

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    Gotta Serve Somebody - The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-9-4 18:57

    I like this Cd a lot.

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    I prefer Baez with acoustic guitar, but I've played tracks of this 1968 recording over and over, first on LP, now on CD. It's at times too country for me, but the best tracks are so very good. For me, these are "Restless farewell," "I shall be released," "Tears of rage" and the 11+ mins of "Sad-eyed lady of the lowlands." I've spent a lot of hours of my life listening to Dylan and Baez do the latest of these without every being able to stay focused on the words. The sound always mesmerizes me! As much as I like Dylan (and I like much of his work a amazing deal), I'd rather hear Baez sing it.

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    I listened to this over and over and over again... especially Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands. My French boyfriend created me love this album because he did. How weird that I did not realize they were all songs of Bob Dylan until now???? (I guess because it never included that addendum.) My favorite song of hers is FOR and ABOUT Bob: Diamonds and Rust.

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    i love this album i have the original on vinal i tryed to but on amazon but it still hasnt come yet lots of issues i obtain it paid and then they cancel on me still havnt gotten a cd of it but its a amazing album

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    This small gem is my favorite Baez album. It is a simple, very attractive collection of Dylan songs. No huge hits here (unless you are the kind of Dylan fanatic who considers "Sad-eyed lady of the Lowlands" a huge hit). Nothing to distract you from the easy beauty of the music. Dylan is seldom simple, and in this macho phase, tries hard not to be beautiful. Baez' sweet voice brings out something that was there, but you would not have known or noticed had she not sung. That's what's unique about this album. My all-time favorite has to be "Love is just a four-letter word" which strike me, each time I hear it, as the recollection of an unintentional moment of shared intimacy between mother and son. Very tasty.

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    Whether or not you have fun this remarkable recording would most likely depend upon one or both of two factors: 1) do you like the woman's very distinctive voice applied to the rough-and-tumble verse and attitude of a Bob Dylan song? and 2) do you have fun country-style folk melody played by top-notch, improvisational musicians who are willing to step back just enough to let the singer to maintain center stage? If you are a Joan Baez fan AND a country melody fan (who can obtain past the obvious contradictions between those two musical worlds) then go directly to the nearest melody store, or obtain this CD right here and now online. I am a Joan Baez fanatic who is ALSO a huge Bob Dylan fan. I know several Dylan lovers who hate Joan Baez, and they can't stand this record. I think they are simply unable to obtain past a chauvinistic, macho dislike for the feminine and the attractive in their music. Does Baez strip some of Dylan's work of its grit and grime, and therefore some of its power? Perhaps, but I don't give it too much thought anymore, because what Baez brings to the proceedings here, besides her obvious reverance for Dylan's songs, is an ability bring out the MELODIES that Dylan composed, which, with all due respect to the Songwriting Genius, he himself barely sang. Because Baez's precise diction, pronounced vibrato and soaring soprano are rather out of fashion these days, younger listeners may have to create some effort to obtain used to her style, but close listening (get in the headphones and crank up the volume) and patience, should pay off in the end. I should mention, too, the deepening in Joan's voice that began to occur around this time in her long career. Her ravishing low notes are by turns lovely like a cello and then somewhat nasal and twangy -- perfectly suited to this kind music. Her full range is heard on "Boots of Spanish Leather" and the awesome "Restless Farewell."Contrary to what another reviewer on this website felt, this album is anything BUT bland! The countrified instrumentation is simply gorgeous throughout, adding something mysterious and haunting to Joan's intense vocals. Listen to how Grady Martin's electric sitar sends a mournful chill into the heart of "North Country Blues," or how a lovely, liquid guitar line shades the melancholy in "One Too A lot of Mornings," and how Joan can't support but obtain down with the boys in the band on the rock 'n' roll numbers "Drifters Escape" and "Dear Landlord," because they are both energetic and obviously fun to play. Joan must have been beside herself with joy to be able to sing with these guys and she definitely rose to the occasion, critics be damned. The much lauded rendition of "Love Is Just A Four Letter Word" is indeed a definitive performance, but it is by no means the only reason to buy, as it is equalled several times throughout ANY DAY NOW, most notably on the gospel-styled title song, (complete with a rousing chorus), and the wonderful epic "Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands." There are a lot of subltle pleasures to be discovered with repeated listenings to this album, and after all these years it remains not only my top favorite Joan Baez album, but one of my all-time favorite records, period.

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    One of the greatest compilations of all time. Joan Baez and her attractive voice perfectly illustrate the poetry of Bob Dylan as no one else can!

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    I had this album in the "olden days". Had to obtain rid of boxes of vinyl when I moved to Alaska (due to weight) and this was like welcoming an old friend. It doesn't obtain any better than this.

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    VERY GOOD

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    I adore this album. It arrived as stated, is in amazing condition, and the price was fair. I would recommend this album especially for the brilliant ver of Sad-eyed lady of the lowlands

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    Any Day Now: Songs of Bob Dylan []  2020-1-16 23:19

    enjoyable - was hoping for a better song selection of Dylan's work but as always Ms Baez is in amazing voice

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    One it Dylan's best albums, always a favorite of mine. Just because of that I'd normally give a five star rating lol but I'm giving this a 4 because I received this brand new, unopened vinyl(said used), and was bent at the corner(picture) without hurt to the prime box and only to the album cover before it was shipped.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    I was able to snag an original copy of this baby for about $10, it came in awesome condition and was even in a protective plastic sleeve cover. The method it was shipped was amazing, super safe and it got here in one piece (which is always my concern with getting vinyls in the mail!) Very very satisfied with this purchase, added to my collection and it’s one of my favorite albums ever!

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    Anyone who buys a fresh ver of this vinyl will need no comments on the melody itself. This vinyl is created by a company called "We are Vinyl". The sleeve offers no mention of the source of the material as to whether it was from the master ogue tapes or from a digitized source. Regardless, the record sounds so clear and crystal - if they did indeed use a digital source, it must have been a high resolution source. If you are looking to make batter to a newer ver of your old vinyl, this would be a amazing purchase for the price.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    This 180g mono pressing sounds fantastic. I had been eying the MoFi release, but I can't see that sounding any better than this. No background noise, no warping (as is common in a lot of pressings nowadays), just a great, clean sound. Sounds amazing with my Small Dot MKII. Highly recommended.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    This album pressing and sound is far superior to any older ver you're going to e printed cover is very nicely done and of superior quality.I own this and and the boxed mono set. And after listening to both I would argue that the mono ver yields no existentially improved listening experience. But it is far less expensive to buy the boxed set of 8 albums rather than these (excellent) stereo pressings.If you're just after a couple of Dylan recordings then these stereo pressings are great. But if you wish the first 8 for [email protected] go with the boxed set.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    I had this album , years ago , when I was in college. I still have most of my albums , from back then , but I , somehow , lost this one , through a lot of moves. I ordered this , in a moment of nostalgia , and am very happy with it . I , almost , feel young again ! LOL

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    Bob Dylan's second album was his first on which eleven of the thirteen individual songs were written exclusively by him. Two others, "Corrina, Corrinna," and "Honey, Just Let Me One More Chance," are older Blues songs that Dylan adapted and Columbia Records, after notations, credits exclusively to him. Considering the rich body of work found here, it is simple to see why a lot of Dylan aficionados regard this CD/Album as his best. Some of his greatest music, without a doubt, is heard here. The Civil Rights Movement- inspired theme song, "Blowin' In The Wind;" "Girl From The North Country," perhaps Dylan's greatest long song; "Masters Of War," an expose of what former President Eisenhower called the Industrial-Military Complex; an evocative response to the then latest Cuban Missile, "A Hard Day's Rain's A-Gonna Fall;" and the best of his a lot of fare-thee-well gal salutations, "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right." The fact that Dylan was only twenty-two when this album was recorded is created obvious by the front and back cover images of Dylan's famed early love Suze Rotolo and him strolling through the snow-swept roads of Fresh York's Greenwich Village. These youthful portraits are reason enough to classify this album as a collector's item whose melody still seems new today.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    This album was the first full Dylan album I ever heard. I found a cassette of it at a Thrift Shop for $0.30, and from the first second I heard it, I fell in love with it. After a while, the cassette wore out, and I had no other copy of it. Until I saw it on here, and bought it the second I could. But when I place my headphones on and listened to it, I was slightly horrified. The stereo is so not good on this album. They place all guitar in the right speaker, and tried to place all harmonica in the left. But they place vocals in the middle, so when it goes from vocals to harmonica, you can hear the terrible, choppy chop that tries to move the sound. Don't obtain me wrong, it's still a amazing album! My all-time favorite Dylan album. But I just want the editing had a small more effort place into it.

