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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Had to read book for school very interesting and chock full of facts and pictures

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    It is ok!

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Enjoyed it!Listened to it twice, Well written, and insightful.

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    A marvelously well-presented, thoroughly researched book! And boy, was it difficult, scary, and sickening to read! Not because of Bartoletti, but because of the topic matter. If one wants to read horror stories, one need look no further than our own human history, at "man's inhumanity to man."* In her book They Called Themselves the K.K.K, Susan Campbell Bartoletti lets you know up front what you're in for. She says in part of her note to the reader at the front of the book: "Whenever possible, I have allow the people of the past speak in their own voices. Some of these people use crude language. No matter how difficult it is to see the offensive words in print, I have created no attempt to censor these historical statements. You will see photos from pictorial newspapers such as 'Harper's Weekly' and 'Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper' and other sources. These photos depict people, events, and viewpoints of the time. Some of the depictions are caricatured and racially offensive. I deeply regret any offense or damage caused by the images, but again I have chosen not to censor." I appreciate Bartoletti's bold, unflinching and compelling acc of this era of history. She puts a terrifyingly human face on the topic of the K.K.K.'s terrorsim, by her liberal use of both the victims and the Klan members' first-person accounts (the Slave Narratives of the 1930's), diaries, historical journals, newspaper reports, etc. Also included are a multitude of photographs and newspaper photos from the day. Bartoletti doesn't whitewash anything. She does an perfect job of explaining the a lot of factors surrounding the beginnings of this group, things you won't search well-explained in school history books. This highly readable book will teach you a lot I'll bet you never learned before.*From a poem by Robert Burns (1759-1796) entitled " Man Was Created to Mourn: A Dirge".Many and sharp the num'rous illsInwoven with our frame!More pointed still we create ourselvesRegret, remorse, and shame!And man, whose heav'n-erected faceThe smiles of love adorn, -Man's inhumanity to manMakes countless thousands mourn!Please note that the publishers have labelled this book as suitable for ages 8-12, grades 4 through six. My library has listed this as Young Adult and I would have to concur. I think the topic matter is too graphic for an 8 year old, but of course you as the parent can create your own determination.

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Very disturbing but fascinating and very informative. It’s a time in our history (reconstruction) that I didn’t know all that much about

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Scary!!! Purchased for Middle School assignment and simple to read and understand.

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Amazing buy. Second time I this book!

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Not an academic text. Reads like a children's book complete with pictures on each page and simple to read language only it's about one of America's most notorious terrorist organizations. The author fails to provide any true citations and only a brief bibliography and I have to question the historical accuracy of some of the statement created in the book. Did I mention it arrived without a cover.

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    This book keeps you posted on the past. I guess you must know your history to know where you heading and recognize red flag to not allow history repeat itself.

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    They Called Themselves the KKK []  2020-1-17 23:0

    Amazing read lacks depth of the Klan's history and its decline.

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Had to read book for school very interesting and chock full of facts and pictures

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    This book keeps you posted on the past. I guess you must know your history to know where you heading and recognize red flag to not allow history repeat itself.

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Amazing read lacks depth of the Klan's history and its decline.

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Scary!!! Purchased for Middle School assignment and simple to read and understand.

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Amazing buy. Second time I this book!

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Not an academic text. Reads like a children's book complete with pictures on each page and simple to read language only it's about one of America's most notorious terrorist organizations. The author fails to provide any true citations and only a brief bibliography and I have to question the historical accuracy of some of the statement created in the book. Did I mention it arrived without a cover.

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    It is ok!

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Enjoyed it!Listened to it twice, Well written, and insightful.

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    Very disturbing but fascinating and very informative. It’s a time in our history (reconstruction) that I didn’t know all that much about

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    They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group []  2020-1-10 19:29

    A marvelously well-presented, thoroughly researched book! And boy, was it difficult, scary, and sickening to read! Not because of Bartoletti, but because of the topic matter. If one wants to read horror stories, one need look no further than our own human history, at "man's inhumanity to man."* In her book They Called Themselves the K.K.K, Susan Campbell Bartoletti lets you know up front what you're in for. She says in part of her note to the reader at the front of the book: "Whenever possible, I have allow the people of the past speak in their own voices. Some of these people use crude language. No matter how difficult it is to see the offensive words in print, I have created no attempt to censor these historical statements. You will see photos from pictorial newspapers such as 'Harper's Weekly' and 'Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper' and other sources. These photos depict people, events, and viewpoints of the time. Some of the depictions are caricatured and racially offensive. I deeply regret any offense or damage caused by the images, but again I have chosen not to censor." I appreciate Bartoletti's bold, unflinching and compelling acc of this era of history. She puts a terrifyingly human face on the topic of the K.K.K.'s terrorsim, by her liberal use of both the victims and the Klan members' first-person accounts (the Slave Narratives of the 1930's), diaries, historical journals, newspaper reports, etc. Also included are a multitude of photographs and newspaper photos from the day. Bartoletti doesn't whitewash anything. She does an perfect job of explaining the a lot of factors surrounding the beginnings of this group, things you won't search well-explained in school history books. This highly readable book will teach you a lot I'll bet you never learned before.*From a poem by Robert Burns (1759-1796) entitled " Man Was Created to Mourn: A Dirge".Many and sharp the num'rous illsInwoven with our frame!More pointed still we create ourselvesRegret, remorse, and shame!And man, whose heav'n-erected faceThe smiles of love adorn, -Man's inhumanity to manMakes countless thousands mourn!Please note that the publishers have labelled this book as suitable for ages 8-12, grades 4 through six. My library has listed this as Young Adult and I would have to concur. I think the topic matter is too graphic for an 8 year old, but of course you as the parent can create your own determination.

