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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Thank you so much! Where have you been all my life?!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Thanks.. for BLACK POWER, best application ever

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Very much so needed!!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Amazing app.

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    I'm a bookseller who hoped this would be useful to connect people with poc fronted titles. However, the application doesn't have much capacity to refine your find and the recommendations stayed the same everytime I accessed it. As well, I submitted several recommendations, but saw no updates to the catalogue of titles. This is a amazing concept, but definitely needs some work and more frequent updates to be as useful as it could be.

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    We Read Too is such an appropriate title. As an educator, writer and avid reader - WE need to spread the notice about literacy in the Black community. Love this App!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Amazing application to obtain a book briefing

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Amazingly insightful!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    I love the suggested books!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Amazing for young adults

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Love this application must have !

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    What a cool app! This is so necessary because representation matters. However, I think this application should be updated to categorize the books by age and reading level. Having a "picture book"category is a amazing begin but it's not very specific because so a lot of reading levels are within that category, and can range to books for toddlers to books for 4th graders. Having specific reading levels would create it easier for educators who may wish to books for their classroom libraries using this app. Will definitely recommend to all my teacher mates though.

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    This application is Everything!!! I am always wanting to books with POC in them and by them for the kids in my life. This application gives me options!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Amazing application much required glad I found it

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Amazing Job Goddess

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    I luv this application because it lists book drom various Cultures. Now I can read to my kid about our culture and other peoples cultures

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Love this!! Promotion of black authors is much required presently.

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Well done!!

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    We Read Too [App]  2019-1-26 13:36

    Excellent

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    It starts out interesting, but is biased toward the author's perception of 'what we see when we read'. I see things a bit differently, so I don't believe the causality he posits as absolute, is. [say that three times, rapidly]I got about 1/2 method through before I have up. It's a amazing book with interesting observations, but I wouldn't take it as gospil

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    This is a fantastically interesting read for book lovers, really gets you thinking deeply about the act of reading and how it's kind of magical and uniquely human. Very cool.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    A amazing bonus for anyone who likes to read. Very interesting.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    As a writing instructor, I'm suggesting that all my students read this brilliant book. There are so a lot of necessary take-aways, including tips for describing characters and locations. The helpful illustrations of often esoteric points add to the Peter Mendulsund's sound guidance. This book is a bonus for readers and writers!

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    This is an perfect treatise on what we see when we read. It makes you cognizant of the words on the page. All readers should read this book.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    The cover caught my eye first while I was browsing in the bookstore. Not surprisingly, I later learned that the author, Peter Mendelsund, is an award-winning cover designer. His book stood out from the surrounding piles of others for its simplicity. The cover is matte black with two lines of serif text top and bottom that frame a gold foil icon of a keyhole at its center. Of course, I wanted to know what was on the other side of the keyhole; in this case, the contents of the ’s unlike any book I’ve read before in that almost every other page is illustrated. I found this both interesting and distracting, if not overwhelming at times. However, the points Mendelsund makes are equally interesting and original for their insight. In one chapter about the co-creative process of reading, he states, “These photos we ‘see’ when we read are personal: what we do not see is what the author pictured when writing a particular book. That is to say: Every narrative is meant to be transposed; imaginatively translated. Associatively translated. It is ours.”Mendelsund’s examples from classic books are well chosen, among them Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. Several decades after having read Anna Karenina, I still remember what she looks like. However, through the author’s careful analysis, I realize that my representation of Anna is based on how I characterized her in my mind, how I have imaginatively constructed her, rather than the scant info given of her physical e author delves beyond the concrete when he compares reading to listening to music. “If we don’t have pictures in our minds when we read, then it is the interaction of ideas—the intermingling of abstract relationships—that catalyzes feeling in us readers. […] This relational, nonrepresentational calculus is where some of the deepest beauty in art is found. Not in mental pictures of things, but in the play of elements…”This book much to consider when we think about how we read. I’ve come away with a fresh awareness that will support me in my future writing, as well. I recommend this book for anyone interested in how we see what we read, and how what we write impacts our readers.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    If you're a fiction writer, this book yesterday. Minimalistic, deep, pictorial, profound. Now needed reading for any student of writing.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    I thoroughly enjoyed this enlightening interpretation of what one's mind's eye sees when we read the text of literature. Innovative graphics are liberally sprinkled through this short, delightful read! Now I have several photos of Anna Karenina, to name one of the figures in literature used as examples throughout Mendelsund's special work.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    Peter Mendelsund's What We See When We Read is an interesting text with delightful illustrations. Once upon a time, I told someone that I do not really pictures in my head when I read, and he was flabbergasted by that comment. In an odd and off-beat method Mendelsund supports my findings. Some people do picture the objects and characters in books, but every picture is various according to him. Because authors do not paint complete images, it is truly impossible for readers to fully concur with how things should actually look from the descriptions that are I read this amusing work, I found myself thinking of individual mates who read: Oh, so-and-so would love this insight. Gosh, this reminds of what that mate said about that text. Wouldn't whatshisname love that line and picture. By the time I finished, I thought I should a whole case of these books, one for every reading mate I have. And a case certainly would not be t only that, but I marked it like someone might try me on the contents. There were so a lot of points that I agreed with, so a lot of I hadn't even considered, and some that simply opened my eyes to what I do see when I read that I fell in love with this book. From the cover to the final line, What We See When We Read charmed me.

