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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace If mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    The ladies voice reading is the worst! Like a female William Shatner.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    I found this book extremely insightful and worth the read for any pregnant woman. That said, some of her research on epidurals is outdated, I imagine this may be the case for other pieces too. Hopefully she writes an modernize soon. There are a lot of photos and charts cited in the audio recording that would be extremely helpful to be able to see. Not sure if there is a method to access them or not.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    I go this audiobook out of the library. I really like the narrator and the book itself is outstanding. Well written, well researched, empowering and fascinating. A serious must read/ listen for any pregnant woman.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    This book claims to use scientific data to debunk existing myths around pregnancy. However, the author does not use varied sources to draw conclusions. In a lot of instances she uses one paper to create a claim and draw conclusions that are not necessarily true. For example, she uses data from ONE paper to conclude that if you don’t have any morning sickness you will likely have a miscarriage in your first trimester. This is just absolutely e author uses her credentials to give the reader a false sense of security. She has no medical background and two pregnancies does not create her a pregnancy expert. Frankly, she also does not use her skill set (yzing data and drawing conclusions) well enough to create any compelling points in this book. Bottom line: don’t waste your cash on this book that does nothing place perpetuate fears and insecurities that women are fed throughout their pregnancy.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    I appreciate the scientific approach the author takes in reviewing common myths (and facts) about trying to conceive, pregnancy, and a lot of of the common do’s and don’ts we’ve heard most of our lives. It’s a amazing read and I want I’d read it instead of listening to the audiobook. I believe the author’s intent was to remain, as a scientist, unbiased—she presents the facts and trusts the reader to create her own decisions. However, the narrator imparts her own condescending and dismissive tone, which distracts from the purpose of the book. She sounds bored reading this book and it really shows. All-in-all, I would recommend the hard copy of the book and, tentatively, the audiobook. Listen to the entire audio sample before purchasing to create sure you’re okay with more than nine hours of this droning, judging voice.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    PLEASE do not listen to the AWFUL tip throughout this book! The author badly misrepresents research. This is basically an economist reviewing medical tip by cherry-picking a few studies, poking holes in the design, and then issuing proclamations based on no understanding of the mechanisms, of biology, or of medicine!--just her skepticism of the exceedingly few studies she decided to read. The issue is that her tip is very often to ignore troves of research on things that can be very harmful to your baby, because the author decides, maybe those things aren't are the main flaws:1. Finding a study or two and poking holes in them, instead of looking at the overall results of hundreds or thousands of studies on these topics2. No understanding or discussion of the biological mechanisms in issuing her decisions--simply snarky skepticism about cherry-picked studies and defiance versus her doctor, who seems to have been beautiful dopey3. Mothers SHOULD create conservative decisions when it comes to the life, death, suffering and long-term health of their child. If something maybe does and maybe doesn't seriously hurt their child, and refraining doesn't hurt the mother in any way, then you refrain!! I don't like being judgmental, but when you're talking about a completely defenseless small fetus or baby, then yes, you do need to protect it and your petty desire for cold cuts, wine or coffee isn't worth harming your child.A lot of her information is WAY off base. If you so much as read normal pregnancy www services that spotlight studies, this should be very clear to you. This book is kind of like having your Mom review your PhD dissertation and telling you what to change. Mom doesn't understand your dissertation and won't be helpful in you making decisions about it.Examples--The author decides its fine to drink a couple drinks a week, or one or so a day, mainly because she is able to question a couple studies that showed this was bad. However, there is a trove of research that is beautiful tight that she doesn't look at, including some very latest research not covered by this book, that is very strong, and shows that you can seriously hurt your child's brain in a method that will create that human suffer its entire life. The pertinent point here, is that she couches everything in terms of her definition of economic decisions-making in a very flawed way. She says, you have to take data and weigh the benefits--that you have fun a couple drinks--against the costs--data that she thinks is rather inconclusive about the potential impacts. And she decides to go ahead and consume some alcohol. But this is NOT how mothers create decisions, nor should they! The costs are Maybe or Maybe Not damaging this fetus irrevocably for its entire future life, weighed versus your desire to have wine. Wine is NOT a need! Why would a mother even consider doing something that might seriously hurt their fetus, just because it also might not? The same for coffee. She looks at a couple little studies, pokes holes in their design, and decides that it is fine for her to drink multiple cups of coffee per is is why you should use an understanding of biology, medicine or physiology--not an understand of "economics", when making these decisions! The blood and organs of your fetus are not yet developed. The caffeine you drink comes through and into the fetus' body, but it cannot metabolize this the method that you can. Caffeine impacts the small one far more heavily than it impacts you. One cup of coffee to you is like 3 to 4 cups for your fetus. What kind of mother would deliberately place 12 cups of coffee into a baby! How would you feel after 12 cups? Why would you wish your baby to suffer, when you could just not do it? There is also latest very powerful research that finds a significantly higher rate of miscarriage for women who drink more than 2 cups of coffee per day.Another example showing the same pattern--she discusses the drop in fertility in women with age based on research from 1880. She says this is the main research on the topic. And then disagrees with it. Sorry, but there are entire scientific journals devoted to this topic! There are thousands of studies!She also goes on a diatribe about research stating that Correlation is not Causation, and that doctor's recommendations are based on correlative evidence. Congratulations, the idea that causation and correlation differ is not fresh to anyone in a medical profession, nor to probably most people. She then shows a childish understanding of science, talking about how the only method to obtain away from correlation is to have extensive control groups for every variable studied. Anyone who has done more than freshman year statistics knows that there are a lot of statistical methods that work very well for getting away from correlation and finding causation. You can't always have a control group. When you spend a year or more in the rigorous peer review process before getting your study published in a medical journal, yeah, results not based solely on causation is actually something they require. But thank you miss economist lady for letting us know about that!The author should have just gotten a better doctor who answered her questions with detail and research. My doctor does. This book reads like those people who decide to do really offensive and outlandish things for the reason of defying political correctness. But this isn't about political correctness, this is about your baby. Why would you ever wish to risk this small person just to be edgy and snarky? I am really sad that a number of people have thought this is a amazing book.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    I was excited to read this book - I bought it online when I found out I was expecting a child. There is a lot of hokum and pseudoscience surrounding pregnancy and health. I wanted a book that would chop through that and give an evidence-based survey of pregnancy-related topics, and hear the scientific community's consensus (as much as they have one) on those ever, I was shocked seeing a review on the book talking about the "myth" that alcohol is inadvisable during pregnancy. Certainly the author isn't advising any amount of alcohol is advisable, given the overwhelmingly consensus on the problem from public health advocates?I immediately read the entire alcohol part of the book. I soon learned not only would this book not provide me with the best evidence from health advocacy groups and scientist groups, they would provide evidence that directly contradicted e author says it's fine to drink some alcohol during pregnancy, and info how much and why she thinks this. She walks through studies and literature on the subject that she examined. Given that the CDC, the American Pregnancy Association, the Globe Health Organization, National Council on Alcoholism and Dependence, the March of Dimes, and others all agree and firmly say the best tip is to abstain from alcohol completely, I really required an extraordinary explanation from the author as to why I should ignore those experts. Not surprisingly, I found her ysis underwhelming and unpersuasive, and not worthy of ignoring the consensus shared by experts in the k yourself, who is a more trusted source? An economist writing a book to a mass audience for profit, or the March of Dimes, the CDC, WHO, American Pregnancy Association, the UK Health Ministry, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome scientists and advocacy groups? Do all those independent groups have a profit motive to give distorted and wrong health advice?And fetal alcohol syndrome is not some one in a million risk that parents shouldn't really worry about. A latest study showed 1% to 5% of children studied had fetal alcohol syndrome disorder, and it was being chronically be fair, while this has been the consensus for a while, you could search outliers when the author first wrote this book. For example, the UK's health ministry used not advise versus very light alcohol use, but they have since examined emerging research on fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD) and they now say the best tip is to abstain completely - joining the consensus among other health groups like CDC, WHO, has the author been concerned about the emerging evidence since she wrote this book? I saw Dr. Oster was asked about latest studies showing that even light alcohol use was unsafe during pregnancy by a health journalist, and her respond was illuminating. Dr. Oster basically said for those studies she'd wish to see them be replicated and more info about the links between behavior and harm. That's fine (we should fund lots of replication studies!), but note when she looked at studies that didn't search a danger for pregnant women to drink moderately - she didn't say "well I'm going to wait to see if these can be replicated and more detail provided" - she took them to the bank and said you can create conclusive decisions about your child's health outcomes based on these studies.I would agree there is not an abundance of studies showing that a little amount of alcohol will lead to significant medical risks. But there have also been no related studies showing that having one cigarette (or two, or three) during your pregnancy is a significant risk. So in this book, does the author similarly suggest smoking a very little amount of tobacco is perfectly acceptable, given the absence of studies? No, she follows the scientific consensus here. Why the double standard?With things that pose a serious risk to kids (like lead paint), we may not ever know exactly where the line is between what is harmless and what will irreversibly hurt a child. When the activity is something that is avoidable, the scientific community generally urges avoiding it entirely.I'm sure Dr. Oster is well-intentioned, but this is a book about health written for profit to a famous audience, and even in the best cirtances that is a fraught situation. There is a profitable shop for people with academic credibility to sell a notice that, while it goes versus the consensus of the public health community, it's something a lot of people wish to hear. I hope the book gets updated with the a lot of advances in our understanding of FASD, or at least explains why they have a double standard on very light tobacco use.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    As a first time soon-to-be mom this is by far my best pregnancy book I’ve read! The author re-examines old studies and articles about certain pregnancy no-no’s, myths, tests, etc. and presents the facts to the reader so you can create your own conclusion. She reviews if the study/survey was flawed, outdated, and level of accuracy and then tells the reader her private stance on the issue. For example, she examines all the studies that rule out caffeine and her decision on how much caffeine was safe to drink. She describes the number of prenatal tests a pregnant woman will be offered, when they are offered, the risks, and the level of accuracy associated with its results and then outlines which tests she decided to take and why. Whether you agree with her private decisions or not, this book is amazing in that she presents the science and facts so that each mom-to-be can draw her own conclusions. I felt so much more informed after reading her book and often refer back to it as fresh pregnancy options arise!