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    The New KKK []  2020-7-13 20:57

    I present this to my High School Sociology students who love it.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    Perfect work. Deeply moving and informative about US history, released at a time when the same offenses to the US Constitution are currently threatening our democratic principles. I knew a fair amount about this period of history already, but learned a amazing about the aftermath of the concentration camps that I did not know. Deeply grateful to the gracious Mr. Takei for sharing this story of his life and family and to the squad who helped him capture his memories and thoughts in this very engaging work.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    George Takei shares his private story with us in a graphic novel, an perfect format for endeavoring to obtain the word out to as a lot of people as possible. I recommend this book for anyone American or not. It is a reminder of how precious and fleeting liberty can be. His story rings true, as I have heard related stories before. I am honored that George Takei is a fellow American. What happened to him and his family can happen to any of us.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    I would recommend this book to any and all. It is the early life of George and ow he survived the relocation camps setup by the US for the Japanese during WW2. In our current era, i see that history is starting to repeating itself.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    Sorry I bought it! Failed to read info carefully and thought it was a "normal" book, not a comic! As a former history teacher, thought I would be reading an autobiographical presentation of a regrettable but not unusual situation of a time in our history not unlike 911. Japanese atrocities are well documented and my father and his generation protected our country in the only method they knew how. It's regrettable that Japanese-Americans suffered indignities but nothing like the pain and suffering of their relatives in Japan who suffered because of emperor worship and the militaristic furor of their war-crazed generals. Pearl Harbor is truly an happening that shook America like 911.....we will never forget!

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    Satisfied book birthday to They Called Us Opponent by George Takei, Justin Eisinger, Steven Scott, and Harmony is graphic novel was sitting at my door today when I got home, and I read it in two ey Called Us Opponent is a memoir that tells the story of George Takei (known for his groundbreaking role as Hikaru Sulu on Star Trek as well as his activism for social justice) and his family’s imprisonment in two various internment camps during Globe Battle II. Jumping between the show day and WWII,this is a text that belongs in all school and classroom libraries. (Honestly, though, if you know a middle grade/high school reader with an interest in WWII or social justice, they’d like this book.)I was mesmerized by this story. Tears definitely fell from my eyes, and I couldn’t place it down until I reached the end. I love that it is written as a graphic novel and adds another access point for children to interact with this chapter of history. It also is a unbelievable tribute to the Takei family and a haunting (and timely) reminder of the importance of learning from history’s mistakes.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    This is a hard graphic novel to review. It is about the "Japanese Internment Camps" the US had during WWII. It is a part of our history that was never taught when I was in school and we need to know about and not forget about them. While we might understand why it happened, it does not create it any less e story itself is interesting. George Takei shares about his life and the lives of his family growing up in these camps. The art work is easy and stylized, but makes it point well. I have always enjoyed listening to George Takei speak and he has a unbelievable sense of humor and timing. For some reason this seems to be lacking in the Graphic Novel, making it a small dryer read than it needs to be. Takei may have done this because of the seriousness of the subject, but sometimes a bit more humor drives home the point of the more serious points, and I would have liked to have seen just a small bit more of is is not to say there are not a few humorous parts in the book and it may be that what is really missing is Takei's easily seen roll of the eyes, or sarcastic smile, and the inflection of his voice as he makes a point. The narrative portion of the story is written in a method that I have a hard time hearing his voice in my head as I read is still a amazing read, but it could have been a amazing read. And no matter what, I hope that in these troubled times it support us to remember our history, so we don't repeat it again.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    This black-and-white graphic novel tells the story of how George Takei, popular as helmsman of the starship Enterprise, was imprisoned in an internment camp during Globe II, how his family survived those four years, and how they moved forward once the battle ended.On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Not long after, 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry living in the U.S. were sent to live in internment camps. In the spring of 1942, Takei was incarcerated first at Santa Anita Racetrack, where the family spent months living in a horse stall, and then in two successive internment camps. He had just turned 5. He spent the next 4 years living behind barbed wire with his parents and two younger siblings. Especially harrowing was the long train trip from California to their first internment camp in Arkansas, taken at a time in history when being herded onto a train led to a notoriously poor outcome. Takei's determined mother did everything she could to turn the journey into a vacation for her children, and it is a testament to her determination that she succeeded.Takei's mother was born in the United States. But his father, while raised in the U.S., had been born in Japan. He was not a U.S. citizen because at the time it was illegal for Asians to apply for U.S. citizenship. (!) These distinctions became critically necessary for the family. While the Takei family was in an internment camp, the Supreme Court found the camps unconstitutional. U.S. citizens could no longer be held in internment camps, but ironically Japanese-Americans were safer behind barbed wire because of the stunningly racist environment of the time. Takei's mother took the difficult step of renouncing her U.S. citizenship so she could remain in the camp, only to face deportation to war-ravaged Japan when the battle ars ago, I read George Takei's autobiography To the Stars. It was published in 1994 and, as an avid Trekkie who read all the autobiographies of the Star Trek gang, I bought it immediately. I expected to read about George Takei's experiences filming Star Trek; instead, I was blindsided by reading in vivid detail about his childhood in an internment camp in which people of Japanese ancestry were incarcerated. I was 33 years old, college educated with three graduate degrees. I had never before heard about these camps. Our history books have been whitewashed. In high school and in college, it simply never came stomach was in a knot before I even cracked begin this book. It comes into my hands as people of conscience struggle with what is event at our southern border. Kids are being separated from their parents at the border, the kids effectively incarcerated under unfathomable conditions, the parents also jailed or sent back to their countries of origin. Asylum seekers are commonly being (mis)referred to as illegals. Dreams of the better future promised by the U.S. are being destroyed, innocents imprisoned. In this context, I opened the book. It had me in tears by page arently, history has taught us have heard the expression “Those who can not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” and its corollary “Those who can remember the past are condemned to watch other people repeat it.” This is why this book is so important, right now. It could not have been published at a more meaningful time than when we are once again incarcerating kids for non-existent ey Called Us Opponent is a strong history lesson, one we should never forget. The writing is good. The artwork is sparse, but it works very well with the story it is telling. One weakness is that no context is given for Globe Battle II, just that the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and then the U.S. found itself at war. But it is an excusable omission; the authors must have created judicious decisions about what to contain and what to exclude, and the tale they tell in this story will stay with you. It is an emotional gut-wrenching read of a history we would do well not to forget and better not to thanks to the publisher for providing an advance reader copy of this book which in no method influenced my review.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    Granted, what was done to the Japanese Americans in the US was wrong, but a the time, the Japanese government was without a doubt one on the most evil nations on this planet doing absolutely horrific things not only to other nations, but their own people. You can't imagine the borrow they were inflicting upon everything they were touching. It was about primary survival at hat time and GT doesn't even mention that. He also doesn't mention that double agents WERE found. At the end of the book he shows scenes of crying Muslims, etc., but not scenes of Muslims beheading Americans or their own people. This book is slanted to the hard left, to be sure.......