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    Didn't expect this to sound amazing out vinyl, but wow. Almost like you're in the room with that guitar. So clear and warm sounding. Really worth it, despite thinking the recording was too easy to present fresh life on wax, but very happily surprised. Corrina Corrina was a highlight, and girl from the north country never sounded so heartbreaking

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    The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-10-28 18:54

    This was the first amazing Dylan album. His own music, with those witty lyrics, those photos of absurdity (listen to "Talkin' Globe Battle III Blues"), along with the spare guitar/harmonica format. And that voice!One of the striking things about this classic Dylan CD is that some of the least known songs are still great. I still have fun listening to "Talkin' Globe Battle III Blues" to this day. The story of his expropriating a Cadillac; his listening to Rock-a-Day Johnnie singing "Where's your ma, where's your pa; Our love's a gonna grow, ooh-ahh, ooh, ahh"; his conversation with a telephone operator; etc. "Oxford Town" is a amazing couple mins that lays out the key underlying aspects of the racism of the South that called for a Civil Rights movement.And, of course, there are some of his early "political" classics represented here: "Blowin' in the Wind," "Masters of War," "A Hard Rain's a Gonna Fall."This album also features some of his gentler songs, such as "Girl from the North Country" and "Don't Think Twice, It's all right."This CD holds up awfully well over time! Those who wish to know about the early Dylan would be well advised to listen to this CD.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    This has always been one of my favorite Dylan albums. As odd as it may sound, this collection of songs made a minor earthquake at the time among the hardcore folk crowd. Rather than protest anthems, it is filled with private reflections and love songs. While "Bringing It All Back Home", his next album, marked the use of electric instruments in his songs, this album really shows Bob Dylan moving away from the protest song genre and exploring a few fresh roads. That being said, the songs are an eclectic blend of funny, romantic, ironic, poetic, and downright goofy. It's an often overlooked album of an artist who was in the midst of a life long transition from the past to the questions of the future. I read once he recorded it in one night with some mate sitting around the studio drinking some wine. I want I'd been there.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    I don't know if I can add anything more in the method of praise for this disc that hasn't already been said by others here. Its one of Dylan's 'must have' classic records, and has been since its first release back in '64. All of the original tunes became classics in the Bob Dylan catalog. While a lot of others have done amazing cover versions of a lot of of these songs here, nobody else has delivered them with the soul and the passion that the Master himself did. I can't recommend this disc highly enough to anyone who is a Dylan fan, a folk melody fan, or historian of the period.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    The first time I ever heard of Bob Dylan was in 1964. I was just 18 and working as a temp clerk-carrier for the post office at the Van Nuys Kester annex. One night as I was sorting mail into pigeon holes, the guy next to me, Bob Oelrich, asked me if I had ever heard of this guy called "Bob Dieland". I had not. He said, "he can't sing, and can't play well, but something is there and it is really good." It wasn't long before Dylan was all over the radio. I loved it. A lot of years have gone and all my albums, too. A couple of years ago I had a yearning to obtain some Dylan music, so I bought 3 or 4 of my old favorite albums. Lately, I converted everything to my PC and have been listening again. I saw this "Another Side of Bob Dylan" on Amazon and decided to obtain it. What a amazing discovery! I had not heard most of the tracks and it transported me back to my youth when I created discovery after discovery with the melody that was appearing. This was back in 1965-1969.What I wish to say about Dylan and this album is this: Think about the fact that this guy was only 23 years old when he wrote and recorded these songs. Then, listen carefully to the words in each cut. It is absolutely astonishing. How could he come up with these words and tunes? Dylan is a really amazing poet. And, he can combine that talent with the ability to make the melody to convey that poetry. His melody and lyrics are something that seems odd at first, but if you listen to it, really carefully, you will be with him. This is a amazing album, and I am surprised that I never found it before.I have read most of the reviews posted here and there is a lot of yzing going on. Since my introduction to Dylan was from the radio and then from getting his albums, my experience is various from the people who are younger than I because you had no choice but to hear Dylan, unless you just turned off your radio. In my day, AM radio was king. FM was so-so and sort of sleepy. You could not have the radio on in the vehicle and not have a Dylan tune come on. My point is that Dylan seems lousy when you first hear him. Well, that was how I reacted. But, play it a few times. It will grow on you. Don't think so much about whether the melody is good, or his voice is good. Just listen and feel it, suspend your thinking, allow his lyrics be your thoughts.When something seems really amazing at first, it usually fades with repetition. Dylan's songs are the other method round. I have found that is the tag of something made from a deeper source. Take his words in song when he is asked if he feels free and he says are birds free from the chains of the skyway. This shows a wisdom far beyond a 23 year old person. He understands that freedom is relative and everything is limited.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    The 2007 movie "I'm Not There" was about Bob Dylan, but his name was never mentioned and his a lot of personas were played by various actors. So, which Dylan is represented on "Another Side Of Bob Dylan"? I read that this August, 1964 album sold less than the preceding one, "The Times They Are A-Changing". I also read that people were puzzled by it and didn't quite know how to react to it upon its release. Having heard the whole thing now in 2014 for the first time, I understand why. Only 7 months after the previous album's release, Dylan unveiled a fresh melody that would soon captivate the world. Abandoning his position as the purveyor of, in his own words "finger-pointing songs", Dylan's songwriting combined social comment ("Chimes Of Freedom") with topical humor ("I Shall Be Free - No. 10" and "Motorpsycho Nightmare") and songs about self-ysis ("My Back Pages" and "Black Crow Blues") and private relationships ("All I Really Wish To Do", "Spanish Harlem Incident", "To Ramona", "I Don't Believe You", "Ballad In Plain D", "It Ain't Me Babe"), moving away from traditional folk melody and towards the globe of pop currently ruled by The Beatles and related bands, adding insights from his own special perspective. Even though the electric guitar was still not used, the melodies were generally more buoyant, the mood generally MUCH lighter, and the lyrics were beginning to exhibit a lot of enigmatic imagery, stream-of-consciousness and clever wordplay to a greater degree than on his previous albums. Dylan the activist was becoming Dylan the pop poet. On this album he planted the seeds for a sound and style that would change pop/rock melody forever, and would also create him a major pop/rock force. No wonder his folk-oriented, activist fans, most of whom viewed pop melody with contempt, were puzzled, turned off by what was in their eyes a blatant quest for fame. Just to present how influential the album was, 4 of these songs were covered by The Byrds (3 of them on their debut album), and another one, "It Ain't Me Babe", was a huge hit for The Turtles.Just like his previous album, this one is a one-man show, with Bob singing all vocals and playing guitar, harmonica and, on "Black Crow Blues", honky-tonk piano. Just that piano performance alone will clue you in to the fact that this is a different, lighter album. But you would know that already from the first track, "All I Really Wish To Do", in which he tells a prospective girlfriend all the things that he DOES NOT wish to do, among them, "I ain't lookin' to block you up, shock or knock or lock you up". He is having so much fun that he actually laughs audibly twice during the song. Deliberate humor is evident in "I Shall Be Free - No. 10", a topical rap about such subjects as Cassius Clay, the Russians, Barry Goldwater, Cuba and "a weird monkey, very funky". He comes to the conclusion that "I'm a poet and I know it, hope I don't blow it." Still more humor is found in "Motorpsycho Nightmare", in which a weary Dylan seeks refuge at a farmer's house. His troubles begin when "In comes his daughter whose name was Rita/She looked like she stepped out of La Dolce Vita", and the fun continues as Rita turns out to be like a female Tony Perkins from "Psycho".Other relationships are more realistic. In "Spanish Harlem Incident", he is fascinated by a gypsy girl with "pearly eyes so quick and slashing, and your flashing diamond teeth". "To Ramona" is a Mexican-inflected country/folk love song. Dylan soothes Ramona and tries to build up her self-image: "There's no one to beat you/No one to conquer you/'Cept the thoughts of yourself feeling bad". "I Don't Believe You" is about rejection, but the mood is lighthearted so it must not have been too serious an affair. But, "Ballad In Plain D" is dead serious, about love that apparently leads to violence. The violence is implied, not specifically spelled out. And in "It Ain't Me Babe", Dylan is determined to discourage an admirer who wants "someone who's never weak but always strong...someone to begin each and every door...someone who'll promise never to part...someone who'll come each time you call". It ain't him, babe.Dylan did not completely forget his old fanbase. In "Chimes Of Freedom", a long poetic song in which those chimes are generated metaphorically by a thunderstorm, we search imagery such as this description of lightning: "Electric light still struck like arrows, fired but for the ones condemned to drift or else be kept from drifting". Dylan's chimes are for all outcasts, underdogs, the deaf, the blind, the mute, refugees, lonesome lovers, people unjustly imprisoned, and finally, "for every hung-up person in the whole wide Universe". But, on the other hand, in "My Back Pages" the former self-assured activist ("Good and bad, I define these terms/Quite clear, no doubt, somehow") finds "lies that life is black and white" and concludes: "Ah, but I was so much older then/I'm younger than that now."

