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    Travels into the Interior of Africa []  2020-1-26 23:3

    Awesome travelogue of English 'gentleman explorer' in Africa.

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    Travels into the Interior of Africa []  2020-1-26 23:3

    It is a unbelievable and thrilling story written in a very humble tone with an aparant ambition to show what actually happened. It is surprisingly from prejudice, written at a time when I did not think this objectivity existed. A remarkable achievement.

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    Travels into the Interior of Africa []  2020-1-26 23:3

    Personally, I don't like Amazon's 5 star rating system, in my opinion too a lot of people rate books 5 star, which in my mind would be a book 100% excellent in every category. To me this is practically unattainable. So I give this book a 5 star rating with reservations, I would prefer a 4 3/4 rating if this were possible. There should be a 7 star rating system, with 7 stars being practically unattainable.Having said this, this is the greatest work of travel and exploration I have ever read. And I have read the greatest, all the African greats; Burton, Baker, Stanley, Livingston, Mary Kingsley & etc., etc. Also the North American giants; Lewis & Clark, Champlain, La Salle, Jedediah Smith and the rest; and most of the South Americans of fame, Spruce, Bates, Humbolt, Dr. Richard Schultes And latest but not least the the Asian explorers, such as Doughty, Thessiger, Hedin and a lot of more. I say this so you know where I'm coming from. But "Travels into the Interior of Africa" by Mungo Park is my favorite. Read it and you may agree with me, I don't know why this book is so ignored, especially after reading so a lot of rave reviews on Amazon on Mary Kingsley's, "Travels in West Africa" {but she deserves it}.There are heart touching as well as humorous scenes in this book especially in his encounters with African women. Park's courage, perseverance, humility, humanity and his empathy for the African peoples he encounters as well as his informative acc of the exotic makes this book a amazing read. The "good, the bad, and the ugly" are all here, and it is written in a straightforward and manly me he was truly one of the greatest explorers of all times!The "Eland" edition I have is of fairly amazing quality, but overpriced.

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    An Account of Travels Into the Interior of Southern Africa in the Years 1797 and 1798 (1802) []  2020-1-26 23:4

    Very interesting acc of travels prior to 1900.

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    An Account of Travels Into the Interior of Southern Africa in the Years 1797 and 1798 (1802) []  2020-1-26 23:4

    An wonderful review of historic travel of one of the greatest missionary statesman of the century

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Awesome first hand acc of travel in the latter part of the 18th century. Anyone who has been to West Africa or planning to go or move there should read this book. I didn't search it tedious. I found it enlightening as to the history and culture (which, in a lot of ways, hasn't changed). A valuable book if one is interested in Mali at all.

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    A very well written first-person acc of Mungo Park's visit to Africa in the late 1700s. This book should be needed reading for all high school graduates, since reading it would clear up a lot of false notions connected with African/American slavery. Although Mr. Parks was anti-slavery, he plainly states that 75% of Africans were slaves to the other 25%, and that the buying and of slaves among Africans and the of slaves to Europeans were as common and natural as life itself.

    0  


  • 0

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    Awesome first hand acc of travel in the latter part of the 18th century. Anyone who has been to West Africa or planning to go or move there should read this book. I didn't search it tedious. I found it enlightening as to the history and culture (which, in a lot of ways, hasn't changed). A valuable book if one is interested in Mali at all.

    0  


  • 0

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    A fascinating insight into Africa in 1795

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Coudl have been contemorary. Very interesting insight in the culture and thougts of anno end of the Remarkably and surprisingly not much racism. Simple to read.

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  • 0

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Wonderful acc of his travels. It does drag a bit toward then end, certainly doesn't paint a very nice picture of the Blacks in their own native country. Park bends over backwards to test and understand and empathize with the Blacks he travels through and he certainly meets some outstandingly amazing individuals. But in general, they tend to be beautiful unpleasant characters: greedy, selfish, belligerent. The worst of the people he encounters are the Moors, the Moslem Africans. They're really despicable. But the other Blacks are beautiful miserable, too, not just to the defenseless Park, but to each other, continually waging battle and enslaving each other. And it's this same tendency to belligerence and greediness that causes Park's ultimate is picture of the Africans in their native land was completely unexpected and left a true poor taste in my mouth. This is just one man's experiences so I probably shouldn't put too much weight on it. Park does compare his poor treatment to what he could have expected in his own country if he'd been traveling alone and carrying amazing treasure, i.e., he couldn't have expected any better.A Frenchman, Rene Cailllie, actually created it through to Timbucktoo 20 years later and wrote a long book about it. Unfortunately, it's no longer in print, although it's available from Google in PDF. Don't know when I'll create time to read it, I don't own an eReader.I guess the best thing you can say about this whole ugly business is that it just shows how over-populated Africa had become and how advanced the African Blacks had become towards civilization.I really can't recommend this book highly enough. This Wordsworth edition is really excellent, too.

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    Mungo Park was a keen, humane, and fair-minded observer. The villains in his acc are the Moors, who he found to be rapacious, treacherous, and vicious.

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  • 0

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    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    As the first of the amazing African Explorers, Mungo Park certainly had a amazing role in opening up Africa to European exploration (and yes, exploitation). His narrative of his adventures in Western Africa searching for the source of the Niger river is full of excitement, intrigue, narrow escapes and adventure. Highly recommended to anyone interested in real adventure stories!!!

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    As the first of the amazing African Explorers, Mungo Park certainly had a amazing role in opening up Africa to European exploration (and yes, exploitation). His narrative of his adventures in Western Africa searching for the source of the Niger river is full of excitement, intrigue, narrow escapes and adventure. Highly recommended to anyone interested in real adventure stories!!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    I read this a while ago, so I can't remember details, but it's a terrific first-person acc not peppered with any conventional narrative glossing, so it's a raw gem that provides amazing insight into exploration before the globe became much smaller.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Mungo Park was a keen, humane, and fair-minded observer. The villains in his acc are the Moors, who he found to be rapacious, treacherous, and vicious.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    Wonderful acc of his travels. It does drag a bit toward then end, certainly doesn't paint a very nice picture of the Blacks in their own native country. Park bends over backwards to test and understand and empathize with the Blacks he travels through and he certainly meets some outstandingly amazing individuals. But in general, they tend to be beautiful unpleasant characters: greedy, selfish, belligerent. The worst of the people he encounters are the Moors, the Moslem Africans. They're really despicable. But the other Blacks are beautiful miserable, too, not just to the defenseless Park, but to each other, continually waging battle and enslaving each other. And it's this same tendency to belligerence and greediness that causes Park's ultimate is picture of the Africans in their native land was completely unexpected and left a true poor taste in my mouth. This is just one man's experiences so I probably shouldn't put too much weight on it. Park does compare his poor treatment to what he could have expected in his own country if he'd been traveling alone and carrying amazing treasure, i.e., he couldn't have expected any better.A Frenchman, Rene Cailllie, actually created it through to Timbucktoo 20 years later and wrote a long book about it. Unfortunately, it's no longer in print, although it's available from Google in PDF. Don't know when I'll create time to read it, I don't own an eReader.I guess the best thing you can say about this whole ugly business is that it just shows how over-populated Africa had become and how advanced the African Blacks had become towards civilization.I really can't recommend this book highly enough. This Wordsworth edition is really excellent, too.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    A very well written first-person acc of Mungo Park's visit to Africa in the late 1700s. This book should be needed reading for all high school graduates, since reading it would clear up a lot of false notions connected with African/American slavery. Although Mr. Parks was anti-slavery, he plainly states that 75% of Africans were slaves to the other 25%, and that the buying and of slaves among Africans and the of slaves to Europeans were as common and natural as life itself.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Park's acc of his travels though western Africa in the late 18th century provide a completely fresh (for perspective) on indigenous communities, structures of authority, Islamic vs. traditional religious groups, and the nature of the slave trade. In Park's Africa, the European traveler is still vulnerable to the strictures and control of Africans.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Even back in 1795 good-natured explorer Mungo Park deeply feared the muslim slavers of the indiginous e issues of today are nothing new.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    I read this a while ago, so I can't remember details, but it's a terrific first-person acc not peppered with any conventional narrative glossing, so it's a raw gem that provides amazing insight into exploration before the globe became much smaller.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2019-12-26 18:52

    I liked this book quite a lot. I bought it after reading Travels Volume One. Mungo Park showed a lot of compassion and understanding of the different tribes he encountered in Africa. I found the culture and traditions of the people very interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    Coudl have been contemorary. Very interesting insight in the culture and thougts of anno end of the Remarkably and surprisingly not much racism. Simple to read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    Park's acc of his travels though western Africa in the late 18th century provide a completely fresh (for perspective) on indigenous communities, structures of authority, Islamic vs. traditional religious groups, and the nature of the slave trade. In Park's Africa, the European traveler is still vulnerable to the strictures and control of Africans.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Travels in the Interior of Africa (1893) (Illustrated, Complete Edition) []  2020-9-15 18:52