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    Beautiful. A graphic novel can be one of the most effective ways to reach the hearts of the people. It draws people into a story in a method that words, even from the heart, may not.I genuinely have fun reading George Takei’s comments on our lives and the globe we live in now. His sense of humor helps to hold the horror at bay. But he also articulates his opinions of the horror, in bright strong language. It is hard to imagine what he survived and now he has drawn it out for us, in vivid style and mesmerizing is is a difficult book and I would allow kids read it. (Mine is on Kindle so they won't, but I will certainly it in paperback shortly.) This is an American story. They are living it now. It was an American internment camp. FDR ordered people of Japanese descent place into camps without due process. They lost everything, from their homes to their jobs and their freedom. Kids know what is going on in our country.Takei uses the comic book format to explain this to a younger audience. “The resonance of my childhood imprisonment is so loud today…every headline, every morning…It’s an endless cycle of one inhumanity, cruelty, injustice, repeated generation after generation. And it’s got to stop. We have to learn our history. America is a land that is created up of the desendents of immigrants.” (Washington Post interview with George Takei, published 7/16/19).This is about history and now.

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    They Called Us Enemy [Book]  2019-11-30 18:0

    This story brought me near to tears several at our government stole tha lives from nearly 200,000 citizens brings me shame.I hope and pray that such events never take put again but, I fear, with the current gov’t, our citizens of color are in danger.Everyone should read this story.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    Fastest service. very satisfied

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    Funny, but it seems as though every time a fresh Ed Ruscha book gets released, it then becomes the standard "must-have" edition. In my opinion, this is an perfect book for the price, even if only for a single viewing. What I mean is this: it's more like an object than a book, due to its little zone (but thick volume), and lack of publisher info distraction - the absolute first page blatently plunges you into the art immediately. It will take the average art fan a amazing two hours alone viewing each plate at a contemplative pace. I have had two art shows myself, and Ed's work is by far my closest influence, so I am heavily biased. This book lacks the token interview with the artist, and also his other forms of work (notably the parking lot photography series, which is a sheer delight in its own right), but for the sake of the design, perhaps the book as it is says all it has to say (no pun intended, if you're familiar with his works). Part of the fun, though, with viewing these kinds of Ed's works, is reading his titles and materials used, as they are equally insightful; yes, I miss that. But the average or novice art buff wouldn't even message it missing. All things considered, this is a amazing small form of entertainment all contemporary art lovers should own.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    The only thing that really bugs me is the large 'Phaidon' logo on the front, almost as huge as the title. But there are like 300 pages of his word pieces, and they're all really funny and awesome.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    Amazing size. Makes for a unbelievable gift. I came across this book in Vegas and had to my own copy.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    ...because it is a nice object and very enjoyable to thumb through. The binding is failing a bit, but it is an essential in my library.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    I gave this one to a mate who never heard of Ruscha before. He loved it. It's a small unpretentious experience through Ruscha's world. It's not that kind of 7-colour-printed-on-coated-expensive-paper, but works very well as amazing entertainment and a valid introduction to west coast fine artists. Worth its price.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    This book is as inspiring to look at closed as it is on every page. It is a "paper brick" and very page has an image. I will pick this book up for inspiration as well as simply look at it as an inspirational object. LOVE!!!!!

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    Amazing condition! Binding and pages perfectly intact

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    My adventures with They Called Her Styrene began on a subway ride in Boston earlier this month. I saw an older woman flipping through a book, each page containting a picture with a few words written on it. I started looking with her as as she flipped through it. She flipped through it for about 20 minutes, and then my stop was next. I was worried I would never know the title of this book, and, being too shy to ask, would leave the train and be unsatisfied. Luckily, just as the train stopped, she closed the book and I saw the title.I bought it shortly afterwards.I already described it- it's a book of pictures with words across them. I have fun it very much. As you sit and thumb through all of the pages, each word or group of words, combined with the colors on the background, conjur all sorts of thought and feelings inside r me, it serves very well to just sit and thumb through it, looking at all the pictures and letting my mind wander as the book s wonderful.