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    What We See When We Read []  2020-1-22 19:3

    Thought-provoking. Eye candy. Your book discussion group will be amazed at you ... and so will you.

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    I like the idea of this book and the notice it puts out there. Stories about bullied kids is not the easiest thing to read, but I'm sure it could support some kids going through the same thing. The reason I gave three stars is because there was something off with the writing. While I believe the stories were true stories told to the author, I don't believe the kids wrote them. I would be okay with this if the author said this was the case, instead of making the book sound like it was written by teenagers. The "teen speak" nearly had me putting the book down. Despite this, I still think the book would be amazing for young children.**I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.**

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    This book has 17 stories from various kids who were bullied. Including one very touching one in which the speaker has since committed suicide. It is a amazing read for teens to see that they are not alone and amazing for adults to see the kind of problems children are facing. Jodee’s responses at the end of each kid stories come off beautiful canned and sound like the tip we have all heard a million times. However, once in awhile she has a statement that were beautiful insightful.~Disclaimer I received this book for free. This is no method impacts my review, but I feel disclosure is important.~

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    Why We Eat (Too Much): The New Science of Appetite []  2020-1-21 20:26

    I say "sadly" because it does have two things going for it: 1) it is very current in terms of the most intriguing *speculation* about what might explain our current obesity crisis -- including the need to think beyond calories-in-calories-out and 2) the author has an smart MDs grasp of a lot of scientific concepts that is first-rate and does a amazing job explaining them to a lay audience ---- BUT: it suffers horribly from making claims in the "knowing doctor voice" that cannot be backed up and is organized like a jumble of vignettes with vastly varying degrees of plausibility which are somehow or another loosely created to help the author's overall is amazing science and junk science all jumbled together and glossed over with a healthy dose of "I have my medical degree. People listen to me. I cannot photo that I am not right." Check out, for example, the "Case Study - Atomic Testing" on page 49 (which happens to be placed in the middle of an absolutely backward overly genetically determined bit on African American incidence of obesity being entirely explainable by the genetics resulting from the Atlantic passage of the slave trade) - in the case study, the author describes the eureka moment when he explains the obesity of a patient whose family does not suffer from obesity, generally, by genetic mutation due to his father's exposure to radiation in Atomic weapons testing. No other evidence is hinted at in this "case study" other than the fast gathering of these biographical facts in an initial patient interview and the brilliant deductive reasoning of the author. He does not say "maybe x" he simply states his conclusion as fact. THIS rather beautifully illustrates what is unfortunately wrong with the entire book (again, I think some of the thinking about genetics and metabolic set-point are valuable, but not in the hands of this author).

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    Well thought out book that tells the reality of bullying and the pain it inflicts

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    I highly recommend this to students, parents and peer abuse survivors alike. Anyone can learn life lessons from reading these honest heartfelt essays

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    This is a book that EVERY KID who has ever been bullied, and every parent or grandparent of a bullied kid MUST READ. Jodee Blanco has once again outdone herself with her editing and presentation of these kids' stories- which are all true. The children talk straight from the heart, in their own language, directly to OTHER children and to their parents and caregivers. Most of the stories are inspiring- but there are a few in this book which are truly heartbreaking to is book will probably save the lives of more than one bullied kid or teen, just like Ms. Blanco's other two books did. ( I have both of those on my shelf, and they have inspired ME to write about my own not good experiences with public education.)

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    I'm not quite sure about this one. I probably got about halfway through it before I just had to stop. The method the stories are written, it seems kind of...off, like it's not really the bullied kids/teens writing, but written by an adult who thinks they know the "language" of children and teens, like that's how they really talk ere was one story in there by a teen named Tiffany that was very moving, and I still can't believe that something like that would happen to anybody.