    Mungo Park1771... Scotsman... the age of 24 volunteered to discover Africa alone despite being married, knowing that his predecessor, Major Houghton, was killed. He was to trace the origin of river Niger.He travelled by horse & foot inside deep Africa where White Men and Christians were completely unknown & hated and almost always will search exotic names like Timbaktoo in his journey. With him you will enter an altogether various globe without Electricity, roads, communication and newspapers. He will introduce you to Moors, Mohammedans, @#$%!&s and Slaves. You will observe their customs and method of living first-hand. You will be surprised when an African says “Strike me, but do not curse my Mother”. Ancestral worship among a lot of undiscovered aspects of Africa.His is a painful but attractive story of exploration, the fields, the hills, rivers and most importantly the people with human spirit intact. Don’t forget this was the peak period in slavery. You will search the of a young, male slave at 20 Pound Sterling ! His sensitive but controlled description of the conditions of these slaves, the ladies who fed him with care and love when he was sure to die of hunger will bring tears to your eyes. He has immortalised the song which the Slave lady sang when she fed him after he had begged everyone for meal & no one would feed a Christian.Juxtapose this with treachery, barbarism, helplessness, everyday fear of horrible death from bandits and lions, the miles long walks on foot through difficult terrain always on no or small food, water. Mungo Park was robbed of everything including the shirt on his back. He still had the courage to hold on going begin thinking what kept Mungo Park going ? He was the ultimate “Adventurer” !His few and rare friendships formed with the locals, his happiness to see the reunion of old mates after years, his desperate attempts to test to his attendants from slavery will bring a lump to your throat which will refuse to subside for quite a e episode where the Captain of the ship throws aboard 126 slaves to claim insurance will leave you aghast. The latest 26 of them looked the ship’s officers in the eye, did not let anyone to touch them, and jumped off on their own to sure deaths. The win of human spirit is written in these is is a treasure worthy book. With all the limitations brought about after 220 years, it still appeared so new to me !Hope you have fun it as much as I did and shed a tear for Mungo Park. His name should be there .... right at the top... with all other Amazing Explorers !!

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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    Experience Africa, discover 13 countries, right in the comfort of wherever you are! Soar in wing planes, travel by sea. Drink in the attractive scenery, sneak peek into various cultures, history and traditions. Experience the overwhelming welcoming warmth in various settings, hotels, communities. Join in the conversations, learn a fresh language, share the food, drink plenty coconut milk! Without a care in this world, sit on the pier and count the boats. Then go on hikes, visit attractive resorts, dance to the birds' attractive melody, dare to discover the islands! Create fresh mates and don't be too sad when it all comes to an end and you have to say goodbye to African Memories! This book is that good!!! Loved it!

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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    The book description said, among other things, "Escape to Africa with the attractive photographs and videos from: Senegal Ghana The Gambia Mauritania Cote D’Ivoire or Ivory Coast Morocco Cameroon Nigeria Egypt Kenya Libya Benin Cabo Verde Mali".. "enjoy the attractive and stunning pictures of Africa."I assumed the book was full of attractive images of Western Africa. It was not. The main part of the book has 8 images: 4 are pages of a magazine, 1 is of a tripod and a camera, and 1 is of the author. There are links to www services in the book if one wants to see "beautiful images of Western Africa."I bought this book to give to a formerly homeless man, now gainfully employed and doing very well, who recently had a once in a lifetime opportunity to travel to Western Africa with a mission group. So the book was a deep disappointment.

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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    Experience Africa, discover 13 countries, right in the comfort of wherever you are! Soar in wing planes, travel by sea. Drink in the attractive scenery, sneak peek into various cultures, history and traditions. Experience the overwhelming welcoming warmth in various settings, hotels, communities. Join in the conversations, learn a fresh language, share the food, drink plenty coconut milk! Without a care in this world, sit on the pier and count the boats. Then go on hikes, visit attractive resorts, dance to the birds' attractive melody, dare to discover the islands! Create fresh mates and don't be too sad when it all comes to an end and you have to say goodbye to African Memories! This book is that good!!! Loved it!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    I have been reading Ndeye's, books over the past year. I am always amazed, how quickly she makes mates and her courage to travel in unknown circumstances. But she always prevails. I learned a few things about Ndeye, like being a student pilot, a modern day explorer, here drive for fresh adventures, all impressive.Her book African Memories, describes her trials and tribulations, challenges, successes, disappointments and loss of friends. I applaud the detail in her book, and I hope she continues to discover and write, so that readers can live through her books. Amazing ic Moore

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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    I've always wanted to travel to Africa. Reading Ndeye's book brought Africa to life! She described the setting of each put she journeyed so effectively, I almost felt like I was traveling with her! I felt I really got to know her through her book - I mean, beyond being and amazing, educated, spirited beauty, she's also skilled as a pilot! Wow!I was drawn into her experiences much more than I expected. I definitely have some locations in mind for my future visit to Africa. I'm really glad I took the time to check this book out. I'm excited to read her other books!

    0  


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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    As an aspiring globe traveler I found this book refreshing. Reading the authors accounts of traveling all over Africa was like being there. Even though some things have changed in some o the locations, like the Ivory Coast, the authors accounts were refreshing. I found some spots from this book that are now on my bucket list of locations to visit. It's like taking an adventure without having to leave home.

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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    This book is quite adventurous!! I can't believe the author was actually in a plane crash!! Not everyone can live to tell that!! Quite interesting to see what it's like to live in other places!! Amazing book!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    I've always wanted to travel to Africa. Reading Ndeye's book brought Africa to life! She described the setting of each put she journeyed so effectively, I almost felt like I was traveling with her! I felt I really got to know her through her book - I mean, beyond being and amazing, educated, spirited beauty, she's also skilled as a pilot! Wow!I was drawn into her experiences much more than I expected. I definitely have some locations in mind for my future visit to Africa. I'm really glad I took the time to check this book out. I'm excited to read her other books!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    This book is quite adventurous!! I can't believe the author was actually in a plane crash!! Not everyone can live to tell that!! Quite interesting to see what it's like to live in other places!! Amazing book!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    This was quite possibly the MOST special non-fiction book I've ever read! I expected to see and learn about some African sites, but this book offered much, much more! I didn't expect to be completely 'drawn into' the author's journey like I was! Not only did the author describe the setting of each put she journeyed, but she described her own private experience so effectively, I almost felt like I was traveling with her! And I definitely felt like I WANTED to travel with her! This is because you feel like you actually KNOW her after reading the first few pages of her book. Ndeye (the author) is a kind, savvy, educated, globe traveler, model, pilot - and I'm not sure what else. Haha! I search that I MUST read her earlier books so I can learn more about this intriguing individual! I gave this book 5 stars because Ndeye went well beyond telling me about her travels in Africa. She brought me along with her. What a delightful surprise!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    She makes you feel like a amazing mate invited along to have fun her travels through locations you dreamed of seeing in person. The images give you even more sense of being there all while savoring it through Ndeye's travel expertise, curiosity & appreciation for other cultures. AND how cool is it that besides all her entrepreneurial talents, she is also a little plane pilot! What better method to see the countryside. This book is a neat method to have that African travel adventure you've dreamed of and created possible by just diving into the pages of her book. So, where are you traveling to next, Ndeye?

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    I have been reading Ndeye's, books over the past year. I am always amazed, how quickly she makes mates and her courage to travel in unknown circumstances. But she always prevails. I learned a few things about Ndeye, like being a student pilot, a modern day explorer, here drive for fresh adventures, all impressive.Her book African Memories, describes her trials and tribulations, challenges, successes, disappointments and loss of friends. I applaud the detail in her book, and I hope she continues to discover and write, so that readers can live through her books. Amazing ic Moore

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    This was quite possibly the MOST special non-fiction book I've ever read! I expected to see and learn about some African sites, but this book offered much, much more! I didn't expect to be completely 'drawn into' the author's journey like I was! Not only did the author describe the setting of each put she journeyed, but she described her own private experience so effectively, I almost felt like I was traveling with her! And I definitely felt like I WANTED to travel with her! This is because you feel like you actually KNOW her after reading the first few pages of her book. Ndeye (the author) is a kind, savvy, educated, globe traveler, model, pilot - and I'm not sure what else. Haha! I search that I MUST read her earlier books so I can learn more about this intriguing individual! I gave this book 5 stars because Ndeye went well beyond telling me about her travels in Africa. She brought me along with her. What a delightful surprise!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    The book description said, among other things, "Escape to Africa with the attractive photographs and videos from: Senegal Ghana The Gambia Mauritania Cote D’Ivoire or Ivory Coast Morocco Cameroon Nigeria Egypt Kenya Libya Benin Cabo Verde Mali".. "enjoy the attractive and stunning pictures of Africa."I assumed the book was full of attractive images of Western Africa. It was not. The main part of the book has 8 images: 4 are pages of a magazine, 1 is of a tripod and a camera, and 1 is of the author. There are links to www services in the book if one wants to see "beautiful images of Western Africa."I bought this book to give to a formerly homeless man, now gainfully employed and doing very well, who recently had a once in a lifetime opportunity to travel to Western Africa with a mission group. So the book was a deep disappointment.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    An enjoyable glimpse into a continent that currently feels so out of reach for this, sadly, not well-traveled suburban mom. At times I had difficulty keeping areas straight, but this may have been due to my own geographical ignorance. Overall, nice recount to inspire the vagabond within each of us.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    She makes you feel like a amazing mate invited along to have fun her travels through locations you dreamed of seeing in person. The images give you even more sense of being there all while savoring it through Ndeye's travel expertise, curiosity & appreciation for other cultures. AND how cool is it that besides all her entrepreneurial talents, she is also a little plane pilot! What better method to see the countryside. This book is a neat method to have that African travel adventure you've dreamed of and created possible by just diving into the pages of her book. So, where are you traveling to next, Ndeye?

