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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    I absolutely LOVE the content but the broadcast routinely (always) cuts out after about 45 seconds. It's too bad.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    This application is trash. I've been told to obtain this application and this is the worse for music. Who ever tries to obtain this app...good luck.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Way, way, method too a lot of donation ads/breaks for a melody app. Please test again with retooling the application as I love The Current and wish to help the channel/station as much as possible.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    I love The Current

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    ... works as it should. I feel like a local ( Minneapolis native ) hold up the amazing work #PRINCE4EVER 👊🏾 😎 💜

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    It's just what it is. A radio application full of ads and audio spams. Obtain Spotify and relqx

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    More Ads Than Songs - Constantly breaks in _mid-song_ on the Purple Current stream to play ads. Love the Current but this application is terrible.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Not good app. Melody is interrupted 1-2 times per song for a disinterested sounding voice to read donor recognition ad copy--often the same ads, over and over. I appreciate the need for donors, but other Public Radio stations like KCRW manage to play dozens of amazing old and fresh melody without interrupting a single track for donor ads. There is no longer any room for this level of advertising abuse, when so a lot of other melody application options are available. It doesn't matter how amazing your melody curation is if we can never listen to the melody without at least one donor ad interruption mid-song.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Amazing to have a dedicated application for The Current with lots of potential.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Pure trash.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Sucks

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    I love The Current. Unbelievable music. But there are major bugs in app. 1) Alarm does not work at all. 2) when internet connection is lost and then recovers, then controls via notifications or remote play/pause stop working and playlist display freezes, 3) ducking (when audio drops because of another application like driving directions) is broken; other audio is lowered instead of this app. Otherwise it works ok and despite negative feedback elsewhere complaining about ads, there are not very a lot of ads. It is their live stream and typical public radio. Nothing worse than usual FM radio.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Thanks

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Unusable

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Not good application it doesn't play melody and it keeps interrupting it

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    It was advertised as a melody application not a radio

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    I'd love it if it didn't crash all the time.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Its more of a radio station but its still amazing

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Dont install this app.

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    Oh its Spotify! Who knew Spotify had alot of ads, or a radio stations...

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    The Current [App]  2019-4-23 13:36

    1 word, absolutely terrible. Oh wait

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    The Travelling Bag (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-21 22:54

    Susan Hill is always worth reading, and she does the ghostly brigade well, though I must confess to wishing for a small more of those factors which would have had me whimpering in slight fear, and turning on all the lights. She did this marvellously of course in The Woman In Black, knowing how to turn up the volume knob of terror slowly and is moderately long story collection comprises 4 tales of the ghostly, and whilst they are well done, the first two did not make any unease in me at all – possibly because the chosen constructions for both stories tended to minimise and undercut fear in the reader, because fear was not really there for the e first story, The Travelling Bag is not the narrator’s own story, and so there is a distance from emotion, through the using of one person to tell another’s story. This makes it a ghost story told as entertainment, so I was not surprised to search no hairs rising on the back of my neck, though there might well be some vivid photos which create certain readers feel a small whimpery and uneasy!Boy Number 21 also has a device which turns the fearful volume knob down. The narrator is reminded of an happening from his long ago childhood. This concerns the paranormal. At the time, others in his circle were a bit spooked, but he himself was not, so, really, the absence of the narrator’s fear didn’t stir mineIt was only the third, and really, the fourth story which created me obtain close to any kind of feeling spooked and a bit scared – and that, after all, is surely one of the reasons we like ghost stories (those of us that do)The central characters in the latest two are female, as indeed the possible spookers are. What makes it work is that the characters the reader is being encouraged to identify with are uneasy, and becoming increasingly so, as the story progresses, so we have mounting fear going on. In the third story, Alice Baker, the inexplicable spooky goings on take put in the mundane surroundings of the typing pool in an office e latest story, The Front Room, was the one which most happy my desire for being a bit scared, set in an unexceptional twenties suburban house, at a time beautiful close to the present, as DVD players and TVs figure! What makes for a better fear factor is that everyone, bar the source, is in the end scared. And this contains little children, which somehow created the scary events more sinister and potentI bought this as a download, but the ‘real’ book by all accounts is a beautifully presented one, and it’s probably particularly well-marketed for a Christmas stocking filler

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    The Travelling Bag (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-21 22:54

    Although Susan Hill will of course always be remembered as the author of the "The Woman in Black" she has written other tales of the supernatural which I have personally enjoyed reading. These contain such books as "Printers Devil Court", "Dolly" and "The Man in the Picture" which can be categorised as the traditional ghost story and encapsulate for me a lot of of the essences needed for a chilling tale which contain the permeating sense of foreboding and unease as the story progresses through layers of increasing ere are four stories in this compilation that can easily be read in one siting on a dark and windy evening that turns into e first is the "The Travelling Bag" which begins in the manner of a MR James story, being told over an after dinner brandy in the library of a London club where the "the fire glowed and the lamps cast circles of tawny light". It is the story of obsessional revenge for an act of plagiarism and theft. Recognition is denied and is claimed by someone else who must now bear the consequences of their actions. But when enacting revenge one must also be aware that this may to have consequences that could if you are unlucky emanate from beyond the grave."Boy number Twenty One" is another classically derived psychological ghost story. Toby and Andreas have an unseparable schoolboy friendship but two weeks before the end of term Andreas disappears but they meet later in strange circumstances or do they?"Alice Baker" is a story that will certainly stay in the mind and for me was the most chilling and sad of the four stories here. Alice Baker was the fresh girl in the office but there is something not quite right about her " a bit off-putting" is the phrase used. What is her secret? Once read I wanted immediately to reread this story e final story is "The Front Room", a chilling tale of "Evil, and the powers of evil" with a terrifying finale. What happens when you invite someone into your house to live with you that has malevolent intent?A thoroughly enjoyable set of spooky tales that are just right to be read at this time of year. Well worth a read.I would like to thank NetGalley for providing a copy for this honest review.

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    The Travelling Bag (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-21 22:54

    I love ghost stories, and Ms. Hill is a master of the genre. Period! Four amazing yarns wrapped in a beautifully bound volume!

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    The Travelling Bag (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-21 22:54

    I'd heard a commentator say that, "The Front Room" was a very chilling tale. So I bought the collection on that basis. These are a bit too sedate, for my tastes. More 'disquieting' than horror-filled.

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    The Travelling Bag (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-21 22:54

    The latest two stories in particular are the scariest I have read in a long time...Susan Hill is the master!