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    I think most of us are now aware of the differrence between Phil Ochs didactic and hopeful clarity and Dylan's unswervingly political sense of personality. In most of us these positions are equally passionate and/or headstrong! Both are the most strong statements of this period. Who could not wish to be like one or the other or both??? Who doesn't want we still had 's hard to imagine being who I am without thinking of both. And maybe impossible.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    Bob was getting bored with the folk scene. There's a true lack of passion with the performances on this album compared to what came after - Bringing it all back home, Highway, and Blonde On Blonde. And at least with his earlier folk albums he seemed to be passionate. This album just really has no punch - it just sort of sits there. So, this is really just a conduit piece linking his folk period to his electric period. I guess on that note it's important, but not really essential. It's a pause before he started spitting out the artistic venom that created him any track off this acoustic album with the acoustic side of the next album, Bringing it all Back Home, and it's almost like an entirely various person. Chimes of Freedom is maybe the only rsonal beef with Amazon that doesn't tie into the rating itself. Vinyl albums are now being sent unboxed, and are arriving with the covers bent. All future orders like this will be sent back as damaged - as they are. If someone is paying $25 bucks for an album, you can place it into a box like any other product you ship to avoid damage. Until reciently, everything has arrived in a sturdy mailer. I've talked to several people who've experienced the same thing.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    I'm fresh to the globe of Bob Dylan, and I'm glad I started here. Amazing CD -- can't go wrong for the money.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    I loved this CD. I’ve had it for years, then lost it, so I bought another.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    Bob Dylan does not need my opinion to secure his position as an outstanding artist, but because my age parallels his and I attended one of his concerts (in May, 1965), I would like to leave a few comments about this collection, which is, without doubt, one of his finest and most representative of the earlier phase of his "becoming." The exuberance in the arrangements, in his voice and in the material itself makes this disc noteworthy and a must-have. Listen to the enthusiasm with which he sings "All I Really Wish To Do" or the passion in "The Chimes of Freedom" or the scorn in his "It Ain't Me, Babe" and you will easily see that he was at the summit of the early portion of his multi-textured career when he wrote and recorded this material. I recall how confused his "fans" were as he shifted phases, always real to the essence of himself. It was the changing form that confounded listeners, those who could not or would not recognize that in back of the form, the artist was always consistent to his essence--the "I am" that he is. They called him a traitor, and indeed he was or is...a traitor to Bob Dylan...if being a traitor means refusing to be locked into a rigid concrete form. More power to you, Bob Dylan. You are 100% right when you say that an artist has to be careful never to reach a mental state of having arrived. May you never arrive, but hold on becoming etc., etc.

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    Another Side of Bob Dylan (180 gm Vinyl) []  2020-7-18 19:41

    Pure Dylan

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    ...Do not go gentle into that amazing night.Rage, rage versus the dying of the light...That poem and a lot of others of surpassing eloquence are included in this book. Dylan Thomas needs no external compliments. This is one of my most valued books.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    Bought this for my girlfriend who is doing a research project on his writings. This is the best compilation available on the shop and she's relieved she doesn't have to carry several books around with her all the time. Victory win.On a side note, read him. He really is fantastic.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    You'd have to be created out of stone not too answer to Dylan Thomas' poems. I really have fun the CD recording of Dylan reading his work; it bedazzles the ear, breaks the heart, and makes you thankful you're Human.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    Dylan Thomas was probably underrated during his brief lifetime and career, but this handsome collection of his poetry makes it unlikely that he will continue to be underrated. If you like poetry--the true stuff, with bite and wit and poetic originality--make this volume part of your permanent book collection: simply outstanding.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    This is probably the most readable of the Dylan Thomas editions, in terms of both print quality and lay-out. His reputation, and his poems, speak for themselves. For people who wish a good, solid collection of this master's poems, I strongly recommend this edition.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    For the latest 63 years since I first went to college--I remember a lot of of the lines from "Fern Hill" since I grew up near apple towns --and from age 5 to 12 --I was often their "king" At my university I was able to go to one of his recitals and -even though he had had to stiffen his will with several straight Irish whiskeys-he gave me a memorable presentation of Sitwell's ""Still falls the Rain"--of such things are lifetime memories made.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    A book to treasure and hand down to future generations (who sadly no doubt, the method things are going, will be puzzled about what to do with it!).

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    If you are fresh to Dylan Thomas, this is a unbelievable collection of his work. The introduction, written by Daniel Jones, is a well-written ysis of the thoughtful placement of Thomas' poetry in this book Fresh Directions made a attractive book of poetry. The typography of each poem, the pages, the cover artwork...everything speaks to a thoughtful collection of poetry. Please purchase this book if you are looking to obtain acquainted with Dylan Thomas.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    Unbelievable collection. If you like Dylan Thomas, you wish this book. I purchased it as a replacement for my worn out copy of Collected Poems and was not disappointed. This is a much more complete collection of his poems.

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    The Poems of Dylan Thomas []  2020-1-17 22:30

    Bought this as a bonus for my mom and she loved it! It’s a nice collection and arrived in excellent shape