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    This shows a side of Africa I never read much about. The true life adventures of a brave young woman as she travels through several countries. Her experiences with flying planes (and similar mishaps!) was amazing to experience through her words and pictures. It's a special publication, written in a very private style. A amazing method to begin learning about travel in Africa.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa ((Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-7-28 19:22

    This shows a side of Africa I never read much about. The true life adventures of a brave young woman as she travels through several countries. Her experiences with flying planes (and similar mishaps!) was amazing to experience through her words and pictures. It's a special publication, written in a very private style. A amazing method to begin learning about travel in Africa.

    0  


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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    As an aspiring globe traveler I found this book refreshing. Reading the authors accounts of traveling all over Africa was like being there. Even though some things have changed in some o the locations, like the Ivory Coast, the authors accounts were refreshing. I found some spots from this book that are now on my bucket list of locations to visit. It's like taking an adventure without having to leave home.

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    African Memories: Travels to the interior of Africa (Travels and Adventures of Ndeye Labadens Book 3) []  2020-8-26 19:29

    An enjoyable glimpse into a continent that currently feels so out of reach for this, sadly, not well-traveled suburban mom. At times I had difficulty keeping areas straight, but this may have been due to my own geographical ignorance. Overall, nice recount to inspire the vagabond within each of us.

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    great

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    I bought this CD for background sounds for a powerpoint presentation on my trip to Africa, for a Mates of the NRA Foundation banquet with a "safari" theme. It was the excellent choice -- unbelievable sounds of the forest, savannah and bushlands. Having heard the birds and animals in person -- including lions and leopards -- I can attest to the authenticity of this recording.

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    I play this while working on my paintings of African landscape and wildlife - I lived in Africa for nearly forty years and loved the bush. Although I can't recognise all the sounds, it still makes me think of home. A lot of thanks!

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    EXXCELLENT SOUND QUALITY. GREAT CD! SEEMS YOU ARE THERE PRESENT IN THE AFRICAN PLAINS. RELAXING AND VERY INSPIRING! HIGLY RECOMENDED!

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    This was exactly what i was looking for!! An hours worth of pure african sounds of the bush! No music, no interruptions, just lovely typical african sounds of the wild.

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    Amazing service and a amazing product

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    we required this for backgound sounds, works great

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    Es un cd de muy buen sonido , realista y de una muy buena duracion , perfecto para ambientar una fiesta , un restaurant , una obra teatral o simplemente para relajacion.

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    Sounds of the Earth: Into Africa []  2020-2-2 21:51