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    Plot: Caro had her future all outlined, she would inherit the family boat and live her days on the river like a real wherryman. Her plans went to hell when she was forced to deliver a pack to a neighboring kingdom and with a boy who clearly had never set foot on a boat. Unexpectedly, Caro found herself with unlikely allies and a key player in a political scheme.I don't know how to begin this review. I have written words and deleted words multiple times and looked up synonyms for "great." No matter what I say, it won't truly describe how much I loved this book. From the start, you could tell that Song of the Current was going to be a non-stop adventure. The plot is your primary political betrayal, but it pulled from a lot of other events in the Song of the Current globe which I'm eagerly awaiting to learn more about in the aracters: Be still my heart; Caro was everything and I wanted and more. Raised by her father, Caroline wasn't afraid to obtain down and dirty and would do anything to protect her home. She was headstrong, fearless, and unsure of her put in life. I loved her because she thought that she was destined for a quiet river life and saw herself as a "sidekick" in someone else's o was also biracial and I found it really interesting how Tolcser handled race relations in this fantasy world. I recommend checking out this blog post the author wrote before reading Song of the Current, because it's amazing insight into Tolcser's intentions and hopes for Caro's portrayal.Okay enough of that, can we talk about the kissing? Because the kissing, it killed me guys! The romance was my all-time favorite trope of "enemies-to-lovers" and those two were at each other's throats 90% of the time. The banter was witty and had me laughing out loud at times, and I absolutely adored how the author wrote their journey to each other and her subtle thoughts on love and building: Sarah Tolcser wrote one of the most authentic fantasy worlds I've seen in a while. Tolcser clearly had a deep love for life on water and her passion for it spilled onto the pages. She incorporated regional dialects, traditions, and local mythologies. Song of the Current took put mostly on water but it never felt limiting. I grew to love wherryman life and easily fell into Caro's day to day motions on the ort N Sweet: Song of the Current took my breath away with Caro's sass and the beauty of the river lands. This is a series I'll be talking about for a long time.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    What do you do when your destiny is bigger than you were told?Caro has always been told that the river god will call for her when she is ready. She has been straining to hear the call for as long as she can remember. Caro decides to take her destiny into her own hands and takes on her father’s job to transport cargo in exchange for her father’s freedom. Caro was given strict rules to dealing with the cargo she was in charge of, and like any normal human with a sense of curiosity she opens the crate and Hello o is such a amazing character, she is powerful and independent, she seems to have a amazing head on her shoulders and she doesn't take crap from anyone. She is determined to obtain this cargo delivered to its destination, despite pirates trying to hunt her down for what is on her ship. She is fast thinking and sharp witted when it comes to dodging ere is magic in this book, but it’s not overly saturated, it is it used just in a method that helps tell the story but not so much that it takes away from is of key importance in this book; Caro is willing to take on this risky shipment to save her father. Her mother is not so much a part of this book until later on. She is very focused on her job, but is still there to support Caro when she needs only problem was with all the ship terms that were used in the book, I think it would have been a bit helpful if there was a glossary in the back to support those of us don't have our sea legs.I cannot wait to see what adventures Caro has ahead of her in the next book.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    Full disclosure: some of my books are also published by Bloomsbury, and I received a copy of this book for from the author. That said, I rarely review books unless I love them, and this is my fair and unbiased opinion.I had the opportunity to read SONG OF THE CURRENT before publication, and I absolutely fell in love with the characters and the writing. I've never really had any interest in sailing or boating, but this created Caro's wherry and the river itself seem like such an AWESOME put to be. I'm in awe of books where the atmosphere is so well written that you don't feel like you're being bowled over by setting, and Sarah is masterful at developing a sense of *place.* This book belongs on everyone's shelf.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    What fun this was! Caro is the daughter of a wherryman, hauling cargo up and down the rivers with a Fee, a frog person as a voluntary first mate. This very plot driven adventure is launched with the arrest of her father for smuggling and a bargain for his release that would require Caro to deliver a mysterious box to a town down the river. There are twists, turns, adventure, treachery, battles, and romance ahead for our intrepid heroine. It would spoil the story to describe it in any detail. But, there are pirates, privateers, storms, magic, high seas, a drakon, frogpeople, shadowmen, gods, and more to catch your imagination. How amazing is that! This view of the fantasy globe is primarily from the water but you can tell that there are people, kingdoms, and politics boiling on land. There is violence with blood and death, but not a lot of graphic details. There is and romance, but again, not a lot of graphic details. This book was a Kindle bargain and it was amazing entertainment. It is not a book group book and it will not change your life, but it was very entertaining. It is the kind of book that might create a reader out a young person just because the fantasy adventure keeps you turning the pages quickly and that actually might change the world.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    Sometimes I hate leaving poor reviews even though I am being completely honest in how I feel about a book. I truly feel poor giving this story such a pitiful amount of stars because I really wanted to like this book--but test as I might, I just couldn't obtain into first I was totally invested in the story. It starts off engaging and there's enough going on to activate your suspension of disbelief and slide seamlessly into the globe that Sarah unveils. The excitement only continues to climb at the rapid turn of happenings the protagonist has to face and then we obtain to the part where she opens the forbidden box! Ooh I was so excited for this blossoming opportunity for a hate-to-love romance between Caro and this young mystery man. It was all going along so smoothly until it just fizzled out and it turns out, the young man in the box turns out to be an utter buffoon who is wet behind the ears and is as clueless as a newborn babe. For someone who has such a huge role to play in the story (I don't wish to give out any spoilers) and considering his background, you would think he would be a bit more world-wise and smart and just have an air of manliness about him--but no, that is so entirely not the case. He constantly has one foot in his mouth, and the other tripping over the ropes. So not beautiful in a male character :( Granted, his circumstances are dire enough that we can excuse some of his ghastly behavior, but it doesn't take away from the overall result of his bumbling e other thing that left me feeling jarred was the pacing of some of the scenes in the story. Take, for example, said male buffoon-boy trying to kiss Caro literally out of nowhere with no preamble leading up to this stage whatsoever. It was all hate and angst and annoyance (which were actually working in favor of their hate-to-love relationship opportunity) when all of a sudden he just tries to plant one on the heroine and she pulls a knife on him whilst wrapped in a towel. It left me feeling with whiplash because it was so incongruent and unexpected. The author didn't even allow them work toward this scene, so there was absolutely no excitement whatsoever, just confusion. You kind of begin to hate the boy even though you are technically supposed to feel sorry for him.Anyway, even after this awkward attempted kissing stage (which happens really early on in the story) I still decided to push through and give it a chance. But around the 35% tag I had to admit conquer as I felt like I was slogging through the story and I dislike when reading starts to feel like a chore. Sorry Sarah :( It was a amazing premise, but I guess I am just not into awkward man-babies.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    I'm torn. There were some parts that were so awesome I couldn't stop reading, and parts so intense with sailing terminology or dialogue that they were hard to pass through. I felt like some of the sailing terminology was used over and over and over, or explained multiple times, to where I felt like slogging through a sailing EVER, for a YA fantasy, this was a amazing read, and there's a lot I appreciated.1. No love triangle. One solid love interest, it wasn't love at first site, and she didn't live to impress him. She also didn't create poor decisions for him, something YA fantasy girls tend to do as soon as their hormones kick in.2. Caro is so confident in who she is, despite of her family, and who they wish her to be. Of course she has insecurities, but overall she knows she belongs to the water.3. I didn't feel like this was so much a story of a chosen one who saves the world. She has a team, she relies on the strength of others, she nurtures and appreciates the strengths of others, and her final *gift* is something she's aware could happen.4. The romance was limited and it wasn't all butterflies and drawn on. The attraction was limited and didn't control her thoughts. And when they did obtain together near the end, it wasn't something the lead girl was ashamed of. Her parents also didn't shame her, or warn her, or anything else. It's one of the first I've read where the love stage is treated with responsibility and not underlying currents of shame.5. There's magic, but it's not the focal point. It's just there, it's just a method of life, you have it or you don't, you use it or you don't, life moves on.YA Fantasy is my guilty pleasure, something I read to break up non-fiction and thick literary novels, and I love that they tend to feature powerful female leads. Lately, I've felt a small burnt out, like I was reading the same book over and over and over again. YA has felt like someone place out an outline for what makes a powerful YA book, and authors simply plugged their characters, plots, and actions in to a formula.I felt like Songs of the Current slightly broke this, not as formulaic, and while it was still a small predictable to where no tropes where turned on their head, the full read didn't feel too sloggy. But I wonder if all of the terminology was removed, where would the fluff and fill come from? How could the author have made a stronger story by cutting an simple 10k in explanations? That's what I'd be interested in, maybe giving some more depth.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    This book earned 5 stars for its characters, setting, dialogue, and sheer pleasure of reading it. I love the unapologetic female characters and the male characters who allow them be who they are, treating them as equal partners. There is even a bit of breaking down of the fourth wall that is a nice touch, admitting this is Caroline's story. I highly recommend this to all females who have fun adventure and could use a reminder that the prince doesn't have to solve all the issues and a girl does not need to be a princess to carry a story or have a satisfied ending/beginning.