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    The book starts off with Dylan's output in the 1960's and progresses decade by decade. It is surprising that even in his early songs religious themes and lyrics crop up much more frequently than I expected and that even before John Wesley Harding was written. Dylan's religious fervour of 1979 to 1981 is well covered and explained, with a lot of comments from other musicians of the period, George Harrison's behaviour towards his old mate Bob is eye opening. Bob's comments after this crucial period are also revealing as my says he was not born again, in result he remained a Jew but one that considers that Jesus Christ is the redeemer. Dylan also says he is anti-religion, meaning, but not quite saying, that he is anti organised religion and the hierarchies and corruption that are often associated with it. The book then delineates the periods from 1981 to the show day inn terms of religious songs that continue to be sung by Bob, and his quotes on the topic in interview and on stage. In summary an perfect book for Dylan fans who wish to know more about Dylan's Spiritual Life. Well researched, simple to read, and something of an eye-opener.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    The author makes a very convincing case that Mr. Dylan is still a believer & had never 'changed his mind' as reported so fervently by the press & different authors. He didn't forget he is a Jew nor did he 'convert' to Christianity but believes that the Messiah is Jesus. He states flatly that he is a 'True Believer' & that he 'believes in the whole book.' I have to thank the author for his careful research & putting this all together for those of us who have wondered for so long.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    This book was really an eye and heart opener for me. I place off buying "Christmas in the Heart" (Dylan's Christmas album) because I had grown cynical about Bob's references to Christ (was it to sell more albums?) because I thought he had reverted back to Judaism, which was fine if that's where he was really at. However, after listening to "Christmas in the Heart" I realized my cynicism may have been unfounded because, as the author here, says, IN THE HEART was purposely place in the title because the Christmas songs he chose were deeply Christ-based ones. I didn't know that at the time and I bought this book well after I listened to to the album and realized this. What this book did for me was not only let me to better understand Bob's melody in terms of the spiritual journey he's led us on, but has also touched me deeply and spiritually. I am revisiting my extensive Dylan collection with a whole various perspective. For example, "Saved" and "Shot of Love" seem infinitely more relevant now and his melody and song writing from that period have brought me to a much deeper level of respect and admiration.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    A few minor criticisms first: occasionally repetitive, at times strays. Otherwise, a thorough and (close to) exhaustive ysis of the topic matter, laying out the thesis, presenting the facts as we know them, and laying Dylan's spirituality and religiosity as bare as possible. I love this kind of items and gobbled it up. Well done.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    The first thing I immediately noticed was the thoroughness of Scott Marshall's evaluation of this topic. No stone is left unturned. No period of Bob Dylan's life is left unexamined. It does not just regurgitate the same old accounts that have appeared in tons of books on Dylan. Marshall has relentlessly conducted his own interviews, a lot of concerning the time of Dylan's conversion. His research is thorough and impeccable. It's like reading Clinton Heylin, minus the you would expect the book covers the 3 significant chapters of Dylan's spiritual life - prior to his Christian conversion, during the time of the gospel trilogy / tours, and the remainder of his life after the fervor of those couple years. I didn't learn much fresh concerning the 1st part but the author info the not insignificant amount of biblical references in Bob's work prior to Slow Train e 2nd part concerning the time of Dylan's new-found faith is extremely interesting. There are some fresh sources that he has accessed. Even after reading well over 50 books on Dylan I found myself appreciating some things about this period that I never did before. There was an wonderful bravery on Bob's part to do what he did. It is one thing to create a well produced sounding album like Slow Train Coming and surprise everyone. But it is another thing to double-down by doing a tour and not play one single old song. To ignore 15 years of songwriting brilliance and play 2 hour shows and only sing songs about Jesus. I would imagine that his old mates hate it, much of his audience hates it, his record label hates it, his Jewish family certainly hates it. Then to triple-down (I know that's not really a word) by releasing an even more Christian album with Saved. Add insult to injury by adding an album cover that shows the saving Blood of the Lamb flowing down to mankind. Bob Dylan had to have been seriously touched by God to do all of that. When has that ever happened before to anyone of like stature in the melody world? He makes U2 look like dabblers in the faith. We've all read about the period of Dylan's career but for the first time, when reading this book, I obtain the sense of how outrageous this was. The sense of isolation that Bob must have felt after setting himself to this path and the undeniable devotion that caused him to be this ter the gospel tours and the 3 Christian albums Dylan's fervor waned. The tours with exclusively Christian songs are over. The Biblical references on the albums, while still there, are less often and more subtle. The thinking of a lot of people is that Dylan has renounced Christianity and went back to Judaism, that this was just a horrible detour in his life and, thank God (or whoever), that it is over. This is another put where this book is invaluable as Marshall presents stacks of evidence that goes versus this viewpoint. I won't list all of it but here are some things that struck me.1. Dylan never comes close to renouncing or distancing himself from Christianity in any way. Ever since his conversion he has stated that Jesus was the only method to God. Never in an interview has he endorsed a more inclusive philosophy; and he has had plenty of opportunities.2. Look at the setlists. Over the next decades he continues to occasionally drop in songs that are extremely clear in their profession of faith - songs like Gotta Serve Somebody, In The Garden and I Believe in you. If you are backing off on your belief in the Jesus is the only method theology wouldn't you stop singing songs with such clear dividing lines? If you're not fully persuaded simply allow them fall by the wayside and don't sing them any more. Bob has also augmented this shows over the years with quite a few traditional Christian hymns and Gospel songs that are not ambiguous in any way.3. In The Garden - Bob really likes this song. He had an HBO unique of an Australian present in the mid 80's that opens with this song. Bob eloquently has a spoken word introduction saying how it is a song about his hero. Not an accident. Later in the 80's Amnesty International used I Shall Be Released as a closing anthem for their star studded concerts. Bob suggests next time they do this they use another one of his songs - In The Garden. He suggests it at least 3 times! When recently asked what songs of his have not received the attention they deserve he answered Brownsville Girl and In The Garden. Feel free to read the lyrics again if you have forgotten just what Dylan says in the song.4. Israel - Bob has played in Israel a few times. Bob - out of a sense of political correctness and sensitivity wouldn't it be a amazing idea if you laid off the specifically hardcore Christian songs? Just so no one would obtain the wrong idea, ok? I mean, you're beautiful much done with the Christian thing and are back to Judaism, right? Apparently not. Every time Bob plays Israel he plays something like Gotta Serve Somebody or Gonna Change My Method Of Thinking or, you guessed it, In The Garden. Maybe it's just a coincidence and he thought he was in Fresh rshall extensively discusses Dylan's relationship with Judaism, detailing visits to synagogues and the like. Bob Dylan certainly has not chop ties with his heritage, but the author illuminates how this is not at all in contradiction to his Christian faith. Bible believing Christians well understand that the 2 are forever linked. Two thirds of the Christian Bible is the Jewish scriptures. The vast majority of the Fresh Testament was written by Jews. Dylan quotes from Jeremiah 31 in the Old Testament on the inside sleeve of Saved which speaks of the Fresh Covenant that God will create with the house of Israel. Dylan's behavior as a believing Jew is not a Christian I don't look at Dylan as an example. He is far from someone who's behavior is worthy of imitating. But he is arguably the most creative and innovative singer songwriter of the latest half century. The word Genius is not an exaggeration. I would imagine, with the possible exception of The Beatles, that there are more books of ysis written about Dylan than any other artist. If one wants to not only know his history but actually come to understand him (if such a thing is possible) I think that this book is essential to that understanding.On "Masters Of War" Dylan originally wrote that "Jesus would never forgive what you do". After his conversion Bob never sang those words again in concert. Apparently he knows from experience just how much Jesus can and will forgive.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    A meticulous study of Bob Dylan's spiritual journey. Well researched and let's you come to your conclusion. One could create the argument that the author believes Dylan never had a Christian phase. and continues to this day embraces his Jewish roots all the time accepting Jesus as the completion of the Messianic prophecy.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    Did you write The Book of LoveAnd do you have faith in God above?Do you believe in rock and rollCan melody save your mortal soulAnd can you teach me how to dance, true slow?This book purportedly sets out to tell us where Bob Dylan is spiritually. Pages and pages of words, more than a hundred footnotes, all with the aim of discovering whether Dylan is (still) a Christian or not. Isn’t it ironic then, that the first sentence in the preface to the book is this one: “Bob Dylan will not be labelled.”Maybe “ironic” is not the right word. Maybe a better word is “paradoxical.” We Christians know that one quite well. Something seemingly contradictory, but finally not so; demanding closer scrutiny and holding within its apparent mystery some deeper truth that we might never have gotten to any other way. For example, we are “in the world, but not of the world,” and we say of Christ that He is “fully man and fully God.”But whether you call the first sentence in this book ironic or paradoxical, anyone who knows anything about Dylan would have to say this about it: it is a large understatement. Dylan has spent his six decades in the public eye doing everything possible to stay out of every category that the globe has tried to place him in. The first and perhaps most popular of these escapes was in the mid-sixties when he traded in his Martin acoustic guitar for a Fender Stratocaster, turned it up to eleven, and blasted electric blues at the Monterey Pop Festival. His purist-folkie fans could not believe it – that their idol had broken trust with them, broken all the rules and sided with those impure and juvenile rock and rollers. How could this be? He would never survive this, so they om then on it was one unpredictable turn after another. Within one or two records