    The sound quality of this CD is extraordinary and I highly recommend it for everything except relaxation and/or lulling yourself to sleep! I turned lights off, CD on, and started to drift off to really attractive and clear as a bell bird calls; even the hyena calls in the distance were pleasant. Then the growling started right, it seemed, at the foot of my bed, and worked itself up into a terrific series of roars. This, at least for a primate, is not relaxing. After a while, the lion faded away and the birds came back, followed by something - leopard? - growling and snarling in a low, sneaky "I really AM in your bedroom" sort of way. At the point where the leopard started dismantling some formerly living thing, I got up, turned off the CD, checked under the bed, and went to sleep under my own power. So, do and listen to this for atmosphere; the quality is unbelievable and the dozens of calls, etc., is really good. But don't expect it to lull you to sleep.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    If I've got this right Fenton believes Homo Sapiens did evolve in Africa and then migrated out of the continent to Europe, Asia, and finally Australia. Along the method inbreeding happened with Neanderthals, Denisovans, and anybody else along the way. Fenton also believes that all Homos could successfully interbreed. But not everybody did. Some interbred only with Neanderthals and some only Denisovans. Unfortunately there was a amazing volcano eruption, the worst in 2.5 million years, and everybody was wiped out save the residents of Australia who in time migrated back through Asia, Europe, and into Africa. Okay this doesn't create any sense. Well it gets worse. Seems the folks living in Tierra del Fuego are remnants of the first migration into the Americas. And I think Fenton feels they are somehow similar to those folks formerly called Bushmen and some others in Australia.Well I think that's his thesis. I can't substantiate it though because the writing is so convoluted that I finally used paper and pen to test following his jumbled and unreadable text. Incidentally there are only 124 pages in this self published book and no index. I certainly can understand why no publisher would touch it. Incidentally Fenton notes that there are physical differences between today's races, e.g. blood types and tooth shape but finishes with the broad generalization that we are one species and one race. Seems there are some leaps of logic here. Europeans have some Neanderthal genes but no Denisovan. Huh? So how did. . .oh well, I is is just a really poor book. I urge the dear reader to save his (her) money.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    Unbelievable survey of the literature and thoroughly up-to-date, even citing sources from 2017. Fenton has given us a mind-blowing, paradigm shattering work. My only complaint is that his writing style is sometimes hard to read and follow. No complaints whatsoever about the content. Superb stuff.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    A lot of things about the history of man on Earth can be explained by this theory. In studying languages of the world, for instance, a "Teaching Company" course on the spread of languages through North America stated that the languages moved from South to North (with the obvious exception of newcomers from East Asia, the Eskimos and NA Dene speakers.) If North America was populated first, moving slowly into South America, the languages would travel that way. However, if a amazing catastrophe such as the author describes destroyed most of civilization in the Northern Hemisphere, the North American continent would then have been populated from the South, hence the older languages would have been from there. The author does not mention this odd fact, but his book certainly explains why it is so. That and a lot of other things we have learned in the latest few years that go versus the paradigm we have been given are explained in this book. Anyone who is interested in the peopling of the planet should read this and begin their minds to some interesting ideas. Never stop learning.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    I really admire people who have the patience to go through humungous amounts of data, take a new look at it and write a book about it. People tend to obtain stuck with paradigms given to them at one scene or other that are not necessarily accurate, and then move on with their lives without looking back or giving the matter another thought, thinking that the problem is solved. The same can be said about so a lot of other “facts” given to us by scientists in other fields. We must always hold an begin mind and hold examining data, otherwise we will never really know what really took put on this planet. Theories are not solid facts and data can be interpreted one method or another depending on the institution or people that brainwashed you. In the past few years I have gone through a large revision of thought due to researchers such as the one who compiled and researched this data. I really enjoyed reading this book and have already tried to challenge one or two archaeologists that I know. They were reluctant as expected (archaeologists tend to dig their feet into the ground and automatically refuse anything that may change or challenge their globe view). I don’t call that science but fear, and unfortunately there’s a lot of that going around.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    An enjoyable read created less so in a book without maps, photographs, or time/charts to illustrate the author's thesis and no comprehensive index to enable the reader to easily cross-check data. With no reference to Man in the Americas save at the very end of the book when the author promises an upcoming sequel offering yet another fresh and controversial theory, I was left to admire amazing marketing as well as balk at an obvious hook.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    I’ve witnessed a slew of paradigm shifts in my life and career. The rise of the Internet and Amazon’s decimation of bookstores and retail. The shift from Madison Avenue brand advertising to online ad auctions like Google and e fall of Neo-Darwinism and the rise of the extended synthesis and systems biology, which is going on right now and is every bit as tectonic as Amazon and Google. The taxi industry being clobbered by Uber. Watching records give method to CDs which gave method to Spotify and online streaming. Now we’re watching fiat currencies obtain clobbered by cryptocurrencies.I remember the fall of the Berlin Wall and how quick the iron curtain fell during the following two years, noting that Marxism seems to be back in universities; and a fresh generation that seems eager to re-create the genocides and mayhem of 100 years can rewind 80 years and look at how Godel’s incompleteness theorem clobbered logical positivism in mathematics. You can also message that logical positivism is still beautiful fashionable among the Fresh Atheists. Even though Godel proved it false in 1931.I’m a student of such revolutions and I study them closely. And this is to say nothing of the mini-revolutions that happen inside of different industries, noticed only by insiders. One example would be the revolution that happened in networking on factory floors in the late 90s. I’ve been involved in tons of such paradigm shifts.Every one of these revolutions was spurred by an OUTSIDER. Jeff Bezos, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the founders of Uber; Sony and Phillips with the CD and then Spotify; the fresh powers that took over the communist bloc countries and Kurt Godel; none of these were part of the amazing old boys club that had been defending the status quo. The old guard fought them all - tooth and e revolution in evolution right now is being driven by Denis Noble, a physiologist; James Shapiro, a geneticist and student of McClintock; neither he nor she ever bought into the usual dogmas; and people from a dozen various fields like semiotics, cybernetics and info theory. The Royal Society meeting in 2016 that announced the revolution in evolution was co-hosted by the British Academy (all participants from the BA being outside of evolutionary biology); all this was done in defiance of hostile resistance from old-school Neo-Darwinists, who fought it beautiful much the same method the taxi bosses have been fighting Uber: not in the lab, not with proof and evidence, but in Town any time a book comes along and to upend a current paradigm, I’m inclined to of course 80-90% of the people who write such books are cranks. But when someone does have a chance of legitimacy, there are telltale signs. Bruce Fenton provides such signs when he says:“Wherever possible, we focus on peer-reviewed scientific papers based on research guided by solid protocols, in almost all cases the scientific sources I have used can be considered mainstream authorities. There are a few instances where non-academics are my sources, but only where they special insight into research that is itself accepted by the scientific community. The revised view of human origins on here is so radical that I could not risk undermining it by using potentially questionable sources, even where such sources appeared to provide a genuine revelation which would help this work.”That’s exactly what I looked for. When I began questioning the old-school interpretation of Darwinian evolution myself, I found that all the evidence I could possibly need to overturn the old paradigm was already available in large abundance from the existing scientific literature. If you could do a find on Google Scholar and had some idea what you were looking for, you could search mountains of y times all you required was a various angle than everyone else inside the field. In my case for the book “Evolution 2.0” it was simply my background as a communication engineer and my professional experience with understand codes and coding systems. Aside from that it was possible to stick assiduously to well-confirmed, non-controversial facts to build the bricks of the quickly became obvious that alternative models were available in abundance. Suddenly work by people like McClintock, Margulis, Jablonka etc came into sharp focus. And I found out those women were vigorously opposed by the amazing ol boys clubs; and because of this had been forced to articulate their views with amazing clarity and mountains of proof. (The most latest review paper in the journal "Biology" by James Shapiro has over 700 references. His 2011 book has 1100.) Lesson: Don't bring a knife to a seems that this is what Fenton has done. Now I must create the disclaimer that I am I have not studied anthropology or paleontology in detail and I’m NOT qualified to tell you whether Fenton is right or wrong. What I can tell you is that his approach is related to other competent outsiders who critique academia with precision and care.A lot of people don’t seem to realize that because of the funding structures in science - with only a handful of organizations handing out almost all the money, and universities being intensely political locations - that breaking lockstep with the majority is usually suicide for a me people imagine scientists to be independent objective thinkers with generous luxuries of academic freedom. But scientists are human beings just like everyone else, topic to tribal behavior and prejudices. And because of the nature of peer review, where the “peers” are almost by definition defenders of some particular conservative status quo; because of tenure and funding; scientists therefore are topic to *enormous* peer pressure. Every scientist knows just how much they can afford to buck the system before they commit career suicide. If you’re going to break the paradigm you have to be of nearly rock-star quality. And it will probably take you 30 years to be taken e old adage “it’s not what you know it’s who you know” is even more real in science than it is even in so what you will see with research scientist rock stars who have become “bulletproof” is that they display a markedly various stance towards traditional views. George Church from Harvard, for example, holds a lot of views that differ from the mainstream, but he simply doesn’t care about the controversy because he has so a lot of choices of projects and funding sources that it does not affect him. One can only admire the sense of Fenton dares to ask the question: “When we examine hominids and neanderthals and genomes and skulls all over the world, does the evidence really tell a story that humans originated from Africa?”His respond is a resounding “no.” They came primarily from Australasia. And they got to Africa in boats - later. And furthermore, humans developed in independent populations around the globe and re-converged in later years, merging the strength of all those disparate evolutionary paths back into a single population which became modern humans.He carefully traces the logic that leads to these conclusions, citing a lot of a lot of papers and DNA analyses and dates, such that his argument in the end appeals to common again I might change my mind if I were to hear him cross-examined by people who espouse the out of Africa view. I don’t know. But what I can say is he’s created his case well and he doesn’t appear to be making anything up or stringing items together with duct tape.I do have a few criticisms. My 13 year old asked me to summarize the case he makes in the book and I had some difficulty doing it. Or course this could be my fault, but bullet point summaries piecing the key touchstones of evidence together at the end of different chapters would be helpful - especially if it was reduced to rock-solid e book has no graphics. Some pictorial diagrams or information graphics could be immensely helpful in simplifying the arguments. One has no difficulty imagining a power point slide that shows progressive layers of history, making Fenton’s arguments crystal clear and immediately persuasive.I also think the book is a small light in explaining the larger implications of changing the theory. Anytime theories like this shift, there are large dominoes. Historical, philosophical and technological. I’m not clear what they are but I’m sure they are there. I also felt like I lacked understanding in what his private story was. Something led him to do all this and feel it was important, and it’s probably not just the abstract truth. What was the motivation?It’s is often said that science proceeds one funeral at a time. It will be interesting to see how this fresh model fares over time, and what tables of changers it may overturn.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    The book presents a theory that mankind travelled all the method to Australia and then back out to complete the population of the globe with fully modern humans. This contains a genetic bottleneck caused by a volcanic eruption. I am going to reread this book and research opposing opinions and see what sense I can create of all point he makes that I help is his belief that early man was using boats earlier than usually given for, I search the opposing view that a viable population of humans were swept out to see by accident and rode mats of floating trees and branches to the islands leading to Australia to be very unconvincing. How a lot of floods and tsunamis does it take to move a viable sized population to an island?On the other hand, letting Grahm Hancock write the forward really damages his credibility. Hancock is a purveyor of crackpot theories. Yes, there are a lot of unanswered questions in history, but no, the answers do not need to verge into the realm of zone aliens or crustal displacement.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    An interesting book with an alternate human popul ation stort. I found it interesting, but the dots between the various points of evidence were unevenly connected leaving the impression that there were holes in the arguments. The genetic data, for example, is interesting, but not conpelling without being more complete. The thin data ww have has explanations that differ from tjose presented in the book. I expect there are a lot of elements of this theory that will survive the coming years and the Modified out of Africa theory may turn into the out of Africa, then back in, then out again as we obtain more nuanced reads of DNA >100K years old. A amazing value for the money. I didn't change the cores of my views after reading this, but a number of info in the peopling of the globe seem like they will undergo refinement in the next decade.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    I have never been comfortable with the theory of modern man's latest colonisation of the globe and his displacement of more primitive human forms. I was therefore happy to read a book where the author puts forward an alternative theory that he supports with facts that are are conveniently overlooked by die hard supporters of the 'out of Africa' theory. The author reaches at times to help his ideas but overall the book is a amazing read and it's a pleasure to search an informed person who is prepared to oppose the herd mentality and promote academic debate.

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    The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution []  2020-1-12 18:24

    Read this book for a contrast to the 'Out of Africa' concept of Sapien domination. Very well researched, conceptually accurate. A amazing read.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    We all as school kids learned of the popular British explorer David Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley..."Dr. Livingstone, I presume..." but there is so much more than just that...This generation of epic British explorers endured hardship, deprivation and private jeopardy beyond our wildest imaginations in the quest to explore the globe and all it's magnificence. Walking across the breadth of Africa, seeking it's secrets, deplorying it's slave trade, spreading the missionary spirit and ultimately dedicated to finding the source of the Nile, Livingstone stands with the amazing lions like Shackleton that define a country's greatness... the undaunted heroic spirit that defies all odds that even in the jaws of defeat, refuses to give up. Livingstone was never lost...he just ran out of supplies and meal and lost communication because of illness...Stanley, an American journalist working for the NY Herald 's publisher, Bennett, was sent to search him to boost circulation for the paper. And find he did...everything up...for 13 months he plodded through deepest, darkest Africa hoping to catch him in Ujiji...which he finally did...finding the amazing explorer debilitated, starving, verging on dementia yet singularly determined to search the source. Stanley spent only five months with Livingstone but that was long enough to obtain the amazing explorer back on his feet, into a canoe and renewing his search...and enough time to form a bond that transcended time and zone and lives on wherever amazing deeds are coming to fruition. SPOILER ALERT: Stanley went on to further enhance his endeavors as an adventure journalist. Livingstone died in Africa having never found the source...his body embalmed and shipped back to England for a royal burial as a amazing lion of the realm....and the kicker of the story... the source was discovered 100 years later from satellite images from zone showing the birth of the Nile about 600 miles north of Livingston's projections ....his greatness of spirit and dogged determination defined a nation and an era and will forevermore fire our imagination.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    A wonderfully faceted jewel for my collection on the African explorers, the find for the source of the Nile, and the history of Africa in general, which became invaluable resources for finally assembling my notes for "The Shameless Full Moon, Travels in Africa", probably my favorite of all the books I've published over the years--well over thirty. Both Stanley and Livingstone were bewitching, each in his own way, and as a duo they were unsurpassed, as is this exquisite reconstruction of their field notes and journals and the story of the landscape, their encounters, their vicisitudes and tribulations, along with their triumphs and accomplishments, which will never, given the conditions, ever be surpassed. If Livingstone was obstinate and ingenuous, if Stanley was often ruthless and cruel, each demanded more of himself than of any other, and by sheer force of will managed to achieve the sublime. There is no greater discovery than the power within oneself.