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    I don’t know if I would’ve picked this one up if Rachel hadn’t told me to (while comparing it to CROWN DUEL!), so allow me tell you right now: don’t create the same mistake I did. SONG OF THE CURRENT is a fun adventure story, full of pirates, magic, political intrigue, and romance that reminded me a lot of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, but with more feminism.I loved Caro. She tries to show herself to the globe as so sure of herself, but she’s really not. Throw in the fact that she’s on her own for the first time ever after her father is thrown into jail, and that her plans of rescuing him are thrown awry when it turns out the super secret shipment she’s carrying has severe political implications that send a fleet of pirates after her, and things obtain very dicey very quickly.I don’t wish to comment too much on the romance for fear of spoiling anything, but it’s my favorite part of the book. It’s a hate to love romance (MY FAVORITE), plus Caro doesn’t place up with anything from [redacted]. Plus, [redacted] is used to getting anything he wants whenever he wants it, and spends most of the book unlearning this. Plus, there is consent, explicitly on the page. Everything about it is fantastic.And this globe was just so much fun to spend time in. The method the globe is developed, created me feel like I was right there in the riverlands with Caro, and in all of the various cities and towns they hid from the pirates in along the way. And the method the political landscape was woven in without it being too information dumpy was fantastic.Overall, perfect globe building, a fast-paced adventure, and political intrigue created this one of my favorite series from latest year. Create sure to give this one a shot!

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    I feel like it has been entirely too long since I found a book that I couldn't place down. Song of the Current was that kind of book for me. I am absolutely in LOVE with all of these books coming out with [email protected]#$%, sea-faring ladies! This book delivered all the scalawags I could have ever wanted!Caro finds herself on a mission to deliver some necessary cargo from Hespera's Watch to Valonikos. After refusing it himself, her father ended up being locked up for smuggling, so Caro agreed to deliver it in exchange for his release. She takes the crate of mysterious cargo and her frogman, Fee, and hit the river. She quickly finds herself being hunted down by a group of fearsome pirates known as the Black Dogs.Wanting to know what she was risking her life to deliver, Caro opens the crate to search a boy. A courier on his method to deliver an necessary notice to o was such a fun heroine. She's kinda sassy with a no nonsense attitude. She doesn't place up with a lot of crap. She has spent her whole life waiting to hear the river god call on her as he has on generations of Oresteia wherrymen. But at 17, she has beautiful much given up any hope of the river god calling on her. Not that she needs his favor, she is a perfectly capable wherryman all on her own.Tarquin, the courier sent from Akhaia to Valonikos to deliver a message, was a amazing hero too. Caro suspects that he's keeping secrets. I liked him as a character. I feel like it took me a min to grow to like him though. I don't know, I feel like his development wasn't super smooth? Like in the beginning he comes off as spoiled and then the next thing you know, he's just not?? I don't know if he's supposed to be putting on some kind of act or maybe that's just how quickly Caro's opinion of him changed, but it felt a bit off to me.I liked the romance in this book. It's a hate-to-love kind of thing. Caro and Tarquin can't stand each other when they first meet. Tarquin is mostly just spoiled and useless and Caro wishes that she could items him back into his enchanted box, but she can't. Then they begin to understand each other more and tell each other the truth and they grow on each is book is beautiful much nonstop action, so it's really simple to obtain drawn into it. I really enjoyed all the relationships in this book. Between Caro and her father, her wherry, Tarquin, Fee, I loved it!Like I said, the only thing that I think I didn't like was the development of Tarquin because it didn't feel smooth.Overall, I loved this book. It's definitely a favorite of 2017! This is kind of a junky review, but darn it, it's hard to write reviews of books I love because I just wish to spell it all out for you and that's just not how it works. If you liked Daughter of the Pirate King, you will probably like this one as well!