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    They Called Her Styrene, Etc. []  2020-2-7 19:22

    Bob Perelman was thumbing through my copy of Ed Ruscha's They Call Her Styrene (Phaidon, 2000) the other evening, which raises the question of intermedia from another angle. Ruscha, if you don't know his work, is a painter and photographer associated with the 1960s Los Angeles stage that proved to be an intersection between Pop, Funk and Conceptual art. His work takes various forms, but Styrene is representative of the works that have most attracted me: prints, drawings and watercolors involving anything from a single word to short phrases, often versus backgrounds that are close to monochromatic but which may suggest a picturesque element. Styrene collects some 600 of these works into a single, affordable volume - I've seen individual paintings priced as [email protected]#$%!45,000. My question is this: fine as they are as visual works of art, are Ed Ruscha's text pieces also writing?Ruscha himself has a cryptic, but intriguing comment right at the end of the book: "Sometimes found words are the most pure because they have nothing to do with you. I take things as I search them. A lot of these things come from the noise of daily life." End of far as I know, Ruscha has not undertaken to publish these works as writing, nor in the context of writing. As visual art, these works inhabit that location that utilizes language for its own purposes. Its closest kin in that vein may be the signage of Jenny Holzer, the paintings of Lawrence Weiner, or the poster paintings of Barbara Krueger, but the more densely textual pseudo-philosophical musings of Joseph Kosuth and Art Language aren't entirely unrelated either. Ruscha's prints and paintings create use of color and the illusions of depth and texture in ways that Holzer's do not and his works often lack the overt political commentary one finds in her work and in that of Krueger's. At its most plain, a Ruscha work might consist of white sans serif letters centered versus a black background:A HEAVYSHOWEROF SCREWSorTHICK BLOCKSOFMUSICAL FUDGEorWARMAUDITORIUMWhile Holzer has executed some pieces etched into benches, a form that has to recall the (literally) concrete poems of Scottish poet Ian Hamilton Finlay, Ruscha's droll texts strike me in a lot of ways being better writing. If, that is, they are writing at all. The latest text above, for example, makes amazing use of the recurrence of the a, r and m sounds (not to mention the echo of the w one hears in the two instances of the u), an attention to the smallest of info that might be more apt to associate with the poetry of Robert Grenier. Microwriting such as this can invoke every pleasure one expects from the best of poetry. The first two pieces above aren't poor either - both use the same tactic of invoking a single term that is "out of context" in its phrase (screws and musical), which functions to set the language around it into a kind of relief, classic demonstrations of what the Russian formalists called ostrananie, Brecht "the alienation effect," and which Pound characterized as "making it new."In addition to reminding me at moments of Grenier, some of the more visually complex of Ruscha's pieces, where richly textured "3D" words float in idealized pastel skies, remind me of how Hannah Weiner used to describe her visual hallucinations, words that would appear on people's foreheads that to her seemed to be composed in "dog fur" or related materials. Weiner used these messages to make her "clairvoyant" works, although that aspect of such found language is not carried through her writing - the closest she gets is to occasionally "erase" some lines of certain l of which makes Ed Ruscha's texts function as an intriguing try of the boundaries of writing - how can a lone word such as "fud," written in what looks like white ribbon on an intense red surface (onto which the letters cast shadows) function as a poem? It can / It can't / It can / It can't - like a Necker cube or other optical illusions, the text strobes in and out of the realm of literature (though it always remains within the realm of the visual). It may be that this flicker result is precisely Ed Ruscha's contribution to writing.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    It appears Amazon has mixed the reviews of more than one Asimov book here. This review is for "The Gods Themselves." As a whole, this book is an perfect read. The middle story, however, is sensational, an example of Asimov's special genius. Not a lot of stories have haunted me years after reading them, but the story of Odeen, Tritt, and Dua is one, a truly unforgettable tale. If you wish to read the very best of a amazing writer, the middle story of this book delivers. As every Asimov fan will tell you, you needn't be a fan of science fiction to have fun this man's writing. Everything by Asimov is good. But "The Gods Themselves" stands out in his remarkable body of work.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    Re-reading these stories years later they have lost none of their wonder. Some of the stories might seem dated though the bulk of technology is easy and understandable as the stories are not hard science sci-fi but more people oriented 'what if' sort of questions. This volume is also a excellent collection that just seems to flow so well favorite has always been stories of the multivac. Read 'The Latest Question'. Awesome story of multivac through the eons of human expansion. This is a must read volume for even casual fans, well worth the if you can search it.

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    They Called Us Love: The Story of April Holden and Africa's Street Children []  2020-7-4 19:15

    If you wish an amazing, fantastic, God honoring and real read, this book is for you. It is awesome what God can do through people who are willing to say yes to Him, no matter what others may say. I am thankful that I was able to read and envision what it was like to face hardships not only from another culture, but with ones own private problems. Through it all God did his work not only for children, but for the author as well. This is a must read!