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    I started this book with an begin mind. But I think being fairly well trained in understanding research/ lit reviews I found myself being skeptical almost right away. I’m a trained in sociology and psychology and did a lot of coursework focused on research and interpreting it. During my studies I read a number of the papers she referred to prior to reading this book. I’m beautiful sure I even reading her and her husband’s academic skepticism grew with her use of statistically insignificant data. On more than one occasion the data used to help the points are labeled as being insignificant. I have always been taught not to place much stock into statistically insignificant findings which is what she bases her opinions on alcohol and caffeine on. I don’t have a PhD, so maybe down the line you learn how to interpret them so they’re okay to use? But most studies I’ve looked at usually ignore those numbers and focus on the significant ones since insignificant numbers are not considered generalizable. There are ways to fine tune data to see if significance changes, but that wasn’t done here. Always been taught that research thats based on insignificant data is not amazing research. Also two supportive studies is not a lot to base a decision that is not supported by any leading health so found her graphs be a small misleading on how there looked to be larger difference visually even though it was really just a percentage point.I’ve also done a lot of studying on cognitive development and psychology and had it drill into my head the entire class that no amount of alcohol was safe during pregnancy because of the risk of FASD. While I understand it’s a ‘risk’ and not certain, but it’s just like pregnancy the only sure method to prevent it is to abstain. While everyone is allowed their own opinions and choice during pregnancy I personally would take in more than one source of info before making decisions that could literally impact someone’s (your child’s) entire life.I’m not religious, I love wine, am educated, and have fun caffeine. I didn’t intend to obtain pregnant so it was never something I was ever super protective/ cautious at being said I would suggest to not depend solely on this one source of info especially when it’s super tempting to with some of the findings.Another red flag to me was that the author just seemed hell bend on proving her OB wrong and from her recounting of her private experience it seems they did not have a amazing relationship. I can’t imagine female medical doctors take kindly to having their credentials constantly questioned and their suggestions based on those credentials constantly ignored. So seem like there was tension on both sides. Seems like she was determined to do what she wanted and did research to justify it.While I didn’t search anything earth shattering and questioned how valid and accurate the presented numbers were, I did honestly like that she explained some of testing so that those without medical degrees or knowledge on that topic could better understand it even if it got to be a small too wordy at times.I had planned to buy the second book, but now I’m questioning if I should test to return this one.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    The book is great, but I would not recommend by from this seller as there were errors in the print. You would turn the page and it would begin mid-sentence, leaving out text and then the next page would repeat text from the page prior.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    I appreciate her data-based research and compilations of findings. There are some aspects that are helpful, such as miscarriages, labor by the numbers, weight gain during pregnancy, and prenatal screenings. However, lots of other books cover this and provide the same info to come to the same conclusions to use for your decision making. A huge portion of the book in the beginning is dedicated to justification of her pre-pregnancy habits that she does not wish to forgo despite official recommendations by ACOG. To each their own if you wish to drink alcohol, eat/do certain things or take prescription not recommended during pregnancy. But rather than helping people come to an informed decision, some of it felt like a compilation of research justifying the fact that she was not able to go without having wine on a regular basis. Oster is right there is limited data on the impact of alcohol in moderation, but she conveniently left out that alcohol directly crosses the placenta and while it makes adult livers work harder to break down it is even more so the case for undeveloped livers in infants. It felt like in some cases data was selected to help her decisions rather than truly unbiased statements from both sides. She also neglected to state that addiction resources note if you are unable to give up alcohol for a period of time such as pregnancy you should seek support that you can abstain. Prescription should always be discussed with your healthcare provider rather than researching and deciding if the symptoms outweigh risks, in some cases there is another alternative that is safer in pregnancy. Save your cash and read a book written by an OB, pediatrician, nurse, midwife, etc. They provide better info than pulled studies to help behaviors that conflict with CDC and ACOG recommendations.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    This book helped assuage a lot of of my concerns about pregnancy and the "taboos" pregnant women are told to avoid without the data to back it up. The author provides this data and allows us to create our own decisions based on this data. I strongly recommend this book for all expectant moms.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    I don't like how she goes on and on about her thought processes, I was hoping this would focus more on the actual information. Also, I don't like how she only pulled data from one study to come up with a lot of conclusions and facts. Very disappointed, was hoping she would have done more research and looked at multiple studies before spouting off her "fake news".