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    Song of the Current []  2020-1-19 21:2

    I loved this book - the first novel by author Sarah Tolscer was well written, detailed and a amazing read. I couldn't place it o is our heroine. And she doesn't need someone to save her, thankyouverymuch. She has everything figured out, while she's waiting to hear from the river god, like the rest of her ancestors. She takes on cargo to save her father, and soon finds herself in the middle of a amazing adventure. The cargo isn't just any old shipment - it is a courier with a vital notice to be delivered. There's pirates, fights, and a love story with Tarquin ... who isn't quite what he seems. Caro learns to trust herself, trust others, and finally finds her destiny in the sea.I highly recommend this - I can't wait for the next one - I wish to know what happens next!

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    Amazing one but face a poor experience with aramex courier services by which i have received it.

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    I won't beheading to Mecca anytime soon, so I'm sitting back and enjoying this erudite, artfully written, historical acc of this sacred Saudi city.

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    The Sacred Gaze []  2020-1-16 10:22

    Amazing condition

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    The Sacred Gaze []  2020-1-16 10:22

    Hate this book. Not worth anyone's time. Want I never bought this book. Wish a refund! Such a waste of time.

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    This is a amazing work written with clarity,passion,wit and deep understanding. It is well researched and beautifully written.I love Ziauddin Sardar's prose which is racy,elegant and has his signature style .I also admire his courage of conviction in putting down the facts as they are knowing fully well that majority of his co-religionists will be very upset with the very critical views on the show Saudi regime.I would recommend this book to every muslim, because Muslim in generalU

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    An perfect book with very rational interpretation of the doctrine and history.

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    Travelling to the Edge of the World []  2020-2-2 1:5

    There was some amazing info tucked into the long, agonizingly detailed descriptions of her banal everyday life in Haida Gwaii.

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    A amazing read, explores the history of Mecca form pre-Islamic day to modern times. Separates the spiritual Mecca from the "real" Mecca and how they co-exist withe each other.

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    Perfect history of Mecca & Muslim political history

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    The Sacred Gaze []  2020-1-16 10:22

    This is a useful book for scholars of religion hoping to learn about theoretical concepts and frameworks for the study of visual culture. It some helpful models for engaging in the academic study of the visual cultures of religions. It presents a lot of fascinating examples that can serve as touchstones for further research.

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    Travelling to the Edge of the World []  2020-2-2 1:5

    Jones has written yet another wonderfully interesting and wise book, a book about the Haida Gwaii, "a First Nation people ... who live on remote islands off the coasts of British Columbia and Alaska, on the eastern edge of the Pacific Ocean."In this account, we obtain a travelogue, an anthropological survey, an art history and a loving look at a people and culture almost extinct, desperately trying to preserve what's left after the ravages by the governments of England and Canada. Travelling is also a hymn to poet Emily Carr and to preservation of our natural nes points out that the health and culture of the Haida people were inextricably linked to the health of their environment. Destruction of their forests and pollution of their waters disrupted their life cycles. The introduction of European diseases and the abduction of their children, forced to attend "residential" schools, destroyed is also a poetic work, not a dry text:‘Thunderbirds are calling out to one another’ — a reference to the mythological beings called Thunderbirds whose wing beats caused the thunder and whose flashing eyes produced lightning. An entire cultural history is embedded in a language."She us insights about the complex and descriptive nature of aboriginal languages and how they reflect the soul of their cultures. Pádraic Pearse offered us this: “Tír gan teanga, tír gan anam. A country without a language is a country without a soul.” Jones explains this concept in multiple ways."Their stories of the sea rising and then falling also confirm geological happenings going back almost fourteen thousand years. Mythology can provide a window into the past and is more reliable than we imagine."She introduces us to Haida artist and sculptor Bill Reid, and a lot of others now represented in museums, art galleries and public locations in British Columbia, in a work complete with copious footnotes and an extensive e us the raven and the eagle - the forest and the sea, manifest in a remote culture still gasping for life. In addition to this book, we can also read poems inspired by her trip to the edge of the globe in The Rainmaker's Wife. I heartily recommend both books!

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    The Sacred Gaze []  2020-1-16 10:22

    Thank you for the Sacred gaze,one of a very few books about such a common practice.Every once in a while some one will come along and scream out "hey I found your key,It is right here in your hand".Made me realize how much this subject has been part of the human experience all along.Did sure stretch my horizon of understanding.

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    Very thorough and interesting, especially if you are familiar with the Middle East. I loved some descriptions and I loved the honesty of the author.

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    A very informative on the history of the region as it similar to the specifics of Mecca, its rulers, and the tribal warfare surrounding it

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    a fascinating yet ultimately depressing acc of Mecca that was amazing for a reader who knew small of the place

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    Mecca: The Sacred City []  2020-1-24 20:45

    Ziauddin Sardar grew up in Pakistan, and the one bit of decoration in his home was a calendar with a gaudy picture of the Sacred Mosque in Mecca, with the cuboid Kaaba within it. It sounds sort of like the first depiction I ever saw of the same scene, which happened to be painted on black velvet and was for in a thrift store. I had no idea what that cube was, but Sardar grew up knowing from the picture that “in some unique sense the divine power is focused in this one place.” He has been intimately involved in Mecca, not just on his own pilgrimages but in administration, and he is dismayed by the current state of the city. Before understanding why, it is necessary to understand what has gone before, and Sardar, who has written a lot of books on science and on Islam, has now given us _Mecca: The Sacred City_ (Bloomsbury), a full history of the city. This is a rarity; most books available on Mecca are written about the experience of the Hajj or are picture books illustrating the pilgrimage. They are especially scant in comparison to all the histories available on, say, Jerusalem. This is a vivid history, with plenty of dramatic, funny, or grisly anecdotes, about a put most readers are banned from ever e beginning of the town stretches back to the time of legends, with the Kaaba installed by Adam and Abraham. It was a center for polytheism, and people were making pagan pilgrimages to it before Muhammad received his revelations emphasizing but one god. This did not endear him to those in power, who profited from the pilgrimages. The middle portion of Sardar’s book is mostly a long acc of conflict between rich and poor, between families, tribes, religions, splinter sects, nations, and empires. After centuries of fighting within and around the city, contingencies wound up favoring the ultra-puritanical Wahhabi sect and their patrons from the Saudi family. The Wahhabis naturally respect the holy website of the Sacred Mosque and the Kaaba within, but regard any other historical websites within the town as possibly promoting worship of the Prophet himself or his early followers. The Saudi royal family has no interest in history, either, but is interested in making more money, and has turned Mecca into a sort of Muslim Disneyland, where pilgrims can create the Hajj, but also do some fancy shopping and dining. About 95% of the city’s ancient buildings have been bulldozed, with no interest in preserving the city’s cultural history. Khadijah was the first wife of the Prophet, and had a house there, but it was turned into a block of toilets. Sardar expects the house where the Prophet was born to become a vehicle park soon. The cave wherein the Prophet got his revelations may be bulldozed away. “The skyline above the Sacred Mosque is no longer dominated by the rugged outline of encircling mountains. It is surrounded by the brutalism of hideously ugly rectangular steel and concrete buildings, built with the proceeds of enormous oil wealth that showcase the Saudi vision for Mecca.” The absurd clock turret building dwarfs the Sacred Mosque below rdar has created the Hajj, of course, but more important, he has worked at the Hajj Research Center and has had his suggestions for slowing the Saudi changes ignored. It isn’t a matter of mere esthetics; the center opposed the installation of pedestrian tunnels as dangerous, but the tunnels were dug anyway, and during the 1990 Hajj there was a stampede in which 1,426 pilgrims died. He is obviously mad over the method the town is being treated, but his book is no polemic. Mecca represents an ideal, an aspiration for human harmony, and he is glad to love it in that role. The town may be sacred, but its inhabitants and combatants are only human.

