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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Caroline Moorehead is an perfect writer whose book "A train in Winter" was highly praised. I read it with amazing ever with her fresh book "Village of Secrets", Moorehead seriously damages her reputation as a reliable writer. To begin with, her title should have been "Villages of Secrets"!Where is her historical scholarship? Who helped her with fact-checking for even easy info like the correct spelling of people she mentions? Why didn't she consult the internet? Her text is loaded with egregious errors and private sarcastic judgments. Her distortions go from some historical facts to the most trivial small s, Moorehead writes very well and her research is extensive judging by the unusually huge list of books in her bibliography...yet her errors are the proof she did not read them all, including the most latest and necessary ones. Yes, she honors deserving people like Pastor Daniel Curtet or Simone Mairesse. But these people were recognized years ago! Strangely enough, one wonders whether she has a unique contact with the globe of the dead when she thanks for their interview Leon Eyraud who died in 1953 and Madame Marguerite Roussel who passed in 1996. There are always several sides to a story. It is regrettable and sad that Moorehead fell under the spell of a disgruntled crowd and some jealous people. The 12 Plateau Vivairais-Lignon villages and all the various types of rescuers, the nonviolent resistance and the armed resistance have not been forgotten in the little WWII museum that opened in LE Chambon - sur - Lignon in 2013. Yet this disgruntled group refused to join the project and did everything possible to slay it.. They even convinced Moorehead that the very capable Mayor Eliane WAuquiez-Motte who raised the funds and organized the professional planning deserved to be demeaned!You don't have to read Village of Secrets: go straight to the Foreword and especially the Afterword to obtain a general impression of the tone of the book. If Moorehead is absolutely right in praising necessary people such as Charles Guillon, Oscar Rozowsky and Marc Boegner ( all recognized years ago), she did not need to trash other necessary people such as the ethicist ( and not the historian) Philip Hallie who in 1979 place Le Chambon -sur-Lignon on the map, or the perfect documentary producer Pierre Sauvage who describes his private story and the reason why he was allowed to live as a Jewish baby born during the Holocaust, and finally two of the several idealists and catalists of the effective nonviolent resistance, Pastors Edouard Theis and Andre Trocme.I ought to know: I am Trocme's daughter and I grew up In Le Chambon during WW II.I also had Caroline Moorehead as my house guest in the United States and I gladly allow her interview me. She was friendly.I now understand better why total silence followed her visit...

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    This book is a scandal; it pretends to be a chronicle of history, which it is emphatically NOT. includes so a lot of errors that it should not have been published at all in its show form.We Hanne (Hirsch) and Max Liebmann are featured in this book as survivors of the only deportation from Germany to France , prisoners of Camp de Gurs French internment camp as well as having been sheltered in Le Chambon sur Lignon. As we have told the publisher and author, we protest the misleading info about ourselves as well as our families and the general misinformation about this particular time period. People not familiar with the happening of 1933 - 1945 will obtain a totally wrong impression. That such a book should even be considered for a literary book award in Britain is totally ludicrous.Just to cite a few of the a lot of errors :Chapter 2; Moorehead states that in Camp de Gurs we ate dogs, cats and rats. There was not a single dog or cat in camp. Plenty of rats, but nobody ate roughout the book Moorehead maligns Pasteur Trocme, a person of the highest moral and ethical integrity. recognized by Yad Vashem as "Righteous Gentile" In addition she denounces Prof. Hallie who with his book "Lest innocent blood be shed" place le Chambon on the map for the worldHanne and Max Liebmann .

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    My parents were among the Jews who found shelter in the zone of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, France, during the Holocaust--the topic of this astonishingly inaccurate book--and I had the amazing fortune to be born there at that time. I thus care deeply about the remarkable rescue mission that profoundly affected my is thus dismaying that this acc of those happenings preposterously asserts that the French Protestant (Huguenot) dimension of the rescue effort has been inflated into a myth, that the village's remarkable pastor can be plausibly charged with being a self-aggrandizing pathological liar, that nonviolence was only a little part of the story, that unnamed atheists and agnostics played an equal role in providing shelter, that indeed the religious beliefs of the rescuers deserve only passing mention... Incidentally, among the a lot of tons of misrepresentations and errors in this sloppy book are the very photograph on the cover: the reader has no method of knowing that the "Village of Secrets" portrayed is not Le Chambon!Furthermore, in the author's eagerness to be able to claim that she is, at last, setting "the record straight" and describing for the first time "what actually took place" in and around Le Chambon, she feels it important to go out of her method to malign the late Philip Hallie and me--who have told the story before her. In my case, she goes so far as to fabricate the utterly false allegation that key figures in Le Chambon's wartime happenings branded my well-received feature documentary on the subject, "Weapons of the Spirit," as nothing less than a "mutilation of historical truth." This is very mean-spirited fiction indeed!For more information, please see: [...]Pierre SauvagePresident, Chambon Foundation