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    As an Engineer dad and PhD mom, we are statistical in mind and control freaks, so we felt this book was speaking to us. After our first audible listen together on a street trip (pre-conception... did I mention we were type A?), we purchased the hard copy for the statistical info and e author (and reader) leads you into the statistical items in a conversational way, but then tutorials you to the more detailed items if you want (either in her book or in actual studies). Once statistical risks are known, it is on you to decide how you feel about those risks - we appreciated this perspective throughout the book.I'm now working my method through it a second time on drives to and from work, hopefully with a lil one on the way.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    This book is written by someone who clearly has no medical or scientific background, yet somehow fancies themselves an expert. Not only an expert, but she states “I realized that training as an economist was in a lot of ways better than training in medicine for this.” While it is probably impossible to see the holes in her arguments if this is not your zone of expertise, as a physician-scientist reading this book, the conclusions are y of the subjects in this book are not amenable to randomized controlled trials, and thus there is no amazing data in humans. In this type of scenario, the medical community begins to rely on animal data. For example, we first learned smoking was poor for people from animal studies, and we learned how a neuron works not from taking live human brains, but from studying parts of animal brains. For better or worse, animals have sacrificed greatly for our knowledge. Sadly, the author does not understand this, because she is an economist, not a scientist, or a physician.Take alcohol consumption while pregnant, for example. Since it would be unethical to take pregnant women, force half of them to drink and the other to abstain, then study their kids for decades to come, we will never know the result of moderate levels of alcohol on the developing human fetus. But, we can take pregnant mice, give half of them two drinks equivalents a day, and observe the effects on their offspring. These data are compelling, and present that the pups/kids have worse memories, worse coordination, slower learning, worse social behavior as adults, and higher likelihood of developing addictive behavior as an adult. It is possible that mice are nothing like humans, and just because alcohol harms a fetal mouse, it does not hurt a human fetus. However, most people would at least consider these studies (as those who create the recommendations about drinking while pregnant generally do). However, the author has no knowledge of these studies, partly because she has no background in science, and probably doesn’t even know where to search them, or even read them. Since the method she interprets human data is limited by her background in health economics, she goes on to say that "the official recommendations were too cautious” about drinking while pregnant, that “there seems to be absolutely no reason for anything close to these draconian restrictions.” She says this with authority, clearly not understanding the majority of the data out there about drinking on the developing brain. In her naïvety, she states “the reason is over interpretation fo flawed studies.” She then goes on to compare drinking while pregnant to eating a ton of banana, because eating a ton of bananas has not been proven is is a prime example of how those who know the least often think they know the most, and unfortunately, one of those people wrote an entire e author states, “if you have the right information, you can create the right decision for yourself.” She fails to note that if you have misinformation, you can never create the right decision for yourself a favor, and your future kids a favor: avoid this book and search something written by someone capable of reading, interpreting, and synthesizing the huge amount of scientific data out there. Avoid a layperson posing as an expert. I am ashamed I contributed financially to this misleading information.

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    Expecting Better: Why Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-29 9:21

    It is empowering for women to have realistic facts at hand. I suspect because the author has gone to a various set of data than what is collected in the US (again, treating women as if they were able to review info and create informed choices) when it comes to alchol consumption during pregnancy, she has been targeted by some very anti education folks.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-1-20 0:46

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace If mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    I was excited to read this book - I bought it online when I found out I was expecting a child. There is a lot of hokum and pseudoscience surrounding pregnancy and health. I wanted a book that would chop through that and give an evidence-based survey of pregnancy-related topics, and hear the scientific community's consensus (as much as they have one) on those ever, I was shocked seeing a review on the book talking about the "myth" that alcohol is inadvisable during pregnancy. Certainly the author isn't advising any amount of alcohol is advisable, given the overwhelmingly consensus on the problem from public health advocates?I immediately read the entire alcohol part of the book. I soon learned not only would this book not provide me with the best evidence from health advocacy groups and scientist groups, they would provide evidence that directly contradicted e author says it's fine to drink some alcohol during pregnancy, and info how much and why she thinks this. She walks through studies and literature on the subject that she examined. Given that the CDC, the American Pregnancy Association, the Globe Health Organization, National Council on Alcoholism and Dependence, the March of Dimes, and others all agree and firmly say the best tip is to abstain from alcohol completely, I really required an extraordinary explanation from the author as to why I should ignore those experts. Not surprisingly, I found her ysis underwhelming and unpersuasive, and not worthy of ignoring the consensus shared by experts in the k yourself, who is a more trusted source? An economist writing a book to a mass audience for profit, or the March of Dimes, the CDC, WHO, American Pregnancy Association, the UK Health Ministry, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome scientists and advocacy groups? Do all those independent groups have a profit motive to give distorted and wrong health advice?And fetal alcohol syndrome is not some one in a million risk that parents shouldn't really worry about. A latest study showed 1% to 5% of children studied had fetal alcohol syndrome disorder, and it was being chronically be fair, while this has been the consensus for a while, you could search outliers when the author first wrote this book. For example, the UK's health ministry used not advise versus very light alcohol use, but they have since examined emerging research on fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD) and they now say the best tip is to abstain completely - joining the consensus among other health groups like CDC, WHO, has the author been concerned about the emerging evidence since she wrote this book? I saw Dr. Oster was asked about latest studies showing that even light alcohol use was unsafe during pregnancy by a health journalist, and her respond was illuminating. Dr. Oster basically said for those studies she'd wish to see them be replicated and more info about the links between behavior and harm. That's fine (we should fund lots of replication studies!), but note when she looked at studies that didn't search a danger for pregnant women to drink moderately - she didn't say "well I'm going to wait to see if these can be replicated and more detail provided" - she took them to the bank and said you can create conclusive decisions about your child's health outcomes based on these studies.I would agree there is not an abundance of studies showing that a little amount of alcohol will lead to significant medical risks. But there have also been no related studies showing that having one cigarette (or two, or three) during your pregnancy is a significant risk. So in this book, does the author similarly suggest smoking a very little amount of tobacco is perfectly acceptable, given the absence of studies? No, she follows the scientific consensus here. Why the double standard?With things that pose a serious risk to kids (like lead paint), we may not ever know exactly where the line is between what is harmless and what will irreversibly hurt a child. When the activity is something that is avoidable, the scientific community generally urges avoiding it entirely.I'm sure Dr. Oster is well-intentioned, but this is a book about health written for profit to a famous audience, and even in the best cirtances that is a fraught situation. There is a profitable shop for people with academic credibility to sell a notice that, while it goes versus the consensus of the public health community, it's something a lot of people wish to hear. I hope the book gets updated with the a lot of advances in our understanding of FASD, or at least explains why they have a double standard on very light tobacco use.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know []  2020-9-16 18:21

    As a first time soon-to-be mom this is by far my best pregnancy book I’ve read! The author re-examines old studies and articles about certain pregnancy no-no’s, myths, tests, etc. and presents the facts to the reader so you can create your own conclusion. She reviews if the study/survey was flawed, outdated, and level of accuracy and then tells the reader her private stance on the issue. For example, she examines all the studies that rule out caffeine and her decision on how much caffeine was safe to drink. She describes the number of prenatal tests a pregnant woman will be offered, when they are offered, the risks, and the level of accuracy associated with its results and then outlines which tests she decided to take and why. Whether you agree with her private decisions or not, this book is amazing in that she presents the science and facts so that each mom-to-be can draw her own conclusions. I felt so much more informed after reading her book and often refer back to it as fresh pregnancy options arise!