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    A follow-up title to Jodee Blanco’s previous book, Please Stop Laughing at Me…, this book includes private stories by high school and college students who were bullied and what they did about it. It’s a very hopeful book, even though the tales can create you feel quite uncomfortable (especially if you might see a glimmer of you anywhere). My only (trite) comment about the book is that the vernacular used by the children writing will soon (and, in some cases, has already) go out of style and sound funny. I understand that the author most likely wanted these written in the kids’ own words so that there would be a ring of authenticity, though I hope that doesn’t take away from the strong stories. My guess is that this book will appeal more to parents than kids.What I appreciated the most from the book is that Ms. Blanco insists upon including the bully in these discussions. Because if you don’t know why someone bullies, it is hard to obtain them to stop. And while the bullied kid doesn’t care why it is event but just wants it to end, it can break the cycle so that two lives are bettered, not just one. I don’t understand why adults tell children to ignore the bully; they wouldn’t ignore other problems, so why this one? It makes it sound like the child is somehow at fault. But, most importantly, she says, when your kid is being bullied and is telling you about it, you need to listen. You can’t project your own experiences on your kid or brush them off. Listen.Bullied Children Speak Out by Jodee Blanco was published January 16, 2015 by Adams Media. A copy of this book was given to Ink and Page in return for an honest review. Huge thanks to the Publisher and the Author.Rating: 3Genre: Young Adult Non-FictionAges: 11 and up

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    This is the book I required as a child. I am beyond thankful that bullying is an problem people care about. Personally I saw four of my mates commit suicide over bullying. Countless more I know dealt with bullying. Your words and actions are l too often you think you are alone when you are being bullied, you don't believe the problem matters, or that anyone can do anything to support you. That couldn't be more wrong. You do matter, the problem matters, and most of all people care.Honestly if I could give this book a million stars I would. This is a collection of first hard stories and accounts of bulling. It is deeply moving and wonderful impacting. Being able to walk through peoples pain will support inspire you to test and change the side this book are stories that range from LGBT students being outcasted, cyber-bullies, young girls told they are fat/ugly. The stories we often hear about too often. They write about the support, or even sometimes lack of help they had in the situation. Wake up teachers and principles, you have to do something. The collection is comprised 17 stories that will create you realize just how much this epidemic is hurting is an eye opening acc of just what so a lot of children with on the playground, in parks, and behind close doors. Kids who are currently being bullied need to read this book. This book could save one life, every life matters. To be able to understand that so a lot of people go through this problem will support them obtain through it. Adults need to read this to learn how to war this ever growing issue. This book will leave a lasting ank you so much to F+W Media for sending me this book for review. All thoughts options and statements created are my own

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    Bullied Kids Speak Out: We Survived--How You Can Too []  2020-2-6 22:52

    I search it hard to believe that anyone really thinks children wrote these stories. I have see Jodee Blanco give her canned talk and doubted a lot of things she said during that. But reading this book sealed the for me. Every acc by the "bullied students" had the exact same voice and a lot of even used the same phrases. This lady's a fraud.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    I learned to read as a kid with these books, and comparing it to reading material being given to my Nursery school grandson from his school, I believe these old @#$% and Jane books are STILL the best by far!

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    Same as the other review for one of these three books...they take me back to the 50's when I was in 2nd grade and was learning to read...Loved being able to share these with some young people in 2019,...

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    I love these @#$% and Jane Books. I bought them for my God-Granddaughter. I studied from them when I was in the 1st grade and I'm 62 years ol!

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    Oh my goodness! I ordered this book because I respect the processes that Robert Probst and Kylene Beers have towards literacy. I teach unique education in a high school and have used the Message and Note books with much success. I read the first 1-2 chapters of Disrupting Thinking the moment I got the shipment. I decided to test some of the questioning techniques in my classroom the very next day. We had the most awesome conversations about the book we were reading as a class. All it took was a few of the questioning techniques where the teacher doesn't control the conversation but leaves it in the hands of the students. If a student doesn't see the connection between themselves and the reading they are asked to do, they tend to not be interested. This book is helping me become more "student centered" as a teacher and allow the students develop their critical thinking skills.

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    I like the thinking of the book. It is related to Kelly Gallagher's Readicide, but I like the method it discusses teaching students to read with their hearts and look for how the book changes them. However, I [email protected]#$%! had more tactics for implementing this perspective in the classroom. Amazing theory but not enough application.