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    Earlynote: the time-travelling messaging app [App]  2019-10-8 13:50

    Just discovered this application and love it! However, what really separates it from the rest of the package is the AWESOME customer service! Yesterday, Sunday, I had a question and sent a notice to the developer, anticipating a answer within a few days. I had a response within two hours, completely resolving the issue. Still can't believe it! In short, you can this perfect app, confident that the developer is right there to support you through it! Well done!

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    Earlynote: the time-travelling messaging app [App]  2019-10-8 13:50

    Stuck on black screen on launching given all permissions and tried reinstalling. Not working.

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    Earlynote: the time-travelling messaging app [App]  2019-10-8 13:50

    I did not liked it . Sorry

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    Really amazing read

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    This book is a android game changer on religion and the American Revolution. See my endorsement above.

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    This book is a superb rejoinder to those who claim that the Founders were all deists or atheists. It covers the several ways that religious belief and the Bible influenced and expressed Patriot resistance to British imperial overreach. Carefully and clearly explains the different perspectives brought to bear on these circumstances. Well written and simple to read. highly recommended.

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    Book is an perfect history of the interaction of clergy with respect to the American Revolution. Loaded with unbelievable references that would support anyone understand the spiritual side of our country's birth.

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    This past Fourth of July, the Freedom from Religion Foundation took out a full-page ad in a number of newspapers, the banner of which proclaimed, "Celebrate Our Godless Constitution." According to FFRF's description of it, the ad quoted "U.S. Founders and Framers on their powerful views versus religion in government, and often critical views on religion in general." Its purpose was to counter Hobby Lobby's annual July 4th ad, which "shamelessly promote[s] the myth that the United States was founded on God and Christianity."The ad is strange for several reasons. For one thing, the Fourth of July celebrates the decidedly non-godless Declaration of Independence, not the supposedly godless Constitution. For another, three of the six Founders quoted--Thomas Paine, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson--were not part of the convention that drafted the Constitution. And finally, the ad selectively quotes the Founders, overlooking the more benign view of religion found in other statements by them. (For a balanced overview of the role of religion in the Founding, see the Library of Congress's exhibit, "Religion and the Founding of the American Republic.")I mention this ad not so much to refute it as to provide context for my review of James P. Byrd's perfect fresh book, Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution. Before we enlist history on one side or another of a contemporary political cause--whether on behalf of FFRF's secularism or Hobby Lobby's Christian nationalism--we must understand it on its own terms. Failing to do so results in anachronistic, selective readings of history that misinform--sometimes, intentionally disinform--rather than inform the e focus of Sacred Scripture, Sacred Battle is "how the Bible inspired patriotism in Revolutionary America" (p. 2). Byrd approvingly quotes Gordon S. Wood on this topic: "it was the clergy who created the Revolution meaningful for most common people" because "for every gentleman who read a scholarly pamphlet and delved into Whig and ancient history for an explanation of events, there were tons of ordinary people who read the Bible and looked to their ministers for an interpretation of what the Revolution meant" (ibid).To see how the Bible inspired patriotism, Byrd compiled what he describes as "the most comprehensive database on the Bible in colonial America, including 17,148 biblical citations from 543 sources over more than a century (1674-1800)" (p. 169). Based on this database, he identified the eight "most cited biblical chapters (50 or more citations) in the Revolutionary Era (1763-1800)": Romans 13, Exodus 14-15, Galatians 5, Judges 4-5, 1 Peter 2, 1 Kings 12, Psalm 124, and Matthew 5 (p. 170). Successive chapters in Sacred Scripture, Sacred Battle describe how Patriots used these passages to buttress their revolutionary resolve, often in the teeth of Loyalist t surprisingly, patriotic clergy often turned to martial passages in the Old Testament to exhort their parishioners both to die and to slay for the revolutionary cause. God's deliverance of Israel from slavery in Egypt, accomplished by divine battle versus Pharaoh and his army, was an obvious choice for revolutionary preachers. So was the boldness of Deborah and Jael versus Sisera the Canaanite general Sisera. Then, of course, there was David, who combined both martial prowess with spiritual depth, serving as a model for Patriot soldiers. (The fact that David was a king needed some finessing on the part of preachers.)More controversially, patriotic clergy rooted help for the Revolution in Fresh Testament texts. "Stand quick therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath created us free" (Galatians 5) was a biblical motto for the Revolution. Other Fresh Testament passages needed significant re-interpretation. Should Patriots submit to the king as Paul and Peter commanded (Romans 13, 1 Peter 2)? John Wesley certainly thought so, but patriotic clergy argued that obedience was owed only to just kings. Didn't Jesus command his followers to turn the other cheek and love their opponents (Matthew 5)? Yes, but Revelation also portrayed Jesus--like God in the Old Testament--as a man of war.Having surveyed the use of select biblical passages by Patriots, Byrd identifies three roles the Bible played in the Revolution (pp. 164-166): "Its basic purpose was to forge militant patriotism." Second, it underwrote republicanism. Byrd quotes Rev. John Mellen, whose view was common among Patriots: "liberty is the spirit and genius, not only of the gospel, but of the whole of that revelation, we have, first and last, received from God." Third, it provided "virtuous heroes" for Patriots to need not agree with Patriot exegesis of Scripture in to appreciate the role it played in their revolutionary cause. Byrd's task in Sacred Scripture, Sacred Battle is descriptive, not normative. That is, he describes how Patriots used the Bible; he doesn't judge their use of it. That is the task of Christian theologians, not historians. For my part--American patriot that I am--I nonetheless unsettled by how my colleagues in the 18th-century clergy used the Bible in the cause of war. (Of course, on the other side, Loyalist uses of Scripture generated their own set of exegetical problems.)Regardless of my reservations about Patriot exegesis, I am unreservedly appreciative of James P. Byrd's analysis of it, and heartily recommend it to readers interested the role religion played in the American Founding. Perhaps some open-minded person at the Freedom from Religion Foundation will read it too and come to realize that both the godly and the godless felt they had a stake in the Revolution.P.S. If you're interested in reading some of those patriotic sermons, check outEllis Sandoz, ed., Political Sermons of the American Founding Era, 1730-1805 (2 Volume Set).