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    I found myself startled when I found I'd come to the end of the book, not just the chapter (reading on Kindle). I was a small disappointed to not revisit the para-universe. Still, and obviously, a good, engrossing read.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    I am reading all of the Nebula Award winning novels in chronological order, including ones I've already read. This is the 9th one, the champion for 1973.I hate to give four stars to Asimov because I love his writing, but there it is. I remember loving this book when I was a kid. I still loved it, but now I can see its rst the positives. It is very well written. Very simple to read. It makes you wish to hold going. I LOVE the aliens. They're so special and so well suited to their environment. I's interesting to think of the consequences of a universe with a various set of physical laws. The moon colony was also very well developed. Info and activities on the moon were interesting and revealing about what life there might be to the negatives. I seriously wanted to know more about the aliens, specifically about what happened to the triad once it passed on. What happened to Dua's ideas? Also, how can a species exists that seems to have a replacement rate of one, at the most? In addition, I felt that the ending was too abrupt. I'm not sure what happens after the end of the book. I also don't think I got quite enough tips to be comfortable with the solution when it was presented. Lastly, moving the moon would be devastating to life on earth. It would almost certainly wipe out humanity., something the characters should be a small more concerned about.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    On the surface, the book is about the problems relating from a seemingly energy source taken from three points of view: Some Earthbound scientists, an alien trio from a parallel universe, and a Moonbound scientist and intuitionist. The book is written in three huge chapters, containing each point of roughout the story, a lot of problems are implied above and beyond the science fiction at hand. Left brain/right brain difference are covered in the alien interactions. The morality of putting one species over another is touched upon. The difficulty of replacing an energy source are touched on - Asimov could have been predicting the oil crisis and resultant pollution times when reading this book, I really felt, "So this is what a truly amazing writer is about..." The prose was fantastic, the weaving of the three story lines was fine craftmanship, and the meaning broader than just the surface plot. In a lot of ways Asimov transcends the genre of science fiction in this awesome story.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    The Gods Themselves is a worthy champion of Science Fiction's greatest annual award - the Hugo.An extraordinary tale of a parallel universe communicating with ours and exchanging matter to provide an apparently inexhaustible source of copious quantities of energy, with the serious flaw of hastening the Sun's course to turn drawback of this story and a lot of of Asimov's early works is male-centric nature of it. There are practically no women in his early stories.An unusual and amusing feature is that the first chapter is labelled "Chapter 6" as it is written as series of flashbacks.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    I'm biased in my reviews as I've been an Asimov fan since I was a kid. I bought this compilation for my son so he could develop the same love of science fiction that I did when I was his age. Isaac Asimov is a amazing writer and I never obtain tired of reading the large amount of items he's produced.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    Isaac Asimov was certainly among the greatest of twentieth-century science-fiction authors, and "The Gods Themselves" is arguably his masterpiece, of hundreds to chose from. Science-fiction aficionado or not, if you've never read it you are in for a treat. Not at all complex, it may be the most imaginative story, from the most imaginative writer bibliophiles have ever imov was a polymath, of the widest ranging fields of study. His library of original writings, much more than science-fiction, remains astounding. I recommend the reader dip into his work, and to begin with "The Gods Themselves." Avoid reading it too rapidly.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    This book was beautiful entertaining. It's a beautiful typical Asimov book (a lot of science, a lot of talking, a lot of mind games), even though it contains the atypical-for-Asimov topic of aliens. I'm just disappointed that the middle section with the aliens wasn't longer! It was easily the most interesting and compelling part of the book, and I'm sure Asimov could've gotten more out of it. The latest part seemed to be the longest and it had the least compelling plot and ill, this book is beautiful decent and is worth reading.

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    The Gods Themselves [Book]  2018-3-7 18:0

    Of course, Asimov is outstanding. I would give "The Gods Themselves" 4.5 stars if possible, because I don't think it is quite the equal of the "Foundation" series or "I, Robot". It does, however, introduce now-iconic SF themes, including self-aware machines, non-terrestrial colonization, parallel universes, and the strange physics of sub-atomic nails the political aspect of amazing human technical advances and the dangers of imov is at his most imaginative in the second part of the book describing life in a parallel universe, which I found delightful.

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    They Called Us Love: The Story of April Holden and Africa's Street Children []  2020-7-4 19:15

    This book, more than any book I have read in latest years (and I read a lot!) moved me deeply, educated me, opened my eyes to the desperate needs of some of the road kids in a lot of locations of Africa. Deborah Meroff skillfully introduces the life and work of "April", yes, but she does so much more. After reading this book, I wanted to DO SOMETHING to help the troops of worker who are literally on the "front lines" in the rescue, education and love required by thousands of children who have nobody at all to support them even to survive. I recommend this book to anyone who wonders just what God is doing around planet Earth.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    It took me a while to obtain into the style, but it was worth the effort. I haven't read any Asimov for well over a decade and anyway this was written almost 50 years ago, and styles change, as have my reading ease read this entirely subjective review what is "The Gods Themselves"? A story based on the idea of exchanging energy between universes where the powerful nuclear force is slightly different, written in three parts. Parts one and three are in our universe, and part two in the "para universe". The powerful nuclear force is explained enough for the story to engage the reader who has no background in physics. In short, it is the force that governs how nuclear fusion works. A difference in values means there is a possibility for energy exchange in *both* directions. At least that is the conceit, and as far as it goes it is backed by scientific fact (at least in models of the two universes involved).The idea is explained well enough for non nuclear physicists to grasp, but this isn't Star Battles SF: no blasters, spacecraft or heated battles. Just a not good existential threat to our solar system, and the inertia of a population wanting something for nothing and led by short-sighted and/or self-aggrandizing fame-hounds who have everything to lose either way, but don't care.I rode along, gradually immersing more in the story, and being overcome with a sense of helpless fury at the inevitability of it all. The alien section started in what seemed to be a frivolous method that I feared would be a waste of reading time, but became perhaps the most emotionally engaging and angering part of the story.I can't five star this, but I can't say why. It won both a Hugo and a Nebula when it was first published, about the best any SF novel can do, but it doesn't push my five-star button somehow. Without that oh-so cleverly done part two this would be a three star story for me despite the really clever idea at it's heart. Maybe it's because I'm too old and academic and political inertia are old tropes I've read about too a lot of times. That might very well be it, in which case this book could well be a five star experience for you. I hope so.I hope too that there is still an audience for this sort of Science Fiction, that not everyone sees SF as bound by the barely literate items coming out of the Kindle mill these days.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    Isaac Asimov's The Gods Themselves is a significant addition to the science fiction genre. In the midst of an energy crisis, the tale outlines a future where energy has become essentially free, not simply in an economic sense, but also in an apparent violation of thermodynamics and physics. Asimov suggests the existence of parallel universes where fundamental physical properties differ such that with the exchange of specific elements, each universe can power its own brand of energy. Needless to add, there are long term consequences for each; however, human greed and the cinematic thirst for power along with academic backstabbing serve to make a stalemate.Furthermore, Asimov crafts a truly alien universe where there are three sexes, the Rational, the Parental, and the Emotional and portrays a special social configuration which results in a related to dilemma as Earth. Finally, Asimov adds a third component which is lunar colonization, along with another distinct social configuration with a desire for separation from their Earthen brethren. The solution to this impending train wreck in both universes lies in the identification of a third universe, where conditions create life impossible, for material transfer and so the exchange can favor the living universes from an energy is typical for Asimov, his hero development is weak, but conceptually, the idea of parallel universes where fundamental laws of physics have various constants, as well as truly alien smart lifeforms carries the tale.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    To me, Asimov can do no wrong. But, in this book, he did small right either. Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics may be remembered forever, but there are no robots in this story; instead, there is the Electron Pump (which won’t be long remembered).The book is in 3 parts. [1] The discovery of the Election Pump, [2] the alien beings who have the para-universe’s complementary Proton Pump and [3] the discovery (by lunar-based scientists) that makes the Election Pump sustainable long-term. But the links between these 3 parts is quite tenuous – they easily could have been three completely separate short stories. The alien para-universe aliens were most interesting as Asimov describes them as being triad family troops – as opposed to our human dual family troops (i.e., mother-father).Still, there was small tension, small excitement and small mystery to go with the Sci-Fi concepts.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    It's been a while since I read anything by Dr. Asimov, and this novel was written in 1972. I forgot how he puts the science into science fiction, and his facility for dialog. The plot points in this book are a bit of a stretch, and it is really 3 similar novellas strung together, but I enjoyed reading it. If you with someone who is an idea stealing SOB, this book will resonate with you. It ends a bit abruptly, but it's still a amazing read.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    Asimov is a master at creating logical and completely imaginary worlds and cultures. He blends a very believable story line in with what were cutting edge scientific concepts. In this book the blending of story within the earth universe frame is cleverly juxtaposed with his concept for an alternate para universe populated with beings totally unlike us. On top of this he weaves a complex plot that keeps you guessing right to the end!