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    I was excited to read this book - I bought it online when I found out I was expecting a child. There is a lot of hokum and pseudoscience surrounding pregnancy and health. I wanted a book that would chop through that and give an evidence-based survey of pregnancy-related topics, and hear the scientific community's consensus (as much as they have one) on those ever, I was shocked seeing a review on the book talking about the "myth" that alcohol is inadvisable during pregnancy. Certainly the author isn't advising any amount of alcohol is advisable, given the overwhelmingly consensus on the problem from public health advocates?I immediately read the entire alcohol part of the book. I soon learned not only would this book not provide me with the best evidence from health advocacy groups and scientist groups, they would provide evidence that directly contradicted e author says it's fine to drink some alcohol during pregnancy, and info how much and why she thinks this. She walks through studies and literature on the subject that she examined. Given that the CDC, the American Pregnancy Association, the Globe Health Organization, National Council on Alcoholism and Dependence, the March of Dimes, and others all agree and firmly say the best tip is to abstain from alcohol completely, I really required an extraordinary explanation from the author as to why I should ignore those experts. Not surprisingly, I found her ysis underwhelming and unpersuasive, and not worthy of ignoring the consensus shared by experts in the k yourself, who is a more trusted source? An economist writing a book to a mass audience for profit, or the March of Dimes, the CDC, WHO, American Pregnancy Association, the UK Health Ministry, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome scientists and advocacy groups? Do all those independent groups have a profit motive to give distorted and wrong health advice?And fetal alcohol syndrome is not some one in a million risk that parents shouldn't really worry about. A latest study showed 1% to 5% of children studied had fetal alcohol syndrome disorder, and it was being chronically be fair, while this has been the consensus for a while, you could search outliers when the author first wrote this book. For example, the UK's health ministry used not advise versus very light alcohol use, but they have since examined emerging research on fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD) and they now say the best tip is to abstain completely - joining the consensus among other health groups like CDC, WHO, has the author been concerned about the emerging evidence since she wrote this book? I saw Dr. Oster was asked about latest studies showing that even light alcohol use was unsafe during pregnancy by a health journalist, and her respond was illuminating. Dr. Oster basically said for those studies she'd wish to see them be replicated and more info about the links between behavior and harm. That's fine (we should fund lots of replication studies!), but note when she looked at studies that didn't search a danger for pregnant women to drink moderately - she didn't say "well I'm going to wait to see if these can be replicated and more detail provided" - she took them to the bank and said you can create conclusive decisions about your child's health outcomes based on these studies.I would agree there is not an abundance of studies showing that a little amount of alcohol will lead to significant medical risks. But there have also been no related studies showing that having one cigarette (or two, or three) during your pregnancy is a significant risk. So in this book, does the author similarly suggest smoking a very little amount of tobacco is perfectly acceptable, given the absence of studies? No, she follows the scientific consensus here. Why the double standard?With things that pose a serious risk to kids (like lead paint), we may not ever know exactly where the line is between what is harmless and what will irreversibly hurt a child. When the activity is something that is avoidable, the scientific community generally urges avoiding it entirely.I'm sure Dr. Oster is well-intentioned, but this is a book about health written for profit to a famous audience, and even in the best cirtances that is a fraught situation. There is a profitable shop for people with academic credibility to sell a notice that, while it goes versus the consensus of the public health community, it's something a lot of people wish to hear. I hope the book gets updated with the a lot of advances in our understanding of FASD, or at least explains why they have a double standard on very light tobacco use.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know []  2021-3-17 19:40

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace of mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    I didnt create it past the 2nd chapter. The book seems to lack understanding of the causes of the disease and dismisses that there are a lot of causes, as well as a lot of types of treatments. The underlying presumption by the author, incorrectly by my understanding, is that the only cause is a dozens of the brain and hence therapy being the answer. But this is not the truth. There are auotimmune causes and cancer or radiation damage, and in the peripheral nerves not in the brain. So i stopped reading and felt it was a risky book to spread misunderstanding.Having said that, if you do have the cause that is limbic in origin, perhaps you read on? Idk though because i dont like the notion of promoting poor science.

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    Patrick Ussher’s “POTS Syndrome: What It Really Is & Why It Happens” is an interesting look at one person’s experience with POTS ( Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome) and the treatment that he found worked for him. To explain why he believes this treatment worked for him, the author makes the case that POTS is actually a neurological-based issue similar to the limbic system, which he believes can be brought on by any kind of trauma to the system, including certain kinds of illness, pregnancy issues, surgeries, or even psychological someone who suffers from a few “mystery” illnesses myself (fibromyalgia, IBS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and even a few of the POTS symptoms), I was especially interested in this topic and found that the author did create a amazing argument for his thoughts on the disease. Of course, as the author states himself, every illness is different, so what works for one person, might not work for another, but if you suffer from the debilitating effects of POTS, you might as well give every potential solution a try! Since the treatment did work for him and others, maybe it will support you too!

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    Perfect information. I believe that Patrick is right on target with his theory. Thank you so much for taking the time and effort to write this book. It helped me learn a lot finally about what was actually occuring for me.

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    Ussher has provided a very clear, substantiated, and convincing argument for the causes of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome. It must be stated up front that Ussher is not a doctor or scientist (and neither am I), but he is a gifted writer who has done tremendous research on POTS. He has also suffered from POTS himself, which actually caused him to research his condition, yet he has found healing. I appreciate Ussher writing about this syndrome a getting his ideas out there and working towards a cure.His argument is that POTS is, as he puts it, “a form of lymbic system impairment,” and if this is the case, then one may search treatment successful with Dynamic Neural Retraining System. Ussher’s book gives hope to people suffering from POTS, but he also sets an agenda for researchers to discover the underlying causes of the syndrome. Kudos to Ussher for writing this book and pushing for better understanding of this debilitating illness.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-11-17 19:35

    I was excited to read this book - I bought it online when I found out I was expecting a child. There is a lot of hokum and pseudoscience surrounding pregnancy and health. I wanted a book that would chop through that and give an evidence-based survey of pregnancy-related topics, and hear the scientific community's consensus (as much as they have one) on those ever, I was shocked seeing a review on the book talking about the "myth" that alcohol is inadvisable during pregnancy. Certainly the author isn't advising any amount of alcohol is advisable, given the overwhelmingly consensus on the problem from public health advocates?I immediately read the entire alcohol part of the book. I soon learned not only would this book not provide me with the best evidence from health advocacy groups and scientist groups, they would provide evidence that directly contradicted e author says it's fine to drink some alcohol during pregnancy, and info how much and why she thinks this. She walks through studies and literature on the subject that she examined. Given that the CDC, the American Pregnancy Association, the Globe Health Organization, National Council on Alcoholism and Dependence, the March of Dimes, and others all agree and firmly say the best tip is to abstain from alcohol completely, I really required an extraordinary explanation from the author as to why I should ignore those experts. Not surprisingly, I found her ysis underwhelming and unpersuasive, and not worthy of ignoring the consensus shared by experts in the k yourself, who is a more trusted source? An economist writing a book to a mass audience for profit, or the March of Dimes, the CDC, WHO, American Pregnancy Association, the UK Health Ministry, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome scientists and advocacy groups? Do all those independent groups have a profit motive to give distorted and wrong health advice?And fetal alcohol syndrome is not some one in a million risk that parents shouldn't really worry about. A latest study showed 1% to 5% of children studied had fetal alcohol syndrome disorder, and it was being chronically be fair, while this has been the consensus for a while, you could search outliers when the author first wrote this book. For example, the UK's health ministry used not advise versus very light alcohol use, but they have since examined emerging research on fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD) and they now say the best tip is to abstain completely - joining the consensus among other health groups like CDC, WHO, has the author been concerned about the emerging evidence since she wrote this book? I saw Dr. Oster was asked about latest studies showing that even light alcohol use was unsafe during pregnancy by a health journalist, and her respond was illuminating. Dr. Oster basically said for those studies she'd wish to see them be replicated and more info about the links between behavior and harm. That's fine (we should fund lots of replication studies!), but note when she looked at studies that didn't search a danger for pregnant women to drink moderately - she didn't say "well I'm going to wait to see if these can be replicated and more detail provided" - she took them to the bank and said you can create conclusive decisions about your child's health outcomes based on these studies.I would agree there is not an abundance of studies showing that a little amount of alcohol will lead to significant medical risks. But there have also been no related studies showing that having one cigarette (or two, or three) during your pregnancy is a significant risk. So in this book, does the author similarly suggest smoking a very little amount of tobacco is perfectly acceptable, given the absence of studies? No, she follows the scientific consensus here. Why the double standard?With things that pose a serious risk to kids (like lead paint), we may not ever know exactly where the line is between what is harmless and what will irreversibly hurt a child. When the activity is something that is avoidable, the scientific community generally urges avoiding it entirely.I'm sure Dr. Oster is well-intentioned, but this is a book about health written for profit to a famous audience, and even in the best cirtances that is a fraught situation. There is a profitable shop for people with academic credibility to sell a notice that, while it goes versus the consensus of the public health community, it's something a lot of people wish to hear. I hope the book gets updated with the a lot of advances in our understanding of FASD, or at least explains why they have a double standard on very light tobacco use.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-11-17 19:35