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    My daughter who is a teacher recommended the book to me. It is well organized, an simple read, and a amazing resource for classroom reading teachers. It is obvious that the authors have a passion for working in schools and listening to what teachers and students are saying about how they think and what they do when reading. I enjoyed the book and agreed with and yet knew most of the references and reports (NRP, etc.) mentioned in the book. I liked the author's sidebar comments and the clear and concise charts and graphs of information. Yet, it was somewhat repetitive e.g. defining disruptive thinking (and might be a amazing thing) and created much reference to their other books (Notice and Note, etc.) as if you have already read them and if you have not the reader might obtain a bit lost. However, Beers and Probst help for bringing back the forgotten truths and rationale for students having CHOICE during independent reading and for sustained silent reading (SSR). The book also presents techniques for getting children thinking in various ways (e.g. book -head-heart) when e book is in divided into four parts but the latest part of the book departs with a various purpose from the rest of the book and is more of a rant or a plea to change the curriculum and method we teach reading (as if everyone according to them is still teaching round-robin, etc.).There are no specific tactics for teaching ELLs or students with disabilities which would create a amazing follow-up edition.Overall, well worth reading as a fresh or experienced teacher-- these authors are out there doing necessary work to tutorial children to disrupt their thinking during challenging times in education. Rating 4.5

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    Bits and pieces are good, but this is not nearly as amazing as Message and Note.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    This was a amazing book... granddaughter was already reading some and had flash cards and harder books...this was a delightful book for her, she was so please with herself... the reward of being able to read most of it with very small help...and still every day...she wants to read one of several @#$% and Jane books.... love them....

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    This was a amazing book about how we need to teach students to be a responsive reader, responsible reader, and a compassionate reader.

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    Loved this book. I have much to think on. My favorite part are the reflection questions at the end of each chapter. A amazing book for a book study!

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    Amazing for sight words for young children...you just have to hold reading this to them, ask them to tell about the picture, what do they think is going to happen....just encourage conversation... and point to the words when you read. Eventually the words will become familiar.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    I bought 5 of the @#$% and Jane books for my 2 grandsons (ages 2&3) for Christmas.I think the simpleness of the books are what draws the children. They can identify with the children and what they do for fun. We are reading them to the kids right now but, it won't be long until they are on their own. The books came before the estimated time of delivery and in excellent condition. I have ordered quite a few stuff from in the latest year or so. I always compare prices. For what I buy, amazon is usually beautiful amazing as far as price. But you MUST compare first. Just because it's from amazon doesn't mean it is the cheapest, I have learned. The shipping on certain products is amazing but some of the stuff I want to are not eligible.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    Just as amazing as when I used in first grade to learn to read. Brought back amazing memories and I will treasure all of these that I brought. May be able to teach future grandchildren to read.

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    This book is another homerun. I highly recommend Disrupting Thinking to any teacher who truly wants to empower their students as readers and writers. It's so well done and the students' response to the frameworks outlined in the book has been gratifying and enlightening. I lost my original copy, so I bought it again!!

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    This text is amazing. There are so a lot of amazing ideas and lessons to learn from these authors. I will definitely be using what I learn from this book in my classroom to engage my students and encourage diverse ways of thinking within the classroom. If you are looking for something to support you make empathetic and engaged readers within the classroom, this book is most definitely for you.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    These type books were the first to come to mind when I thought of teaching my 5 year old to read. It's full of sight words and he enjoys being a huge boy and reading to mommy and daddy. Only give it 4 stars because the pictures are still dated and I want the small boy was named Pete or something other than @#$%.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    I actually had the @#$% and Jane books as a kid which had a huge part in teaching me how to read. I purchased this book for my amazing granddaughter as she's starting to learn word recognition. This is the excellent book to obtain a Pre K started in learning how to read.

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    We Play (Read With @#$% and Jane) []  2020-1-29 18:0

    My professional teacher mother is teaching my 5-year-old daughter to read sight words using these books. In the latest 4 weeks, they've plowed through 6 books, in about 20 mins every evening. My daughter can now read common words in other books, and weirdly enough, she loves the stories in @#$% and Jane. I would recommend these, rather than flash cards, to anyone interested in teaching their kid common sight words.

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    I have read other books by Kylene Beers so I knew what to expect. Yes, my thinking was disrupted and I am in the process of planning a more effective reading program for my students. I love the format, the thought-provoking questions at the end of each chapter, and the links. This book changed my views on reading with my students and I'm looking forward to fresh ways of teaching and learning.

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    Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters []  2019-12-18 20:27

    I am moving from a Reading Intervention teacher role to a Literacy Coach role this year. I will be working with teachers to implement these tactics in their classrooms. I absolutely love Kylene Beers and Bob Probst and the help they present for teachers!