after Monterey he was full-on country, paling around with Johnny Money and using steel guitar in his fresh songs.But the greatest shift of all, by almost anyone’s measure, was in the late 1970s, when Dylan confessed to a profound experience with Jesus Christ and professed his own, private faith in Him as savior and Lord; as, indeed, the Son of God, the Messiah.What a shock. This iconoclast, this spokesman for the counterculture, had embraced Christ. Many, perhaps most, of his fans saw this as treason. Bob, they believed, stood for, well, everything they wanted him to stand for: free love, the tearing down of the “establishment,” the breaking free from all things religious. And weren’t those people he had aligned himself with just the same people who had eschewed if not his melody then at least everything we believed his melody implied or stood for. How could this be? He would never survive this, so they fact it became a minor and diverse industry to somehow divorce “our” Bob Dylan from his profession of faith in Christ and from the catalogue of songs he wrote, recorded and sang for the next few ese fresh songs were not warm and fuzzy. They were not of the ‘let me suggest that you test to be good’ variety. No, these fresh songs were preaching. They were a presentation of the gospel and personally confrontational. Dylan telling his audiences of the rich and popular and privileged and those who had bought in to the modern idea that all things were relative and that there was no such thing as absolute truth and that the self was the final arbiter, that these very ideas, precious to them, were “earthly principles they’re gonna have to abandon.” His rhetoric was straight out of a tent meeting. He told his listeners that they were not self-sufficient and that they could not hide in any identity or any cirtance:You may be an ambassador to England or FranceYou might like to gamble, you might like to danceYou may be the heavyweight winner of the worldYou may be a socialite, with a long string of pearlsBut you’re gonna have to serve somebodyAnd it wasn’t only the songs. They were straightforward enough, but for a couple of years there, Dylan actually preached the Gospel to his concert crowds between numbers. He refused to play the old hits that so a lot of of the ticket-buyers had come to hear and actually went on long raps about Jesus the Messiah and His coming is raised the hackles not only of his hip fans, it did not sit well with his family. Bob Dylan, Robert Zimmerman to them, was born and raised a Jew and all this talk about Jesus was, to place it mildly, strange to them. One of Dylan’s aunts, Ethel Crystal, told an interviewer that she thought the “whole gospel thing” was “done for publicity.”Hoo-boy. For “publicity?” He turns versus everything his fans thought and hoped that he stood for, angers and disappoints concert-goers, has his concert promoters and record producers ready to drop him and this is for publicity?I can believe a lot of things about Bob Dylan, not all of them flattering, but I can’t believe that.And it is here that we obtain to one of the interesting and well-developed themes in the book: the tension between Dylan’s Christian confession and his Jewish rst, a bit of disclosure here. I am a Christian. I was thrilled with Dylan’s profession of Christ, bought all three of the “gospel” records, and attended a concert in Charleston WV in February of 1980. Dylan’s conversion could not have been better timed for me. I had always been a Dylan fan and in 1980 I was twenty-eight years old and finding out a bit about the true globe and learning that the faith I had been raised in was really a matter of life and death. I loved these songs then and I still love them now. In fact, while I was reading this book I went back and watched videos of his performances during these years. I was ever more impressed by what Dylan did. When he tells the Grammy Awards crowd –every rich, self-satisfied, and popular one of them – that they’ve gotta serve somebody, well, that does something for me.A bit more about me. My life in the church has never included anything even approaching prejudice versus or hatred of Jews. In fact, I have a hard time understanding Anti-Semitism, given my private experience with those who claim lineage from Abraham. I have found them to be the most responsible of citizens, family conscious, hard-working and caring people. And when I was taught the Bible I was instructed that almost all of it – save the Books of Luke and Acts – was written by Jews. Jesus is a Jew – a direct descendent of King David - and his Bible was the Old Testament – the Torah and the Psalms and the Prophets. I feel almost ridiculous having to say this – it all seems so obvious to me. But in the book – in this book, I mean, not The Book – the strange divide between Christians and Jews is t Marshall quotes Ruth Rosen, the daughter of Moishe Rosen, the founder of Jews for Jesus, on this issue:For the majority of Jews, the Fresh Testament is a closed and unfamiliar book because it is identified with the age-long persecution of the Jewish people in the name of Christianity. Because most Jews believe that the Fresh Testament promotes anti-Semitism, they think there could be nothing in it which would sustain Jewish life and values. Thus, the common Jewish assessment of the Fresh Testament is formed by a preconditioned impression. In a lot of ways, Jewish experience seems to help this assessment. However, the majority of Jewish people do not feel inclined to verify the assessment by an investigation of the Fresh Testament itself . . .I have seen it both ways. In conversations with two Jewish friends, both of them Ivy-League educated and both deeply schooled in the traditions of their elders, I found one who had read and understood the Fresh Testament and who, to my complete shock, said this: “Oh, I believe that Jesus is the Messiah, all right. It’s just all that Catholic voodoo I can’t obtain around.”The other was surprised when in the course of a conversation I mentioned that a amazing deal of the Fresh Testament consists of letters that were dashed off by one Apostle or another to churches or fellow-workers in the faith during the first century. That the Fresh Testament was so constituted seemed a surprise.What’s the point of all of this? Well, when one considers the question of Bob Dylan’s faith, one must come to the matter with the knowledge that this problem is, to say the very least, a hot button in Jewish circles. Scott Marshall comments that a change from the faith to atheism would be more tolerated and accepted in Jewish communities that a conversion to Christianity. There is, accordingly, a lot of bias and interest involved on both sides of the question. Christians, like me, who wish to believe that Dylan’s confession was sincere and permanent and others who wish to see the matter as a “phase” that their own favorite son soon “got over.” So, we have a three-way tug-of-war going on here, with the Christian Dylan fans, like me, pulling one method – i.e. Dylan’s experience with Jesus Christ was a real, actual happening (Dylan himself described it as “knee buckling”) and his gospel songs were not motivated by a desire for publicity but are authentic expressions of a converted soul, of a man who has met the Lord and, despite his begin sympathy for the Hebrew community, of which he and his kids are inseparably a part, and in spite of Dylan’s more latest writing that is less directly concerned with the Gospel and in spite of any crazy, excessive behavior Dylan may have engaged in since that time, he has never disavowed his confession of the Lordship of Jesus Christ and never disavowed a word of the songs he wrote as a effect of that experience;Secular fans pulling another method – that Dylan’s “gospel period” was just an emotional phase, not untypical for artistic types, but it has no spiritual or lasting reality and though Dylan himself has not directly and expressly disavowed his experience with Christ, such a disavowal can be fairly inferred from Dylan’s downplay of his gospel songs in latest concerts, his begin participation in Jewish rituals and his rock-star behavior.(Let me be clear about that latest thing. Marshall’s book tips that there are rumors of Dylan doing the kind of drinking and womanizing lately that we’ve come to expect of musicians while on the road. The book does not detail or suggest any help for such rumors and I am not here implying that there is any truth to it. All I am saying is that if such rumors are out there, it is a cinch that this tug-of-war squad will use them to establish their case.)The third squad in this war is, of course, Dylan’s Jewish buddies and fans. The book tells that Elie Wiesel viewed Dylan’s conversion as “a tragedy” and that Paul Shaffer, the long-time melody director for the David Letterman Show, admitted that he was brokenhearted by the news of Dylan’s confession. This group sees Dylan as one of their own; one of their very best. Dylan’s embrace of Christ is at best a kind of family embarrassment to them and at worst a true collaboration, by a former hero, with a deadly enemy. This group will repeat almost all of the arguments created by the secularists as described above and add amazing emphasis to the evidence of Dylan’s attendance at bar mitzvahs and other Jewish celebrations and his involvement with the Lubavitchers, an Orthodox Jewish is the goal of Marshall’s book to sort it all now you are aware of this writer’s bias and interest in the matter. Nonetheless, allow me test to give you some outline of the rst, the case for Dylan’s rabid interest in the Bible is unassailable. Whether you buy the Christian conversion business or not, it is simply undeniable that a kind of Biblical, monotheistic and moral worldview has been a fundamental part of Dylan’s philosophy and writing from the very begin of his career. The book does a amazing job of making this Bob Dylan studied with the Lubavitchers, attended his son’s bar mitzvah, visited the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem and has been seen on occasion in one synagogue or another on one Jewish Holy Day or another. Does all or any of that undercut the notion that Dylan believes the Fresh Testament? Believes that Jesus is the Christ?At first glance, we might be tempted to say that it does. The Fresh Testament tells that adherence to the Jewish ritual law is no longer necessary. Salvation does not lie in the keeping of the law, but in the finished work of Jesus Christ. We don’t merit salvation. No man is justified by the keeping of the ritual law. Someone will argue that Dylan’s actions here all point to an opposite conviction and a return to Jewish practice and to the Jewish faith. He is participating in those very rituals that the Fresh Testament rejects. How can he be Christian?Well, let’s test to think of some other examples that we might compare Mr. Dylan’s conduct to. Who are some other Jews who met Jesus, and how did they handle their allegiances – familial and communal – when it came to the old rituals and practices?Oh, here’s one! Saint Peter! What a convenient example! He, like all the rest of the Apostles, was a Jew and we can be as sure of his belief in Christ as we are of anything. The Fresh Testament, which chronicles Peter’s discipleship at the feet of Jesus Christ is, far and away the most reliable historical source out of the ancient world. If we would doubt the accuracy of the Fresh Testament, we’d have to ignore every other source of ancient history. The evidence supporting the accounts in the Biblical Gospels is overwhelmingly stronger than that supporting any other ancient source. In other words, the evidence for Peter’s discipleship ( and the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, for that matter) is far, far stronger than the evidence that there ever was a War of , yes, Peter was a Jew who met Jesus and became His disciple. He witnessed the resurrected Christ and ate fish with Him on a beach in Palestine. He believed. He, accordingly, was