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace If mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-6 20:30

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-10 19:24

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-10 19:24

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-12 19:33

    I was excited to read this book - I bought it online when I found out I was expecting a child. There is a lot of hokum and pseudoscience surrounding pregnancy and health. I wanted a book that would chop through that and give an evidence-based survey of pregnancy-related topics, and hear the scientific community's consensus (as much as they have one) on those ever, I was shocked seeing a review on the book talking about the "myth" that alcohol is inadvisable during pregnancy. Certainly the author isn't advising any amount of alcohol is advisable, given the overwhelmingly consensus on the problem from public health advocates?I immediately read the entire alcohol part of the book. I soon learned not only would this book not provide me with the best evidence from health advocacy groups and scientist groups, they would provide evidence that directly contradicted e author says it's fine to drink some alcohol during pregnancy, and info how much and why she thinks this. She walks through studies and literature on the subject that she examined. Given that the CDC, the American Pregnancy Association, the Globe Health Organization, National Council on Alcoholism and Dependence, the March of Dimes, and others all agree and firmly say the best tip is to abstain from alcohol completely, I really required an extraordinary explanation from the author as to why I should ignore those experts. Not surprisingly, I found her ysis underwhelming and unpersuasive, and not worthy of ignoring the consensus shared by experts in the k yourself, who is a more trusted source? An economist writing a book to a mass audience for profit, or the March of Dimes, the CDC, WHO, American Pregnancy Association, the UK Health Ministry, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome scientists and advocacy groups? Do all those independent groups have a profit motive to give distorted and wrong health advice?And fetal alcohol syndrome is not some one in a million risk that parents shouldn't really worry about. A latest study showed 1% to 5% of children studied had fetal alcohol syndrome disorder, and it was being chronically be fair, while this has been the consensus for a while, you could search outliers when the author first wrote this book. For example, the UK's health ministry used not advise versus very light alcohol use, but they have since examined emerging research on fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD) and they now say the best tip is to abstain completely - joining the consensus among other health groups like CDC, WHO, has the author been concerned about the emerging evidence since she wrote this book? I saw Dr. Oster was asked about latest studies showing that even light alcohol use was unsafe during pregnancy by a health journalist, and her respond was illuminating. Dr. Oster basically said for those studies she'd wish to see them be replicated and more info about the links between behavior and harm. That's fine (we should fund lots of replication studies!), but note when she looked at studies that didn't search a danger for pregnant women to drink moderately - she didn't say "well I'm going to wait to see if these can be replicated and more detail provided" - she took them to the bank and said you can create conclusive decisions about your child's health outcomes based on these studies.I would agree there is not an abundance of studies showing that a little amount of alcohol will lead to significant medical risks. But there have also been no related studies showing that having one cigarette (or two, or three) during your pregnancy is a significant risk. So in this book, does the author similarly suggest smoking a very little amount of tobacco is perfectly acceptable, given the absence of studies? No, she follows the scientific consensus here. Why the double standard?With things that pose a serious risk to kids (like lead paint), we may not ever know exactly where the line is between what is harmless and what will irreversibly hurt a child. When the activity is something that is avoidable, the scientific community generally urges avoiding it entirely.I'm sure Dr. Oster is well-intentioned, but this is a book about health written for profit to a famous audience, and even in the best cirtances that is a fraught situation. There is a profitable shop for people with academic credibility to sell a notice that, while it goes versus the consensus of the public health community, it's something a lot of people wish to hear. I hope the book gets updated with the a lot of advances in our understanding of FASD, or at least explains why they have a double standard on very light tobacco use.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-12 19:33

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-1-9 20:33

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-1-9 20:33

    As a first time soon-to-be mom this is by far my best pregnancy book I’ve read! The author re-examines old studies and articles about certain pregnancy no-no’s, myths, tests, etc. and presents the facts to the reader so you can create your own conclusion. She reviews if the study/survey was flawed, outdated, and level of accuracy and then tells the reader her private stance on the issue. For example, she examines all the studies that rule out caffeine and her decision on how much caffeine was safe to drink. She describes the number of prenatal tests a pregnant woman will be offered, when they are offered, the risks, and the level of accuracy associated with its results and then outlines which tests she decided to take and why. Whether you agree with her private decisions or not, this book is amazing in that she presents the science and facts so that each mom-to-be can draw her own conclusions. I felt so much more informed after reading her book and often refer back to it as fresh pregnancy options arise!

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-2-3 20:58

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-2-3 20:58

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace of mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    This book claims to use scientific data to debunk existing myths around pregnancy. However, the author does not use varied sources to draw conclusions. In a lot of instances she uses one paper to create a claim and draw conclusions that are not necessarily true. For example, she uses data from ONE paper to conclude that if you don’t have any morning sickness you will likely have a miscarriage in your first trimester. This is just absolutely e author uses her credentials to give the reader a false sense of security. She has no medical background and two pregnancies does not create her a pregnancy expert. Frankly, she also does not use her skill set (yzing data and drawing conclusions) well enough to create any compelling points in this book. Bottom line: don’t waste your cash on this book that does nothing place perpetuate fears and insecurities that women are fed throughout their pregnancy.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-20 19:26

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-20 19:26

    This book claims to use scientific data to debunk existing myths around pregnancy. However, the author does not use varied sources to draw conclusions. In a lot of instances she uses one paper to create a claim and draw conclusions that are not necessarily true. For example, she uses data from ONE paper to conclude that if you don’t have any morning sickness you will likely have a miscarriage in your first trimester. This is just absolutely e author uses her credentials to give the reader a false sense of security. She has no medical background and two pregnancies does not create her a pregnancy expert. Frankly, she also does not use her skill set (yzing data and drawing conclusions) well enough to create any compelling points in this book. Bottom line: don’t waste your cash on this book that does nothing place perpetuate fears and insecurities that women are fed throughout their pregnancy.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-11 19:46