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    Out of Africa & Into the Cloud: Girls can Code too []  2020-5-6 18:0

    I applaud the author Dr. Isi. This is a book I highly recommend for amazing counsel in life and career choice.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    The meeting of Dr David Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley in the middle of Africa in 1871 is perhaps one of the most remarkable and dramatic happenings in history. Like the Miracle of Dunkirk, when a flotilla of civilian boats rescued the British troops from Nazi forces early in WWII, the near impossible odds of success and eventual epic win seem to be pulled from a Tolkien book rather than true history. Thus Martin Dugard’s Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone, is rightfully a story first and a history second. In Dugard’s story, Stanley is the real protagonist, who will survive Africa to become Livingstone’s successor as the world’s greatest explorer. However, he ends up working counter to the Doctor’s goal of a slavery-free Africa, tragically helping to create the Dark Continent... e book begins at the begin of Livingstone’s third and final trek into Africa in 1866. The globe renowned, prototypical explorer and paragon of Victorian virtue is desperate to redeem his reputation and finances after his disastrous 1858 Zambezi expedition. He sets out to search the source of the Nile, an elusive mystery since 460 BC when the ancient Greek Herodotus failed to search the source. However, despite setting out with his usual exhilaration, writing in his journal that Africa is “a tonic to the system”, the trials of Africa quickly overwhelm the now older man. His porters desert him, taking irreplaceable supplies. He constantly wars all manner of African diseases, often so weakened by fever and dysentery that his few remaining porters have to carry pletely obsessed with finding the source, he relies on the Arab slave traders he despises to continue his quest. Dugard writes that “it was as if he had sold a part of his soul in the name of ambition.” After staying with the slavers for five years, he witnesses the Arabs massacre a village of Africans deep in the center of the continent. Faced with the evil of the slave trade, he leaves for the little village of Ujiji, where, sick and without supplies, he helplessly and hopelessly waits for a “good Samaritan” to rescue stone has been gone for nearly four years and is presumed dead by a lot of when the Fresh York Herald’s owner, James Gordon Bennett, seeking an exciting story to distract the public from a gold shop scandal, assigns Stanley, his foreign correspondent, the task of finding Livingstone. An unlikely African explorer, Stanley was born in England to a prostitute and the city drunk. Abandoned at the age of five, he was sent to live in a orphanage where he was regularly sexually violated until, at the age of 17, he escaped to America. In the States he wars for both the Confederacy and Union in the Civil War, where he discovers his talent for writing. After an ill-fated adventure in Turkey, he dedicates himself to journalism, eventually joining the staff of the onically, Stanley’s horrific upbringing prepares him well for the brutalities of an African expedition. After months of preparation, facing almost no possibility of success, he sets out with a huge caravan from Zanzibar. Struggling to lead his recalcitrant men, Stanley resorts to whipping them constantly, at one point writing in his journal “The virtue of a amazing whip was well tested by me”. Overcoming multiple mutiny attempts, a near fatal case of cerebral malaria, a battle with “The African Bonaparte”, crocodile attacks, and worst of all the unforgiving African landscape itself, Stanley finds the strength and confidence he has always lacked. Miraculously, he also finds Livingstone. Upon their meeting he asks the now popular question, “Doctor Livingstone, I presume?”Stanley and Livingstone spend weeks together in Ujiji. Stanly, “basking in the older man’s grace”, writes of the doctor:“I grant that he is not an angel, but he approaches to that being as near as the nature of a living man will allow.”Stanley tries to convince Livingstone to return to England with him but the Doctor refuses. Weeks after one of the most improbable meetings in history, Stanley returns to Zanzibar and Livingstone continues his quest for the source. He dies shortly after, his body destroyed by years of African hardship and disease, in a village almost 600 miles south of the actual source. Stanley takes up Livingstone’s mantle as the world’s greatest explorer, finding the source of the Congo and following the risky river all the method to the West coast of the continent.Dugard tells this story with amazing care and skill. He is himself an adventurer and while researching Into Africa, he followed Stanley’s path across what is today Tanzania, getting thrown into an African prison while doing so. This is, presumably, what helps him understand his explorers’ relationship with the African landscape, leading to unbelievable insights such as the following after Stanley’s near miss with a crocodile:“Africa had soothed him and calmed him and created him feel as if he were its master. But it was all a myth. The continent had no equal.”Dugard also enhances his story with an epic style. Like a gifted film director, he cuts chapters back and forth between Stanley, Livingstone, and the rest of the world, creating dramatic scope and pacing. Small details, for instance starting each Stanley-focused chapter by counting down the “Miles to Livingstone”, gives an intense sense of urgency to his relentless quest. But Dugard never loses the intimacy of his characters. For example, when he describes Stanley “striving desperately to say exactly the right thing” when meeting Livingstone.If Dugard loses anything in his account, it is the various impacts Stanley and Livingstone will have on Africa after their meeting. Livingstone’s fervent abolitionist beliefs and his graphic description of the horrific slave trade, especially the massacre he witnesses, will spur the British Empire to use its superpower status to end the slave trade. Stanley, however, tragically uses his knowledge of the Congo to enforce the brutal Belgian regime of King Leopold II, failing to continue the real legacy of Livingstone. The two explorers serve as contrasting symbols, the best and worst of Western action in Africa.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    An wonderful read. I never expected such suspense and anticipation regarding a climax that I already knew about (Stanley would succeed in finding Livingstone), and in connection with a single, solitary phrase ("Dr. Livingstone I presume?") ---!!! The globe is familiar with the broad, general aspects of the story, but Dugard brilliantly sums-up and knits together all the concurrent themes, plotlines and info of these wonderful, in-tandem adventures of Stanley and Livingstone. It is in the same vein as David McCulloch, in its readability and (for some, disappointingly) assumptions as to certain facts. I.e., Dugard provides the colourful details, and "gets inside people's heads" as if he was there, on the scene, or privy to the characters' thoughts and reflections. Also, the listed sources (there are no actual footnotes) are rather threadbare and general. However, I would give Dugard a pass with this particular subject, inasmuch as both of the main heroes of the book---Livingstone and Stanley---left us with copious journal entries and notes, and as such, a reliable record of precisely what went on inside their heads, and what was witnessed factor I utilize in judging the greatness of a history book, is whether the book left me wanting to know more, to research more on the topic or as to different people. By that standard, this book definitely qualifies as great, because not only do I have a desire to now read further---the find for the source of the Nile ("The White Nile" will probably be my next book), the further adventures of Stanley, etc.---but I would even consider visiting the Dark Continent one day (something I NEVER had a desire to do previously). Truly a marvelous book---among the best books I've read.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    Although nonfiction, "Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone" reads like an adventure and is a true page turner. The book far exceeded my expectations. One really gets the feel of what it is like to travel through Africa, especially during the early and mid 19th century. Martin Dugard describes with immense detail the travels of both the Englishman David Livingstone and the Welsh born naturalized American Henry Morton Stanley.David Livingstone travelled through East Africa with the aim of discovering the source of the Nile River. He did this for the British Royal Geographic Society as well as for the British Empire. Due to different factors such as disease, abandonment of servants, and lack of funding, he was stuck in eastern Africa and no one heard from him. Henry Morton Stanley, a journalist empoyed by the Fresh York Herald, travelled through East Africa with the goal of finding David Livingstone before the British did. There was a British-American rivalry going on at the om reading this book, one really comes to understand how risky travel through Africa was, and, perhaps, still is to this day. Both travelers and their servants succumb to various diseases frequently such as malaria and little pox. They encounter other natural menaces such as parasites and risky wildlife as well as geographic challenges like marshlands and rainforest. In addition, they have to with hostile tribes who are occasionally at battle with each other and often demand payment from travelers in to continue.Anyhow, a terrific and entertaining read.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    The mid 19th century was a time of exploration, when men and women sought knowledge, danger, fame and fortune in the dark corners of the world. Africa, the dark continent, was one of those corners because its interior was largely unexplored. One of the most sought after mysteries of all was the unknown source of the longest river in the world: the Nile. While David Livingstone was not the first man to seek "The Four Fountains Of Herodotus" he was certainly the most famous. In this engrossing book author Martin Dugard takes you back to that time and gives you an in depth look at the people and locations that created news headlines all over the world. Two organizations were at the heart of the story: American newspaper the Fresh York Herald and the Royal Geographic Society in England. The RGS would endorse and support fund Livingstone in his quest and the NYH would send their journalist Henry Stanley to search the missing explorer. What followed was a story of danger, hardship and treachery that would captivate the globe and forge a fresh generation of explorers for the future. Dugard's writing style has a flair for the adventure and his graphic narration will hold you turning the pages. But there's more to the story than two men trekking through the African bush to their historic meeting. There were other men involved, other than Stanley and Livingstone, some were mates and some were enemies, but all would play a part in what transpired. The author delves into the history of some of those men; botanist Joseph Banks; RGS's Roderick Murchison, adventurer John Ledyard and a lot of others. The history of the RGS and the NYH is also touched on, tracing each organization's past leading up to their involvement with Livingstone. Dugard's research was extensive, using private journals, historical documents, newspaper accounts and the work of other authors. Most readers will have a general idea on how the story comes out but don't allow that stop you, this book is one you may wish to revisit from time to time. It's awesome what explorers will risk and what they will go through to achieve their goals; starvation; sickness; life-threatening injuries and even death. It's this dedication to the quest for knowledge and danger that will hold people testing the limits of human endurance and curiosity for as long as there are hidden locations and unknown lands that lie just beyond the horizon. I had no technical issues with this Kindle edition but the book could have used an stRanger