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    James Byrd's "Sacred Scripture, Sacred Battle is an interesting study of the influence Colonial preachers exerted through their sermons. Byrd examined hundreds of sermons preached in help of Colonial battles and the revolution of 1776, tallying the scripture passages used in the sermons. His book is built around the top four scriptural themes preachers used: the deliverance of Israel from Egypt, David the warrior, Peter and Paul's admonitions to "stand fast", and Revalation's photo of Christ the warrior. Using these and other scriptures preachers encouraged participation in battle and venerated leaders like George Washington.A couple of questions kept popping into my mind as I read Byrd's work: 1) what percentage of Colonial preachers were represented by the sermons he read and tallied and 2) how frequiently even did those pastors who supported the revolution devote their sermon to help for the patriot's cause. The sense one gets from the book is that the pulpits of colonial churches were filled each Sunday with Patriots admonishing young men to go shed their blood for the holy cause of independence. If that is the case, the churches must have deserted their basic mission of sheparding the flock in its faith and evangelizing those of no faith, or another faith. I search it unbelieveable that more than a little minority of colonial pastors were represented in the sermons Byrd uses to create his point. Nonetheless Byrd illustrates well the influence a core of Colonial preachers had as promoters and supporters of colonial and revolutionary patriotism and war. One cannot read the book without drawing mental parallels to the influence conservative ministers are exerting on the problems of our day.

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    Battles are not simply military affairs. For the Christian, they are theological to the core. Tag Noll has created that clear with the different ways ministers interpreted the Civil Battle (see The Civil Battle as a Theological Crisis, University of North Carolina Press).Last year, James Byrd of Vanderbilt released his Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: the Bible and the American Revolution (Oxford University Press). It received a book of the year award from Christianity e following interview appeared Feb. 1, 2014 on Jesus Creed. Professor Byrd teaches in the divinity school at Vanderbilt ore: What were the most famous passages of Scripture which preachers used to muster help for the American Revolution?Byrd: Most famous was Romans 13; which included commands for obedience to civil rulers. Understandably this was a major text used by loyalists to oppose the Revolution, so patriots had to with it at cond was Exodus 14-15; the parting of the Red Sea story, which created sense for patriots who felt that they were like the Hebrew slaves under bondage to the Egyptian Pharaoh, which they similar to British tyrannical policies. Paul’s commands on the freedom of Christ (Galatians 5) was third, which they similar to civil freedom as well. Fourth was the story of Deborah and Jael in Judges 4-5. This included the popular Curse of Meroz versus any who did not join in God’s troops to fight. There were several other famous texts, including a lot of from David’s life, including his win over Goliath, which created sense for patriots who saw themselves as Davids going up versus a fresh Goliath in the British ore: Were there any influential ministers who preached pacifism?Byrd: There were pacifists. Anthony Benezet, the amazing abolitionist, wrote Serious Considerations on Battle and its Inconsistency with the Gospel (1778). It went through several printings and patriotic preachers responded to it at length. Benezet and others created use of the Sermon on the Mount, which was another of the most cited texts because patriots had to answer to ore: What did Paine think about ministers preaching pro revolutionary sermons?Byrd: I don’t recall reading anything about Paine’s views of the ore: You mention that Washington loved chaplains. Why was that?Byrd: Chaplains not only reinforced morality and discipline in the army, but they also spurred soldiers on to war with patriotic sermons. Washington was also a powerful believer in providence, and he believed that chaplains could appeal for God’s guidance and advocacy in the ore: Why was there a prevalent belief that Christians create the best soldiers?Byrd: Christianity enforced morality and discipline, which were essential qualities of a solider, they believed. Also Christianity reinforced courage in the face of death in battle. At least as necessary was the belief that Christianity was a martial faith, which taught the necessity of just warfare and even fierceness in ore: Apocalyptic fervor has been a besetting sin for thousands of years as Paul Boyer created clear in his seminal, When Time Shall Be No More (Harvard). What lessons are there for preachers today who may be tempted to give current events, especially wars, end-times significance?Byrd: One of the surprising findings of the book was the relative lack of apocalyptic preaching in the Revolution. For years scholars seemed to think that most of revolutionary preaching was apocalyptic. But even the apocalyptic preaching that was show usually did not focus in grand claims for the United States being only God’s chosen nation. Usually preachers were more cautious. But they did call on apocalyptic war scenes (e.g. Rev 19) to prove that battle was appropriate for Christians to engage ore: Methodists and Roman Catholics did not really come on the American stage until the nineteenth century. If they had been around during the revolutionary period, do you think the anti-British sermons would have been as influential?Byrd: Difficult to say. Most of the Roman Catholics in America at the time were patriotic — see Maura Jane Farrelly’s Papist Patriots (Oxford University Press). Methodists were suspect because of their ties to Wesley, who opposed the Revolution. But most American Methodists quickly distanced themselves from loyalism. If they had not, they would not have been as successful as they were. They had to create the case that they were true, patriotic Americans.

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    Very informative. I search it awesome how Scripture is so often twisted to fit a particular agenda. I did not know that the colonists considered themselves a chosen (by God) nation with unique blessings and were being compared to the Israelites; that the American Indians were considered savages and required to be wiped out like the Canaanites; that the colonists were told by "Christian" ministers that it was God's will to slay or be killed; that God is a "God of war" and it was the honorable thing to shed blood. I would have a hard time believing this really happened if the resources weren't e reason for the three stars is that I found it somewhat repetitive with the same info being stated repeatedly.Would recommend this book, especially to right-leaning individuals that like the "saber rattling". Just battles are a myth.