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-11 19:46

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-6 20:30

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-10 19:24

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-11-17 19:35

    It's a pity this book got caught up in a kerfluffle about alcohol, when that is about 1% of the books actual content (I've place *exactly* what the author says about it at the bottom of the review for all those negative reviewers who couldn't be bothered reading the actual book!).This book was hands down the most useful pregnancy book I read, not because it tells you what to do, but because it calmly presents the data on every major decision you'll need to create during pregnancy, and then encourages you to form your *own* opinions based on it, instead of treating you like an idiot who can't be trusted to understand anything other than black-and-white 'rules'. As the author says:"I teach my students that making amazing decisions requires two things. First, the right data. Second, the method to weigh the plusses and minuses of the decision *to you personally*...So naturally, when I did obtain pregnant I thought this is how pregnancy decision making would work too. Take something like amniocentesis. I thought my doctor would outline the plusses and minuses...She'd give me the data I needed. She'd then sit back, and my husband and I would discuss it and we'd come to a decision that worked for us. This is not what it was like *at all*".Every pregnant woman knows this is book has the missing data that thinking parents need to support them create a lot of of those decisions, including:- What *really* happens to your odds of conception after 35?- What is the evidence that having a cup of coffee will hurt your baby? or 2 cups? 3 cups? Why is there so much conflicting tip on this?- Same for alcohol, by trimester- What is the likelihood of miscarriage each week? (I found this super reassuring)- What is the statistical likelihood of problems arising from eating deli meats, eggs, fish, shellfish, soft cheeses, and sushi? How do you weigh up the omega 3 versus mercury risk for fish?- What % of women are still experiencing morning sickness each week? Are your morning sickness symptoms 'worse' than the average woman and how dangerous are the for it?- What should you know before you create a decision to obtain antenatal testing for downs syndrome? Does amniocentesis really have a 1 in 200 risk of miscarriage? Is CVS more or less dangerous than amnio? (We ended up having the non-invasive test, while getting our results the doctor told us 'you seem really well informed on this!'. Thanks Emily :-)- Is emptying the cat litter box as risky as gardening?- Exactly how much airplane travel is risky?- What are the true risks (and benefits!) of gaining more weight than the recommended amount?- Is there anything that will support you correctly guess the gender?- What's the evidence on whether Kegels help?- How can I understand the data on which are safe during pregnancy?- What is your possibility of a pre-term birth, week by week? And what % of pre-term babies at each week will survive? (also reassuring)- For full term babies, what is the possibility of the baby arriving each week, if it didn't come latest week? Are there any studies than present symptoms the baby might come soon? Is there anything safe you can do to bring on labor if you are overdue?- What are the risks and benefits of induction? Do you really need to be induced for 'low amniotic fluid'?- How long does the average labor really take?- What, statistically, are the pros and cons of a c-section or an epidural? What about cord-clamping, homebirth, doulas, types of fetal monitoring, episiotomy, and cord blood storage?- An example of an evidence-based birth plan is included, but emphasis given to choosing what works for , in summary, the data need to create your own necessary decisions along the way. Recommended read!--------Appendix: *Exactly* what this book says about alcohol during pregnancy:"There is no question that very massive drinking during pregnancy is poor for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have kids with serious cognitive defects. In one Australian study, women who binged in the second and third trimester were 15 to 20% more likely to have kids with language delays than women who didn't drink. This is repeated again and again in other studies. Binge drinking in the first trimester can cause physical deformities and in later trimesters, cognitive problems.If you are binge drinking, ever, this does not directly imply that light or occasional drinking is a problem. When I looked at the data, I found no credible evidence that low levels of drinking (a standard glass of wine or so a day) have any impact on your baby's cognitive development"(The author then goes on to review a number of studies in more detail, including an ysis of whether those studies correctly separated causation from correlation).------------I did not read that as a licence to go drinking while pregnant. In fact, I read it and chose not to drink anyway (I was too morning sick to wish anything to do with alcohol!). And I respected the author for giving me the evidence, and not blindly repeating something others had 's to being treated with respect when you are pregnant, not like an idiot.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-11-17 19:35

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-12 19:33

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-1-9 20:33

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-1-9 20:33

    I don't like how she goes on and on about her thought processes, I was hoping this would focus more on the actual information. Also, I don't like how she only pulled data from one study to come up with a lot of conclusions and facts. Very disappointed, was hoping she would have done more research and looked at multiple studies before spouting off her "fake news".

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-2-3 20:58

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-2-3 20:58

    One of the greatest ironies of pregnancy is that you spend the beginning of any pregnancy because told by literally everyone around you all the things you aren't supposed to eat & do, but if you have the misfortune of losing the pregnancy, everyone tells you "it's not your fault" and "there was nothing you could have done." After a loss latest year I drove myself a small crazy searching for the reason why, reading study after study, investigating the results of our genetic testing, and desperately trying to understand what the time I got pregnant again (with the support of IVF), I was so frustrated with the misinformation that is perpetuated not only by average people but also by Dr's. that I required a method to take control and create me own decisions (in conjunction with my husband) about this pregnancy. This book was it. It presents the evidence in a factual manner that can be effectively interpreted and allows you to create your own informed decisions. And the best part is that it provides an index to every single study that is referenced in the book (which "Dr. Google" does not usually provide) so you can read the data points yourself and understand the conclusions of the study in a bit more detail. It was easily the most empowering time spent after years of trying to obtain pregnant, infertility treatments, and trying to settle in to this pregnancy. I am grateful to this author for taking on this endeavor so far outside of her normal career.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-11 19:46

    I was excited to read this book - I bought it online when I found out I was expecting a child. There is a lot of hokum and pseudoscience surrounding pregnancy and health. I wanted a book that would chop through that and give an evidence-based survey of pregnancy-related topics, and hear the scientific community's consensus (as much as they have one) on those ever, I was shocked seeing a review on the book talking about the "myth" that alcohol is inadvisable during pregnancy. Certainly the author isn't advising any amount of alcohol is advisable, given the overwhelmingly consensus on the problem from public health advocates?I immediately read the entire alcohol part of the book. I soon learned not only would this book not provide me with the best evidence from health advocacy groups and scientist groups, they would provide evidence that directly contradicted e author says it's fine to drink some alcohol during pregnancy, and info how much and why she thinks this. She walks through studies and literature on the subject that she examined. Given that the CDC, the American Pregnancy Association, the Globe Health Organization, National Council on Alcoholism and Dependence, the March of Dimes, and others all agree and firmly say the best tip is to abstain from alcohol completely, I really required an extraordinary explanation from the author as to why I should ignore those experts. Not surprisingly, I found her ysis underwhelming and unpersuasive, and not worthy of ignoring the consensus shared by experts in the k yourself, who is a more trusted source? An economist writing a book to a mass audience for profit, or the March of Dimes, the CDC, WHO, American Pregnancy Association, the UK Health Ministry, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome scientists and advocacy groups? Do all those independent groups have a profit motive to give distorted and wrong health advice?And fetal alcohol syndrome is not some one in a million risk that parents shouldn't really worry about. A latest study showed 1% to 5% of children studied had fetal alcohol syndrome disorder, and it was being chronically be fair, while this has been the consensus for a while, you could search outliers when the author first wrote this book. For example, the UK's health ministry used not advise versus very light alcohol use, but they have since examined emerging research on fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD) and they now say the best tip is to abstain completely - joining the consensus among other health groups like CDC, WHO, has the author been concerned about the emerging evidence since she wrote this book? I saw Dr. Oster was asked about latest studies showing that even light alcohol use was unsafe during pregnancy by a health journalist, and her respond was illuminating. Dr. Oster basically said for those studies she'd wish to see them be replicated and more info about the links between behavior and harm. That's fine (we should fund lots of replication studies!), but note when she looked at studies that didn't search a danger for pregnant women to drink moderately - she didn't say "well I'm going to wait to see if these can be replicated and more detail provided" - she took them to the bank and said you can create conclusive decisions about your child's health outcomes based on these studies.I would agree there is not an abundance of studies showing that a little amount of alcohol will lead to significant medical risks. But there have also been no related studies showing that having one cigarette (or two, or three) during your pregnancy is a significant risk. So in this book, does the author similarly suggest smoking a very little amount of tobacco is perfectly acceptable, given the absence of studies? No, she follows the scientific consensus here. Why the double standard?With things that pose a serious risk to kids (like lead paint), we may not ever know exactly where the line is between what is harmless and what will irreversibly hurt a child. When the activity is something that is avoidable, the scientific community generally urges avoiding it entirely.I'm sure Dr. Oster is well-intentioned, but this is a book about health written for profit to a famous audience, and even in the best cirtances that is a fraught situation. There is a profitable shop for people with academic credibility to sell a notice that, while it goes versus the consensus of the public health community, it's something a lot of people wish to hear. I hope the book gets updated with the a lot of advances in our understanding of FASD, or at least explains why they have a double standard on very light tobacco use.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-11 19:46