free from the requirements of the ritual law. His faith in Christ was so powerful that he suffered martyrdom. Tradition – not the Fresh Testament – tells us that he chose to be crucified upside down because he did not deserve the same death as his master Jesus Christ.But the Bible tells us clearly that there was a time when old Peter himself continued to observe the old Jewish ritual laws. Here is how the Apostle Paul tells the story:Galatians 2: 11 -13 (The Message)Later, when Peter came to Antioch, I had a face-to-face confrontation with him because he was clearly out of line. Here’s the situation. Earlier, before certain persons had come from James, Peter regularly ate with the non-Jews. But when that conservative group came from Jerusalem, he cautiously pulled back and place as much distance as he could manage between himself and his non-Jewish friends. That’s how fearful he was of the conservative Jewish clique that’s been pushing the old system of circision. Unfortunately, the rest of the Jews in the Antioch church joined in that hypocrisy so that even Barnabas was swept along in the about that? Why was it that Peter reverted to observance of Jewish ritual? To hear Paul tell it it was because of the pressure place on Peter by other Jews. We must accept this at face value if we credit the scriptures as authoritative, but what might Peter have said about this business?Would he have said that he lost his mind and forgot the saving work of Christ and decided it was the best thing for him to go back to the same systems of rituals he kept before meeting Jesus? Did his pulling back here mean that he was not a Christian? Or might Peter have said something more along the lines of this “I’ve known these guys for a long time. I don’t see the rituals as a means of salvation, but the old rituals are cultural and communal ties among us old friends. I did what I did to avoid offending them.”Again, I am not arguing versus Paul’s stance here or his final ysis of the situation. I’m just saying that there are such things as communal and cultural ties and there is some value in keeping the peace with one’s neighbors to the extent that you can. Again, I’m not saying that Peter was right to do what he did. I’m just saying that, you know, this kind of thing is understandable. And maybe more understandable for Dylan than for Saint Peter.Dylan’s son is Hebrew by birth. A bar mitzvah is a part of the culture that surrounds him. In fact, part of the culture that Dylan himself embraced or at least participated in until his conversion. How could Dylan refuse to take part in or at least acknowledge the significance of this ritual? Would Jesus have demanded that?And let’s look at Paul himself. In the Book of Acts we see him “purifying himself” before entering the Temple in Jerusalem: “. . . and he went into the temple to give message of the time when the days of purification would be completed – the time, that is to say, when the sacrifice could be offered for each one of [the men].” Acts 21: 25-26I don’t for a min pretend to know all that was going on here in this passage, but it seems a very safe bet to me that Paul submitted himself to Jewish rituals – you know, “the Law” that he jumped all over Peter for observing - for the very purpose of keeping the peace among believing Jews. The distinction, I guess, is that Paul did what he did among Jews and out of the hearing of the Gentiles. But the point for now is that observance of Jewish ritual by Jews is not an indication of unbelief! It is not inconsistent with faith in Christ.Dylan’s observances, it seems to me, are more like those of Paul than those of Peter’s. That is, they are done within the Jewish community and culture alone, outside the hearing, as it were, of the Gentiles. Bob could be keeping the peace; assuring his blood tribe that he hasn’t forgotten himself or the heritage of his people. He has not removed himself from their culture and e mothers and fathersThroughout the landAnd don’t criticizeWhat you can’t understandBob Dylan, “The Times They Are a’Changing”The book is very right to address the question “Is Bob Dylan a Christian or a Jew?” since that is how so a lot of people see the issue. But, as the book explains, it is the wrong question or at least not the true or final question. Of course, Bob Dylan is a Jew. He is a Jew in the same method that Lebron James is African-American. By birth and also by what we in Appalachia call “his raisin.’” So was the Apostle Paul. So were all of the twelve Apostles, and so was Jesus. So what?When confronted with what the questioner apparently saw as a contradiction between his mid-60s visit to the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem and his later gospel songs, Dylan answered rightly, and in accordance with the scriptures. His respond was, more or less: I don’t see any contradiction. To me it’s all one thing.Dylan continues to acknowledge his heritage and to love and be a part of his community – a community that has suffered unimaginable horrors throughout history and particularly in this modern age. He is right to do that. He’d be wrong not e true question is whether Dylan stands by his confession of Jesus; his conviction that Jesus of Nazareth is who He claimed to be – the long-promised Messiah of Israel, to whom all of the Old Testament law and all of the Old Testament prophets t Marshall’s book, as it considers this question, inevitably tells us much about Dylan’s hero and personality. One of the most telling sentences for me was this one, a quote from John Dolen, who interviewed Dylan in 1995:Dylan is not an intellectual. He is wise, but he is more folksy than cerebral . . . I was struck by this and realized I had place my own trappings on what he is, just as others have throughout the years.Dylan is not C. S. Lewis. He is not a systematic theologian. He is a poet and a musician and his life is one of emotion, synthesis and experience. Indeed, as he describes his encounter with Jesus, it is a tactile, almost physical experience. We should not expect Bob Dylan to write apologetic tracts. We should not expect that when he is interviewed about his faith he should answer with a recitation of the Westminster Larger Catechism. That’s not who Dylan is. It’s not how he experiences the world; it’s not how he articulates. Indeed, if we got an respond like that from him, we’d be sure he was faking t Marshall makes the case that with Dylan the ultimate expression of his soul is in his songs. For him, songwriting was not a nine-to-five job; a method to create a living. He did not set out to search and exploit a market. He set out to tell the truth; to bare his soul. Even if that took him away from the deed, this book makes the case that Dylan finds his own philosophy, a statement of his own faith, in the songs of others. He points to songs Dylan covered in the years following the “gospel” tours. The songs are old, traditional, American, country gospel: Ralph Stanley’s “I Am The Man, Thomas,” and the gospel standard “Stand By Me.”If we are to believe that Dylan’s real convictions are articulated in his songs and if we believe that he has never, ever retracted or disavowed any of his expressly Christian songs from the 1979-81 period, then what can be said about the change in Dylan’s setlists? That is, if he is still convinced of the deity of Christ, and still convinced of the reality of his experience with Jesus, why isn’t he singing about that anymore?Marshall offers several ideas on the point. There are amazing arguments that several of Dylan’s songs written long after the “gospel period” carry references to his Christian experience and confession. In “Thunder On The Mountain,” released in 2006, Dylan sings this verse:Everybody's going and I wish to go tooDon't wanna take a possibility with somebody newI did all I could and I did it right there and thenI've already confessed – no need to confess again Dylan is a man who says it once and moves on. Doesn’t mean he forgot what he said or that he no longer means that. He just goes on to the next cause this book deals with such a controversial matter; because so much seems at stake for several diverse crowds; and because the book comes to at least a soft conclusion about Dylan’s continuing faith in Christ; it will be a lightning rod for criticism. This globe is full of experts about Mr. Dylan and full of folks who will challenge every statement of fact, every conclusion and every inference that Marshall makes here. The train of criticism is sure to come and it may not be a slow train.But the book is a unbelievable piece of work. I could hardly place it down. The research is exhaustive and the conclusions are never overstated. It deals with an awesome topic this Nobel-Prize and Medal-of-Freedom winning American poet. Wish to know why everyone is out to claim him for their own? Listen to what Marshall quotes from Andrew Motion, poet Laureate of the United Kingdom, in 1999:"The concentration and surprise of his lyrics, the beauty of his melodies and the rasp of his anger; the dramatic sympathy between the words and the music; the range of devotions; the power of self-renewal; his wit; his surrealism; the truth to his experience."Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And tom line? Here is the conviction the book leaves me with: Dylan’s conversion was no stunt. It was not a effect of confusion or delusion. He met the living Christ and the songs thereby inspired are gold, not fool’s gold. They are every bit as authentic as any of the rest of Dylan’s work and they continue to stand. They may be cherished.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    "... a man’s words will always express what has been treasured in his heart." —excerpting Luke 6:45 (Phillips Translation)Ready evidence shows us that Luke was, in addition to being a first-century physician, a Gentile believer in Jesus working with the Jewish Apostle Paul in help of his ministry to anyone willing to listen to, reason with, and evaluate the claims of Christ as they similar to the Old Testament Scriptures and the realities of shared human experience. He had a profound bonus for doentary history flowing out of skilled written expression, sharp attention to detail, and keen observational and ytical ese are talents I admire in anyone who puts them to use with authentic creativity and honest integrity. These are talents I have long admired in Bob Dylan, and I think Scott Marshall has brought these same talents to bear in this book born out of a lot of years of enthusiastic interest in Dylan's art and ke's writings exhibit "case-making" qualities of sophisticated investigative journalism: straight-from-the-source quotation corroborated with eyewitness interview material and cross-referenced with objective research into other sources, including those antagonistic to or differing from the central perspective.I think Marshall has walked in that same wisdom in his effort to discover what can be understood of what Dylan "treasures in his heart" by means of organizing and considering the actual words Dylan has spoken— in song and conversation, in studio and on stage, behind closed doors and out in the open, in whispers and shouts, in complex allegory and easy statement of fact, where two or three have been gathered and where multitudes crush and clamor."The heart overflows in the words a person speaks; your words reveal what’s within your heart." —Luke 6:45 excerpt (The Voice version).Jesus said it; Luke (and others) doented it; language experts translated it; Bob paid attention and created mention; Scott listened and now shares, from the overflow of his own heart and for our benefit and enjoyment, what he has learned and treasured from all of them (and a supporting cast of thousands) about Bob's private and poetic, living and growing relationship to the greatest story ever told about the Greatest Person Who Ever Lives—the One Bob (along with a lot of of us) continues to call "his Hero," Jesus.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:15