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    The musical landscape is littered with the waste of "one-hit" wonders who catch the public attention for their allotted fifteen mins of fame, then fade to a career of headlining Holiday Inns. Since almost everything that appears on famous radio stations is pre-programmed by suit-wearing execs to be spoon-fed to lemming-like teenagers it makes true musicians take message any time true musicians create it in the biz, especially if their melody is e Brothers Garza (Henry on guitar and most lead vocals, Jojo on Bass and vocals and Ringo on drums and vocals) won a grammy for their initial album (for the surprising "Heaven") and bring their intense, and seriously fun, brand of Tex-Mex Tejano Bluesabilly to their sophomore album and they don't allow up an inch. The tunes are just as good, and their performances just as e CD opens with "My Way", and proceeds through one gem after another. Every track is worthwhile, but I'm particularly drawn to the spicy "Oye Mamacita" and "Texican Style", as well as the tribute "Outlaws" recorded with their father and unique guest Willie Nelson.

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    Amazing music

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    I LOVE this CD! I lost my first one and was thrilled to keep this copy. It arrived in amazing condition and in record time.

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    Los Lonely Boys does rock 'n' roll in a quintessentially classic manner, as a hard-driving rock guitar trio. However, several things separate them from the e most necessary is that these three brothers (Henry, JoJo, and Ringo Garza; guess which one is the drummer...) are very, very amazing musicians. In Henry's playing, one can hear a small Stevie Ray Vaughan, some Kenny Wayne Shepherd, and some Carlos Santana. It could well be that in time, Henry will be spoken of on their level. JoJo is an outstanding bassist, driving the melody but not overpowering it. Ringo, which is actually his true name, does what a lot of drummers can't do: he complements the melody and avoids trying to insert percussion magic tricks into e second thing that separates this band from the herd is that they are all perfect singers; indeed, any of them could be called the band's lead vocalist, and all of them are amazing at harmony, too. Their voices just seem to go together, much as those of the three singing Beatles ly, their tunes are fine exemplars of "Texican" music: tight rock 'n' roll with irresistible hooks. On this album, "Diamonds," for example, sticks in the mind for hours after just one playing. (I mean this in a amazing way, not in the horrifying "It's a Little World" way.)Buy this album, place it in your CD player, turn the volume up, and enjoy.

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    I got interested in the Boys after "How Far Is Heaven" got so popular. That entire album is really great. This title is very amazing as well. The flavor is not a "up" as the first, but I suppose that fame and fortune does take its toll on everyone in certain ways. The Boys are not multifaceted like Los Lobos (who are sensational). Their melody mostly have predictable lyrics and musical rifts, but very catchy. Amazing party music. Check it out!

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    Los Lonely Boys has come out swinging on their newest CD, "Sacred." They have intentionally stayed away again, as on the self-titled CD, from being painted into one musical genre corner. There is something for every melody taste on Sacred, from Tex-Mex rock to Texas blues to a defiant anthem young people can identify with to a rocking country blast to two favorites are Roses and My Way, although Diamonds, My Loneliness and Oye Mama Cita are not far behind. Personally, I believe that if Roses had been the first release from the CD, it would be blowing the top off the charts as we speak like Heaven did in 2004.Los Lonely Boys will bring in fresh fans, and they will place to rest the nay-saying critics who are always skeptical whether a band can follow the phenomenal success of its first Henry puts it, Los Lonely Boys has taken something from the legends and place it into their own tortilla to create a highly-individualized Musical Burrito to feed to the world. Vamonos----again, LLB!!!

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    Just it . These guys are unreal

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    quick and accurate

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    This is a uniquely fascinating book that identifies the most famous scriptures referenced in sermons around the time of the Revolutionary War. For a church musician that plans Independence Day celebrations each year, this book is a amazing resource. I also highly recommend it for Christians who love early American history.

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    Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution []  2020-1-22 22:45

    This book should be needed reading for all college students!

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    As Described

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    The Sacred Bible - Pastoral Edition [App]  2019-9-20 21:11

    Extasiada de version La Palabra de Dios en la Persona de Su Hijo Jesucristo para darnos una manera de vivir plena.

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    Sacred []  2020-4-3 19:49

    Amazing cd. Lost my first one.

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    The Gambia: Land of the Mandinka (Travelling Solo) (Volume 3) []  2020-1-31 0:16

    Informative

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    The Gambia: Land of the Mandinka (Travelling Solo) (Volume 3) []  2020-1-31 0:16

    I adore this author and this is her best book yet.Warm funny and e does the kind of thing most of us only dream of.Looking forward to the next ep traveling Susan and writing. 5*****

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    The Gambia: Land of the Mandinka (Travelling Solo Book 3) []  2020-1-25 17:25

    Informative

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    The Gambia: Land of the Mandinka (Travelling Solo Book 3) []  2020-1-25 17:25

    I adore this author and this is her best book yet.Warm funny and e does the kind of thing most of us only dream of.Looking forward to the next ep traveling Susan and writing. 5*****

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    30 years ago this book along with a lot of reality, changed the path of my life. I was in a little book shop and for some reason a limited edition pocket ver of this practically flew off the shelf at me. I think the title "Sacred path of the Warrior" created sense at the time because I felt like the effort it took to endure the private change I was faced with felt like nothing short of Warriorship. I like to think that Trungpa Rinpoche "threw the book at me". There are endless things to be said about this book, the path of human being as Trungpa Rinpoche tutorials it, and our whole existence on planet earth. If you are drawn to the book for any reason I would recommend not hesitating. Buy it now and dive in.On an aesthetic note- the size, shape and covers of this edition are really special.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    I love this book. I picked it up before sinking my teeth into Shambhala training at my local Shambhala center. If you are curious about meditation, I'd highly recommend this book. It is eye opening for practitioners and non-practitioners alike. Chogyam Trungpa writes for the common person, and shares insights that bring into focus the profound parts of daily life. A amazing book for yourself or a meaningful gift. I couldn't recommend it enough! I've already read it more than more once and I predict I'll be re-reading a lot of times to come.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    I was familiar with the Ed Thomas story. I just didn't know the info until I read this book. Tag did a amazing job of not making the entire book about football. The first two-thirds or so are about how Ed responded to the town's tornado, then it shifts more to football. The book reads like a amazing letter from a amazing friend. Amazing detail. The book flows. I don't think there is really any slow part. But most of all, Ed Thomas is an perfect inspiration.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    This book makes you take a look at your own life and critique it. It is very thought provoking about how God can live at the center of your life and you still live in the true globe and work in the public school system. Amazing read. I will read it again and again. Since I am from Iowa and know that this is how a lot of little communities work, it hit very close to home. I actually bought another copy to share with my family.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    This book is a classic in the Tibetan Buddhist globe of meditation and spirituality. In this presentation Buddhist Master Chögyam Trungpa shows how Shambhala Fighters can, and indeed must, bring to their private spiritual practice gentle mindful loving kindness as an inevitable, a necessary, and a natural part of human spiritual living and growth. Shambhala concepts have impacted and influenced the Western Globe (and my own life) immensely since this book was published in English so a lot of years ago. Read and re-read it several times and you’ll see what I mean...Captain Jack