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    After reading this I had to again ask myself why. A well told story of a village under siege and how they did the best they knew how to preserve not only their method of living, but necessary belongings. It got a small long for the info presented.

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    ...and a excellent example of what people of conscience can and must do here and now in these United States.

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Village of secrets is exceptionally well researched and well written. A sad acc of some of the atrocities committed by Germany in the lead up to, and during WW2. The villagers who quietly and without fuss accepted kids and a lot of adults into their midst and sheltered them from tyrany should never be forgotten. This book like a lot of others will ensure the memories live on.

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Interesting story of resistence

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Very interesting insight into the role of French Huguenots and Darbyists in saving Jews and others sought by the Nazis in Vichy France. The writing is stilted, dry and, at times, the vocabulary, word choices and phrasing are not good and/or confusing.

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    This story has so much info and so a lot of characters that I was sometimes lost in the following of it. It did enlighten me to the a lot of organizations that existed in France and to which ones were helpful in the hiding of the Jewish kids and adults. A very sad story.

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    Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France (The Resistance Trilogy Book 2) review [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    This book was very informative on the risk people were willing to take to save others. We forget so soon what the battle was like for those living then.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    Just started reading The Saboteur and I'm about half method through. It's a fast read but a small bogged down with put names and no reference to major geographic cities/areas/landmarks. As with a lot of books referring to a lot of characters, it gets difficult at times to put people. The reader is mercifully spared much of the subject's not good ordeal under torture.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    My first thought when reading this book was, "Why hasn't a major motion picture been created about this person?" Once I started reading it I couldn't place it down. The author has done a amazing job of research and analysis and applying what he learned to the story of this brave and honorable man. The book is well written and flows smoothly and makes one anxious to turn the page to read what happens next. I highly and enthusiastically recommend this book.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    A gripping and tense real story of French and British insurgency in France during WW II. The real story also the growth of the resistance and the brutal German response. Fresh to me was the high level of. citizen collaboration and the limited size of the resistance.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    Fans of espionage fiction will appreciate this real life story of a young aristocrat who wars the Nazi occupiers of France during WWII.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    I've said it before and will say it again: Globe Battle 2 teems with amazing, dramatic stories of heroism and greatness. Add to that list Paul Kix's The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando. Kix pored over family records, military records, and private accounts to place together this gripping acc of Robert de la Rochefoucauld's activities during WW2. And what a story it is.When the Nazis marched into France, the French gave small resistance. A lot of in France considered Nazi occupation was preferable to Nazi bombardment. As the German occupation set in, Robert de la Rochefoucauld, a brash teenager from a family with a long aristocratic history, became angrier and angrier. Nazi military leaders moved into the family home, leaving the family to occupy one wing while the Nazis used the other wing as a headquarters and bunkhouse. This imposition reflected, in La Rochefoucauld's mind, the amazing insult of the Germans making themselves at home in France and subjugating the spired by the broadcasts from general-in-exile Charles de Gaulle, Robert determined to create his method to London and volunteer for de Gaulle's Resistance. Getting out of France was an adventure. When he got to Spain he was thrown in prison, along with a couple of RAF pilots, while they awaited intervention from the U.K. Thanks to British officials, Robert created his method to England, where, after meeting with de Gaulle himself, he agreed to join a British unit training for secret missions into bert parachuted back into France and embraced the missions with a vengeance. One of his basic roles was leading sabotage missions, strategically placing explosives to shut down an arms plant. He was also instrumental in obtaining weapons for the Resistance. It was risky, but Robert knew the risks. Sure enough, after a few months he was caught and spent miserable months in prison, being tortured and interrogated by the Nazis. Real to his training and to his country, he did not betray the Resistance movement.When his Nazi jailers couldn't obtain amazing intel out of him, they sentenced him to be executed. But on the method to his execution, he escaped. In a stage that might be wonderful in an action movie, he evaded his pursuers' gunshots, stole a Nazi dignitary's car, drove it through a Nazi roadblock, and dumped the vehicle in a quarry. His career continued with acts of escape, daring-do, and heroism. Through luck and skill and training and maybe some miracles, he survived the battle and was recognized for his x's narrative is straightforward and unembellished. The Saboteur is gripping, not because of Kix's writing, but because of the remarkable experiences of la Rochefoucauld. That, I suppose is the tag of a skilled biographical writer: I did not place the book down thinking, "Wow, Kix sure can write!" My only thought was "Wow, that la Rochefoucauld fellow was amazing!" The Saboteur gives a amazing perspective on the battle in France and chronicles one of France's amazing anks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the complimentary electronic review copy!