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    I found myself startled when I found I'd come to the end of the book, not just the chapter (reading on Kindle). I was a small disappointed to not revisit the para-universe. Still, and obviously, a good, engrossing read.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    I had almost forgotten how amazing Science Fiction could be: A literature of E GODS THEMSELVES by Isaac Asimov brings it back to ink about it: The whole plot is initiated when a second-rate scientist finds a sample of an impossible (literally!) plutonium-186 isotope on his desk. I wouldn’t even know what a possible plutonium isotope would be (and what’s an isotope?) But I believe it if Asimov says it. (Who else would even think of such a thing, much less its possible ramifications?) A brief investigation leads to the discovery of a parallel universe and creation of a device that will give humans a and limitless supply of energy.Except it would eventually be at the cost of destruction of the at would be plenty for most SF writers, but in Part 2 Asimov introduces a parallel universe inhabited by strange monsters completely various from us in in body, spirit, and philosophies, yet who we also identify with as if they are human.Even more interesting, Asimov shows these monsters engaging in three-party in which their alien ways are described in more sensual detail than human pornography. And at the same time Asimov provides a sly commentary on the method a lot of of us humans view Part 3, Asimov returns to the original characters almost a generation later in a plausible hard-science zone station setting as the truth is slowly discerned. The second-rate scientist is now considered the savior of humanity (even though plans for the "invention" were planted by the aliens for their own purpose) even while, to preserve his fame, fortune and honor, he hides or discredits the proof that his invention will lead to the death of all.And for still more wonder, Asimov seems strangely prescient of the debates going on in our current globe when technology threatens our very existence (climate change) but we (or at least a lot of of us and most of the industries that have gotten rich off of raping and slowly destroying the planet) choose to deny the reality because the very acts of planetary violence have given us beautiful comfortable nsider this from THE GODS THEMSELVES:“It is a mistake,” he said, “to suppose that the public wants the environment protected or their lives saved and that they will be grateful to any idealist who will war for such ends. What the public wants is their own individual comfort .”I understand that though Asimov had a super-size ego he did not consider himself a genius. A profile in the Fresh York Times said, “Genius he may be, although he disputes it. In the matter-of-fact method in which he writes, he puts it thus: ‘Just say I am one of the most versatile writers in the world, and the greatest popularizer of a lot of subjects.’ “THE GODS THEMSELVES, however, would create a beautiful amazing case for genius.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    Three stars because the idea of this book is interesting. Asimov is always interesting! But the book seems to not be finished!! We have the universe, the para-universe. We see the globe from the universe side, then the para-universe side, then the book meanders off into a sort of romantic novel. The main thread of the book, the interaction between the universe and the para-universe, does not resolve and we are left hanging. Three stars because Asimov is one of the best sci-fi writers, but this book falls short of his usual perfect stories.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    Isaac Asimov was certainly among the greatest of twentieth-century science-fiction authors, and "The Gods Themselves" is arguably his masterpiece, of hundreds to chose from. Science-fiction aficionado or not, if you've never read it you are in for a treat. Not at all complex, it may be the most imaginative story, from the most imaginative writer bibliophiles have ever imov was a polymath, of the widest ranging fields of study. His library of original writings, much more than science-fiction, remains astounding. I recommend the reader dip into his work, and to begin with "The Gods Themselves." Avoid reading it too rapidly.