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    Deepa Iyer's gem of a book narrates how Muslim, South Asian, and Middle Eastern communities have resisted profiling and Islamaphobia since 9/11. Through the stories of Sikhs who suffered violence and horrific loss then turned to activism, Muslims who organize in their communities in the face of tremendous possible risk, and activists who stand in solidarity with other communities of color, Iyer has ensured that this book is not an exercise in academia or ivory turret research. It is a testament to the strength and stories of communities who continue to struggle for change. We Too Sing America is a moving and timely book. A must read.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    If you have already read "The Mind on Fire" by Richardson, no need to read this book. But if you haven't, it is a amazing read and conveys some of the passion Emerson had for writing, but nevertheless, it is a very well written book and Richardson never seizes to amaze me with his style.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    Deepa Iyer 's book, We Too Sing America is the best book for better, comprehensive, and more nuanced understandings underscored by necessary solid qualitative and quantitative data, on South Asian, Arab, Muslim and Sikh immigrants and how these amazing American populations must be included in our thoughts, policies, actions, and empathies if we are to achieve American aspirations such as equality, equity, freedom, and truly value the greatness of these individuals and cultures to our own professional, community, and private lives.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    BRAVO! Words cannot describe how much I appreciate Deepa Iyer's perspective in these strange times we live in post-9/11. Her ability to balance the legal problems with the human element are spot on. Thank you, Ms. Iyer for being a vigilant community advocate and for spreading these vital accounting to the broader world. Ms. Iyer, you are correct, this is not just a Muslim, Sikh, or Arab problem but a narrative of inclusion and unity.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    I’ve just read a bit of Emerson, knowing more popular quotes than his actual work. This brings Emerson to life and provides a lovely mediation on how reading fuels writing and the value that Emerson saw in each of us as thinking, creative minds.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    Powerful! Insightful! Hopeful!