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-11 19:46

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace of mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-20 19:26

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    I started this book with an begin mind. But I think being fairly well trained in understanding research/ lit reviews I found myself being skeptical almost right away. I’m a trained in sociology and psychology and did a lot of coursework focused on research and interpreting it. During my studies I read a number of the papers she referred to prior to reading this book. I’m beautiful sure I even reading her and her husband’s academic skepticism grew with her use of statistically insignificant data. On more than one occasion the data used to help the points are labeled as being insignificant. I have always been taught not to place much stock into statistically insignificant findings which is what she bases her opinions on alcohol and caffeine on. I don’t have a PhD, so maybe down the line you learn how to interpret them so they’re okay to use? But most studies I’ve looked at usually ignore those numbers and focus on the significant ones since insignificant numbers are not considered generalizable. There are ways to fine tune data to see if significance changes, but that wasn’t done here. Always been taught that research thats based on insignificant data is not amazing research. Also two supportive studies is not a lot to base a decision that is not supported by any leading health so found her graphs be a small misleading on how there looked to be larger difference visually even though it was really just a percentage point.I’ve also done a lot of studying on cognitive development and psychology and had it drill into my head the entire class that no amount of alcohol was safe during pregnancy because of the risk of FASD. While I understand it’s a ‘risk’ and not certain, but it’s just like pregnancy the only sure method to prevent it is to abstain. While everyone is allowed their own opinions and choice during pregnancy I personally would take in more than one source of info before making decisions that could literally impact someone’s (your child’s) entire life.I’m not religious, I love wine, am educated, and have fun caffeine. I didn’t intend to obtain pregnant so it was never something I was ever super protective/ cautious at being said I would suggest to not depend solely on this one source of info especially when it’s super tempting to with some of the findings.Another red flag to me was that the author just seemed hell bend on proving her OB wrong and from her recounting of her private experience it seems they did not have a amazing relationship. I can’t imagine female medical doctors take kindly to having their credentials constantly questioned and their suggestions based on those credentials constantly ignored. So seem like there was tension on both sides. Seems like she was determined to do what she wanted and did research to justify it.While I didn’t search anything earth shattering and questioned how valid and accurate the presented numbers were, I did honestly like that she explained some of testing so that those without medical degrees or knowledge on that topic could better understand it even if it got to be a small too wordy at times.I had planned to buy the second book, but now I’m questioning if I should test to return this one.

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    Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less []  2019-12-23 19:27

    For a book written with a famous audience in mind, it is actually quite good. A very sensible balance of theoretical explanation with examples of practical application. And there are countless references to others in the field who have done extensive research in this area. Worth reading.

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    I hope anyone reading reviews can set the negative reviews aside. This is a life-changing book. I am deeply grateful to Patrick for writing it. POTS/dysautonomia is devastating and debilitating. This book, and the DNRS program suggested, is a light in the dark tunnel. I have now personally completed the DNRS program and am seeing improvements. The author, Patrick, has a big, attractive and very generous heart for taking the time and care to write this book - to present those of us out there struggling, that there IS hope. If even one soul can recover from POTS, it means it is possible for all of us. I can't thank Patrick enough for writing this, and I cannot recommend this book strongly enough to anyone struggling - give yourself the bonus and grace of hope, of a possibility at a renewed and healthful life. Place previous ideas, understandings and judgements aside, and hold an begin mind. If you need to understand the foundational premise better, go to the DNRS website, read about it, read Annie Hopper's book, "Wired for Healing", and listen to the success stories on the website. Don't allow your critical mind obtain in the method of you finally finding healing. What other options do we have anyway? It's not like the medical industry is providing long-term solutions. May you read this and be blessed.

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    I am in the process of sorting out symptoms I have had for a while now . After reading Patrick's book , I am more than convinced that I have this syndrome. I had a major surgery in October of 2017. Prior to that I was hospitalized in May 2017 with an episode of atrial fibrillation caused by a fresh diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. A lot of years ago I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and advanced osteo arthritis. I have had several major surgeries for these conditions. In November 2017 I began to experience episodes of weakness, shaking and sweating when attemping to do anything that needed me to stand. I was unable to do exercises at physical therapy due to this problem. I began to check my blood pressure and was surprised to search it fine while laying or sitting down but on standing I was unable to obtain a reading. My pulse also was low [ 60's ] while lying or sitting but went into the 100's when standing. Latest week I had a very poor episode that sent me to the hospital. My blood pressure readings there were acceptable while lying down but went higher when sitting and even higher when standing. My pulse was again in 60's laying down and up into 120's while standing. During these episodes I also have anxiety and feel like I will pass out if I don't sit or lie down. The anxiety and tremulousness sometimes stays with me when I am sitting. Before reading this book I had not heard of POTS. I am a registered nurse (been one for 40 plus years ) One would think that in that amount of time I would have at least some knowledge of this syndrome. Not so. I found this to be very informative. Being a nurse I am able to understand the medical terminology well, however I believe even if I had no medical background I would be able to understand the authors explanations of this condition because of his simplifying terms and definitions through out the book. After reading the entire book in one sitting I now believe that my limbic system has been compromised for a lot of years and this latest surgery was the straw that broke the camel's back (so to speak). Now I still have a lot of tests and consults to obtain through before I will be given the diagnosis that I know is sure to follow. In the mean time I have a head begin on planning my attack and recovery from this syndrome. I have the author of this book, " Patrick Ussher" to thank for that. If not for his clear, honest and easily understood explanations about this (unknown to me) syndrome I would at this moment still be baffled by these strange symptoms I have been having. I now feel that I can create informed decisions about treatment and recovery for myself in the future. I know I need to read and research much much more info and I will but I have to give Patrick 5 stars for giving me so much insight at such a distressing point in life. Thanks so much Patrick for sharing !!!!!

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    Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less []  2019-12-23 19:27

    The authors should be sued for using Einsteins name as pure click-bait for religious nonsensical ideas that should never have been published.p I am giving it one begin only because I can't give zero stars. The authors of this book are either delusional or writing specifically to a target demographic whose IQ's fall somewhere between a peanut and rock.

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    Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less []  2019-12-23 19:27

    This book fulfilled my hopes that it is largely based on actual empirical evidence instead of the multitude of myths that seem to prevail in American society and education. It seems a bit redundant in places, but over-all a amazing book for all. It could be quite valuable for parents of young kids or those who are in the education business such as teachers and administrators.