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    I'm from Iowa so I heard all about this in the news but really had no idea about who Ed Thomas really was. I had a mate tell me that I just had to read this book latest fall, and I kept putting it off until latest week and when I did, I couldn't place it down.What an awesome story - its a very meaningful book even if you don't know diddly about football. Parkersburg lost an wonderful man but its wonderful the difference he created in the lives he AND his family have touched. How they reacted to his loss is something we should all take a lesson from. I will be rereading this again and again.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    You will love Ed Thomas. Who of us has not known a coach like him - dedicated, caring and driven. Ed Thomas was all of this and a believer in Christ as well. If you wish to be blessed and inspired yourself, you will wish to read this book. You'll laugh and you will cry. It will cause you, as it has me, to be grateful for the time you have upon this earth to impact the lives of others. Do read this book! I highly recommend it.

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    The Bhagavad-gita: The Sacred Song []  2020-2-1 4:30

    Perfect translation, it's simple to read and understand. Plus it isn't bogged down with ISKCON theology like the Prahupada translation and is a amazing translation to begin memorizing from because the English flows smoothly and isn't loaded with untranslated Sanskrit terms.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    Must say this is one of the best books I have ever read. Whether you are a football fan, a Christian, a Christian football fan, or simply one who enjoys hearing or reading about a real character who lived life the method it is meant to be lived. I laughed. I cried. And throughout the book I felt like I was a part of the Thomas family. This is not a book about football. It is a book about living life to its fullest. Truly remarkable book. Highly recommend to anyone.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    What a unbelievable life I took the time to  read this book finally  When  i was sitting in a hospital room with my wife and two day old son until then i had never read an entire book. i could not place it ing from St. Ansgar i knew of coach Thomas as a coach of the other squad that was always going to be our toughest android game of the year. we had the up most respect for AP. I heard of the loss while i was serving the county after high school. My heart sunk.  I read the book at the right time because shortly after birth my wife and I learned our son would be blind. It was true tough and i required something to take my mind off things i read the book and not only passed time but realized God has a plan for my family and we need to trust in him. gave me a wake up call and perspective of how precious life is. i would recommend this book  to any one but especially going though a tough time and may be lost in life... Thank you

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    Fundamental text in Shambhala Buddhism, both for the beginner and the long time student. Material is accessible, yet profound and the depth is well worth revisiting repeatedly.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    I had some reservations about reading this book because of the double tragedies that occurred in Parkersburg on May 25, 2008 and June 24, 2009. However, Tag Tabb strikes a amazing balance between the tragedies and the aftermath. How so a lot of people, not only the Aplington-Parkersburg football squad and Ed Thomas' students, but also the residents of Parkersburg looked to Coach Thomas guidance as the bellweather of the town's morale. This isn't a biography but Tag Tabb presents a full portrait of Ed Thomas, his struggles with his father's alcoholism, his genuine love of God, his family, friends, colleagues and every one of his players and students. Through the amazing and poor times, he never gave up on anyone, even those individuals who felt unworthy of other's compassion. A truly inspirational read about overcoming adversity, perserverance, and most importantly, forgiveness.

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    The Sacred Acre: The Ed Thomas Story []  2020-1-26 23:38

    I went to college a half hour away from Parkersburg and my instructor was a large fan of Coach Thomas. We read this book, keeping his and his family's leadership styles in mind, but really I would recommend this book to anyone. This family was awesome in the face of tragedy and if anything so not good ever happens to me or mine, I hope that I could follow in their footsteps.

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    The Bhagavad-gita: The Sacred Song []  2020-2-1 4:30

    It's about time that we obtain a fresh translation of the Bhagavad Gita. The most famous ver nowadays seems to be Swami Prabhupada's version, but unfortunately, he seems to think he is god. Prasad takes a much more low-key approach, simply translating the Gita to the best of his ability and allowing the reader to create sense of it rather than forcing his own opinions on others. Any time there is the chance of confusion, Prasad defines his terms and goes to the additional effort to create sure that what Vyasa was trying to describe is clear to even ones not familiar with Indian philosophy. More accurate than most other translations and rendered into modern prose, this makes an perfect put to begin with if you're fresh to Eastern thought. Few terms are left in Sanskrit other than those that are important (Dharma, Karma, etc.). A unbelievable addition to any seeker's library.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    I had for my brother who is going through a rough time in life, he is into spirituality but doesn't like to talk about it. This is a nice book because it isnt very pushy and doesn't force it's faith onto the reader. Chogyam Trungpa more talks about the human condition as a whole in a method we can all relate. Not like some other faiths that say this is amazing and this is bad, if you do this your amazing but if you do that you're bad. Which makes it easier for my brother to read and not place his defenses up.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    I love this book, and have bought multiple copies. I have to complain, though, that I can't stand this edition. It's and tiny. Shambhala Press published a fine full-size hard-cover edition some years back, but that was then and this is now. I'm hoping demand will justify a more attractive, larger edition. Quoting Trungpa, "As you meditate.... may you be bombarded with coconuts of awareness."More advanced students familiar with Trungpa will know that copies of this book should properly be hand-calligraphed with a brush created of hair from the tail of an albino tiger, raised, never knowing conflict, in an imperial court.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    A guideline to transforming your life internally. The author does obtain into the abstract Tibetan concepts and aligns it to practical living but if you expect step by step method to apply, you’ll have to do deep reading and analysis of writing.

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    Unexpected Rewards: Travelling to the Arctic With a Mobility Scooter []  2020-1-25 5:10

    Such a unbelievable story about travelling with the challenges of disability. Amazing insight and certainly gives you more of an appreciation and understanding into how difficult some things can be. Had some unbelievable info about MS intertwined in it as well. Amazing read, and a very inspiring travel story.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    About the third time I've purchased this book. I hold giving it away. First read it 30 years ago and it has changed my life for the better. I've been hit with some difficult times over the years and this helped hold me going.

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    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior []  2020-1-22 22:22

    This can be dense for some people. Don't allow that discourage you. Read it through without worrying too much about understanding everything. As you progress along your path return to it and you'll search that it reveals itself to you in various ways each time. It's like terma. The teachings will appear to you as you can use them. You'll return to the book and wonder where the 'extra' chapters came from. :-)

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