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    An wonderful read. I never expected such suspense and anticipation regarding a climax that I already knew about (Stanley would succeed in finding Livingstone), and in connection with a single, solitary phrase ("Dr. Livingstone I presume?") ---!!! The globe is familiar with the broad, general aspects of the story, but Dugard brilliantly sums-up and knits together all the concurrent themes, plotlines and info of these wonderful, in-tandem adventures of Stanley and Livingstone. It is in the same vein as David McCulloch, in its readability and (for some, disappointingly) assumptions as to certain facts. I.e., Dugard provides the colourful details, and "gets inside people's heads" as if he was there, on the scene, or privy to the characters' thoughts and reflections. Also, the listed sources (there are no actual footnotes) are rather threadbare and general. However, I would give Dugard a pass with this particular subject, inasmuch as both of the main heroes of the book---Livingstone and Stanley---left us with copious journal entries and notes, and as such, a reliable record of precisely what went on inside their heads, and what was witnessed factor I utilize in judging the greatness of a history book, is whether the book left me wanting to know more, to research more on the topic or as to different people. By that standard, this book definitely qualifies as great, because not only do I have a desire to now read further---the find for the source of the Nile ("The White Nile" will probably be my next book), the further adventures of Stanley, etc.---but I would even consider visiting the Dark Continent one day (something I NEVER had a desire to do previously). Truly a marvelous book---among the best books I've read.

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    Out of Africa & Into the Cloud: Girls can Code too []  2020-5-6 18:0

    I seemed to have forgotten how much you can learn from the failures and triumphs of others. Huge reminders to be flexible and open. I value the method Dr. Isi is able to flesh out her own experiences in an begin and honest way. Her reflections are both relatable and inspiring and honestly everything I required to hear. I've been in a rut and feeling the pressures of society, ever more as I am getting older. I've been allowing my failed experiences to dictate my willingness to surpass my limits. Fear truly can create you stagnant and excuses does leave you to accept that position. Thank you so much for giving us a glimpse of your story and for reminding me that I am not alone in my sentiments and that yes I can. I recommend this book to everyone really. And as a socially marginalized person being black, queer, working class and a woman, I feel like it just hits me that much more.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    A wonderfully faceted jewel for my collection on the African explorers, the find for the source of the Nile, and the history of Africa in general, which became invaluable resources for finally assembling my notes for "The Shameless Full Moon, Travels in Africa", probably my favorite of all the books I've published over the years--well over thirty. Both Stanley and Livingstone were bewitching, each in his own way, and as a duo they were unsurpassed, as is this exquisite reconstruction of their field notes and journals and the story of the landscape, their encounters, their vicisitudes and tribulations, along with their triumphs and accomplishments, which will never, given the conditions, ever be surpassed. If Livingstone was obstinate and ingenuous, if Stanley was often ruthless and cruel, each demanded more of himself than of any other, and by sheer force of will managed to achieve the sublime. There is no greater discovery than the power within oneself.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    I have often heard the popular words that Stanley spoke to Livingstone when he finally found him: "Livingstone I presume." But the stories behind these amazing men are fascinating and adventurous. The 19th century was one of exploration and discovery. The bold adventurer was extolled in high locations and in the expanding newspaper eir insurmountable obstacles would be unheard of in our safer world. So only amazing ambition and faith brought them through their challenges, spurring the globe on to greater accomplishments. I recommend this book for any history buff and to those who are not faint of heart.

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    Out of Africa & Into the Cloud: Girls can Code too []  2020-5-6 18:0

    This book is very helpful and motivating. The Author is dedicated and knowledgeable. Her experiences are special and special. Thanks for all you do.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    “Doctor Livingstone, I presume?” These iconic words are culturally embedded in the psyche of Americans (and, I assume, the British as well), but I had only a vague understanding of their meaning before reading Dugard’s acc of the two expeditions that would bring the phrase into household immortality—the first of which was Dr. David Livingstone’s find to once-and-for-all search the source of the Nile and the other was Henry Stanley’s find to explore whether Livingstone was still alive.If one isn’t a diehard history buff, it can be hard to maintain one’s interest in happenings of almost 150 years ago. Allow me assure you, this isn’t the case for stories of African explanation—including “Into Africa.” If the author is at all skilled, these books read like novels with an almost improbably high level and pace of tension. That’s because almost everything in Africa in those days was working versus the explorer, and most things were actively trying to slay him. A summary of threats include: a panoply of diseases (e.g. malaria, dysentery, etc.), an ark of animals and insects (e.g. poisonous snakes, lions, elephants, rhinos, etc.), and of course tribes and other humans (e.g. one could search oneself caught in the cross-fire between Arab slave traders and tribes who resented being enslaved, even if one had no stake in the fight.) And if none of those assassins got one (and at least some of them always did), your men might desert you in the middle of the night while absconding with all your goods—and those goods were how one for both one’s meal and for safe passage through tribal lands. In Dugard’s work, one sees each of these threats played and replayed, as well as a host of others from political conflicts, incompetence, and disgruntledness. It should be noted that there was almost no precedence for sending someone to look for a lost explorer—it was considered so unlikely to succeed in that era, not to mention likely getting a lot more e book largely alternates chapters featuring Stanley with those featuring Livingstone. This is particularly the case once the book reaches the point at which Stanley is actively on the trail. These were very various men, but the name of each man became synonymous with courage. Stanley was an American journalist who created it to the top based solely on willingness to go locations and do things other reporters wouldn’t. In fact, he had problem making a go of his career starting out, and it wasn’t until a traumatic adventure that he developed the assertiveness to create something of himself. Livingstone was already a legend when he took on this expedition, and was arguably too far past prime to be taking on such an adventure. The men were also quite various as expedition leaders. Stanley ran his caravan with an iron fist, while Livingstone was known for being lax and easily distracted—while they were at opposite end of the spectrum in this regard, it seems likely that both would have succeeded better with more the book’s beginning there’s a conflict at the Royal Geographical Society between Richard Burton (the explorer, not the actor) and John Speke over the source of the Nile. Livingston, a living legend, was asked to investigate and settle the issue—an objective he didn’t complete. It should be noted that finding the river’s source isn’t as simple as it sounds. Speke was correct in that the Nile reached at least to Lake Victoria (at the equator), but it wasn’t clear whether Victoria was connected to other lakes in the southern hemisphere, and—if so—how far down it went. There was a chain of lakes to the south that might have drained into the Nile, but, as it happens, flow into the Congo River.I found this to be fascinating reading. The book consists of 40 chapters divided among five parts, and so most of the chapters are fast reads and the interspersal of the Stanley and Livingstone story lines keeps the pacing going nicely. Dugard did a amazing job structuring the narrative.I’d recommend this book for anyone interested in learning about Stanley, Livingstone or who just wish to know what it was like to be an explorer on the Dark Continent. [Fun-fact: While “dark continent” sounds blatantly racist, it turns out that the phrase was originally used in reference to the fact that so much of the map was blank—i.e. it was largely unmapped.]