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    Reading this book for the first time, I just couldn't believe it was all real. Imagine your favorite James Bond movie, add in some Guns of Navarone and some Jason Bourne, and that's what you've got here ... except that every word of it is shockingly true. Really, you won't be able top place it down.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    The cover of this book promises a biography of Robert de La Rochefoucauld, the “Saboteur” of the title, that is “as fast-paced and emotionally intuitive as the very best spy thrillers” --- and it delivers just that. Paul Kix’s debut nonfiction acc is based on La Rochefoucauld’s own memoir, but he has supplemented it with careful research to broaden the focus and provide context for his subject’s remarkable story. In so doing, he also has created it accessible to readers who may not be totally familiar with how Globe Battle II was fought beyond the rn into one of the oldest and most aristocratic French families, La Rochefoucauld was a teenager when the Nazis invaded France in 1939. By lying about his age, he set out the following year to join Charles de Gaulle’s Free French, which was operating out of London. He created his method to Spain, but was caught and imprisoned --- before making the first of three awesome escapes from ter La Rochefoucauld created his method to London, a possibility encounter resulted in an offer to join the fledgling Unique Operations Executive, Winston Churchill’s brainchild. He agreed to do so, but only if de Gaulle supported the decision. When he was ushered into the General’s presence and posed the question, de Gaulle’s response was typical: “It’s still for France, even if it’s allied with the Devil. Go!”After intensive training, La Rochefoucauld parachuted into Vichy France to work with the Resistance, but was soon captured and imprisoned. Conditions at the prison near the city of Auxerre were appalling, and he was regularly tortured. Finally, La Rochefoucauld was tried and sentenced to death --- but, on his method to the firing squad, he decided to overcome his drivers and create a run for it. His escape involved stealing an SS vehicle and dressing as a nun, and thanks to sympathetic villagers, he managed to evade capture, once again making his method to Rochefoucauld’s latest mission turns out to be both his most risky and the most brazen. Kix’s description of hanging from netting above a casement that surrounded a Nazi stronghold is vivid, and La Rochefoucauld’s success in destroying the almost impregnable garrison was celebrated by his e story doesn’t quite end there. In a surprising twist, years after the war, La Rochefoucauld found himself confronting a man accused of collaborating with the Nazis and was forced to decide if he believed in his innocence. His decision reflects the courage he exhibited in E SABOTEUR is a book about one man overcoming his own fear in service of his homeland, but Paul Kix uses Robert de La Rochefoucauld’s experiences to discover what it was like to survive in a country overtaken by the enemy, and the courage it took to war back when those around you have acquiesced. It’s an inspiring ed by Lorraine W. Shanley

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    Paul Kix weaves the tragic story of the German occupation of France together with the heroic story of a very young and daring French aristocrat. Not a lot of lived through the horror to tell about it, but Robert La Rochefoucault lives to tell of his escapades in the French Resistance. Kix brings this story to us as vividly as if he were there himself.

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    This book is an outstanding read. Delving into the small known French Resistance' warrior Robert de La Rochefoucauld's exploits, Paul Kix masterfully tells the tales of bravery, courage and pain. A must read!

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    The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando review [Book]  2018-2-4 18:0

    My husband couldn't place the book down.

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    All Village Map - Locate Your Village review [App]  2019-1-31 13:15

    japekrom

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