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    The Gods Themselves: A Novel []  2020-1-22 21:11

    "The Gods Themselves" by Isaac Asimov is one of the standards of science fiction. My impression of Asimov is that he was a man of intriguing ideas, and a man with a strong intellect. This book certainly bears that out. Parallel universes, sharing materials, energy, and laws of physics across universal boundaries; alien sex, lunar colonies, and so r the most part, I enjoyed the book. Asimov's ideas rate 5 stars. But the book is a small shop-worn with age (published in 1972). It seemed to bog down in lengthy verbal exchanges between characters. The middle third of the book involved the alien society, and that portion particularly dragged. But if you have read and enjoyed Asimov before, you'll certainly wish to read this one.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    This is a follow-up to Helen Brown's earlier book, "Cleo: the Cat Who Mended a Family". That one was a difficult read because of the tragedy of Sam's death, but after I finished it, I felt like I was amazing mates with everyone in the family. So I was happy when I learned of this book, because I wanted to know what had happened next with Helen's family. I was not disappointed. I got to share in the next phase of the family's lives--Rob's marriage, and Lydia's quest for spiritual growth, and Helen's deepening understanding of her daughters. The author also showed her courage when faced with cancer. It was also interesting to 'see behind the scenes' of how a best book came to be written--and how it impacted the world.I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and hope a third one comes along soon.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    Expected more from this book. I am a Siamese cat owner and absolutely love the breed and how they interact with us humans, The book centers more on the author and her family then secondly on the cat. Although she does incorporate the Siamese and I understand her plot ; it became boring and redundent.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    I loved Cleo, but this book isn't about the cat -- it's all about the author. And this acc is by one of the most self-absorbed people I've ever read. I, too, have had breast cancer, and I certainly know about the anxiety. But are these theatrics what it's been for the thousands of us who have just got on with things, and not created ourselves the middle of a drama?

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    First, allow me say that I was not aware of the author's first book, "Cleo" until I began reading this book. I don't remember how I discovered the availability of this title but it captured my attention and it was added to my 'wish to read' list. This is a attractive memoir by Helen Brown to delight every aspect of a reader's senses from the beauty of the cover design by Colleen Andrews to the collage of color family photographs on the first page to the author's remembrances throughout the pages. The descriptions of experiences, thoughts and emotions are shared with honesty and without I am a daughter that wandered away from my home city on two occasions to follow my heart - once for professional exploration and once simply to follow my heart - I can truly understand some of the perplexing conversations through the years between mother and daughter. As dearest cat Jolie continued to live with Mother throughout the years of these same wanderings I have a deep appreciation for Jonah's nurturing of Helen Brown's family as well as his soulful is is a very unique glimpse of the bonds shared by mothers and daughters, the friendship circle of women when courage, strength and hope are required for sharing in higher volumes but softly without fanfare and the unconditional love between cats and their forever families.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    it is a unbelievable book for cat lovers & mothers. I enjoyed it very very much.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    I hadn't read the author's previous book, "Cleo". After subsequently reading "Cleo", I would suggest reading it before reading "Cats & Daughters". In any case, "Cats ....." is a amazing book that talks about family relationships and challenges as well as the necessary part that a cat played in dealing with these issues. The book is well-written and was an interesting read. The writing pulled me in and I felt like I had a front row seat to seeing the author's feelings and reactions. A amazing book.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    Very much looking forward to reading "Cats and Daughters", it will be my third book written by Helen Brown. Highly recommend her books about cats as well as the human interest side. I felt like I was actually there with her experiencing what she was experiencing. You will LOVE her books, especially if you love cats.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    As I am wont to do, I read the sequel, Cats and Daughters, loved it and am now reading the first book, Cleo. In any order, they both deliver a powerful message. Embrace life you don't obtain another this go-round. I don't have a daughter. I do have a sister and I do have a cat. Neither the sister or the cat necessarily comes when called so I'm guessing daughters are the same way. Also cool is the fact the author hails from Fresh Zealand. She is correct; people remain the same, past, present, future and on different parts of the globe.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    This is supposed to be a sequel to CLEO. It is not. There is very small of the cat in here. It is mostly about the author's daughter. It was not nearly as engaging as the previous book. I will not be keeping this one.

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    Cats & Daughters:: They Don't Always Come When Called []  2020-1-16 17:23

    People who have raised cats and children will recognize a lot of the behaviors. For the most part, is a narrative of the ups and downs of normal life in sort of "as the globe turns" style. The author seems to be a nice person and the book a "feel good" sort of experience.

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    Fairly interesting history, more for early Notre Dame and for the KKK in Indiana. Riot itself was not really that significant in the scheme of things. ND hierarchy rightly felt that KKK would implode by itself.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    A amazing story regarding the importance of family.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    The book was interesting and simple to follow.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    A nice lesson that family is the most necessary thing in life.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    If you wish to be Successful for what you aim for never take the derogatory remarks of others on heart. You know your potential they don’t so hold striving and hold achieving. Such type of lessons are very necessary for the kids

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    It’s full of reminders about being polite and nice to everybody, behind a fun seafaring adventure for a brave small girl and her loyal parrot friend.

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    This was very eye opening! Definitely not what you are taught in an American History class! This is a very lengthy read and at times reads like a textbook. I personally did not search that a detraction.I really think this is a must read if you are interested in either the history of The Klan or Notre Dame. I can truly say I learned a lot of fresh facts about both. I have recommended this to a lot of friends..

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    Interesting story about how Notre Dame surrounded by an anti-catholic population managed to survive and thrive. An interesting example how universities are not just a collection of buildings.

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    As a ND grad I really appreciated the insight of this era

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    I stumbled across this book by accident and because I am interested in the history of racial and religious bigotry in the US, I bought it. It was a fascinating study of a little-known encounter between the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana and the students of Notre Dame. Most intriguing, from my perspective, was the story of D. C. Stephenson, who rose to prominence with the KKK in the 1920's, and whose war for leadership led ultimately to the collapse of the Klan during that era. The author gives us lots of historical background on Stephenson, his opposite, Fr. Walsh of Notre Dame, and the development of both Notre Dame and the Klan of the '20'e actual clash between the Fighting Irish takes up only a little part of the book, but with the historical background, we can understand better why it was so significant, and why it is not well known today. It also reminds us of an era in which racial and religious prejudice was widely held, and is a reminder of the need to stand up versus it.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    A amazing example of real friendship that no matter how difficult the odds are, real and loyal mates will stay by your side. Luna and coco are amazing examples.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    This book gets into the begin of a community along with the history. I would create a very amazing teaching tutorial for teachers.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    This story have taught my children the importance of friendship and how to stick for your mates at time of need.