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    Lots of causation from correlation. It seems as if the author is attempting to push a political agenda rather than reveal facts. It is also a recurring theme that antiracism/ post-racial ideals are only achievable through absolving all responsibility from all racial groups, while extending said responsibilities to 'The white man'.I'd consult a lot of sources while navigating this text.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    Essential and accessible reading for anyone who cares about our Constitution, the state of our Union, and humanity. A chronicle of injustices by individuals and the state since 9/11 based on individuals' race, ethnicity, and faith; and prescriptions for bringing about real equity, which will not come about simply because of our Nation's imminent multiracial population, and which affects all of us. Iyer's elegantly–written stories of South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh people on the front lines before and since 9/11 will in turns create you angry, sad, inspired, and hopeful. Highly recommend.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    This book really helped me understand the history and continuing reality of private and structural discrimination versus South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh people in the U.S. Deepa Iyer's combination of historical fact (e.g. U.S. security and immigration policies) and their intersections in true people's lives created for a strong call to action on behalf of all concerned parties to organize for justice. I felt both educated and impassioned with a sense of urgency to take steps to conquer white supremacy, although it benefits me personally, to ensure a safe and prosperous environment for everyone in our community.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    I thought Deepa Iyer's fresh book, We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future, would be about positive and jarring cultural contributions from immigrants, how their literature, music, myths, cooking, clothing, and cultural practices are merging with and influencing wider U.S. culture. I think that would be a amazing book. Maybe someone's written is, too, is a amazing book, and I recommend it. But it is mostly about the all-too-familiar story of post-911 prejudice, racism, violence, and police profiling and abuse, with a particular focus on South Asians. As an enemy of murder in any form, my first response to this subject is usually: Take the guns away! Hatred doesn't slay people -- hatred in people with guns kills people! But of course I'd love to take the hatred away as well and obtain the gun deaths down to accidents, suicides, and non-hate crimes.I admit some uncertainty as to how we can identify a gun murder as of hate. Here's how Iyer describes hate crimes: "Hate violence affects everyone in America. A hate crime affects not only the person being targeted but the entire community to which that person belongs. Acts of hate violence can disrupt and affect even those who do not belong [to] the community being directly targeted, as we witnessed in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where non-Sikhs also experienced fear and anxiety in the wake of the massacre."Of course, that sounds almost identical to the effects of a non-hate school shooting. A value to be found in distinguishing crimes motivated by, for example, hatred of Muslims, lies in the consequent ability to report on and know how widespread that phenomenon is. Does badmouthing Muslims encourage shooting them? Does shooting them encourage discriminating versus them? We cannot study and address these matters if we don't identify them. And of course, fearing being shot for living in a country whose government has been purchased by the NRA, is not exactly the same as fearing being shot for being a Muslim and living in a country whose government has been purchased by the NRA. Hatred of part of your identity can create you wish to hide that identity and/or resent the suggestion that you should do so and/or internalize the idea of inferiority, etc.On the other hand, hate crimes laws don't just produce data. Neither do they do anything to reduce racism or other bigotry or to address underlying insecurities and grievances. What they do, as Iyer points out, is increase long sentences in the U.S. mass incarceration ch of the work that Iyer describes being undertaken by community groups in help of abused minorities and crime victims involves attempting to tweak the flood of sewage spewing forth from the corporate media. She urges reporters not to talk about non-Muslim people having been mistaken for Muslims when they've been attacked. Her reason is that this could be taken to imply that it's all right to attack Muslims. That sounds crazy, but of course she is right that that could happen. Why, then, does locking people up for extra years or decades because they killed while racist not risk implying that it's OK to slay while not racist? It seems no more e permanent U.S. battle on the Middle East has fed the streams of both personal and police hate crimes, and that battle has trained a lot of to believe that, in fact, it is OK to slay only while believing in racism and bigotry. Members of the military cannot avoid thinking that, while killing was wrong all through their childhood, something has suddenly created it acceptable when they are ordered to engage in it. For a lot of the dehumanizing strategy that allows them to obey their orders is racism. Such racism at home, Iyer argues, enables the United States to hold going to war.And what about the endless FBI frame-ups, the profiling, the deportations, and all the racist abuse by "law enforcement" -- why aren't these hate crimes? Don't they set examples and influence the broader culture? If someone in Germany proposes immigration policies resembling those of the United States they are immediately denounced for racism and hatred.Iyer's book is full of heart-wrenching stories of raging racist hatred and violence, and the suffering it creates. She also proposes some amazing ideas rarely heard about in the corporate media, including reparations for the victims of post-911 state bigotry, on the model of reparations for the victims of the Japanese-American internment camps.What really breaks my heart in reading so a lot of accounts of the sort of nastiness that has just helped lead that young man whose school clock project was labeled a bomb to leave the United States for someplace less hostile, is the focus of the corrective work on trying to influence the corporate media. We all know how poor the corporate media is, how small it is turned into a force for good, and what minor partial tweaks are proclaimed as victories by activists.We need a communications system that ceases to condone hatred or violence, that contains all voices in its communications, and that condemns cruelty -- whether public or personal -- without exception.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    Briefly, Desiderius Erasmus, (1469-1536) was the greatest scholar and teacher of the northern Renaissance, the first editor of the Fresh Testament, and also an necessary figure in patristics and classical literature. If there were a Rushmorean monument for book lovers, he would be among the first selected, probably joined by Ralph Waldo Emerson. Both read books with amazing passion and appreciation long before they began to write about them and discuss their significance in First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process, Robert D. Richardson shares the very best of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s thoughts about the creative process in general, and about writing in particular. There is no doubt in Richardson’s mind that Emerson could have published the material but probably didn’t because he was never wholly happy with his own work. His standards were so high “that even the Almighty could not have met them.”In my opinion, Richardson’s Emerson: The Mind on Fire is the finest biography of him written thus far. What we have in First We Read, Then We Write is the only assemblage I know of that focuses on Emerson as a literary exemplar, sharing his thoughts about creative reading as well as creative e basic sources contain two magnificent essays, “The American Scholar” and "The Poet." Emerson thought of himself more as a poet than as an essayist, one who earned this living as a lecturer. He viewed the poet as one who is representative, who “stands among partial men for the complete man, and apprises us not of his wealth, but of the commonwealth.” Writing is a noble calling that calls for noble sacrifice.” But Emerson never wrote an essay on the topic of is a representative selection of brief passages that caught my eye:o On what young writers need to hold in mind: “Meek young men grow up in libraries believing it is their duty to accept the views which Cicero, Locke, and Bacon have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only young men in libraries when they wrote those books.”o On having passion and courage for writing: “The method to write is to throw your body at the tag when your arrows are spent.”o On amazing writing: “Good writing and brilliant conversation are perpetual allegories.”o On self-editing: “All writing should be selection in to drop every dead word.”o On priorities: “There is then creative reading as well as creative writing. First we read, then we beget; first we read, then we write.”o Finally, to the reader of his essay, Nature: “Every spirit builds itself a house, and beyond its house a world, and beyond its globe a heaven. Know then, that the globe exists for you. For you is the phenomenon perfect. What we are, that only can we see. All that Adam had, all that Caesar could, you have and can do. Adam called his house, heaven and earth; Caesar called his house, Rome; you perhaps call yours, a cobbler’s trade; a hundred acres of polished land; or a scholar’s garret. Yet line for line and point for point; your dominion is as amazing as theirs, though without fine names. Build, therefore, your own world.”Hopefully, a lot of of those who read this volume will be encouraged to read several of Emerson’s essays as well as Richardson’s biography. There are several perfect collections of the essays and journals. My private favorite is a Library of America College Edition, Emerson: Essays and Lectures: Nature: Addresses and Lectures/Essays: First and Second Series/ Representative Men/English Traits/The Conduct of Life.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    Amazing book for the time invested. It's a fast biography of his reading and thinking... not too much about the happenings in his life. It is obviously very quotable, and is amazing to obtain a piece of the relaxed, natural, individually focused transcendental ideas that Emerson is known thing I thought was interesting was his seeming emphasis on reader centrism rather than author's purpose. I would like to delve into these locations more. It seems like he would wish people to recognize what the author is saying, but then again it seems like he wants you to obtain something from the author or move on to the next. I like Emerson, but I also like trying to focus on the author's purpose. I bet depending on what angle you asked him from he would respond ere's a lot of amazing quotes in here, but here are a few that I collected:"Never read a book that is not a year old""If a man has amazing corn, or wood, or boards, or pigs to sell, or can create better chairs, or knives, crucibles or church organs than anybody else, you will search a broad, hard-beaten street to his house, though it be in the woods.""now and then a man exquisitely created can and must live alone; but coop up most men, and you undo them."On his relationship with Thomas Carlyle "Strict conversation with a mate is the magazine out of which all amazing writing is drawn"On writing: "you should begin with no skeleton or plan. the natural one will grow as you work. knock away all scaffolding.""The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. Why should not we also have fun an original relation to the universe? Why should not we have a poetry and philosophy of insight, and not of tradition, and a religion by revelation to us, and no the history of theirs?"