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    The mid 19th century was a time of exploration, when men and women sought knowledge, danger, fame and fortune in the dark corners of the world. Africa, the dark continent, was one of those corners because its interior was largely unexplored. One of the most sought after mysteries of all was the unknown source of the longest river in the world: the Nile. While David Livingstone was not the first man to seek "The Four Fountains Of Herodotus" he was certainly the most famous. In this engrossing book author Martin Dugard takes you back to that time and gives you an in depth look at the people and locations that created news headlines all over the world. Two organizations were at the heart of the story: American newspaper the Fresh York Herald and the Royal Geographic Society in England. The RGS would endorse and support fund Livingstone in his quest and the NYH would send their journalist Henry Stanley to search the missing explorer. What followed was a story of danger, hardship and treachery that would captivate the globe and forge a fresh generation of explorers for the future. Dugard's writing style has a flair for the adventure and his graphic narration will hold you turning the pages. But there's more to the story than two men trekking through the African bush to their historic meeting. There were other men involved, other than Stanley and Livingstone, some were mates and some were enemies, but all would play a part in what transpired. The author delves into the history of some of those men; botanist Joseph Banks; RGS's Roderick Murchison, adventurer John Ledyard and a lot of others. The history of the RGS and the NYH is also touched on, tracing each organization's past leading up to their involvement with Livingstone. Dugard's research was extensive, using private journals, historical documents, newspaper accounts and the work of other authors. Most readers will have a general idea on how the story comes out but don't allow that stop you, this book is one you may wish to revisit from time to time. It's awesome what explorers will risk and what they will go through to achieve their goals; starvation; sickness; life-threatening injuries and even death. It's this dedication to the quest for knowledge and danger that will hold people testing the limits of human endurance and curiosity for as long as there are hidden locations and unknown lands that lie just beyond the horizon. I had no technical issues with this Kindle edition but the book could have used an stRanger

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    The meeting of Dr David Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley in the middle of Africa in 1871 is perhaps one of the most remarkable and dramatic happenings in history. Like the Miracle of Dunkirk, when a flotilla of civilian boats rescued the British troops from Nazi forces early in WWII, the near impossible odds of success and eventual epic win seem to be pulled from a Tolkien book rather than true history. Thus Martin Dugard’s Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone, is rightfully a story first and a history second. In Dugard’s story, Stanley is the real protagonist, who will survive Africa to become Livingstone’s successor as the world’s greatest explorer. However, he ends up working counter to the Doctor’s goal of a slavery-free Africa, tragically helping to create the Dark Continent... e book begins at the begin of Livingstone’s third and final trek into Africa in 1866. The globe renowned, prototypical explorer and paragon of Victorian virtue is desperate to redeem his reputation and finances after his disastrous 1858 Zambezi expedition. He sets out to search the source of the Nile, an elusive mystery since 460 BC when the ancient Greek Herodotus failed to search the source. However, despite setting out with his usual exhilaration, writing in his journal that Africa is “a tonic to the system”, the trials of Africa quickly overwhelm the now older man. His porters desert him, taking irreplaceable supplies. He constantly wars all manner of African diseases, often so weakened by fever and dysentery that his few remaining porters have to carry pletely obsessed with finding the source, he relies on the Arab slave traders he despises to continue his quest. Dugard writes that “it was as if he had sold a part of his soul in the name of ambition.” After staying with the slavers for five years, he witnesses the Arabs massacre a village of Africans deep in the center of the continent. Faced with the evil of the slave trade, he leaves for the little village of Ujiji, where, sick and without supplies, he helplessly and hopelessly waits for a “good Samaritan” to rescue stone has been gone for nearly four years and is presumed dead by a lot of when the Fresh York Herald’s owner, James Gordon Bennett, seeking an exciting story to distract the public from a gold shop scandal, assigns Stanley, his foreign correspondent, the task of finding Livingstone. An unlikely African explorer, Stanley was born in England to a prostitute and the city drunk. Abandoned at the age of five, he was sent to live in a orphanage where he was regularly sexually violated until, at the age of 17, he escaped to America. In the States he wars for both the Confederacy and Union in the Civil War, where he discovers his talent for writing. After an ill-fated adventure in Turkey, he dedicates himself to journalism, eventually joining the staff of the onically, Stanley’s horrific upbringing prepares him well for the brutalities of an African expedition. After months of preparation, facing almost no possibility of success, he sets out with a huge caravan from Zanzibar. Struggling to lead his recalcitrant men, Stanley resorts to whipping them constantly, at one point writing in his journal “The virtue of a amazing whip was well tested by me”. Overcoming multiple mutiny attempts, a near fatal case of cerebral malaria, a battle with “The African Bonaparte”, crocodile attacks, and worst of all the unforgiving African landscape itself, Stanley finds the strength and confidence he has always lacked. Miraculously, he also finds Livingstone. Upon their meeting he asks the now popular question, “Doctor Livingstone, I presume?”Stanley and Livingstone spend weeks together in Ujiji. Stanly, “basking in the older man’s grace”, writes of the doctor:“I grant that he is not an angel, but he approaches to that being as near as the nature of a living man will allow.”Stanley tries to convince Livingstone to return to England with him but the Doctor refuses. Weeks after one of the most improbable meetings in history, Stanley returns to Zanzibar and Livingstone continues his quest for the source. He dies shortly after, his body destroyed by years of African hardship and disease, in a village almost 600 miles south of the actual source. Stanley takes up Livingstone’s mantle as the world’s greatest explorer, finding the source of the Congo and following the risky river all the method to the West coast of the continent.Dugard tells this story with amazing care and skill. He is himself an adventurer and while researching Into Africa, he followed Stanley’s path across what is today Tanzania, getting thrown into an African prison while doing so. This is, presumably, what helps him understand his explorers’ relationship with the African landscape, leading to unbelievable insights such as the following after Stanley’s near miss with a crocodile:“Africa had soothed him and calmed him and created him feel as if he were its master. But it was all a myth. The continent had no equal.”Dugard also enhances his story with an epic style. Like a gifted film director, he cuts chapters back and forth between Stanley, Livingstone, and the rest of the world, creating dramatic scope and pacing. Small details, for instance starting each Stanley-focused chapter by counting down the “Miles to Livingstone”, gives an intense sense of urgency to his relentless quest. But Dugard never loses the intimacy of his characters. For example, when he describes Stanley “striving desperately to say exactly the right thing” when meeting Livingstone.If Dugard loses anything in his account, it is the various impacts Stanley and Livingstone will have on Africa after their meeting. Livingstone’s fervent abolitionist beliefs and his graphic description of the horrific slave trade, especially the massacre he witnesses, will spur the British Empire to use its superpower status to end the slave trade. Stanley, however, tragically uses his knowledge of the Congo to enforce the brutal Belgian regime of King Leopold II, failing to continue the real legacy of Livingstone. The two explorers serve as contrasting symbols, the best and worst of Western action in Africa.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    “Doctor Livingstone, I presume?” These iconic words are culturally embedded in the psyche of Americans (and, I assume, the British as well), but I had only a vague understanding of their meaning before reading Dugard’s acc of the two expeditions that would bring the phrase into household immortality—the first of which was Dr. David Livingstone’s find to once-and-for-all search the source of the Nile and the other was Henry Stanley’s find to explore whether Livingstone was still alive.If one isn’t a diehard history buff, it can be hard to maintain one’s interest in happenings of almost 150 years ago. Allow me assure you, this isn’t the case for stories of African explanation—including “Into Africa.” If the author is at all skilled, these books read like novels with an almost improbably high level and pace of tension. That’s because almost everything in Africa in those days was working versus the explorer, and most things were actively trying to slay him. A summary of threats include: a panoply of diseases (e.g. malaria, dysentery, etc.), an ark of animals and insects (e.g. poisonous snakes, lions, elephants, rhinos, etc.), and of course tribes and other humans (e.g. one could search oneself caught in the cross-fire between Arab slave traders and tribes who resented being enslaved, even if one had no stake in the fight.) And if none of those assassins got one (and at least some of them always did), your men might desert you in the middle of the night while absconding with all your goods—and those goods were how one for both one’s meal and for safe passage through tribal lands. In Dugard’s work, one sees each of these threats played and replayed, as well as a host of others from political conflicts, incompetence, and disgruntledness. It should be noted that there was almost no precedence for sending someone to look for a lost explorer—it was considered so unlikely to succeed in that era, not to mention likely getting a lot more e book largely alternates chapters featuring Stanley with those featuring Livingstone. This is particularly the case once the book reaches the point at which Stanley is actively on the trail. These were very various men, but the name of each man became synonymous with courage. Stanley was an American journalist who created it to the top based solely on willingness to go locations and do things other reporters wouldn’t. In fact, he had problem making a go of his career starting out, and it wasn’t until a traumatic adventure that he developed the assertiveness to create something of himself. Livingstone was already a legend when he took on this expedition, and was arguably too far past prime to be taking on such an adventure. The men were also quite various as expedition leaders. Stanley ran his caravan with an iron fist, while Livingstone was known for being lax and easily distracted—while they were at opposite end of the spectrum in this regard, it seems likely that both would have succeeded better with more the book’s beginning there’s a conflict at the Royal Geographical Society between Richard Burton (the explorer, not the actor) and John Speke over the source of the Nile. Livingston, a living legend, was asked to investigate and settle the issue—an objective he didn’t complete. It should be noted that finding the river’s source isn’t as simple as it sounds. Speke was correct in that the Nile reached at least to Lake Victoria (at the equator), but it wasn’t clear whether Victoria was connected to other lakes in the southern hemisphere, and—if so—how far down it went. There was a chain of lakes to the south that might have drained into the Nile, but, as it happens, flow into the Congo River.I found this to be fascinating reading. The book consists of 40 chapters divided among five parts, and so most of the chapters are fast reads and the interspersal of the Stanley and Livingstone story lines keeps the pacing going nicely. Dugard did a amazing job structuring the narrative.I’d recommend this book for anyone interested in learning about Stanley, Livingstone or who just wish to know what it was like to be an explorer on the Dark Continent. [Fun-fact: While “dark continent” sounds blatantly racist, it turns out that the phrase was originally used in reference to the fact that so much of the map was blank—i.e. it was largely unmapped.]