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    Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less []  2019-12-23 19:27

    This book is so encouraging! I am so frustrated with parents that believe that their kids need to be involved in everything. The book is packed full of research that shows just the opposite. Kids need to play and they learn best through play. It is so necessary that we spend quality time with our kids and the authors reinforce this throughout the book. This book educates parents with the ways to go about helping our kids and debunking the myths and lies such as purchasing certain products like flashcards, classical melody at an early age, and certain toys create our kids smarter.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-6 20:30

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-11-17 19:35

    This book was amazing. It was factual, it had a TON of national/international research studies to better support you (or whomever is pregnant) create an informed decision about what to eat, drink, which meds are okay, labor, and delivery.I literally can not understand how this book has 1 star reviews...Like, what? You don't like evidence based research? It just astound me.I've cross referenced Oster's sources and found them to, in fact, be incredibly the unknown globe of pregnancy, Oster attempts to gather numbers/percentages/ figures and studies to give the reader OPTIONS. She is not saying, yeah--go drink a bottle of wine (like a lot of naysayers accuse her of doing). She presents the evidence and lets the reader decide whichever approach is best for them. It's not pushy or biased at all, it simply allows the reader to see the science behind "no deli meats while knocked up..."Seriously, read this book. I am so thankful I did.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-11-17 19:35

    I don't like how she goes on and on about her thought processes, I was hoping this would focus more on the actual information. Also, I don't like how she only pulled data from one study to come up with a lot of conclusions and facts. Very disappointed, was hoping she would have done more research and looked at multiple studies before spouting off her "fake news".

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-10 19:24

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-12 19:33

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2020-12-12 19:33

    I don't like how she goes on and on about her thought processes, I was hoping this would focus more on the actual information. Also, I don't like how she only pulled data from one study to come up with a lot of conclusions and facts. Very disappointed, was hoping she would have done more research and looked at multiple studies before spouting off her "fake news".

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-1-9 20:33

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-2-3 20:58

    Overall the book is very infirnative. I am most certainly a numbers person, and knowing where the data lies really helps quiet my mind. I have 2 complaints: 1) I want the data reflected racial disparities in maternal health. As a black woman, the data does not always apply. Just to see if she had the info, I found an interview where she falsely claims that poverty is the reason for racial disparities, which is wholly untrue and easily debunked. So, essentially, she wrote this book with people of european ancestry in mind, whether she realized it or not. 2) Who edited this book! Am I the only person who has place of order pages, repeated pages and just whole pieces of info missing entirely?? I am reading the chapter about induction/amniotic fluid/nonstress tests and as soon as she starts discussing the differences between SVDP and AFI, it just jumps straight to no stress tests with a huge amount of information missing. Then she starts describing what to do if your baby is sleeping during the nonstress try and it just skips ahead again, mid-paragraph. I see in ‘The Bottom Line’ to hold on clapping and have no idea what the basis is.Otherwise, it’s a amazing read. If your black, especially if you live in NYC or SF, I suggest you look up numbers that greater reflect our demographic, but this book is still a amazing so, can I obtain a fixed copy for free?! This is a raggedy edit, for sure.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-2-3 20:58

    As a first time soon-to-be mom this is by far my best pregnancy book I’ve read! The author re-examines old studies and articles about certain pregnancy no-no’s, myths, tests, etc. and presents the facts to the reader so you can create your own conclusion. She reviews if the study/survey was flawed, outdated, and level of accuracy and then tells the reader her private stance on the issue. For example, she examines all the studies that rule out caffeine and her decision on how much caffeine was safe to drink. She describes the number of prenatal tests a pregnant woman will be offered, when they are offered, the risks, and the level of accuracy associated with its results and then outlines which tests she decided to take and why. Whether you agree with her private decisions or not, this book is amazing in that she presents the science and facts so that each mom-to-be can draw her own conclusions. I felt so much more informed after reading her book and often refer back to it as fresh pregnancy options arise!

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-11 19:46

    Overall, I really liked the first ⅔ of this book. It has a lot of great, factual info about your first and second trimesters that support you create informed decisions. I’m someone who loves numbers and data so I really enjoyed the facts and figures. However I had some problems with the latest part, which focuses on the 3rd trimester. I have unfortunately experienced a late term pregnancy loss so I found her tip on pushing back when your doctor wants to schedule an induction or questioning fetal monitoring results unsympathetic to those of us who unfortunately haven’t had healthy pregnancies. For anyone who has lost a baby, I think a lot of would wish any medical intervention required to obtain that baby here safely. If you’ve had healthy pregnancies or this is is your first pregnancy and things seem normal, I think this book is awesome! For those of you who are having a more complicated journey to motherhood, I would skip the latest part and take the rest with a grain of salt.

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    Useful review?

    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-19 19:51

    I love this book for the same reasons I love The Science of Mom by Alice Callahan (for the baby's first year): it's evidence-based and very well researched, it presents the facts in an unbiased method and lets you create your own decisions (like an informed adult!), and it's well organized, concise, and touches on all the major is book would have saved me HUNDREDS of hours of googling. And given my private experience with full-term stillbirth and anxiety-filled subsequent pregnancies, I'm not an simple customer to please when it comes to pregnancy tip - my bs detector is tuned to ultra-high sensitivity, and this book truly impressed me for having absolutely zero bs.If you read only one pregnancy book, this should be it. And if, like me, you read them all, you will really appreciate how balanced, fact-focused, and reasonable this one is. Lots of solid tip here - don't miss out.

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    Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know (The ParentData Series) []  2021-3-20 19:26

    Oster's book saved me from adhering to a bunch of unexplained, illogical rules during my first and second pregnancies. She advocates for moderation instead of restriction when making behavioral decisions and has the data to back it up. This is honestly the only book that has given me peace of mind during my pregnancies. I want she would write another one about parenting!

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    Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less []  2019-12-23 19:27

    I'm not a helicopter parent nor do I believe children's days need to be completely planned. In today's society I always have felt like I may be making a mistake but I'm beautiful independent and stubborn. This book supports the idea that children need to be kids!!! Love Love it. Oh and private history I have 5 kids and two have graduated and are attending college one studying deaf education they are very advance intelligent driven adults. My third has autism and I was told he would never speak and playing with other kids helped him more than any "scheduled" activity. This is a must read.

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    Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less []  2019-12-23 19:27

    I want I could just absorb this book and automatically incorporate its ideas into my daily parenting. The info is very well presented and convincing, and the suggested activities are specific and useful. It's serious tip to parents of babies and young kids that their child's best learning moments are in play! It doesn't encourage parents to take to the sidelines, but rather to use play and daily experiences to foster their child's love of as I watch my son, I can truly appreciate that "Play IS learning!" Just the other day he was carefully moving his trike back and forth, turning the handle bars and watching the wheels turn and move as he manipulated it. Now he confidently rides his trike through narrow paths between obstacles, backing up and steering as needed. Not too long ago he would obtain frustrated and immediately cry for support to obtain out of a is book drives home the idea that you really shouldn't "try to teach" your young kid so much as expose and tutorial him/her through various learning opportunities. Kids are wired to learn, which doesn't mean we should test to feed as much information into their growing brains as early as possible. It's not meant to be work...it's play.

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    This was a fast read. I was excited to [email protected]#$%! in one day, hoping to search some answers. Overall the info was helpful. It is certainly more info than I've ever received from doctors. I think it would've been even more helpful to have some examples of DNRS activities to do, for people who cannot afford that program. Also, there is no indication of what has caused or what might support the neuropathic type of pots, which a lot of people have, including myself. Mine is caused by autoimmune illness. This book is theoretical in nature and that was helpful to have one huge picture. I plan to present it to my doctors the next time I go. This mysterious DNRS program needs to be more widely available to people, if it does what it says it does.

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    POTS: What It Really Is & Why It Happens []  2020-7-25 19:51

    No idea how this created it across an editor's desk. Terribly and unnecessarily wordy. Jumps around in its goals and targets for the book and chapters.

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