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    Robert Richardson's short book is an extremely close look at Emerson's writings and comments about reading and writing, with enough biographical material to put Emerson's journal and paper extracts in context. While the novella-long essay is informative and occasionally thrilling when revealing bookish sentiments stated so beautifully by both Emerson and Richardson, I think these chapters will be appreciated only by those of us with stacks of books all over the house and doing double service as furniture. Sad. But if one wants to see an example of gorgeous writing, this is one to check out.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    If you know a student or fledging author in need of a thoughtful gift, consider the of this book on the essence of that most useful creative art, writing. (Or, it for yourself.)Professor Richardson brings a lifetime of acquired knowledge to this fine summary of Ralph Waldo Emerson's scattered expressions similar to both reading and writing.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    This is an perfect book. All though short and sweet it has so much info and interesting thoughts packed into it. Anyone interested in being a life long learner should read this book.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    Deeps Iyer puts unbelievable spotlights on individuals and communities across America who are actively pursuing the more excellent Union our country should represent. She shares truthful histories of tragedy and triumph, and brilliantly discusses how modern daily South Asians, Arabs, Muslims, and Sikhs can transform American realities. There is no single approach for success, and Ms. Iyer explores the complexities of causes, identity, and activism that all of us as "brown folks" (my term, not hers) encounter. I'm fired up and eager to engage in more social justice movements after reading this.

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    We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future []  2020-2-4 10:48

    As Islamophobia spikes even further, threats of fresh versions of "Muslim registries" persists, & fear of unknown futures for South Asian, Arab, Sikh, & Muslim immigrants continues to permeate the reality of everyday life, We Too Sing America provides necessary historical context and helpful framing that challenges anti-Blackness & model minority myths to support readers prepare for and engage in a multiracial war for justice.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    The notice that any book we read means something special to each reader resonates with me. The feeling that we are the sum of our experiences, and that a lot of of our experiences have come through reading, gives a fullness to the idea that we read in to gain knowledge. Emerson maintains, however, that we cannot gain from reading any thought that is not already in our minds.

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    Necessary for my husband’s research

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    First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process []  2020-1-22 19:2

    This book is as much about Ralph Waldo Emerson as it is about reading and writing. It reveals the books he read as well as the method he thought and wrote. Thinking was not part of the title but it was clear that it is every bit as important. Emerson was an intellectual in that he read, thought, and wrote. That is the intellectual's life and anyone aspiring to that life would search this a helpful book. "There is always a right word, and every other that is wrong." This book also discussed the writers who had influenced Emerson; writers like Goethe and Shakespeare.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    I bought these books for my emerging reader. They're adorable!