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    While the topic and the explorers are ones I've read about extensively, this acc was more of a travelogue than an historical perspective. The emphasis seemed to be on the arduousness of the expeditions than of the African politics which impacted it e main failing is the lack of maps outlining the routes, areas of conflicts, and attempts to search the source.I listened to the Audiobooks ver for about half the book. While good, it added to my frustration with the book's repetitiveness.

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    Out of Africa & Into the Cloud: Girls can Code too []  2020-5-6 18:0

    Isi captures the reader's attention by highlighting very relevant subjects of challenges overcome through success. She does this while giving true life examples on how to identify your goals and any obsticles that could stand in the way. Her insights and experience within technology are in highly looked up to... Place that at the intersection of motivating women and girls of all ages, then you have the kind of book that anyone would have fun reading and applying to life. Being a parent I can relate to those aspects of her genuine care for the future generations. I would definitely recommend this to my daughter as she gets older and more inquisitive in a technical career. I also can relate to the technical tip given. She speaks truth on those subjects and I can vouch for those because I too work in the same industry & have worked with Isi first hand on some major projects together. It's a amazing read for ANYONE interested in technology and amazing tip / teaching on being successful in the same locations of the industry for their career.

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    Out of Africa & Into the Cloud: Girls can Code too []  2020-5-6 18:0

    I’m amazed at the level of info the author packed into this book. It’s simple to read and understand and a amazing tutorial for any girl or any one for that matter who wants to build a Tech-related career. And for non-tech people, it’s even still inspiring as it shares an impactful notice on focus, resilience and determination which can be applied to beautiful much every zone of your life. I’m quite inspired!

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    We all as school kids learned of the popular British explorer David Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley..."Dr. Livingstone, I presume..." but there is so much more than just that...This generation of epic British explorers endured hardship, deprivation and private jeopardy beyond our wildest imaginations in the quest to explore the globe and all it's magnificence. Walking across the breadth of Africa, seeking it's secrets, deplorying it's slave trade, spreading the missionary spirit and ultimately dedicated to finding the source of the Nile, Livingstone stands with the amazing lions like Shackleton that define a country's greatness... the undaunted heroic spirit that defies all odds that even in the jaws of defeat, refuses to give up. Livingstone was never lost...he just ran out of supplies and meal and lost communication because of illness...Stanley, an American journalist working for the NY Herald 's publisher, Bennett, was sent to search him to boost circulation for the paper. And find he did...everything up...for 13 months he plodded through deepest, darkest Africa hoping to catch him in Ujiji...which he finally did...finding the amazing explorer debilitated, starving, verging on dementia yet singularly determined to search the source. Stanley spent only five months with Livingstone but that was long enough to obtain the amazing explorer back on his feet, into a canoe and renewing his search...and enough time to form a bond that transcended time and zone and lives on wherever amazing deeds are coming to fruition. SPOILER ALERT: Stanley went on to further enhance his endeavors as an adventure journalist. Livingstone died in Africa having never found the source...his body embalmed and shipped back to England for a royal burial as a amazing lion of the realm....and the kicker of the story... the source was discovered 100 years later from satellite images from zone showing the birth of the Nile about 600 miles north of Livingston's projections ....his greatness of spirit and dogged determination defined a nation and an era and will forevermore fire our imagination.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    I have often heard the popular words that Stanley spoke to Livingstone when he finally found him: "Livingstone I presume." But the stories behind these amazing men are fascinating and adventurous. The 19th century was one of exploration and discovery. The bold adventurer was extolled in high locations and in the expanding newspaper eir insurmountable obstacles would be unheard of in our safer world. So only amazing ambition and faith brought them through their challenges, spurring the globe on to greater accomplishments. I recommend this book for any history buff and to those who are not faint of heart.

    0  


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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone []  2020-1-17 22:54

    I found Dugald's telling of this story to be completely fascinating. He has filled it with small known facts (he is such an perfect researcher). For those of us that believe we know all about Stanley and Livingstone - well, we had no idea of the "real story." This book is chilling, inspiring and written so that you cannot wait to obtain to the next chapter. This book is filled with amazing and evil, rich and poor, the courageous and the ones who only wished to be. This book is so much more than, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume."

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    Although nonfiction, "Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone" reads like an adventure and is a true page turner. The book far exceeded my expectations. One really gets the feel of what it is like to travel through Africa, especially during the early and mid 19th century. Martin Dugard describes with immense detail the travels of both the Englishman David Livingstone and the Welsh born naturalized American Henry Morton Stanley.David Livingstone travelled through East Africa with the aim of discovering the source of the Nile River. He did this for the British Royal Geographic Society as well as for the British Empire. Due to different factors such as disease, abandonment of servants, and lack of funding, he was stuck in eastern Africa and no one heard from him. Henry Morton Stanley, a journalist empoyed by the Fresh York Herald, travelled through East Africa with the goal of finding David Livingstone before the British did. There was a British-American rivalry going on at the om reading this book, one really comes to understand how risky travel through Africa was, and, perhaps, still is to this day. Both travelers and their servants succumb to various diseases frequently such as malaria and little pox. They encounter other natural menaces such as parasites and risky wildlife as well as geographic challenges like marshlands and rainforest. In addition, they have to with hostile tribes who are occasionally at battle with each other and often demand payment from travelers in to continue.Anyhow, a terrific and entertaining read.

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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    I found Dugald's telling of this story to be completely fascinating. He has filled it with small known facts (he is such an perfect researcher). For those of us that believe we know all about Stanley and Livingstone - well, we had no idea of the "real story." This book is chilling, inspiring and written so that you cannot wait to obtain to the next chapter. This book is filled with amazing and evil, rich and poor, the courageous and the ones who only wished to be. This book is so much more than, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume."

    0  


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    Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone []  2020-7-13 19:36

    While the topic and the explorers are ones I've read about extensively, this acc was more of a travelogue than an historical perspective. The emphasis seemed to be on the arduousness of the expeditions than of the African politics which impacted it e main failing is the lack of maps outlining the routes, areas of conflicts, and attempts to search the source.I listened to the Audiobooks ver for about half the book. While good, it added to my frustration with the book's repetitiveness.

    0  


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    Useful review?

    Out of Africa & Into the Cloud: Girls can Code too []  2020-5-6 18:0

    Dr. Idemudia, PhD. does a amazing job of describing the life of an IT professional and the fears that girls/women have about the field. She also has a list of references in the back of the book to support girls learn more about the topic. As the Nike commercial says "Just Do It". If you have any interest in STEM go for it. Don't sit on the sidelines and allow your fears obtain the better of you. That is my take away from this book.

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    The Village On The Edge Of The World: Travels In West Africa []  2020-1-22 21:52

    nice book

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    The Village On The Edge Of The World: Travels In West Africa []  2020-1-22 21:52

    A very interesting book written by a very adventurous woman. Well written with a sympathetic view of village life in The Gambia. Her observations about diet-induced lethargy are very telling. I want I was young enough to follow in her footsteps! Highly recommended!

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    The Village On The Edge Of The World: Travels In West Africa []  2020-1-22 21:52

    a very adventurous woman traveling alone on a bike in west africa -- unusual and interesting, especially if you have traveled to that part of africa.

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