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    Captain Luna: Children’s book about a young pirate girl. An illustrated picture book to teach children about staying true to themselves and that they can be brave and kind at the same time. Ages 3-5 []  2020-1-16 8:46

    I enjoyed this book so much, It was so hard to place down. It was different, in a exciting way. Kept me enthralled throughout the story. It was so various and with a surprising twist. I can't wait to see more of his books.

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    Unbelievable story. A lot of lessons applicable to today

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    Like Like Like--lived in South Bend most of my life and had no idea about his. Knew KKK was massive in Indiana but not here. Very interesting!

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    A amazing summery of the strength and activity of the Klan in Indiana.I would not say Notre Dame defeated the Klan. A more honest appraisal would that it outlasted the Klan which defeated is an enlightening story about the clash between the two.

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    Very interesting. I was unaware of much of the history presented in this book.

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    Notre Dame vs. The Klan: How the Fighting Irish Defied the KKK []  2020-1-7 18:41

    The history of Notre Dame and how it intersected with Klan was very interesting. The fears in the early 1900's are some that we see today. How should we react to them now?

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    A glimpse into the life of a 14-year-old South African girl, Khosi, who is trying to figure out what she believes and who she is. She is caught in the struggle between Western thought and African culture, between the ideals of her mother's generation and the traditions of her grandmother's generation. Those traditions and lines of thought are more than just mere philosophy for Khosi -- she is faced with very true situations, including the looming threat of HIV that haunts so a lot of in South Africa. For her and her loved ones the reality of the spirit world, sickness, Western medicine, and traditional healing is life and death, not theoretical talk. One thing that fascinated me about the story is the portrayal of a connection between Christianity and science in the minds of South Africans. For so a lot of in the West, Christianity and science are portrayed to be at odds, but it seems that the opposite is the case in this part of Africa.I recommend reading the book for an understanding of the worldview of this generation of South Africans and of the crisis of HIV/AIDS, as seen through the story of a sympathetic young girl rather than through a list of faceless statistics.

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    What is it like to come of age, fall in love even, during the AIDS epidemic in South Africa? J.L. Powers' recent novel, This Thing Called the Future, answers this question. Using spare, forthright prose, Powers delves into the emotional, physical, and spiritual globe her young protagonist, Khosi, inhabits. Caught in the lull between her elders' optimism (those fighting for freedom from white control) and the devastating wake of poverty and illness still wracking her people, Khosi endures a everyday life rife with danger and the challenge of deciphering choices in a changing landscape (the long standing Sangoma healing tradition facing off with the newer, Western medical model of treating AIDS). Powers conveys the complexity of generational suffering, the political forces at work behind the scenes, and the resilience and strength of the next wave of young adults. This Thing Called the Future

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    A fascinating story of a young girl caught between traditional beliefs and Western medicine and surrounded by conflict. Very poignant....

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    An perfect and strong read

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    This author is awesome!!! Does on website research and has a heart for social justice.

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    A gripping tale of growing up in one of South Africa's not good neighborhoods. Told through the eyes of its young narrator, Powers creates a tragic, sad, and hopeful story that is neither romantic nor melodramatic. An entertaining and intense read where the characters stay with you long after you're finished reading.

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    I thought this book was perfect and it always held my interest. I did not know too much about life in South Africa before reading this book. I recommend that teenagers and adults in America should read this book and realize how much easier life is here compared to the life of the young girl in "This Thing Called the Future."

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    This Thing Called the Future []  2020-1-26 22:49

    This Thing Called the Future by J.L. Powers is a strong and moving coming-of-age story about Khosi, a fourteen-year-old girl living in a modern South African shantytown. It seems like someone is dying all the time, and billboards hang everywhere, warning people about AIDS. A lot of people believe that it is a curse. As a young adolescent, Khosi finds herself attracting unwanted attention by men interested in her body, especially one particular drunk who seems to have taken an unpleasant interest in her. There is also the witch on the hill who claims that she'll come for Khosi one osi is just like any other teenage girl. She only wants to search the right guy, someone her age--someone like Small Man Ncobo who seems to be developing a mutual interest in her. She wants to obtain an education, but her wishes don't seem possible considering how not good her family is. Then her family's next-door neighbor claims that Khosi's mama stole from her, and Khosi's mama comes home sick one day.I love how J.L. Powers tackles the problem of the reconciliation of traditional belief with modern ideals. Khosi is caught between Gogo (her grandmother), who believes in both God and the traditional ways, and Mama, who believes in God and science. She loves her biology class, but she always believes in her ancestors. There's also Small Man, who doesn't know how to feel about Khosi's supernatural beliefs.Powers brings Khosi's hero to life through her desires to protect her family and to be accepted along with her beliefs in God, science, and her people's traditions. At the same time, Khosi begins receiving dreams from her ancestors that her about danger coming to the family, and she must learn to wield the powers of her ancestors and herself in to stand up for herself and her family. So she can be the person who she wants to be: powerful and independent, like her is Thing Called the Future is a story filled with culture that teaches you to appreciate family, love, and faith. You learn that not everything is what it seems to be and that your strongest help will always come from your family, both dead and living, and that you must believe in your own powers. Even with her family and Small Man to back her, Khosi must learn to trust in herself and strengthen her heart as she decides whether or not she possesses the power not only to forget her anger and forgive both the living and the dead.

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