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    My granddaughter Mia loves this book.

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    Amazing book! I am a book collector and this one certainly stands out. My 3 year old is a large fan. We even play out the story of this book for fun.

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    Very cute book. My small one enjoys reading this one and now I have to create brownies. :)

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    Grandkids like

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    Read This If: A Collection of Essays that Prove Someone Else Gets it, Too []  2020-8-1 18:38

    I purchased this a while ago when experiencing a rough patch in my life. This is a book that I purchased in to read occasionally, whenever I was feeling particularly down and drawn to it. Most of the essays in the collection created me feel much better.A close mate of mine is getting divorced. She finally decided, after years or struggling to improve her marriage. I purchased this book (and another) for her, in hopes that it would support her feel better as it helped me. She's very satisfied with the essays that she's read so far.

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    Read This If: A Collection of Essays that Prove Someone Else Gets it, Too []  2020-8-1 18:38

    I read this book and my first thought was that it should be a reference book. Maybe a self support reference book. This isn't an insult, in fact it is high praise.A lot of these essays don't quite fit me right now, but they might in the future. Plenty did affect me right now. So use this book when you need. It will help.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    Mia and the Too Huge Tutu was a sweet book for emerging readers. My daughters loved the book, especially the method it was written in shorter sentences and bright pictures.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    Our daughter loves cats and anything to do with dancing so this book was excellent for her. The cat Mia is upset about her tutu being too big, but in the end she dances anyway and forgets about her issues while having fun.

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    Amazing series for my grand daughters.

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    Read This If: A Collection of Essays that Prove Someone Else Gets it, Too []  2020-8-1 18:38

    this is very strong and awesome to read especially when you’re feeling down or just alone

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    Read This If: A Collection of Essays that Prove Someone Else Gets it, Too []  2020-8-1 18:38

    So I bought this book on a whim. Not sure what to expect but curious. This book is a must read, the chapters/ essays were so relevant to my life and reminded me that I'm not alone: that we all feel these things and that while we are going through what ever it is that we are going through how simple it is to forget that.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    I was happy with the quality of this book for the price. I purchased this as a donation, so I cannot comment in terms of if the six year old I bought it for liked it. It is a fairly Simple Reader.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    6yr old Granddaughter liked the book.

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    My kiddo liked this book. It was a fun subject that created her laugh and created her wish to read - she’s a reluctant reader. Illustrations were blurry but that didn’t bother her. Recommend.

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    Nice! This book is beautiful cute, my son loves it! He loves sharks and brownies too.

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    Read This If: A Collection of Essays that Prove Someone Else Gets it, Too []  2020-8-1 18:38

    This is an awesome book. You can turn to any page and feel comforted or attractive or just understood. I wish to copies for all of my girlfriends, and we're all in our sixties and seventies -- but we still relate -- we're still children at heart (and soul). Even if all you wish is to smile -- especially if you think the latest thing you can do in the globe right now is smile -- read the first chapter. Honestly, there is something in here for every girl (and yes, just because I'm old doesn't mean I'm not a girl), and I swear that no matter where you are in your head, heart, and life, you'll be in a better put for reading this book. Every woman should read this. When the sun comes up I'm calling my forty-nine year old daughter and telling her to a copy.

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    Read This If: A Collection of Essays that Prove Someone Else Gets it, Too []  2020-8-1 18:38

    So a lot of chapters of this book appeared to be written just for me. The first chapter had me crying. It was just what I required to read. Not every chapter will apply to every person, which makes it interesting to read what others are going through as well. Highly recommended!!! You'll read and reread this book.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    I bought a few of these "I Can Read!" for my 5yo and she can't obtain enough of them. She had been working on nursery school sight words and was reading other books of the sort, so I figured she would jump right into these. For the most part I was right. There were a few words here and there that she would need support with, but for the most part she was reading away. If you small one is doing well on primary sight words they should be able to hit the ground running with these. I would also guess you could use them as an interesting method to practice the sight words.

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    Mia and the Too Big Tutu (My First I Can Read) []  2020-1-21 18:2

    I have 2 year old and she loves to have me read to her... they are nice short short for me to read to her. And she will love to read them when she can to her small sister!

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    Clark the Shark: Too Many Treats (I Can Read Level 1) []  2020-7-2 19:17

    My students loved all of the Clark the Shark books. I purchased in preparation for our school's Author Visit with Bruce Hale. My students were anxious to obtain their hands on any of his books because they wanted to have questions before he arrived.

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