    Knowing of and respectful of a lot of of Dylan's spiritual allusions, I was awed by the breadth of his Judeo-Christian imagery spanning his entire career. Following this reading pilgrimage accompanied by the soundtrack of a lifetime was a profound experience.

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    Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life []  2020-1-31 21:14

    An inspiring and compelling odyssey-spiritual journey which of course is continuing in the life of Bob Dylan aka Robert Zimmerman..well-written and compiled by Scott Marshall. I loved it! Anyone who has followed the melody of Bob Dylan all these years realizes there's a lot of stories and journalistic perspectives from Lord knows who-all. I found it new to hear from the songwriter himself during the course of the book, within its pages, and cleared up some misunderstandings on my part. Read it for yourself and see what you find. After all these years, he's still my brother!

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-10-4 18:21

    Well, it’s gossipy and engrossing if you lived through these times, were consumed by the melody and followed these artists’ careers. Who drank and ged, who slept around, who wheeled and dealed and held the strings that Godfather style they often pulled — it’s all here with juiciness and quick moving, ‘what’s around the next bend?’ plot prose. Sedona Woodstock was not. Nor was it Memphis or Nashville. But what was it? was there something there before, besides the magnetism and mutual attraction-repulsion and inspiration of the artists? Something in the water, the history, the nature, the soul of the place? Genre creating artists during a Culturally Revolutionary time didn’t gather just anywhere. They gathered here. The book makes for amazing reading and raises intriguing questions about the nature of creativity and genius and the ‘soul of place’.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-9-25 18:46

    "Small City Talk is the story of what happened after Sally and Albert Grossman came to Woodstock." Barney Hoskyns."Every summer I obtain this longing in my bones to be back in Woodstock." Maria Muldaur."Woodstock is like a Venus flytrap. Whether you obtain stuck to it or not depends on whether your vibration is in harmony with it." Elliott Landy, photographer popular for his photographs of The Band in Woodstock.If you're tired of the same old observations, points of view, and/or reminiscences about Woodstock, you should read this book. The author, Barney Hoskyns, who wrote (among other things) the amazing book "Hotel California", has taken a various approach to his book on Woodstock, "the mountains of the mind." This isn't focused solely on the three day festival but instead on a sometimes more private look (he lived there several years) at the zone itself and the people drawn to it beginning (roughly) with the Woodstock Folk Festival in 1962, after briefly describing the "unspoiled landscape that for five thousand years had been home to Native Americans".Yes, included are a number of musicians we all know (Dylan, The Band, Paul Butterfield, etc.) who lived in the area, but also people who're intertwined with that zone like Tim Hardin, Janis Joplin, singer Karen Dalton, Peter Yarrow (Peter Paul & Mary), fugitive/singer Bobby Charles (Guidry) whose self-titled album according to the author "may be the quintessential Woodstock album", who wrote "See You Later, Alligator" in the '50s, the Traum brothers, Van Morrison, Geoff and Maria Muldaur, producer John Simon, singer Jesse Winchester (his first amazing Bearsville album is close to a country sounding album by The Band), Jimi Hendrix, and others. On the jazz side there's German musician Karl Berger, Jack DeJohnette, Marilyn Crispell, Carla Bley, Anthony Braxton, Dave Holland, and others all who lived in the area. On a side note there's a 2 CD set ("The Song Is You") recorded at the Woodstock Jazz Festival which contains DeJohnette, Braxton, Chick Corea, Pat Metheny, and several other amazing musicians. Writers included Phillip Roth, Ed Sanders, and Allen Ginsberg.Dylan's manager/minder, Albert Grossman ("the Baron of Bearsville") is also included at length--his power during this period was undeniable--not only as a manager, but also as someone who oversaw a number of enterprises (studios, the Bearsville record label, local businesses) in the Woodstock area, and who ruled over people who came into his orbit with a tight fist and his discerning eye for a buck. Grossman's life and influence on different artists forms the major foundation for the book. He's at the core of how that entire zone changed beginning in the sixties, for better and for worse depending on who you talk to, and in the book Hoskyns gives ample zone for a lot of opinions and observations from a number of people closely aligned to Grossman from both popular and not so popular musicians to waitresses, bartenders, and others who were there during those years.Hoskyns has also included people outside the limelight if you will--the artists, the schemers, dealers, and others who attached themselves (or tried) to anyone who looked to be making money, and who had to endure a sometimes rough life in the harsh winters. Through firsthand interviews with people who were there at the time Hoskyns puts together a picture of this little city which came to be so necessary to so many--and especially how both Grossman and Dylan changed the zone after moving there. Included is a Prologue, a tutorial map of the zone (complete with a numbered list of necessary places--"Todd Rungren's house", "Big Pink", "Paul Butterfield's house", "Levon Helm's barn", "Byrdcliffe Theater", etc.-- with corresponding numbers on the map), a list of what Hoskyns calls "25 Timeless Tracks", notes on the chapters, Bibliography, and an Index. Interspersed throughout the book are a number of little b&w images and other ephemera that add depth to the story. There's also eight pages of glossy b&w photos, a few (like Dylan on a trampoline with his kids) that don't usually create it into other books (unless you've seen some of them in Landy's book, "The Band Photographs 1968-1969") we've all seen about Dylan/The Band/Woodstock. And since I mentioned Landy's book I have to say that if you're a deep fan of The Band during their Woodstock era, Landy has published some amazing photographs that give a deeper look and some insight into what that period was like when The Band lived in the tom line--if that period of melody and the artists associated with the Woodstock zone appeals to you, plus a focused look at how that zone changed over the years, including some people who usually don't obtain the limelight, you should check this book out. When I first heard about this book I thought, "Uh-oh, another book on Woodstock". Well it is and it isn't. Hoskyns has taken a various approach and it's a refreshing change from the usual Woodstock/peace/love/tie-dye/mud/flowers items we've all read before. Not only is it about the zone and the people, but he's tied in other notable happenings from the same period which gives more of a foundation and insight into the primary premise of what this book is about. This book can sit on the shelf next to other thoughtful books on the Woodstock era.And I have to mention another amazing book involving a lot of musicians/artists from the same period, "The Smith Tapes: Interviews With Rock Stars & Icons 1969-1972", edited by Ezra Bookstein. These pieces were culled from the late Howard Smith's tapes, found after Smith's death. Smith's position as a writer for the Village Voice and his radio present gave him access to a lot of people. This is another amazing book that deserves to be on your shelf if you're interested in that period of music. The selected pieces really bring those years back into focus for those who were around then, or give a amazing idea of what it was like for those who weren't.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-9-25 18:46

    Having lived in the zone all of my life, this was a very enjoyable book to e chapters on Dylan, the Band, and even Albert Grossman and his influence were rticularly enjoyed how the author used a lot of interviews and much information from the local ese really bring to life what the stage was like in Woodstock in the 60's and early 70'so enjoyed how he contrasted that stage to what the city and surrounding zone are like e final chapters on Levon Helm and his legacy in the city are quite touching and I think quite was very sad to read how Rick Danko and Richard Manuel had fallen on such hard times at the endof their all too short lives. Overall, a very enjoyable read of a very well researched book.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-9-25 18:46

    Little City Talk was a amazing read. I logged a lot of a night out in Woodstock, crossed paths with some of the folks (including my own Albert Grossman encounter) and have witnessed the changes over the decades.A lot of skeletons fall out of the closet that is STT (not in a gotcha way) but the impact the Woodstock zone has had on the melody stage is undeniable. The general focus being on the universe around Grossman provides a interesting and intimate look at a large cross section of musicians, artists, hangers on, local characters in general and their day-to-day lives and problems and interaction with each other.Fascinating.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-9-25 18:46

    I saw this book in the window of the bookstore on Woodstock's main road (Tinker Street). If you loved melody in the 60s, 70s and 80s, this is an absolute must read. A well-respected British rock critic tells the compelling story of what happened before the festival (in the late 50s and 60s, then he talks about the attempt to keep the festival in the village of Woodstock. He then explained what happened in Woodstock after the festival, which was held in Bethel, NY about an hour and a half's drive south of the Village. Woodstock was always an artists' colony. To this day it still is and the town, even though it is falsely associated with a concert that never took put there, still remains a put of creativity. This is one of those books that I couldn't place down and at the end had to ration it, knowing it'll be awhile before I search a read as amazing as this one.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-9-24 18:58

    Having lived in the zone all of my life, this was a very enjoyable book to e chapters on Dylan, the Band, and even Albert Grossman and his influence were rticularly enjoyed how the author used a lot of interviews and much information from the local ese really bring to life what the stage was like in Woodstock in the 60's and early 70'so enjoyed how he contrasted that stage to what the city and surrounding zone are like e final chapters on Levon Helm and his legacy in the city are quite touching and I think quite was very sad to read how Rick Danko and Richard Manuel had fallen on such hard times at the endof their all too short lives. Overall, a very enjoyable read of a very well researched book.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-9-24 18:59

    Quite a story about an upstate Fresh York city that was the epicenter of so much amazing music- and some not so great. The story about Dylan and The Band and how their manager held such a tight grip on their melody and their lives. Then theres the debauchery: , addiction, infidelity. It is mostly a sad story that reflects how Stardom all too often can't stand up to human frailty

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-10-19 18:26

    "Small City Talk is the story of what happened after Sally and Albert Grossman came to Woodstock." Barney Hoskyns."Every summer I obtain this longing in my bones to be back in Woodstock." Maria Muldaur."Woodstock is like a Venus flytrap. Whether you obtain stuck to it or not depends on whether your vibration is in harmony with it." Elliott Landy, photographer popular for his photographs of The Band in Woodstock.If you're tired of the same old observations, points of view, and/or reminiscences about Woodstock, you should read this book. The author, Barney Hoskyns, who wrote (among other things) the amazing book "Hotel California", has taken a various approach to his book on Woodstock, "the mountains of the mind." This isn't focused solely on the three day festival but instead on a sometimes more private look (he lived there several years) at the zone itself and the people drawn to it beginning (roughly) with the Woodstock Folk Festival in 1962, after briefly describing the "unspoiled landscape that for five thousand years had been home to Native Americans".Yes, included are a number of musicians we all know (Dylan, The Band, Paul Butterfield, etc.) who lived in the area, but also people who're intertwined with that zone like Tim Hardin, Janis Joplin, singer Karen Dalton, Peter Yarrow (Peter Paul & Mary), fugitive/singer Bobby Charles (Guidry) whose self-titled album according to the author "may be the quintessential Woodstock album", who wrote "See You Later, Alligator" in the '50s, the Traum brothers, Van Morrison, Geoff and Maria Muldaur, producer John Simon, singer Jesse Winchester (his first amazing Bearsville album is close to a country sounding album by The Band), Jimi Hendrix, and others. On the jazz side there's German musician Karl Berger, Jack DeJohnette, Marilyn Crispell, Carla Bley, Anthony Braxton, Dave Holland, and others all who lived in the area. On a side note there's a 2 CD set ("The Song Is You") recorded at the Woodstock Jazz Festival which contains DeJohnette, Braxton, Chick Corea, Pat Metheny, and several other amazing musicians. Writers included Phillip Roth, Ed Sanders, and Allen Ginsberg.Dylan's manager/minder, Albert Grossman ("the Baron of Bearsville") is also included at length--his power during this period was undeniable--not only as a manager, but also as someone who oversaw a number of enterprises (studios, the Bearsville record label, local businesses) in the Woodstock area, and who ruled over people who came into his orbit with a tight fist and his discerning eye for a buck. Grossman's life and influence on different artists forms the major foundation for the book. He's at the core of how that entire zone changed beginning in the sixties, for better and for worse depending on who you talk to, and in the book Hoskyns gives ample zone for a lot of opinions and observations from a number of people closely aligned to Grossman from both popular and not so popular musicians to waitresses, bartenders, and others who were there during those years.Hoskyns has also included people outside the limelight if you will--the artists, the schemers, dealers, and others who attached themselves (or tried) to anyone who looked to be making money, and who had to endure a sometimes rough life in the harsh winters. Through firsthand interviews with people who were there at the time Hoskyns puts together a picture of this little city which came to be so necessary to so many--and especially how both Grossman and Dylan changed the zone after moving there. Included is a Prologue, a tutorial map of the zone (complete with a numbered list of necessary places--"Todd Rungren's house", "Big Pink", "Paul Butterfield's house", "Levon Helm's barn", "Byrdcliffe Theater", etc.-- with corresponding numbers on the map), a list of what Hoskyns calls "25 Timeless Tracks", notes on the chapters, Bibliography, and an Index. Interspersed throughout the book are a number of little b&w images and other ephemera that add depth to the story. There's also eight pages of glossy b&w photos, a few (like Dylan on a trampoline with his kids) that don't usually create it into other books (unless you've seen some of them in Landy's book, "The Band Photographs 1968-1969") we've all seen about Dylan/The Band/Woodstock. And since I mentioned Landy's book I have to say that if you're a deep fan of The Band during their Woodstock era, Landy has published some amazing photographs that give a deeper look and some insight into what that period was like when The Band lived in the tom line--if that period of melody and the artists associated with the Woodstock zone appeals to you, plus a focused look at how that zone changed over the years, including some people who usually don't obtain the limelight, you should check this book out. When I first heard about this book I thought, "Uh-oh, another book on Woodstock". Well it is and it isn't. Hoskyns has taken a various approach and it's a refreshing change from the usual Woodstock/peace/love/tie-dye/mud/flowers items we've all read before. Not only is it about the zone and the people, but he's tied in other notable happenings from the same period which gives more of a foundation and insight into the primary premise of what this book is about. This book can sit on the shelf next to other thoughtful books on the Woodstock era.And I have to mention another amazing book involving a lot of musicians/artists from the same period, "The Smith Tapes: Interviews With Rock Stars & Icons 1969-1972", edited by Ezra Bookstein. These pieces were culled from the late Howard Smith's tapes, found after Smith's death. Smith's position as a writer for the Village Voice and his radio present gave him access to a lot of people. This is another amazing book that deserves to be on your shelf if you're interested in that period of music. The selected pieces really bring those years back into focus for those who were around then, or give a amazing idea of what it was like for those who weren't.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-10-19 18:26

    Having visited Woodstock in the early 70s and not being privy to the deep "behind-scenes" melody globe of this charming city I'd always been curious to what was really going down there musically speaking. SMALL TOWN TALK sure provided me with all of that and much more: Its anostalgic and fascinating inside acc of the rock 'n roll genius-legends of the time who either lived in Woodstock or often passed through to make what has turned out to be the veritable anthems of rock 'n roll. It's also an acc of the rock melody business and industry, and how that behemoth too often clashed with the pure, innocent creative souls of the artists with a lot of unpleasant consequences. Through the beauty of Woodstock - including the haze of pot and all kinds of other that swept its method into the brains of some of the most creative and successful rockers of our time - we come to better appreciate how this little city north of "the city" became a magnet for the rock and folk geniuses that left their indelible stamp on an entire generation. It's a hell-of-a-read and certainly one of those necessary contributions to the history of this time and the melody and musicians that created all of that history and melody so indelible. Did my mind actually hear a lot of of the classic tunes that were part of our collective experiences of the time for most of the read? You bet it did! Frankly, I had no idea that one little city in rural Fresh York State contributed to enormously to perhaps the most necessary chapter in melody history. And this gem of a book explains how that all happened.

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    Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock []  2020-10-19 18:26

    I really enjoyed this book. If you are interested in the artist community of Woodstock, and not the festival, this is a very amazing read. It covers all the musicians you know - and a lot of you don't - who had (and some who still have) connections to this town. Albert Grossman looms huge in this book, and he ruled the Woodstock roost for a lot of years, controlling those under his management as well as others who, well were just under his control. From Dylan to Rundgren, the Band to Janis and Jimi, Paul Butterfield, Van Morrison and a lot of others of that era, the melody that was spawned in the Catskills during this time period was some of the best that was made and still resonates with listeners today. I recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about the melody of the 1960s-1990s and those who made it, recorded it, produced it, engineered it and distributed it to the rest of the world.

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